Author Topic: Supporters of 'Personhood Amendment' Make Case to Mississippi Voters  (Read 81430 times)

Dos Equis

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Re: Supporters of 'Personhood Amendment' Make Case to Mississippi Voters
« Reply #350 on: May 14, 2019, 05:45:26 PM »
Ok, I posted several times that  support for abortion rights DROPS as the woman gets further along in the pregnancy. * We agree.
Like me, the clear majority ( 60%) support abortion for the 1st 12-16 weeks of pregnancy.

I don't know how to break it down any clearer or more direct.

Here is what you said:


The social  issues might ignite the Trump and Christian voter but it will alienate the moderates and independents.


The "social issue" is abortions through the 9th month of pregnancy, which is where today's Democrat Party is.  You then gave me a link that likely talks about first trimester abortions.  First trimester abortions are not the issue.

If you have poll data that shows "moderates and independents" support abortions up through delivery, please share it.  Otherwise, all you've done is set up a straw man.     

Dos Equis

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Re: Supporters of 'Personhood Amendment' Make Case to Mississippi Voters
« Reply #351 on: May 15, 2019, 11:00:07 AM »
Ok, I didn't realize you're main focus was on the late abortion issue.
I skimmed and figured it was about abortion and included the late term issue.

I just  looked and one poll said 80% of women support late term abortion bans
https://thefederalist.com/2016/01/19/poll-80-percent-of-women-support-late-term-abortion-bans/.
This poll had the same results but a bit less support at 59% wanting to ban abortion after 20 weeks .

https://townhall.com/tipsheet/guybenson/2013/07/12/huffington-post-poll-americans-overwhelmingly-support-lateterm-abortion-ban-n1639073
I think we actually agree on this aspect of abortion law, along with the majority of woman.

Lastly, my position and most of America supports abortion rights for the early stages of pregnancy.
Liberals want unrestricted access and strict conservatives want to ban all abortion.
I think either side is too extreme


You didn't realize I was talking about abortion through delivery, despite the fact I said it in every response to you about this issue? 

Why are you citing statistics about women?  You specifically said Trump will alienate "moderates and independents."  Still waiting for reliable polling data showing "moderates and independents" support abortion through delivery. 

And you have stated your position that you support killing unborn babies in the first trimester about four or five times in this discussion, and probably 100 times on the board.  Nobody cares.  We're talking about whether or not "moderates and independents" support killing unborn babies through delivery. 

Dos Equis

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Re: Supporters of 'Personhood Amendment' Make Case to Mississippi Voters
« Reply #352 on: May 15, 2019, 08:14:19 PM »
I guess we will find out where Kavanaugh and Gorsuch stand on this issue. 

Alabama Governor Signs Near-Total Abortion Ban Into Law
Wednesday, 15 May 2019

Alabama's Republican governor signed the most stringent abortion legislation in the nation Wednesday, making performing an abortion a felony in nearly all cases.

"To the bill's many supporters, this legislation stands as a powerful testament to Alabamians' deeply held belief that every life is precious and that every life is a sacred gift from God," Republican Gov. Kay Ivey said in a statement.

The bill's sponsors want to give conservatives on the U.S. Supreme Court a chance to gut abortion rights nationwide, but Democrats and abortion rights advocates criticized the bill as a slap in the face to women voters.


"It just completely disregards women and the value of women and their voice. We have once again silenced women on a very personal issue," said Sen. Linda Coleman-Madison, a Birmingham Democrat.

Coleman-Madison said she hopes the measure awakens a "sleeping giant" of women voters in the state.

But Republican pollster Chris Kratzer noted that there is no congressional district and likely no legislative district with enough swing voters to put Republicans at serious risk in the state.

"The people who are outraged about this are not the people who are electing these guys, generally speaking, especially when we're talking about the primary," he said.

The legislation Alabama senators passed Tuesday would make performing an abortion at any stage of pregnancy a felony punishable by 10 to 99 years or life in prison for the provider. The only exception would be when the woman's health is at serious risk. Women seeking or undergoing abortions wouldn't be punished.

Ivey acknowledged Wednesday that the measure may be unenforceable in the short term.

"The sponsors of this bill believe that it is time, once again, for the U.S. Supreme Court to revisit this important matter, and they believe this act may bring about the best opportunity for this to occur," Ivey said.

Rep. Terri Collins, the bill's sponsor, said she believes the bill reflects the beliefs of the majority of the state electorate.

"I've heard from lots of women in the state who are extremely pro-life and they're very supportive," Collins said.

Kentucky, Mississippi, Ohio and Georgia recently have approved bans on abortion once a fetal heartbeat is detected, which can occur in about the sixth week of pregnancy. The Alabama bill goes further by seeking to ban abortion outright.

Abortion rights advocates vowed swift legal action.

"We are laser-focused on urging Gov. Kay Ivey to veto this dangerous bill. If she chooses not to, then we will take this to court and ensure that abortion remains safe and legal and accessible in the state of Alabama," said Staci Fox, president and CEO of Planned Parenthood Southeast.

Supporters of the bill acknowledged the ban would not be effective anytime soon, because they expected it to be blocked by the courts as they fight upward toward the court.


One mile from the Alabama Statehouse — down the street from the Governor's Mansion — sits Montgomery's only abortion clinic. Because of its location, the clinic sees a stream of patients from Mississippi and the Florida Panhandle because other clinics have closed.

Clinic staff on Wednesday fielded calls from patients, and potential patients, wrongly worried that abortion was now illegal in the state. They were assured abortion remained legal in the state.

"It's been a lot of fear. A lot of people who are afraid they can't get their procedure," said Kari Crowe, a clinic employee and escort.

"Abortion is OK!" read a banner paid for by abortion rights advocates that a plane carried as it circled the Alabama Capitol and Statehouse on Wednesday.

https://www.newsmax.com/newsfront/abortion-kay-ivey-signs-bill/2019/05/15/id/916170/

Moontrane

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Re: Supporters of 'Personhood Amendment' Make Case to Mississippi Voters
« Reply #353 on: May 15, 2019, 08:53:53 PM »
I guess we will find out where Kavanaugh and Gorsuch stand on this issue. 

Alabama Governor Signs Near-Total Abortion Ban Into Law
Wednesday, 15 May 2019

Alabama's Republican governor signed the most stringent abortion legislation in the nation Wednesday, making performing an abortion a felony in nearly all cases.

"To the bill's many supporters, this legislation stands as a powerful testament to Alabamians' deeply held belief that every life is precious and that every life is a sacred gift from God," Republican Gov. Kay Ivey said in a statement.

The bill's sponsors want to give conservatives on the U.S. Supreme Court a chance to gut abortion rights nationwide, but Democrats and abortion rights advocates criticized the bill as a slap in the face to women voters.


"It just completely disregards women and the value of women and their voice. We have once again silenced women on a very personal issue," said Sen. Linda Coleman-Madison, a Birmingham Democrat.

Coleman-Madison said she hopes the measure awakens a "sleeping giant" of women voters in the state.

But Republican pollster Chris Kratzer noted that there is no congressional district and likely no legislative district with enough swing voters to put Republicans at serious risk in the state.

"The people who are outraged about this are not the people who are electing these guys, generally speaking, especially when we're talking about the primary," he said.

