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Author Topic: Would you seriously date someone who you knew had a bad credit score?  (Read 36664 times)
BayGBM
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« on: January 07, 2008, 09:15:37 AM »

As you may know, many employers now do credit checks on employees and have even declined to offer or rescinded job offers for people with bad credit scores.  The rationale being a particularly bad credit score is indicative of many other potential problems especially with regard to judgment.

Do you know your own credit score?

Would you date someone with bad credit or break up with someone once you learned s/he had bad credit?

It has been argued that knowing someoneís approximate credit score is more important than knowing someoneís HIV status.

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« Reply #1 on: January 07, 2008, 09:24:43 AM »

hope that is not the case, cause if if it im in trouble Shocked
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« Reply #2 on: January 07, 2008, 09:35:06 AM »

hope that is not the case, cause if if it im in trouble Shocked

 Embarrassed

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« Reply #3 on: January 07, 2008, 10:03:27 AM »

Play around but not seriously date.
I have seen enough of my buddies lives ruined by partners who cant control their spending and who have no conscious over out of control credit.
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« Reply #4 on: January 07, 2008, 10:11:23 AM »

that's ridiculous. I see your point somewhat...but often times people's credit gets messed up from events out of their control. Like when the factory I worked at for 12 years shut down...Many people lost jobs and were forced to start over somewhere else for less pay. I think it just depends on the situation.Sometimes bad things happen to good people.
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BayGBM
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« Reply #5 on: January 07, 2008, 10:34:00 AM »

that's ridiculous. I see your point somewhat...but often times people's credit gets messed up from events out of their control. Like when the factory I worked at for 12 years shut down...Many people lost jobs and were forced to start over somewhere else for less pay. I think it just depends on the situation.Sometimes bad things happen to good people.

Sometimes that is true, but having and maintaining a good credit score means positioning yourself to preserve that score even when bad things happen.  Fired, laid off, illness, and accidents can happen to any of us, but people with good scores, for the most part, do not let those things compromise their credit.  They meet their financial obligationsóno matter what! 

That is why a good score is so highly prized and respected.  It says something about the person that is very worth knowing. 

It is an unfortunate one, but a factory going out of business is not an unpredictable event.  Someone with a good score would be prepared for it either with accrued savings, reduced liabilities or some combination thereof.

A few years ago, a friend of mine had his car repossessed following a period of unemployment and missed car payments.  To this day, he still says it was not his fault and he blames Toyota for taking back the car even though he failed to make payments for several months.  He is working now and has another car, but he has vowed never to buy another Toyota product because he still blames the company rather than himself for the resposession.  Big surprise, his credit score is, shall we say, below 800 (and thatís putting it mildly).

Have you ever noticed that people with bad credit scores are very good at generating excuses and explanations?
 Roll Eyes
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FLEX N FREAK
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« Reply #6 on: January 07, 2008, 08:19:34 PM »

so bay, are you telling us your credit score is above a 725 ? Grin
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« Reply #7 on: January 08, 2008, 02:39:02 PM »

so bay, are you telling us your credit score is above a 725 ? Grin

No.  Iím not making a comment about my score one way or another.  Iím simply throwing a question out there to bat aroundÖ much like the thread on would you date someone who is HIV+ or another thread someone started on would you date a fat person.


i think you should not be so single minded on this topic at all and its pretty fucking shallow

Itís funny to hear someone on a bodybuilding board accuse someone else of being shallow.  I suppose this subject hits a nerve; there are a lot of people out there with bad credit.

Personally or professionally, no one wants to be screened out of the "eligibility pool" but eventually it happens to all of us and often it happens over issues that are far less consequential: age, height, body fat, hair color, bald, breast size, education, etc.  To me, it seems more shallow to screen someone out based on something they have no control over (bald, breast size, age, height, etc.) rather than something they can control like a poor credit rating.

