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Author Topic: What kind of dog should I get????  (Read 6743 times)
Lord Humungous
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« Reply #25 on: September 11, 2007, 07:13:02 AM »

look at a Shibu Inu Mindspin about 25lbs, dont bark or shed much, and very intelligent
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« Reply #26 on: September 11, 2007, 07:27:30 AM »

Our old neighbors have a Golden Retreiver.  Great dog, but holy shit does it shed!  I'd be in the dog house if I brought one home...literaly.
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« Reply #27 on: September 11, 2007, 07:28:16 AM »

look at a Shibu Inu Mindspin about 25lbs, dont bark or shed much, and very intelligent

I'll check it out.  Thanks bro. 

Anyone know fo a good site that lists breeds and theor attributes?
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« Reply #28 on: September 11, 2007, 12:14:36 PM »

I'll check it out.  Thanks bro. 

Anyone know fo a good site that lists breeds and theor attributes?

Those are cool looking dogs.  Kinda like a miniature Akita.

~flower~ has posted some links for breed finders a couple of times.  Haven't been taying apention have you?

Don't forget to check out petfinder.com
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« Reply #29 on: September 11, 2007, 01:15:26 PM »

No offense but a Shibu Inu is a horrible choice.  While they are smart and clean and quiet...they are also extremely willful and independent.

It is so cliche but a female golden is probably a good choice, same with labs.

Whatever you do, stay away from breeds that have strong inherent traits.  Most are larger breeds but for a short list the Rottweiler, German Shepherd, Akita, Mastiff, Chow, Sharpei, Giant Schnauzer, Malamute, Husky, Belgian Malinois, Doberman.  I would include pitbull's but they are awesome with kids, albeit another strong breed that needs guidance and training.  All in all, I would not go for anything I have listed.

Small dogs are GENERALLY bark happy, anything like a Chihuahua/Yorkie/Jack Russell has the tendency to be watch-dogish.

As a final word, if you decide to ignore your requirements of size and shedding issues...

St. Bernard's and Newfoundland's from reputable breeders could not be more amazing with children.  I stress the reputable breeder comment because it is vital to their temperament.  Absolute gentle giants, and if I had to recommend a breed to someone who was open to all ideas, they would be my two choices.  Also as a first family dog, I'd probably go with a bitch.


PS - Back to the pitbull issue.  If you can find someone who does puppy evals with the litter at 6-7 weeks and finds you a female pitbull from a KNOWN BREEDER that is submissive, you basically have your dog that is great with kids and can hang with a 3-4 mile hike without breaking a sweat.  This is of course when it is older, don't go killing a dog before it has matured =P
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« Reply #30 on: September 11, 2007, 02:10:27 PM »

No offense but a Shibu Inu is a horrible choice.  While they are smart and clean and quiet...they are also extremely willful and independent.

It is so cliche but a female golden is probably a good choice, same with labs.

Whatever you do, stay away from breeds that have strong inherent traits.  Most are larger breeds but for a short list the Rottweiler, German Shepherd, Akita, Mastiff, Chow, Sharpei, Giant Schnauzer, Malamute, Husky, Belgian Malinois, Doberman.  I would include pitbull's but they are awesome with kids, albeit another strong breed that needs guidance and training.  All in all, I would not go for anything I have listed.

Small dogs are GENERALLY bark happy, anything like a Chihuahua/Yorkie/Jack Russell has the tendency to be watch-dogish.

As a final word, if you decide to ignore your requirements of size and shedding issues...

St. Bernard's and Newfoundland's from reputable breeders could not be more amazing with children.  I stress the reputable breeder comment because it is vital to their temperament.  Absolute gentle giants, and if I had to recommend a breed to someone who was open to all ideas, they would be my two choices.  Also as a first family dog, I'd probably go with a bitch.


PS - Back to the pitbull issue.  If you can find someone who does puppy evals with the litter at 6-7 weeks and finds you a female pitbull from a KNOWN BREEDER that is submissive, you basically have your dog that is great with kids and can hang with a 3-4 mile hike without breaking a sweat.  This is of course when it is older, don't go killing a dog before it has matured =P

Great info.  thanks man.  Newfoundland's were already on my short list...
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« Reply #31 on: September 11, 2007, 04:02:23 PM »

Great info.  thanks man.  Newfoundland's were already on my short list...

If you have a prob with golden hair your wife will go nuts over a newfie.
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« Reply #32 on: September 11, 2007, 05:22:45 PM »

If you have a prob with golden hair your wife will go nuts over a newfie.

So true.  They need to be brushed daily, only takes 5-10min.