The legislation Alabama senators passed Tuesday would make performing an abortion at any stage of pregnancy a felony punishable by 10 to 99 years or life in prison for the provider. The only exception would be when the woman's health is at serious risk. Women seeking or undergoing abortions wouldn't be punished.

Ivey acknowledged Wednesday that the measure may be unenforceable in the short term.

"The sponsors of this bill believe that it is time, once again, for the U.S. Supreme Court to revisit this important matter, and they believe this act may bring about the best opportunity for this to occur," Ivey said.

Rep. Terri Collins, the bill's sponsor, said she believes the bill reflects the beliefs of the majority of the state electorate.

"I've heard from lots of women in the state who are extremely pro-life and they're very supportive," Collins said.

Kentucky, Mississippi, Ohio and Georgia recently have approved bans on abortion once a fetal heartbeat is detected, which can occur in about the sixth week of pregnancy. The Alabama bill goes further by seeking to ban abortion outright.

Abortion rights advocates vowed swift legal action.

"We are laser-focused on urging Gov. Kay Ivey to veto this dangerous bill. If she chooses not to, then we will take this to court and ensure that abortion remains safe and legal and accessible in the state of Alabama," said Staci Fox, president and CEO of Planned Parenthood Southeast.

Supporters of the bill acknowledged the ban would not be effective anytime soon, because they expected it to be blocked by the courts as they fight upward toward the court.


One mile from the Alabama Statehouse — down the street from the Governor's Mansion — sits Montgomery's only abortion clinic. Because of its location, the clinic sees a stream of patients from Mississippi and the Florida Panhandle because other clinics have closed.

Clinic staff on Wednesday fielded calls from patients, and potential patients, wrongly worried that abortion was now illegal in the state. They were assured abortion remained legal in the state.

"It's been a lot of fear. A lot of people who are afraid they can't get their procedure," said Kari Crowe, a clinic employee and escort.

"Abortion is OK!" read a banner paid for by abortion rights advocates that a plane carried as it circled the Alabama Capitol and Statehouse on Wednesday.

https://www.newsmax.com/newsfront/abortion-kay-ivey-signs-bill/2019/05/15/id/916170/

Justice Roberts has made some unlikely decisions, so he's in the mix I think.

Most of the E.U. fall into the grey area on the left.  The UK allows abortions up until 24 weeks, and they benignly call it, "emptying the womb."


Dos Equis

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Re: Supporters of 'Personhood Amendment' Make Case to Mississippi Voters
« Reply #354 on: May 16, 2019, 11:58:21 AM »
We can all google different sites and come up with various polls, graphs and % on various abortion laws.
That has it's place and I'll leave it to you and  the political pundits to decide how this issue shakes out with the voters..

This is a forum to discuss politics and our political beliefs.
I'm no expert on what everyone thinks and should avloid trying to do so.
I can tell you what I believe and have several times on the abortion issue.

You,like  anyone else is free to disagree and post what you think is relevent.
In the end, I doubt any of us will change anyone's view pt on abortion rights.


Thank you for confirming that when you claimed Trump would alienate "moderates and independents" on the issue of abortion through delivery that you were not relying on any empirical data and just making stuff up. 

Dos Equis

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Re: Supporters of 'Personhood Amendment' Make Case to Mississippi Voters
« Reply #355 on: May 16, 2019, 01:49:06 PM »
Heating up.

Legal battle heats up as more states test strict abortion bans
Other states are already pursuing and defending laws to ban abortion after six weeks of pregnancy
Posted May 15, 2019
Sandhya Raman
@SandhyaWrites
Abortion politics: Will Doug Jones’ opposition to Alabama ban hurt him? Trump aide sees room for talks on Democrats’ opioid bill Lawmakers aim to double down with more opioids legislation
   

Pro-choice protesters shout at pro-life protesters outside of the Supreme Court June 26, 2018. Alabama’s new abortion law, which would essentially ban abortion in most cases, could open the door to restrictions in other states — even though they will all likely be challenged in court. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Advocates are preparing for a legal battle after Alabama passed the strictest abortion bill in the country late Tuesday, part of a growing national push by abortion opponents to test whether the courts will curb constitutional protections for the procedure.

Alabama’s move, which would essentially ban abortion in most cases, could open the door to restrictions in other states — even though they will all likely be challenged in court. Other states are already pursuing and defending laws to ban abortion after six weeks of pregnancy.

[Trump civil rights official wants to defend abortion opponents and religious freedom]

“This is not just about Alabama. We are seeing these extreme bills being introduced across the country,” said Planned Parenthood President Leana Wen in a call with reporters Wednesday. “These extreme bans banning abortions at six weeks or earlier, before women even know we’re pregnant, is happening in 16 states.”

Alabama’s bill, which Wen called the most extreme abortion ban since the landmark Roe v. Wade case guaranteed a national right to abortion in 1973, would go farther than the approach taken in many other red states. The legislation would ban abortion at any stage of pregnancy, unless needed to save the life of the woman, and has no exceptions for rape or incest. Abortion providers who violate these terms could be charged with a felony and punished for up to 99 years in prison.

[She miscarried 8 times. Today she’s telling Lindsey Graham why abortion should remain legal]

“Doctors would be scared to provide needed medical treatment because we’d be worried that by doing what’s needed for our patients we could go to prison for a lifetime,” said Wen, who is also a trained emergency room physician.

Alabamians already face many barriers to abortion, including a 48-hour waiting period and mandated counseling. Half of the patients in Alabama and two other states served by Planned Parenthood Southeast travel over 100 miles to reach a clinic, said Staci Fox, who heads the group’s advocacy arm.

The American Civil Liberties Union has already signaled it will challenge the Alabama bill in court if Republican Gov. Kay Ivey, who opposes abortion, signs it.

The ACLU and Planned Parenthood also filed suit Wednesday in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Ohio over Ohio’s six-week abortion law.

This year, four states have already passed bans after six weeks of pregnancy, and Missouri is expected to pass its own ban by Friday when the legislative session ends. The state legislature there is considering an omnibus abortion bill that would combine a number of restrictions.

Elizabeth Watson, a staff attorney with the ACLU Reproductive Freedom Project, on a separate press call, called the Ohio bill part of the growing “concerted national effort to limit abortion.”

“Let this be a warning to the anti-abortion politicians in Ohio and across the country: if you attack our right to abortion, we will always be here to defend it,” said Watson.

Ohio legislators, whose previous Republican governor vetoed two versions of abortion bans after six weeks, moved quickly on approving restrictions under its new, more conservative governor Mike DeWine.

Restrictions on funding for abortion in public programs are common, but the legislature is currently considering a bill that would ban even private insurance coverage of abortion — which, if passed, could pave a steeper path for women seeking the procedure in Ohio. Doctors and advocacy groups criticized the bill last week for including language that would require the re-implantation of ectopic pregnancies that occur when a fertilized egg is attached outside of the uterus — which is not a medically recognized procedure.

“What was considered too extreme for state politicians just a few years ago is becoming law in a few states,” said Wen.

Court battles
Anti-abortion groups see an opening for further policies like Alabama’s bill and are ready to fight in the courts with the goal of winning a Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade.