For what it's worth, I tend to agree with powerpack.  But socially speaking there's no reason for people with bad credit to be upset... there are plenty of them and they can certainly date each other.  Smiley

As for being screened out by a potential employer... well, that's another, more serious, problem.  I have been on search committees and we have obtained the credit scores for finalists.  People with bad scores are sometimes eliminated from further consideration. Undecided


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« Reply #8 on: January 08, 2008, 03:01:44 PM »

so what is your credit score ? someone who would start a thread like this , you would think would have a high credit score, and like to brag about it, lol Grin
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« Reply #9 on: January 09, 2008, 01:50:32 AM »

I think the better question would be: would you date a dead beat that is consistently 'in-between' jobs.. I know a lot of girls like this and I won't go near them no matter how hot.. these are the girls that work for 4 weeks out of the year at a tanning salon , LOL.
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« Reply #10 on: January 10, 2008, 07:15:07 PM »

No.  Iím not making a comment about my score one way or another.  Iím simply throwing a question out there to bat aroundÖ much like the thread on would you date someone who is HIV+ or another thread someone started on would you date a fat person.


Itís funny to hear someone on a bodybuilding board accuse someone else of being shallow.  I suppose this subject hits a nerve; there are a lot of people out there with bad credit.

Personally or professionally, no one wants to be screened out of the "eligibility pool" but eventually it happens to all of us and often it happens over issues that are far less consequential: age, height, body fat, hair color, bald, breast size, education, etc.  To me, it seems more shallow to screen someone out based on something they have no control over (bald, breast size, age, height, etc.) rather than something they can control like a poor credit rating.

For what it's worth, I tend to agree with powerpack.  But socially speaking there's no reason for people with bad credit to be upset... there are plenty of them and they can certainly date each other.  Smiley

As for being screened out by a potential employer... well, that's another, more serious, problem.  I have been on search committees and we have obtained the credit scores for finalists.  People with bad scores are sometimes eliminated from further consideration. Undecided




well i've never borrowed money in my life or had any bad dealings with a bank so mine is fine, but i honestly think that treating a potential partner as a financial investment is one of the dumbest things i've ever heard and openly saying that to 9/10 people would just leave you on the sidewalk, fair enough you don't want to be some bum, but it doesn't take a credit check to see if someone is financially sound or a homeless bum you know what i mean.
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« Reply #11 on: January 18, 2008, 09:04:37 AM »

As you may know, many employers now do credit checks on employees and have even declined to offer or rescinded job offers for people with bad credit scores.  The rationale being a particularly bad credit score is indicative of many other potential problems especially with regard to judgment.

Do you know your own credit score?

Would you date someone with bad credit or break up with someone once you learned s/he had bad credit?

No.  Bah!
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BayGBM
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« Reply #12 on: February 23, 2008, 09:47:36 AM »

well i've never borrowed money in my life or had any bad dealings with a bank so mine is fine, but i honestly think that treating a potential partner as a financial investment is one of the dumbest things i've ever heard and openly saying that to 9/10 people would just leave you on the sidewalk, fair enough you don't want to be some bum, but it doesn't take a credit check to see if someone is financially sound or a homeless bum you know what i mean.

You may feel that way, but i don't think 9/10 people would agree with you.  Especially people who are not involved in bodybuilding (a sport which focuses on the superficial).
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« Reply #13 on: February 25, 2008, 09:55:49 AM »

No.  Iím not making a comment about my score one way or another.  Iím simply throwing a question out there to bat aroundÖ much like the thread on would you date someone who is HIV+ or another thread someone started on would you date a fat person.


Itís funny to hear someone on a bodybuilding board accuse someone else of being shallow.  I suppose this subject hits a nerve; there are a lot of people out there with bad credit.

Personally or professionally, no one wants to be screened out of the "eligibility pool" but eventually it happens to all of us and often it happens over issues that are far less consequential: age, height, body fat, hair color, bald, breast size, education, etc.  To me, it seems more shallow to screen someone out based on something they have no control over (bald, breast size, age, height, etc.) rather than something they can control like a poor credit rating.