Newfies and Saints are so great with kids.  They are just big goofy balls of love.  And on top of that, while they can be protective, they are quite docile, but you don't really have to worry about people coming near your kids when there is 150lb dog with them =P They are also very gentle.  There are some other large breeds that are hard to handle like my Rottie.  By hard to handle I mean he does everything vigorously and with focus and intent.  He isn't exactly light footed.  Newfs/Saints are very cautious and very aware of their strength, while in my opinion, Rottweilers are less aware of this than Newfs/Saints.

I am not trying to sway on you on any breed by the way, honestly.  I am only commenting on breeds I have experience with or know people very well who own them and work them.

But LOOK FOR BREEDERS NO MATTER WHAT BREED YOU CHOOSE.  If you can find a breeder that breeds SHOW dogs and NOT working dogs, you can assure the dog will have a pretty laid back temperament and a semi low energy level.  My rottweiler's sire/dam are schutzhund dogs and he needs a good deal of exercise to keep him sane.  Show dogs are very easygoing.
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« Reply #33 on: September 11, 2007, 05:23:48 PM »

If you have a prob with golden hair your wife will go nuts over a newfie.

I know.  It's on my list, not hers.  If she had it her way, we would have a dog that doesn't bark, poop, shed, etc.  Basically a stuffed animal  Roll Eyes
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« Reply #34 on: September 11, 2007, 05:50:55 PM »

I know.  It's on my list, not hers.  If she had it her way, we would have a dog that doesn't bark, poop, shed, etc.  Basically a stuffed animal  Roll Eyes

YEah, the not pooping is hard to avoid....    Wink
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« Reply #35 on: September 11, 2007, 07:29:03 PM »

No offense but a Shibu Inu is a horrible choice.  While they are smart and clean and quiet...they are also extremely willful and independent.

It is so cliche but a female golden is probably a good choice, same with labs.

Whatever you do, stay away from breeds that have strong inherent traits.  Most are larger breeds but for a short list the Rottweiler, German Shepherd, Akita, Mastiff, Chow, Sharpei, Giant Schnauzer, Malamute, Husky, Belgian Malinois, Doberman.  I would include pitbull's but they are awesome with kids, albeit another strong breed that needs guidance and training.  All in all, I would not go for anything I have listed.

Small dogs are GENERALLY bark happy, anything like a Chihuahua/Yorkie/Jack Russell has the tendency to be watch-dogish.

As a final word, if you decide to ignore your requirements of size and shedding issues...

St. Bernard's and Newfoundland's from reputable breeders could not be more amazing with children.  I stress the reputable breeder comment because it is vital to their temperament.  Absolute gentle giants, and if I had to recommend a breed to someone who was open to all ideas, they would be my two choices.  Also as a first family dog, I'd probably go with a bitch.


PS - Back to the pitbull issue.  If you can find someone who does puppy evals with the litter at 6-7 weeks and finds you a female pitbull from a KNOWN BREEDER that is submissive, you basically have your dog that is great with kids and can hang with a 3-4 mile hike without breaking a sweat.  This is of course when it is older, don't go killing a dog before it has matured =P

i disagree with your commet on willful dogs. True some breeds are harder to train and more stubborn than others but usally when you get a dog as a pup- 7-8 weeks you they will except the family as its pack and if you work with even the strongest willed dogs they will take there place as lowest in the pack. 9 times out of 10 its the dogs training not the dog with an issue. I just brought a new baby into our house and my dog excepted him as a more dominent member with in days.  The matter of independence is usally found in dogs that were bred to guard, but not always. Ive owned several Lasha Apsos some were highly independent and others not at all so I think that depends on breeding and the parents temperment. If I were bring a dog into a "new to dog" family with children I might avoid large powerful breeds not on a tempermet basis but on the damage potential. Ive never owned a Shibu or a Besenji but if you are looking for a quiet, clean, medium low maintence dog I would have a tough time thinking of a better breed. If you want a nice family breed thats wonderful with children hounds are great but they do shed and they are stubborn
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« Reply #36 on: September 11, 2007, 08:37:34 PM »

i disagree with your commet on willful dogs. True some breeds are harder to train and more stubborn than others but usally when you get a dog as a pup- 7-8 weeks you they will except the family as its pack and if you work with even the strongest willed dogs they will take there place as lowest in the pack. 9 times out of 10 its the dogs training not the dog with an issue. I just brought a new baby into our house and my dog excepted him as a more dominent member with in days.  The matter of independence is usally found in dogs that were bred to guard, but not always. Ive owned several Lasha Apsos some were highly independent and others not at all so I think that depends on breeding and the parents temperment. If I were bring a dog into a "new to dog" family with children I might avoid large powerful breeds not on a tempermet basis but on the damage potential. Ive never owned a Shibu or a Besenji but if you are looking for a quiet, clean, medium low maintence dog I would have a tough time thinking of a better breed. If you want a nice family breed thats wonderful with children hounds are great but they do shed and they are stubborn

"Training", as in obedience training has a much smaller impact on a dogs mind and its realization of who is in charge than does the lifestyle you have it live.  Every dog accepts the family as its pack, it is a matter of where in the pack it feels it is that is the problem.  Breeds that are generally more willful, such as bulldogs and shiba's, are just that, GENERALLY more willful.  A dogs temperament isn't the same at 7-8 weeks as it is when it is 1 year old.  Yes, you can get a feel for submissive/dominant and actually narrow it down quite accurately.  But willfulness is something that is hard to gauge.