The Supreme Court on Monday overturned, 5-4, an unrelated 40-year-old precedent over the ability of individuals to sue a state in another state court, which could hint that the high court is more open to reviewing rulings decided decades ago like Roe.

Susan B. Anthony List is among the many anti-abortion groups hoping for a challenge to rise to the Supreme Court. The group pushed for the confirmation of Justice Brett Kavanaugh last year after swing vote Justice Anthony Kennedy announced his retirement.

“It is clearer than ever that Roe is far from being settled law in the eyes and hearts of the American people, and this is increasingly reflected in state legislatures. The American people want a fresh debate and a new direction, achieved by consensus and built on love for both mothers and babies,” said SBA List’s Marjorie Dannenfelser in a statement. “The time is coming for the Supreme Court to let that debate go forward.”

Catherine Glenn Foster, the president and CEO of American United for Life, a legal advocacy group that opposes abortion, said Alabama has “created the opportunity to implement new, comprehensive policies to ensure the most life-affirming outcomes for both the mother and the child throughout life.”

Next week, U.S. District Judge Carlton W. Reeves for the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Mississippi will hear oral arguments in a hearing over whether to grant a preliminary injunction over the state’s six-week abortion ban.

The Center for Reproductive Rights filed suit on behalf of the state’s only abortion provider — Jackson Women’s Health Organization — after the legislation was enacted in March. The ban is slated to take effect in July.

https://www.rollcall.com/news/congress/legal-battle-heats-states-test-strict-abortion-bans

Dos Equis

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Re: Supporters of 'Personhood Amendment' Make Case to Mississippi Voters
« Reply #356 on: May 16, 2019, 05:59:40 PM »
Somebody should explain to her that Congress has to pass a bill, which is never going to happen unless enough pro abortion Democrats control both Houses. 

Gillibrand says she’d ‘codify’ Roe v. Wade if elected president
By Brooke Singman | Fox News

Reaction and analysis from The Federalist senior contributor Mollie Hemingway on 'Tucker Carlson Tonight.'

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand on Thursday vowed to “codify” Roe v. Wade if elected president, amid a fierce abortion debate in the wake of Alabama’s new state law banning almost all abortion procedures.

During a visit to Atlanta Thursday, the 2020 Democratic presidential hopeful touted her “robust reproductive rights agenda,” and promised to take her plans a “step further.”

ALABAMA GOVERNOR SIGNS RESTRICTIVE ABORTION BILL AS ACLU VOWS TO SUE

“First, as president, I will codify Roe v. Wade. I will make it clear beyond a shadow of a doubt that women in this country have a guaranteed right to an abortion,” Gillibrand, D-N.Y., said.

“Second, I will end the Hyde Amendment, which disproportionately blocks women of color and women with low incomes from getting access to abortion services,” she continued. “And third, in the most sweeping step that I’m going to take as president, I will guarantee access to reproductive health care, including abortion, no matter what state you live in.”

Gillibrand added that she would create a “funding stream” to make sure that women have access to reproductive health centers in every state.

“I would ensure that no state can pass laws that chip away at access to reproductive care or criminalize reproductive health care providers,” she explained. “Federal law should supersede harmful state laws that take away women’s reproductive freedom.”

Gillibrand said that she believed that access to abortion is a “constitutionally recognized right.”

“I’m not afraid to follow through and guarantee it,” she said. “With the power of the federal government, this is about the fundamental question of whether we value women in this country and whether we see them as humans who are able to make their own decision.”

She added: “And any Democrat who expects to win the presidency must answer definitively where they stand on this issue.”

. . . .

https://www.foxnews.com/politics/gillibrand-says-shed-codify-roe-vs-wade-if-elected-president

Dos Equis

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Re: Supporters of 'Personhood Amendment' Make Case to Mississippi Voters
« Reply #357 on: May 17, 2019, 08:56:18 AM »
Our initial disagreement was due to lack of proper communication .
I didn't read the deatils of your posts and only skimmed, so that's on me. ;)

I saw a  Penn town hall on Hardball last night. It was a northereastern  county that voted 2x for Obama but went 58% Trump in 2016.
EVERY time abortion came up, it got the biggest support for keeping the law as it is ( abortion until 16-20 weeks).
Very few wanted to ban all abortion OR have it legal in the later stages of pregnancy.

The AL law is way too extreme by banning all abortion from conception. That extreme position alienates people.



Abortion is and always will be a polarizing issue.  I've said many times that I don't think there is a political solution. 

But the worm has turned.  Liberals-statists-progressive have lost their minds.  Pushing abortion even as a baby is about to be delivered.  Macabre.  It's like a cult.  It's arguably the Democrats second most important issue, with the first being Trump hatred. 

Passing laws saying you can kill a baby in the ninth month of pregnancy is what will alienate millions of people. 

Also, if you actually think this through, if Roe v. Wade is overturned, it will become a state issue.  Will be legal in some states, illegal in others.   

Dos Equis

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Re: Supporters of 'Personhood Amendment' Make Case to Mississippi Voters
« Reply #358 on: May 17, 2019, 11:04:58 AM »
I'd agree the national opinion had turned if AL and Ga didn't pass such draconian abortion bans recently.
Even the RNC chair is against the AL law.
They could have passed a reasonable law banning late term abortion that moderate dems would support along with most republicans.
I think we both agree that going to extremes on either side will alienate the main stream voter.

The Alabama law isn't converting anyone and really has no comparison whatsoever to what Democrats did in Virginia and New York.  Killing a baby whose head has entered the birth canal?  No comparison. 

"Moderate dems."  That's funny. 

I'm not sure we agree about pretty much anything.  lol But it's all good.   :)

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Re: Supporters of 'Personhood Amendment' Make Case to Mississippi Voters
« Reply #359 on: May 24, 2019, 05:51:11 PM »
Federal judge blocks Mississippi ‘heartbeat’ abortion law
By Louis Casiano | Fox News

A federal judge on Friday temporarily blocked Mississippi from moving ahead with a so-called "heartbeat" abortion law that bans the procedure after a cardiac activity is first detected, which occurs at around six weeks of pregnancy.

The ruling by U.S. District Judge Carlton Reeves stops the order from taking effect July 1.

Pay only $49 down to access the best mountains, including Vail, Whistler Blackcomb, Park City, Breck & more. Buy your Pass before May 27!

"Here we go again," Reeves wrote. "Mississippi has passed another law banning abortions prior to viability."

2020 DEMS JUMP INTO ABORTION FRAY AS LEGAL BATTLE HEATS UP

Reeves also struck down a 2018 Mississippi law that banned abortion at 15 weeks. The state is appealing that ruling.

"It sure smacks of defiance to this court," he said of lawmakers passing another ban after he struck down the earlier one.

Attorneys for the state’s only abortion clinic – the Jackson Women's Health Organization -- argued Tuesday that the newest law would eliminate all abortions because most women don't yet know they are pregnant when a fetal heartbeat is first discovered. The state said the law only limits when abortions can be performed.

Exemptions will be made if a woman's health is at risk.

ALABAMA SENATE PASSES BILL BANNING NEARLY ALL ABORTIONS

Reeves wrote Friday that the new measure "prevents a woman's free choice, which is central to personal dignity and autonomy. This injury outweighs any interest the State might have in banning abortions after the detection of a fetal heartbeat."