For what it's worth, I tend to agree with powerpack.  But socially speaking there's no reason for people with bad credit to be upset... there are plenty of them and they can certainly date each other.  Smiley

As for being screened out by a potential employer... well, that's another, more serious, problem.  I have been on search committees and we have obtained the credit scores for finalists.  People with bad scores are sometimes eliminated from further consideration. Undecided




Credit scores were the primary determining factor for giving out sub-prime loans. How'd that work out?

Going forward, I think you're going to see your beloved credit scores not meaning squat.
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« Reply #14 on: April 21, 2008, 03:23:51 PM »

It has been argued that knowing someoneís approximate credit score is more important than knowing someoneís HIV status.

It has been argued incorrectly.  The cure for a bad credit score has been discovered.  I once had this disease, now I'm 100% cured.

Wish I could say the same about HIV. 
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« Reply #15 on: April 21, 2008, 03:44:11 PM »

Hell no to dating a fat person!!!

Some insurance comanied even calculate credit scores into your rate.

Assuming it's a serious question it would depend on how hot she is and why I would care. I don't need a girl to co-sign shit so it would never come up. That being said, some do feel it is a measure of how organized a person's life is. Don't know if that theory really holds water... some people have bad luck and very few people (my ass included) have any financial training whatsoever. People from more structured backgrounds appreciate credit's power better. Me, I'd still prefer to have cash. Smiley
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« Reply #16 on: April 22, 2008, 04:18:49 AM »

what does a bad credit score got 2 do with pussy?
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« Reply #17 on: April 22, 2008, 05:40:08 AM »

what does a bad credit score got 2 do with pussy?

There must be some credit scams in the gay community, LOL!

But since he wrote seriously date.... if you end up marrying someone with bad credit/financial management practices, their problems become yours.
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« Reply #18 on: April 22, 2008, 06:17:50 AM »

Play around but not seriously date.
I have seen enough of my buddies lives ruined by partners who cant control their spending and who have no conscious over out of control credit.

When I was in my 20's I could have cared less. Honestly.

But if I had to date again, and if I found out that my woman had a horrific credit score, I would RUN.  Honestly, RUN.
Pussy is fine and all, but when you get serious with a woman, and you find out that she can not control her spending, and if you 2 were to get married, it would be the source of constant arguments.

MOST marital arguments stem from money issues.  If one partner can not control her spending, or pay her bills on time, trust me, it will become an issue fast.  I know some friends who have been married for yeard and JUST realized that their wifes have over 10k-15k on a credit card they didn't know about.  he honestly thought he was debt free, and had to take a large portion of his bonus to pay her credit cards off.  (I guarantee she all ready has them run back up.  It is a control issue, and I am sure she has none).

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« Reply #19 on: April 22, 2008, 11:00:03 AM »

Severe addicts will get credit in the names of others.... even their children!!!
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« Reply #20 on: June 24, 2008, 07:39:37 AM »

How Bad Credit Can Affect Job Prospects
Many Employers Use Credit History as a Tool in Their Pre-Employment Screening
By TORY JOHNSON
June 24, 2008ó

We all know that our personal credit history affects our ability to secure a home loan or open an account at a department store. But most Americans are unaware that bad credit could cost them a job.

Many employers use credit history as a tool in their pre-employment screening as just one measure of judgment and character. If you can't manage your financial obligations, they wonder if it's a sign of irresponsibility. If your monthly debt payment is higher than your salary, some employers worry that it may distract from your performance.

Critics of this practice say it's unfair for personal credit history to be used when judging professional qualifications. They say there's no link between poor credit and job performance. Many of these people have hit rough patches, and now they're caught in a vicious cycle: To pay down their debt, they need a job, but they can't get hired because of their debt.

The majority of employers today use some form of background check as part of their due diligence not because they're interested in prying or playing gotcha. By the time they move forward with a background check, they've decided they want you. So whether it's verifying your education and work history, a drug test, checking your criminal history or even your credit, they're genuinely hoping that everything checks out.

When it comes to credit history specifically the amount of debt and the number of delinquencies and negative accounts  some positions will have firm standards in black and white. If your credit is weak, you can expect a red flag, which might include losing the offer , if your role requires you to be involved in finances  a cashier, payroll manager, financial planner or senior financial executive, for example.

