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BayGBM:
No offense to Motorola's Zoom, Samsung, or Google's Nexus, but one does not often see bad guys trying to steal their products.  :D


$1.5M in iPad minis stolen from JFK airport in 'GoodFellas' style heist
By Neil Hughes
A pair of thieves stole $1.5 million worth of Apple iPad minis from a building at New York's JFK airport that was also the site of a famous robbery in 1978.

Details of the valuable heist were revealed on Thursday by the New York Post. About 3,600 iPad minis that had just arrived from China were taken from one of the airport's cargo buildings.

That same building was the site of the 1978 Lufthansa heist in which $5 million in cash and $875,000 worth of jewelry were stolen the largest cash robbery to ever occur on U.S. soil. That heist was featured in the 1990 film "GoodFellas" starring Ray Liotta, Robert De Niro and Joe Pesci.

The incident occurred this Monday, just before midnight, when a pair of thieves reportedly used one of the airport's own forklifts to steal two pallets of iPad minis. Not all of the shipments were placed on the truck, as the arrival of an airport worker allegedly forced the duo to leave three pallets behind.

Because the thieves arrived with an official JFK forklift, it's been speculated that an airport employee may have let them into the area near Building 261 around 11 p.m., and also let them out after the iPad minis were stolen.

Apple's iPad mini has a starting price of $329 for a 16-gigabyte Wi-Fi-only model. The most expensive option is the 64-gigabyte version with cellular data, which sells for $659.

Montague:
Bay,

As you seem to be tech-savvy, I thought you a wise choice to ask:
One of my co-workers also works for a physician who recently began using a type of backup battery for his iPad and iPhone. The Dr. claims it can completely charge his tablet and phone with juice left over.

The kicker is that the battery device transfers the charge in a very short time; in around one minute according to my friend. Are you familiar with any such backup device?
I was looking at the iSound 16,000 mAh unit, but the description makes no mention of a rapid transfer time. In fact, none of the devices I've researched do, and that's one of the primary features I'm interested in.

I've asked my friend to get some information from the Doc, but she always ends up forgetting!
Any help?

BayGBM:

--- Quote from: Montague on November 16, 2012, 06:16:03 PM ---Bay,

As you seem to be tech-savvy, I thought you a wise choice to ask:
One of my co-workers also works for a physician who recently began using a type of backup battery for his iPad and iPhone. The Dr. claims it can completely charge his tablet and phone with juice left over.

The kicker is that the battery device transfers the charge in a very short time; in around one minute according to my friend. Are you familiar with any such backup device?
I was looking at the iSound 16,000 mAh unit, but the description makes no mention of a rapid transfer time. In fact, none of the devices I've researched do, and that's one of the primary features I'm interested in.

I've asked my friend to get some information from the Doc, but she always ends up forgetting!
Any help?

--- End quote ---

I've never heard of it and I don't believe it exists.  I am not an engineer, but I do not believe we currently have the technology to recharge batteries--any batteries--in less than a minute.  I will be happy to be proven wrong.  If this device exists and is reliable it will soon be the wonder of tech universe so you should have no trouble finding it.  The fact that you can't find it suggests it is right up there with unicorns and the easter bunny.  :-\

Why doesn't your friend tell you then name of this product or give you a link to the company that makes it?

Montague:

--- Quote from: BayGBM on November 16, 2012, 06:30:56 PM ---I've never heard of it and I don't believe it exists.  I am not an engineer, but I do not believe we currently have the technology to recharge batteries--any batteries--in less than a minute.  I will be happy to be proven wrong.  If this device exists and is reliable it will soon be the wonder of tech universe so you should have no trouble finding it.  The fact that you can't find it suggests it is right up there with unicorns and the easter bunny.  :-\

Why doesn't you friend tell you then name of this product or give you a link to the company that makes it?

--- End quote ---


Eh, you know how some people are - "oh, sorry I forgot...I'll get it next time..." Then next time yields the same response.
Anyway, she said she thought the name started with an "L," and that he bought it at Best Buy for about $80 with his son's discount; it supposedly retails for $100 normally. I spent a fair amount of time on BB's site and turned up nothing.

I'll let you know here if I ever learn anything more.
Thanks for the input!

outby43:

--- Quote from: Montague on November 16, 2012, 06:16:03 PM ---Bay,

As you seem to be tech-savvy, I thought you a wise choice to ask:
One of my co-workers also works for a physician who recently began using a type of backup battery for his iPad and iPhone. The Dr. claims it can completely charge his tablet and phone with juice left over.

The kicker is that the battery device transfers the charge in a very short time; in around one minute according to my friend. Are you familiar with any such backup device?
I was looking at the iSound 16,000 mAh unit, but the description makes no mention of a rapid transfer time. In fact, none of the devices I've researched do, and that's one of the primary features I'm interested in.

I've asked my friend to get some information from the Doc, but she always ends up forgetting!
Any help?

--- End quote ---

Is it one of these?

http://www.mophie.com/mophie-juice-pack-air-iPhone-4-4S-battery-case-p/1145_jpa-ip4-blk.htm

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