Mississippi’s Republican Gov Phil Bryant expressed disappointment after Friday's ruling.

"As governor, I've pledged to do all I can to protect life," Bryant said. "Time and time again the Legislature and I have done just that."

Lawmakers in several states have recently passed or advanced restrictive abortion measures in light of a conservative-majority Supreme Court Abortion opponents are hoping to mount legal challenges to Roe v. Wade, the 1973 Supreme Court decision that legalized abortion nationwide.

Supreme Court bound? Alabama abortion bill could test Roe v. WadeVideo
ALABAMA DEM ATTACKS TRUMP JR. WITH SLUR AFTER ABORTION COMMENTS SPARK OUTCRY

Alabama recently passed a law its own law that makes it a felony to perform an abortion at any stage of a pregnancy. Other states – Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi and Ohio -- have approved their own abortion measures. Missouri recently approved a bill to ban abortion at eight weeks.

All the bans are expected to face legal challenges. Planned Parenthood and the American Civil Liberties Union filed a lawsuit Friday challenging the Alabama measure.

A federal judge in March issued a preliminary injunction on the Kentucky ban.

ACLU, Planned Parenthood working on lawsuits to block Alabama abortion lawVideo
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Under Mississippi’s abortion ban, doctors who perform the procedure could have their medical licenses revoked.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

https://www.foxnews.com/us/federal-judge-blocks-mississippi-heartbeat-abortion-law

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Re: Supporters of 'Personhood Amendment' Make Case to Mississippi Voters
« Reply #360 on: May 28, 2019, 03:46:52 PM »
Justice Roberts has made some unlikely decisions, so he's in the mix I think.

Most of the E.U. fall into the grey area on the left.  The UK allows abortions up until 24 weeks, and they benignly call it, "emptying the womb."



I'm not convinced Roberts and/or Kavanaugh will vote to overturn Roe v. Wade. 

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Re: Supporters of 'Personhood Amendment' Make Case to Mississippi Voters
« Reply #361 on: May 28, 2019, 03:50:03 PM »
Missouri's last abortion clinic says it may lose its license this week
BY KATE SMITH
UPDATED ON: MAY 28, 2019

St. Louis, Missouri — The last remaining abortion clinic in Missouri says it expects to be shut down this week, effectively ending legal abortion in the state.

In a statement Tuesday, Planned Parenthood said Missouri's health department is "refusing to renew" its annual license to provide abortion in the state. If the license is not renewed by May 31, Missouri would become the first state without a functioning abortion clinic since 1973 when Roe v. Wade was decided.

Planned Parenthood filed a lawsuit requesting a restraining order against the state, hoping to restore the license and avoid service disruption. A circuit court judge will hear arguments on Wednesday.

. . .

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/planned-parenthood-missouri-last-abortion-clinic-says-it-may-lose-its-license-this-week-exclusive-2019-05-28/

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Re: Supporters of 'Personhood Amendment' Make Case to Mississippi Voters
« Reply #362 on: May 28, 2019, 05:33:05 PM »
Justice Clarence Thomas Blasts Abortion As A Tool Of Racist Eugenicists
MAY 28, 2019
By Madeline Osburn

The Supreme Court on Tuesday upheld part of an Indiana law requiring aborted infants to be cremated or buried after an abortion. However, they sidestepped a larger ruling on abortion by deciding not to weigh in on whether a child can be aborted for their race, sex, or disability.

Justice Clarence Thomas wrote a concurring opinion, in which he addressed the pro-abortion movement’s well-known history with eugenics, and how the Court’s decision not to rule on the Indiana statute leaves an open question on whether eugenic abortions are protected by the Constitution.

The Indiana law in question, enacted in 2016 by former Governor Mike Pence, included a provision stating, “Indiana does not allow a fetus to be aborted solely because of the fetus’s race, color, national origin, ancestry, sex, or diagnosis or potential diagnosis of the fetus having Down syndrome or any other disability.”

These characteristics of an infant can be known early on in a pregnancy. Blood tests can now predict a baby’s sex at seven weeks. The law is intended to prevent mothers and abortion providers from using abortion as a tool of “modern-day eugenics,” as Thomas writes.

“So long as the Supreme Court forces a policy of unfettered elective abortion on the entire country, it ought to at least allow for states to protect babies from unjust discrimination,” he said.

Thomas’ argument is two-fold. First, embracing abortion for the sake of eugenics was an endorsed practice and long-held belief of early 20th century progressive leaders. Second, with the development of more accurate prenatal tests, aborting children with unwanted characteristics is a modern threat disguised as “reproductive health services.”

Indeed, 21st century progressives often engage in a revisionist history of their early 20th century counterparts’ embrace of eugenics. But Thomas recounts the lengthy history Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger had with the practice of population control. In 1921, she wrote that “the unbalance between the birth rate of the ‘unfit’ and the ‘fit’ [is] admittedly the greatest present menace to civilization” and that “the most urgent problem today is how to limit and discourage the over-fertility of the mentally and physically defective.”

Sanger was a featured guest of the Ku Klux Klan and a proponent of the forced sterilization program of the Nazi regime in the 1930s. She deemed the population of black Americans “degenerate and defective” and her clinics targeted black and immigrant communities like central Harlem in New York City.

Alan Guttmacher, president of Planned Parenthood in the 1960s and early 1970s who explicitly endorsed eugenic reasons for abortion, is also included in Thomas’ opinion. Guttmacher wrote that “it should be permissible to abort any pregnancy … in which there is a strong probability of an abnormal or malformed infant.”

The racist work of Planned Parenthood today is built on the foundational beliefs of their predecessors, Sanger and Guttmacher. Seventy-eight percent of Planned Parenthood clinics are located in minority communities. Blacks make up 12.1 percent of the U.S. population, but 35 percent of the country’s abortions. In his opinion, Thomas cites New York Department of Health data that states, “there are areas of New York City in which black children are more likely to be aborted than they are to be born alive—and are up to eight times more likely to be aborted than white children in the same area.”

Other modern uses of eugenics are rising around the world. In Iceland, nearly 100 percent of women who receive positive prenatal tests for Down syndrome abort their children. In the U.S. around 67 percent of women who find out their child will be born with Down syndrome opt to have an abortion, and in the United Kingdom, it’s around 90 percent.

In India and China, millions of female babies are aborted every year just because of their sex. The Invisible Girl Project estimates that 5 to 7 million sex-selective abortions are performed in India every year.

Thomas concludes that the increased use of eugenic abortions is exactly why Indiana passed a law protecting the unborn from discrimination, and exactly why the Supreme Court cannot ignore a ruling on the subject for much longer.

“Enshrining a constitutional right to an abortion based solely on the race, sex, or disability of an unborn child, as Planned Parenthood advocates, would constitutionalize the views of the 20th-century eugenics movement,” he writes. “In other contexts, the Court has been zealous in vindicating the rights of people even potentially subjected to race, sex, and disability discrimination.”

https://thefederalist.com/2019/05/28/justice-clarence-thomas-blasts-abortion-tool-racist-eugenicists/

You can read the opinion by Thomas here:  https://www.supremecourt.gov/orders/courtorders/052819zor_2dq3.pdf

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Re: Supporters of 'Personhood Amendment' Make Case to Mississippi Voters
« Reply #363 on: May 29, 2019, 09:33:28 AM »
I think everyone here would have supported abortion rights for my mom , back in the 1950's. :D

No way, we get great entertainment from your presence.