This topic is impossible because every dog is different, but it cannot be denied that breeds have traits that shine through more so than other breeds.  Newfoundlands like water, Shiba's are smart/willful.  See my point?

I also COMPLETELY disagree that independence is found in guarding breeds.  If they are so independent and worried about themselves, then what are they guarding?  Independent dogs are care free.  Independence is usually found in hounds, and anyone who has owned one can tell you that.  Rottweilers are known as the "cadillac of guard dogs" and anyone who owns one knows how attached to you at the hip they are.  At any point of the day my Rottweiler will follow me no matter where I go.  Upstairs, the bathroom, the yard.  If I walk away, he follows me, I do not tell him to, he just does.  Once again, hounds are GENERALLY more independent.  Saluki's on the other hand are extremely independent and usually will only bond to one person.
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« Reply #37 on: September 12, 2007, 05:20:53 AM »

you could get a golden lab and shave it  Grin
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« Reply #38 on: September 12, 2007, 05:54:08 AM »

YEah, the not pooping is hard to avoid....    Wink

You mean shitting?
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« Reply #39 on: September 12, 2007, 05:58:00 AM »

ADOPT!...find a good shelter and adopt...all are temperment tested, and housebroken...older (some as young as a year)  and out of the yippy puppy stage...where most of your work happens...
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« Reply #40 on: September 12, 2007, 08:58:46 AM »

"Training", as in obedience training has a much smaller impact on a dogs mind and its realization of who is in charge than does the lifestyle you have it live.  Every dog accepts the family as its pack, it is a matter of where in the pack it feels it is that is the problem.  Breeds that are generally more willful, such as bulldogs and shiba's, are just that, GENERALLY more willful.  A dogs temperament isn't the same at 7-8 weeks as it is when it is 1 year old.  Yes, you can get a feel for submissive/dominant and actually narrow it down quite accurately.  But willfulness is something that is hard to gauge.

This topic is impossible because every dog is different, but it cannot be denied that breeds have traits that shine through more so than other breeds.  Newfoundlands like water, Shiba's are smart/willful.  See my point?

I also COMPLETELY disagree that independence is found in guarding breeds.  If they are so independent and worried about themselves, then what are they guarding?  Independent dogs are care free.  Independence is usually found in hounds, and anyone who has owned one can tell you that.  Rottweilers are known as the "cadillac of guard dogs" and anyone who owns one knows how attached to you at the hip they are.  At any point of the day my Rottweiler will follow me no matter where I go.  Upstairs, the bathroom, the yard.  If I walk away, he follows me, I do not tell him to, he just does.  Once again, hounds are GENERALLY more independent.  Saluki's on the other hand are extremely independent and usually will only bond to one person.

I dont have much time now bro but I will say this hounds ( ive owned a few) are one of the least independed in general. They are know for seperation anxiety and work best in groups or packs. Example, a brace of beagle or bassets to run rabbits, fox hounds, guy hounds etc. their is huge difference between scent and sight hounds like salukis, Afghans and greys. more latter gotta run
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« Reply #41 on: September 12, 2007, 10:14:20 AM »

I dont have much time now bro but I will say this hounds ( ive owned a few) are one of the least independed in general. They are know for seperation anxiety and work best in groups or packs. Example, a brace of beagle or bassets to run rabbits, fox hounds, #### hounds etc. their is huge difference between scent and sight hounds like salukis, Afghans and greys. more latter gotta run

I just used the Saluki as an example.

As far as separation anxiety goes, that has NOTHING to do with the type of dog.  It has to do with the owner.  A lot of times the reason for separation anxiety is because the dog thinks its in charge.  It whines/barks when its subordinates leave, because they never told you to leave.  When you are the boss of your dog you go and do as you please and your dog has no say.