The same applies if you're handling expensive jewelry or other small valuables, if you have access to trade secrets or if you're a key holder, someone who opens and closes a store and has access to cash and merchandise. Almost always in those cases, you can expect a credit check. But it's by no means limited solely to those areas; employers use their own discretion when deciding which positions to screen.

Beyond that, if you're in a position that involves high security or access to cash and valuables, you may be subject to recurring background checks while on the job. Ask your employer directly about its policies.

Read the fine print. Under federal law, prospective employees must give permission for employers to conduct background checks, including credit checks, so none of this happens behind our backs.

Yet some 80 percent of Americans, according to a Visa survey, don't realize that credit history can be used in pre-employment screening. Whenever you sign an employment application, read the fine print. Most of the time, you're signing a consent and disclosure clause that grants your permission to the employer and its designated third party vendor(s) to conduct a background check. Be aware of what exactly you're agreeing to upfront.

Bad credit, now what? If you have poor credit, it doesn't automatically mean you're unemployable. You should focus on three steps so you don't lose out on positions.

Check your credit report. Even if you're not actively job searching, everyone should know what's in their credit report. Under federal law, you have the right to receive a free copy of your credit report once every 12 months from each of the three nationwide consumer reporting companies. (Visit www.annualcreditreport.c om to access those reports.) Don't bury your head; if you have problems with your credit or you find mistakes on the report, address them immediately with creditors and the reporting company. This will come in very handy should you find yourself looking for work.

Ask the employer's policy. Then when it comes to job searching, avoid voluntarily discussing credit history during the interview process. There's no need to knock yourself out of the running prematurely. When you receive an offer that's contingent on a background check, ask directly, "I'm thrilled at the prospect of working here. What is your policy on background checks? I'd like to know what specific screenings you use and the general timeframe for that process." At this point, they've said they want you, so you're in a good position to ask such a question with relative ease. Most employers will gladly walk you through their process.

Speak up with confidence. If an employer says the background screening includes a credit check  and you've seen the negative activity on your credit report  then you should consider speaking up. You can say, "I'd like to tell you what in advance you're likely to find on my personal credit report. Please allow me the opportunity to explain it, too." It's important to have a solid rationale. Maybe you hit a challenge because of an unexpected layoff, a divorce, a medical necessity, or a problem with your mortgage. Maybe there are mistakes on your report that you're working to fix.

Talking about personal credit can be embarrassing and difficult for anyone you're not alone so at this moment it's essential to have a clear, confident explanation that you've rehearsed. You don't want to babble or look like a deer in the headlights. Speaking up at the right moment can make or break the job opportunity.

Additional resources: ChoicePoint (www.choicepoint.com) and Sterling Testing Systems (www.sterlingtesting.com) are two of the services used frequently by employers to conduct background checks. Visit their sites to educate yourself on the pre-employment screening process used by employers and for information on facts and services available to individuals.

Copyright © 2008 ABC News Internet Ventures

http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/story?id=5229894&page=1
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« Reply #21 on: June 24, 2008, 08:33:46 AM »

Who needs credit when you have cash.  Plus believe me no one will turn down a 50%+ deposit on anything. 
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« Reply #22 on: June 24, 2008, 10:11:42 AM »

Only,

Most people confuse credit with income. Smiley

A friend (financial advisor) of mine loves to tell people: credit is just debt you don't have yet.
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« Reply #23 on: June 24, 2008, 11:42:28 AM »

If one is independently wealthy then this subject (like so many others) would not apply to you.  Most people however depend on credit and therefore need a good credit rating.  The sooner young people learn that the better off they will be.  Smiley

Some things are particularly difficult to buy without a credit card though in those cases a debit card will usually suffice.
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« Reply #24 on: June 24, 2008, 11:46:38 AM »

Living within your means is the best way of sticking it to the man.

Don't go there Bay, LOL! It's a figure of speech.  Smiley
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