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Re: Supporters of 'Personhood Amendment' Make Case to Mississippi Voters
« Reply #364 on: May 30, 2019, 11:34:28 AM »
ARE WOMEN WHO HAVE ABORTIONS ALSO MOTHERS? HERE’S WHAT RBG SAID
05/29/2019 | POLITICS
Mary Margaret Olohan | Reporter

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg said a woman who decides to have an abortion “is not a ‘mother,'” citing her “constitutionally protected right to terminate a pregnancy.”

Ginsburg contested Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas’s use of the word “mother” in a footnote in the Supreme Court case of Box v. Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky, Inc. by saying pregnant women who choose to terminate their pregnancies are not mothers.

“A woman who exercises her constitutionally protected right to terminate a pregnancy is not a ‘mother’; the cost of, and trauma potentially induced by, a post-procedure requirement may well constitute an undue burden,” she wrote in a footnote.

. . . .

https://dailycaller.com/2019/05/29/ruth-bader-ginsburg-abortion-mother/

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Re: Supporters of 'Personhood Amendment' Make Case to Mississippi Voters
« Reply #365 on: June 12, 2019, 01:32:59 PM »
Gov. J.B. Pritzker signs abortion rights law making procedure a 'fundamental right' for women in Illinois
Chicago Tribune staff

Gov. J.B. Pritzker signed into law Wednesday morning sweeping new abortion rights legislation, establishing the procedure as a “fundamental right” for women in Illinois.

“In a time when too many states across the nation are taking a step backward, Illinois is taking a giant step forward for women’s health,” Pritzker said in remarks at the Chicago Cultural Center before signing the bill. “Today, we proudly proclaim that in this state, we trust women.”

Illinois lawmakers approved the legislation in the recently ended spring session amid an increased sense of urgency among advocates looking to protect abortion access as a series of states recently passed laws essentially banning the practice.

“I believe, frankly, there’s a war against women’s rights going on,” Sen. Melinda Bush, the Grayslake Democrat who sponsored the bill in the Senate, said at the time.

Bush and Rep. Kelly Cassidy, D-Chicago, were among those standing behind Pritzker as he signed the bill.

The bill establishes the “fundamental right” of a woman to have an abortion and states that a “fertilized egg, embryo or fetus does not have independent rights.” It repeals the Illinois Abortion Law of 1975, doing away with provisions for spousal consent, waiting periods, criminal penalties for physicians who perform abortions and other restrictions on facilities where abortions are performed. A number of those provisions have not been enforced because of court injunctions.

Inside the Illinois abortion clinic that could become the nearest option for women in St. Louis and beyond
State lawmakers approved the measure on their last scheduled day of the General Assembly’s spring session, before heading into legislative overtime to handle other high-profile bills such as casino gambling expansion and a $45 billion capital projects package.

https://www.chicagotribune.com/politics/ct-met-illinois-abortion-rights-law-governor-jb-pritzker-20190612-story.html

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Re: Supporters of 'Personhood Amendment' Make Case to Mississippi Voters
« Reply #366 on: October 04, 2019, 05:34:36 PM »
Supreme Court to hear Louisiana abortion case
BY JESSIE HELLMANN - 10/04/19

The Supreme Court announced Friday it would take up an abortion case from Louisiana, setting the stage for a national fight over a contentious issue during a presidential election year.

It will be the first abortion case taken up by the Supreme Court since President Trump's two nominees — Justices Neil Gorsuch and Brett Kavanaugh — were confirmed to the bench.

The case centers on the law in Louisiana that would require doctors who perform abortions to have admitting privileges at a nearby hospital, a requirement that critics say is designed to force abortion clinics to close.

The Supreme Court in February ruled 5-4 to block the law from taking effect while it was being challenged in court, with Chief Justice John Roberts siding with the liberal justices.

But it’s not certain whether Roberts’s decision in February means he will vote to block the law after the court hears oral arguments.

Kavanaugh and Gorsuch sided with Justices Clarence Thomas and Samuel Alito in dissenting.

In 2016, the Supreme Court struck down a similar Texas law 5-3, with former Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy siding with liberal justices and Roberts in dissenting.

But Kennedy has since retired, and two conservative justices have taken seats at the court.

Abortion rights groups say the Supreme Court should follow the precedent it set when it struck down the Texas law.

The court's ruling stated that requiring abortion doctors to have hospital admitting privileges placed an "undue" burden on women seeking abortions.

"Three years ago, the Supreme Court decided that laws like this one in Louisiana had no purpose other than to make abortion more difficult to access," said Planned Parenthood acting President Alexis McGill Johnson.

"There’s only one reason the court would not strike down the Louisiana law and that is because Justice Kennedy, who voted to protect abortion access just three years ago, has been replaced with Justice Kavanaugh."

Despite the Supreme Court's 2016 ruling, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 5th Circuit upheld the Louisiana law last year in a 2-to-1 vote, ruling it “does not impose a substantial burden on a large fraction of women.”

Opponents of the law argued it would force most of the state's abortion clinics to close.

https://thehill.com/policy/healthcare/464367-supreme-court-to-hear-louisiana-abortion-case

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Re: Supporters of 'Personhood Amendment' Make Case to Mississippi Voters
« Reply #367 on: October 29, 2019, 04:51:58 PM »
Federal judge halts Alabama abortion law deemed the strictest in the nation
PUBLISHED TUE, OCT 29 2019
Tucker Higgins

A federal judge on Tuesday ruled that an Alabama abortion law considered the strictest in the country will not go into effect, citing Supreme Court precedents that forbid bans on abortion prior to fetal viability.

Supporters of the Alabama law hope to use it to spur the Supreme Court to revisit those reproductive rights precedents, including the landmark decision Roe v. Wade. They expected lower courts to block the law.

The law criminalizes providing an abortion at any stage during a pregnancy, threatening doctors with prison sentences up to 99 years. It was set to take effect Nov. 15. The law provides no exception for rape or incest victims, but allows the procedure in cases where the patient’s life is at risk.

“Enforcement of the ban would yield serious and irreparable harm, violating the right to privacy and preventing women from obtaining abortions in Alabama,” District Judge Myron Thompson wrote. Thompson issued a temporary injunction that will prevent the law from going into effect until the court resolves the case in full.

Gov. Kay Ivey signed the law in May, acknowledging at the time that it was illegal under federal law and likely unenforceable.

The law came amid a flurry of other abortion restrictions passed in states led by Republicans attempting to test the Supreme Court’s new conservative majority.

The nine-judge panel has five Republican appointees, including Justice Brett Kavanaugh, whom President Donald Trump selected to replace Justice Anthony Kennedy. Kavanaugh is generally seen as more conservative than his predecessor. 

The ACLU, which has challenged a number of those laws, said in a statement that none of those measures have survived legal scrutiny.

“With this federal court ruling, it’s official: None of the state abortion bans passed earlier this year are in effect,” the group wrote in a post on Twitter.