If this is in fact not the case then whatever hounds you have experience with were extremely anxious and insecure dogs all by coincidence.  It can only be one or the other.  This is not the case of a dog being genetically predisposed to a certain trait, because all dogs are born with the desire to follow and obey the pack structure.
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« Reply #42 on: September 12, 2007, 01:11:49 PM »

Hounds are driven by their nose(beagles, bassets coonhounds) not by their desire to be independent or a tendency to be so. If you google Beagles and look at their traits I think you might find that separation anxiety is a common trait. Thats all
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« Reply #43 on: September 12, 2007, 01:27:14 PM »

Hounds are driven by their nose(beagles, bassets coonhounds) not by their desire to be independent or a tendency to be so. If you google Beagles and look at their traits I think you might find that separation anxiety is a common trait. Thats all

Separation anxiety should not be a normal or common trait in ANY breed.  Absolutely ridiculous.
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« Reply #44 on: September 12, 2007, 04:53:44 PM »

Mindspin how about a miniature bull terrier? Smart, agile, extremely playfull, athletic and great with kids. They go about 15 - 30 lbs but are muscular and athletic. Sounds like something you are looking for. Athletic enough to go fora long run, but also a short haired dog that is not high maintenance. A mini spud McKenzie.













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« Reply #45 on: September 12, 2007, 06:44:16 PM »

Separation anxiety should not be a normal or common trait in ANY breed.  Absolutely ridiculous.


yeah that sounded a little odd to me too
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« Reply #46 on: September 12, 2007, 08:10:04 PM »

Separation anxiety should not be a normal or common trait in ANY breed.  Absolutely ridiculous.

Sorry bro your opinion on separation anxiety doesnt hold much water. Im not talking out my ass since I have had 2 beagles/mix and my uncle probably 10 in his life. Its a trait of the breed like it or not and its really not all that uncommon in a few breeds. Being pack animals and generally likeing the company of other dogs and or people they dont do all that well for long periods of time by themselves. Not to say all hounds cry endlessly when seperated, its just one of their less endearing qualitys. Heres a short quote from Beagles:Whats good about em.com

Beagles are excellent choices for families with children. The breed's easygoing nature makes them tolerant family members that love to participate in games. Beagles do not enjoy being left alone for extended periods of time. They can easily become frustrated and bored, leading to behavior problems, including destructive behavior.

And a quick blog from Wikipedia

Beagles are excellent with children and this is one of the reasons they have become popular family pets, but they are pack animals, and can be prone to separation anxiety.[39] Not all Beagles will howl, but most will bark when confronted with strange situations, and some will bay (also referred to as "speaking","giving tongue" or "opening") when they catch the scent of potential quarry.[40] They also generally get along well with other dogs, but can be excitable and may bay. They are not demanding with regard to exercise; their inbred stamina means they do not easily tire when exercised, but they also do not need to be worked to exhaustion before they will rest, though regular exercise helps ward off the weight gain to which the breed is prone.[41]

Im not trying to make an arguement, just stating what I know to be true. I have the sectional couch to prove it.


yeah that sounded a little odd to me too

See above woo


All this aside I still find them to be great dogs, intelligent, loyal, sturdy, and possible the most happy go lucky breed ever.


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« Reply #47 on: September 12, 2007, 08:40:19 PM »

It holds so much water that my opinion is fucking overflowing.  Breeds that may or may not be prone to emotional disorders, should not continue the characteristics of said disorder throughout their lifetime due to the actions of a responsible owner who will rectify the problem. period.  Separation anxiety is a result of bad training and babying your dog.

Being protective is a trait of Rottweiler's it doesn't mean you can have visitors.  Herding is a trait of Bouviers it doesn't mean they can't be stopped from herding your children.  We all know what pitbulls were used for, does that mean they are all vicious canine killers?

If any dog, any breed, any age, any sex, 100% OBEYS you, you can stop any unwanted behavior you want.  A dog beckoning to you because you are leaving is a sign of a dog who "holds water" in the pack hierarchy. 

Also, if a dog is properly exercised, which in a beagles case is a TON.  These behaviors would be non existent.  The supposed howling and destructive behavior that is.

Don't like my opinion?  It is true, sorry.  You won't convince me that a beagle who has separation anxiety is because it is a beagle.  Asinine.

Every time I hear someone attribute a dogs bad behavior to the breed I want to smash them in the head with a ball-peen hammer.  Ignorance, flat out ignorance.
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« Reply #48 on: September 12, 2007, 10:24:06 PM »

Mindspin how about a miniature bull terrier? Smart, agile, extremely playfull, athletic and great with kids. They go about 15 - 30 lbs but are muscular and athletic. Sounds like something you are looking for. Athletic enough to go fora long run, but also a short haired dog that is not high maintenance. A mini spud McKenzie.















That seems like a GREAT option.  What cute pics....
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« Reply #49 on: September 13, 2007, 09:15:17 AM »

I know.  It's on my list, not hers.  If she had it her way, we would have a dog that doesn't bark, poop, shed, etc.  Basically a stuffed animal  Roll Eyes

LMAO--If you find a dog that doesn't poop let me know!!
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