In a statement, Attorney General Steve Marshall said that the district court’s decision was “not unexpected.”

“As we have stated before, the State’s objective is to advance our case to the U.S. Supreme Court where we intend to submit evidence that supports our argument that Roe and Casey were wrongly decided and that the Constitution does not prohibit states from protecting unborn children from abortion,” he said.

Planned Parenthood v. Casey was a 1992 Supreme Court decision that affirmed the central holding of Roe v. Wade.

Read more: ACLU and Planned Parenthood sue to bar Alabama abortion law from taking effect

The lawsuit was brought by Planned Parenthood and the American Civil Liberties Union in the United States District Court for Middle Alabama.

The Supreme Court will hear a case this term challenging a Louisiana abortion law that opponents say will limit the state to one provider. The law requires doctors who perform abortions to have admitting privileges at hospitals within 30 miles of their clinics.

https://www.cnbc.com/2019/10/29/federal-court-strikes-down-alabama-abortion-law.html

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Re: Supporters of 'Personhood Amendment' Make Case to Mississippi Voters
« Reply #368 on: December 27, 2019, 11:37:05 AM »
Here Are The Most Extreme Pro-Abortion Policies Of 2019
MARY MARGARET OLOHAN
SOCIAL ISSUES REPORTER
December 26, 2019

Pro-abortion lawmakers fought fiercely to loosen abortion laws in 2019.

January bills in New York and Virginia particularly demonstrated Democratic lawmakers’ determination to make abortion available at all stages of a pregnancy.

Lawmakers pushed to expand abortion access, to discard abortion health and safety standards, and to remove age requirements for obtaining abortions.

Pro-abortion lawmakers throughout the United States sought to instate policies in 2019 that expanded abortion access and removed safeguards on abortions.

As Democratic lawmakers fought to stem the tidal wave of pro-life legislation in red states across the country, pro-abortion advocates pushed to loosen abortion laws in states such as New York, Virginia, Maine, Illinois, Nevada, and Rhode Island. (RELATED: Pro-Life Policies Growing ‘Like A Steady Drumbeat,’ Abortion Analyst Says)

Democratic lawmakers in these states introduced legislation that enabled non-doctors to perform abortions, took away standards intended to help women make informed decisions about abortion, and sought to legalize abortion up until the mother gives birth.

New York

Timing his move with the 46th anniversary of Roe v. Wade, Democratic New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo signed the Reproductive Health Act in January. The bill not only removed abortion from New York’s criminal code, but it also allows non-doctors to perform abortions and allows women to obtain late-term abortions if their health is in danger or if their unborn baby is not viable.

Cuomo said at the signing that the moment was ” bittersweet.”

“I say bittersweet, because there is a bitterness,” Cuomo said. “We shouldn’t be here in the first place. … This administration defies American evolution. We’re supposed to be moving forward; we’re supposed to be advancing.”

Cuomo also ordered that the One World Trade Center, or the “Freedom Tower,” glow pink night to celebrate the passage of the bill.

“I am directing that New York’s landmarks be lit in pink to celebrate this achievement and shine a bright light forward for the rest of the nation to follow,” Cuomo said.

Virginia

Democratic Virginia Delegate Kathy Tran introduced HB 2491 in January, a bill that would allow doctors to perform abortions while the mother is giving birth. Virginia law currently states that second and third-trimester abortions should only be performed to preserve the health or life of the mother.

The law would also remove the requirement that mothers have an ultrasound before they obtain an abortion, that three physicians conclude the third-trimester abortion is necessary, and that the second and third-trimester abortions be performed in hospitals.

The bill was “left in Courts of Justice” on Feb. 5.

Virginia House Democrats propose legislation to allow abortions up until the moment of birth

Todd Gilbert (R): Where it’s obvious a woman is about to give birth…would that be a point at which she could still request an abortion?

Kathy Tran (D): My bill would allow that, yes pic.twitter.com/UHgzU3EGDA

— Ryan Saavedra (@RealSaavedra) January 29, 2019

Shortly after Tran introduced the bill, Virginia Democratic Gov. Ralph Northam spoke out in January about abortion up until birth, suggesting that if the baby survived the abortion, then the child’s life would be up for discussion between the physician and the mother.

“If a mother is in labor, I can tell you exactly what would happen,” Northam said. “The infant would be delivered. The infant would be kept comfortable. The infant would be resuscitated if that’s what the mother and the family desired, and then a discussion would ensue between the physicians and the mother.”

Maine

Maine took a shot at the state’s health and safety standards for abortions when Democratic Maine Gov. Janet Mills signed a bill June 11 permitting nondoctors, physician assistants and advanced practice registered nurses to perform abortions.

Democratic Maine House Speaker Sara Gideon sponsored the bill, which went into effect in September.  “These health care professionals are trained in family planning, counseling, and abortion procedures, the overwhelming majority of which are completed without complications,” Mills said at the time. (RELATED: Maine Will Allow Non-Doctors To Perform Abortions)

Illinois

Democratic Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker in June signed the Reproductive Health Act, a law that makes abortion “a fundamental right” in the state of Illinois. The law is designed to alert women in surrounding states that they can travel to Illinois to receive abortions if they cannot receive them at home.

Like the Maine bill, the Illinois legislation allows non-doctors to perform abortion. But the Illinois law also abolished the state’s parental notification law, forces religious and private health care organizations to provide abortions, and eliminates required investigations into deaths of mothers. (RELATED: Lawmakers Repeal Abortion Safeguards To Build ‘A Firewall Around Illinois To Protect Access’ To Abortion)

The law also eliminates requirements to publicly report abortion data, including “the number of abortions performed on out-of-state women or underage girls” according to a press release from the Susan B. Anthony List.

Nevada

The Nevada Assembly in May passed The Trust Nevada Women Act, which removed the obligation of doctors to inform women about the “emotional implications” involved in abortions. Democratic Nevada Gov. Steve Sisolak signed the bill into law on May 31.

The bill, SB179, “removes the requirement that a physician certify a pregnant woman’s marital status and age before performing an abortion” and “also removes the requirement that a physician certify in writing that a woman gave her informed written consent.”

Democratic Nevada Rep. Dina Titus praised the bill in May, calling restrictive abortion legislation “dangerous anti-choice agenda.”

“The Trust Nevada Women Act is a crucial piece of legislation that will bring Nevada’s laws in line with Nevadans’ values,” said Caroline Mello Roberson, NARAL Pro-Choice Nevada state director, in a statement at the time. “We know that Nevadans are overwhelmingly pro-choice and the [Trust Nevada Women Act] will finally ensure these values are reflected in state law.”

Rhode Island

The governor of Rhode Island signed a bill protecting abortion access within the state and repealing pro-life laws.

Rhode Island Democratic Gov. Gina Raimondo signed HB 5125 in June, a bill otherwise known as the Reproductive Privacy Act, which Raimondo called an “important, consequential bill” protecting abortion access within the state, repealing pro-life laws, and legalizing abortion up until birth.

“Fundamentally this bill is about health care,” Raimondo said in June. “It’s about protecting and providing access to health care for all the women of Rhode Island.” (RELATED: Rhode Island Legalizes Abortion Up Until Birth)

The Reproductive Privacy Act says that Rhode Island will not restrict a mother’s right to obtain an abortion before the baby is able to survive outside of the womb and that the state will allow abortions after fetal viability if the mother’s health is at risk. This effectively allows abortion up until birth.

The bill also repeals several chapters of Rhode Island General Laws on abortion that charge doctors with murder and jail time for inducing miscarriages and declare dying admissions of women who die during abortion procedures to be used as evidence in homicides.

https://dailycaller.com/2019/12/26/most-extreme-abortion-laws-2019/

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Re: Supporters of 'Personhood Amendment' Make Case to Mississippi Voters
« Reply #369 on: January 23, 2020, 01:59:58 PM »
Trump Declares Roe v. Wade Anniversary 'National Sanctity of Human Life Day'
By Eric Mack    |   Wednesday, 22 January 2020

In an effort to promote a reduction in abortion, President Donald Trump declared Wednesday, Jan. 22, National Sanctity of Human Life Day, the 47th anniversary of Roe V. Wade, and announced he will be the first president to attend the March for Life rally Friday.

"Every person — the born and unborn, the poor, the downcast, the disabled, the infirm, and the elderly — has inherent value," Trump's declaration read. "Although each journey is different, no life is without worth or is inconsequential; the rights of all people must be defended.

"On National Sanctity of Human Life Day, our Nation proudly and strongly reaffirms our commitment to protect the precious gift of life at every stage, from conception to natural death."

Also, Trump plans to be the first president to address the expected hundreds of thousands of attendees live at the March for Life on Friday. It will be a way to reach a large swath of pro-life voters amid his 2020 presidential campaign, one of the fundamentals he holds dear and that polarizes voters against pro-choice Democrat opponents.

"We are deeply honored to welcome President Trump to the 47th annual March for Life," March for Life President Jeanne Mancini said, according to LifeNews. "He will be the first president in history to attend, and we are so excited for him to experience in person how passionate our marchers are about life and protecting the unborn."

In the National Sanctity of Human Life Day declaration, Trump trumpeted a decline in the abortion rate from 2007-2016, along with a decline in teen pregnancies, "contributing to the lowest rate of abortions among adolescents since the legalization of abortion in 1973."

"All Americans should celebrate this decline in the number and rate of abortions, which represents lives saved," Trump's declaration continued. "Still, there is more to be done, and, as president, I will continue to fight to protect the lives of the unborn."

Trump also vows to build "international coalition to dispel the concept of abortion as a fundamental human right," announcing 24 nations have signed on.

"I call on the Congress to join me in protecting and defending the dignity of every human life, including those not yet born," Trump concluded. "I call on the American people to continue to care for women in unexpected pregnancies and to support adoption and foster care in a more meaningful way, so every child can have a loving home.

"And finally, I ask every citizen of this great nation to listen to the sound of silence caused by a generation lost to us, and then to raise their voices for all affected by abortion, both seen and unseen."

On Jan. 22, 1973, the Supreme Court issued a 7–2 decision in Roe v. Wade that held that women in the United States have a fundamental right to choose whether or not to have abortions without excessive government limits.

https://www.newsmax.com/politics/roe-v-wade-pro-life-pro-choice-march-for-life/2020/01/22/id/950897/

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Re: Supporters of 'Personhood Amendment' Make Case to Mississippi Voters
« Reply #370 on: February 21, 2020, 11:30:58 AM »
This shouldn't be controversial.  What other medical procedures can a minor undergo without parental knowledge/consent? 

Florida Legislature passes abortion parental consent bill
Girls under the age of 18 will have to get a parent's permission before having an abortion under a bill that Gov. Ron DeSantis is expected to sign.
Image:
Feb. 21, 2020
By The Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — Girls under the age of 18 will have to get a parent's permission before having an abortion under a bill passed by the Florida Legislature on Thursday that Gov. Ron DeSantis is expected to sign.

The House voted 75-43 largely along party lines for the legislation that expands a current law that requires a girl's parents are notified before she can have an abortion. DeSantis asked lawmakers to send him the bill during his State of the State speech that kicked off the legislative session last month.

“What we are talking about is a child, and here were are talking about a child who is carrying a child,” said Republican Rep. Erin Grall, who sponsored the bill. “By including parents in this decision we empower the family. It is the critical backbone of our civilized society.”

The debate over the measure lasted nearly four hours.

The bill has a provision that will allow a girl to ask a judge for a waiver from the law in cases of abuse, incest or when involving a parent could cause more harm than allowing the procedure. But opponents argued that asking minors to negotiate the legal system when they are already scared and ashamed could drive them to illegal abortions.

“We are codifying into law that someone else can force a girl to have a child she does not want to have,” Democratic Rep. Susan Valdes said. “I worry that many girls will, when deprived access to a safe termination of pregnancy, take the risks of finding an unsafe, dangerous and untested method of terminating their pregnancies.”

She said that might include searching the internet for “mystery concoctions” in an attempt to end the pregnancy.

Democrats also said some girls might risk being thrown out of their homes or beaten if they tell their parents they're pregnant. But Grall said that just because there are some bad parents, it doesn't mean the rights of others to be part of the decision should be taken away.

“We hear the stories about the bad parent, the human trafficking, the intolerant parent, the abusive parent, the parent who will kill their child. I refuse to accept that we should diminish the rights of all parents in the raising of their children because of the acts of a few,” Grall said.

Republicans argued that children need a parent's permission to go on a school field trip and can't go to an R-rated movie without a parent or guardian, so it makes no sense to make a life-altering decision on their own.

“We require parental consent for a minor to get a driving learner’s permit because it is common sense. It is not common sense to suggest that getting a learner’s permit is a less significant life decision than a child getting an abortion," Republican Rep. Ana Maria Rodriguez said. ”A parent guiding their children through major life decisions is a good thing."

Florida will join 26 other states in requiring that at least one parent give written permission authorizing a doctor to terminate the pregnancy of a minor. Doctors who perform abortions without the parental consent of a girl under 18 would face up to five years in prison for a third-degree felony.

In 1979, the Florida Legislature enacted a similar parental consent law, but it was struck down a decade later by the Florida Supreme Court, which ruled that a woman’s right to privacy extended to pregnant minors. Bill supporters say the constitutional issue has been addressed in the current bill by including the judicial waiver and with a provision that would allow abortions in cases of medical emergencies without parental notification.

Once DeSantis signs the bill, it will become law July 1. It is certain to be challenged in court, but the current makeup off the state Supreme Court is overwhelmingly conservative.

https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/florida-legislature-passes-abortion-parental-consent-bill-n1140476?cid=sm_npd_ms_fb_ma&fbclid=IwAR08r3YbrfEOPF4WtJEaX3G58dssBrCDcN2uMQHTC1xzyNXtgmtCj69Thm4

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Re: Supporters of 'Personhood Amendment' Make Case to Mississippi Voters
« Reply #371 on: June 25, 2021, 12:48:40 PM »
New Poll Shows Americans Still Divided On Abortion, Most Support Restrictions After First Trimester
By  Charlotte Pence Bond
Jun 25, 2021   DailyWire.com

A new poll showed that Americans are still vastly divided on the issue of abortion despite the talking points of many in the pro-choice movement.

An AP-NORC poll released on Thursday was conducted between the dates of June 10 – 14 and included 1,125 adults across the country. It showed that 61% of Americans felt that abortion should be legal in most or all cases during the first trimester of pregnancy, but that number went down to 34% in the second trimester and 19% in the third trimester.

Among non-religious people, 89% of the respondents said that it should be legal in all or most cases during the first trimester with 34% of born-again or evangelical Christians agreeing that it should be legal in the first trimester. Among other religions, 65% believed it should be legal in the first trimester.

When a woman’s health is involved, the respondents widely agreed. Overall, 87% of respondents said that abortion should be legal if the woman’s health is seriously endangered by the pregnancy and 84% believed it should be legal in the case where pregnancy results from rape or incest.

Only 49% of overall respondents said that abortion should be legal if the “woman does not want to be pregnant for any reason.” When asked the same question, 69% of Democrats said it should be legal if the woman does not want to be pregnant whereas only 46% of Independents agreed and 27% of Republicans agreed.

As the Associated Press noted, “Americans are closely divided over whether a pregnant woman should be able to obtain a legal abortion if she wants one for any reason, 49% yes to 50% no.”

With regard to the role of government in abortion, 52% of overall adults said that the federal government should have more responsibility for making laws related to abortion and 45% said the state government should have more responsibility.

According to the AP, 23% of adults said that abortion should be legal in all cases in general whereas 33% said it should be legal in most cases. In addition, 30% said it should be illegal in most cases and 13% said it should be illegal in all cases.

The poll also found that Democrats and non-religious people were more likely to support abortion in most cases, but Independents were notably more split. Of those who identified as Independent, 53% said abortion should be legal in all or most cases and 45% said it should be illegal in all or most cases.

If the “child would be born with a life-threatening illness,” 74% of adults said that a woman should be able to get a legal abortion. When asked the same question, 86% of Democrats agreed, 72% of Independents agreed, and 63% of Republicans agreed. 

Michael New, a pro-life advocate who teaches social research at the Catholic University of America, said that the poll’s discoveries regarding abortions after the first trimester will help the pro-life movement, per the AP.

“This helps counter the narrative that the abortion policy outcome established by the Roe v. Wade decision enjoys substantial public support,” he said.

David O’Steen, executive director of the National Right to Life Committee, said the poll discoveries suggest that pro-choice advocates are “way out of the public mainstream” to the degree that they are in support of abortions even late into a woman’s pregnancy.

The poll came out as the U.S. Supreme Court recently said it would hear a case regarding a Mississippi law that many believe will either solidify or overturn precedent from Roe v. Wade and Planned Parenthood v. Casey.

https://www.dailywire.com/news/new-poll-shows-americans-still-divided-on-abortion-most-support-restrictions-after-first-trimester

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Re: Supporters of 'Personhood Amendment' Make Case to Mississippi Voters
« Reply #372 on: June 28, 2021, 08:12:31 PM »
Doulas Create Abortion Book for Kids to Normalize It as ‘Another Outcome of Pregnancy’
KATHERINE HAMILTON
27 Jun 2021
https://www.breitbart.com/health/2021/06/27/doulas-create-abortion-book-kids-normalize-it-another-outcome-pregnancy/

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Re: Supporters of 'Personhood Amendment' Make Case to Mississippi Voters
« Reply #373 on: August 02, 2021, 10:29:03 PM »
Democrats seek to abolish anti-abortion Hyde Amendment – but how far are they willing to go?
The Hyde Amendment has been a part of every government spending bill since 1976
By Chad Pergram | Fox News
https://www.foxnews.com/politics/democrats-abolishing-hyde-amendment

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Re: Supporters of 'Personhood Amendment' Make Case to Mississippi Voters
« Reply #374 on: September 06, 2021, 12:03:18 PM »
‘Catholic’ Joe Biden No Longer Believes Life Begins at Conception, Supports Abortions
September 4, 2021

President Joe Biden has walked back remarks he made years ago when he said he believed life began at conception. Speaking on Friday, Biden said that although he respects Americans who believe life begins at conception, he does not agree with them.

Biden, a “staunch Catholic,” discussed Texas’ new Heartbeat Act, which the Supreme Court refused to block earlier in the week, on Friday morning with reporters. Under the Texas law, abortions are banned after six weeks and allow “any person” to sue a doctor, abortion clinic, or anyone else who “knowingly engages in conduct that aids or abets the performance or inducement of an abortion.”

Contrary to fears sparked by alarming posts on social media, the law does not allow individuals to sue expectant mothers who choose to have an abortion, nor does it allow anyone to sue women who have already had an abortion. Likewise, the law does not prohibit abortions from being performed in life-threatening medical situations.

“I am a strong supporter of Roe v. Wade, number one,” Biden said, according to the Daily Caller. “The most pernicious thing about the Texas law, it sort of creates a vigilante system … I know this sounds ridiculous, almost un-American, what we are talking about.”

“I respect people …  who don’t support Roe v. Wade. I respect their views,” he said. “I respect those who believe life begins at the moment of conception and all, I respect that. Don’t agree, but I respect that. Not going to impose that on people.”

Biden’s remarks are a clear reversal from his own prior statements when he stated that he supported the Catholic view that life began at conception.

“I’m prepared to accept that the moment of conception is a human life and being, but I’m not prepared to say that to … people that have a different view,” said Biden in an interview with Father Matt Malone of America Media in 2015.

During a 2012 vice-presidential debate against Republican Paul Ryan, who was running for office with Mitt Romney, Biden said: “With regard to abortion, I accept my church’s position on abortion as a — what we call de fide (doctrine ?). Life begins at conception. That’s the church’s judgment. I accept it in my personal life.”

“With regard to the assault on the Catholic Church, let me make it absolutely clear,” he added. “No religious institution, Catholic or otherwise, including Catholic Social Services, Georgetown Hospital, Mercy — any hospital — none has to either refer contraception. None has to pay for contraception. None has to be a vehicle to get contraception in any insurance policy they provide. That is a fact. That is a fact.”

In a 2007 interview with “Meet the Press,” then-Senator Joe Biden said that he agreed with the Catholic view that life begins at conception.

“I am prepared to accept my church’s view,” he said. “I think it’s a tough one. I have to accept that on faith. That is a tough, tough decision to me.”
 
According to NBC News, he once described abortion to a Catholic newspaper as “wrong from the moment of conception.”

Biden’s reversal of his views seemed to have occurred in 2020 when he adopted his entirely new stance on abortion during the 2020 presidential campaign. His new views fly in the face of his voting record, which saw him voting against many pro-choice laws as a senator.

In 2019, the Biden presidential campaign said that although Biden supported Roe v. Wade, he still supported the Hyde Amendment, which bans the use of federal funds from being used to pay for abortions. The statement from the campaign was so widely decried by progressives, prompting Biden himself to reverse course within less than 24 hours to say that he could “no longer support an amendment” that cuts off federal funds from being used to perform abortions.

https://conservativebrief.com/joe-biden-reversal-50441/?utm_source=CB&utm_medium=DJD&fbclid=IwAR1BfiW_1zyHv_pYKb7eYzDXJ94h9RscoINRfMU7sFhkRjDtYETTxHPokA0