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Author Topic: Presidential Candidates 2016: 10 Democrats Who Might Be the Next Nominee  (Read 5982 times)
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« Reply #125 on: January 21, 2015, 09:42:32 AM »

Biden: 'There is a chance' I'll primary Clinton
By Alexandra Jaffe, CNN
January 21, 2015


(CNN)Vice President Joe Biden opened the door Wednesday to a potential presidential primary challenge to former secretary of State Hillary Clinton in the Democratic primary.

"Yes, there is a chance" he would challenge Clinton for the Democratic nomination in 2016, he said on ABC's "Good Morning America."

"But I haven't made my mind up about that. We've got a lot of work to do between now and then. There's plenty of time."

Both Clinton and Biden have made no secret of their interest in running in 2016, but Clinton allies have been building an organization that encompasses many of the key strategists and operatives in the Democratic field, and she holds a significant double-digit lead in every poll of the potential field.

Biden doesn't always come in second — that position in Democrats' hearts is often held by Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, a liberal icon whom many progressives see as their only alternative to Clinton.

But Biden said he feels there's a chance for any candidate to break ahead.

"I think this is wide open on both sides," he said of the presidential primaries. "Right now my focus is getting implemented what the president talked about last night: to nail down this recovery and get the middle class back in the game.

During a round of interviews following Tuesday night's State of the Union, Biden continued to talk up his chances, saying on NBC's "Today" he feels he'd "do a good job" as president.

Although by this time in 2007, Biden had already declared, he said Thursday he doesn't need to decide until the summer about another White House run. In the meantime, the vice president has friendly remarks for Clinton — he called her a "really competent, capable person and a friend."

http://www.cnn.com/2015/01/21/politics/biden-opens-door-to-2016/index.html
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« Reply #126 on: January 21, 2015, 09:48:16 AM »

2016 Run or No, Elizabeth Warren May Define Democratic Ticket

Image: 2016 Run or No, Elizabeth Warren May Define Democratic Ticket (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
Wednesday, 21 Jan 2015
By Jennifer G. Hickey

Since Elizabeth Warren took her Senate seat in 2013, she has held the role of the populist darling of the liberal wing of the Democratic Party and the imagination of those who view her as a welcome alternative to current Democratic presidential front-runner Hillary Clinton. But Warren insists she is not running in 2016.

"No," was the simple answer Warren gave to Fortune magazine in a January interview.

But "no" is not a response accepted by those on the Left who are trying to draft her to run, or by those on the Right who are continuing to include her among possible Democratic opponents.

"Obviously we’ve been spending a bulk of our time on Secretary Clinton. She’s clearly the person that the Democratic establishment is a aligning behind but we’ve also done the necessary research for a potential candidate to emerge and I think Elizabeth Warren is at the top of that list," Tim Miller, the executive director of the conservative PAC America Rising, told the left-leaning blog, Talking Points Memo (TPM).

Like Miller, the Republican National Committee (RNC) also is conducting research and keeping tabs on the freshman Massachusetts senator.
News Update

"There are a lot of Dems that seem to be wary about anointing Hillary and many of them come from the Warren wing of the party. We will continue focusing on her," said RNC press secretary Kirsten Kukowski in an interview with TPM.

Republicans may be hoping to keep the notion of a Warren candidacy alive as a way to diminish Clinton's standing and to split Democratic unity, but liberals' hope is rooted in an actual belief in her stands against Wall Street and her focus on income inequality.

Last week, two liberal PACs — Democracy for America and MoveOn.org — launched a "Run Warren Run" campaign in New Hampshire and have pledged to spend $1.25 million in Iowa and New Hampshire in the hope of convincing Warren to run for president, reports The Boston Herald.

"What the groups are doing is trying to keep the concept of a Warren candidacy in play. They’re hedging," Patrick Griffin, who works for the bipartisan public opinion research firm Purple Strategies, told The Herald. "They’re hoping. But if she’s not a willing participant, there’s nothing to be pining for."

"The bottom line is: Hillary Clinton is not tomorrow’s Democratic Party. The only thing that’s been in Washington longer than the Clintons is the Washington Monument.

"Warren makes Democrats hope for what could be rather than settle for what is," Griffin added.

According to a RealClearPolitics aggregate of recent Democratic primary polls, Clinton is the clear front-runner with 61.7 percent of the vote, while Warren draws 12.2 percent.

Vice President Joe Biden and Independent Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders are both in the single digits.

"Having either Bernie or Elizabeth run would be a wonderful thing for the country," Ben Cohen, a Democratic donor and co-founder of Ben and Jerry's ice cream, told The Wall Street Journal.

"I see Hillary as part of the middle-of-the-road mainstream government that is essentially in bed with these corporations," added Cohen, who expresses a sentiment common among progressive Democrats.

Warren may not be running for president (yet), but she undoubtedly will play a role in setting the agenda for the Obama administration, as well as whomever the Democratic nominee turns out to be.

"Obama appears eager to make inequality and the struggles of working- and middle-class Americans the central agenda for the 2016 campaign, forcing Republicans — and perhaps a Democrat not named Warren — to respond.

"The concentration of wealth and political power at the top is said to be Warren's passion. She may not be running for anything. But if Obama joins her in pressing the inequality case, the Democrats could end up with the equivalent of an Obama-Warren ticket just the same," writes Francis Wilkinson in Bloomberg News.

http://www.Newsmax.com/Newsfront/Elizabeth-Warren-hillary-clinton-2016-democrats/2015/01/21/id/619794/#ixzz3PTX5wnfY
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« Reply #127 on: January 26, 2015, 09:03:09 AM »

Hillary Clinton to Start 2016 Campaign in April, Politico Says
Monday, 26 Jan 2015

Hillary Clinton may start her campaign for the White House in early April with the involvement of her husband, former President Bill Clinton, and a strategy to court liberal Democrats, Politico reported.

Clinton approved a preliminary campaign budget and several key hires shortly after Christmas, signaling to advisers that her likelihood of running is 100 percent, according to the publication’s website Monday.

While many of Clinton’s top campaign advisers have already signed on under likely campaign chairman John Podesta, one new name being floated for communications director is White House Communications Director Jennifer Palmieri, Politico said. Bill Clinton has also been deeply involved in the campaign from the start, unlike when Hillary Clinton ran against Barack Obama in 2008 and he was isolated. He’s already warned her that Jeb Bush is the real Republican threat, with New Jersey Governor Chris Christie seen as “just a sideshow.”

The Clinton campaign’s strategy to avoid strong competition from the left is to court the party’s liberals, such as former Labor Secretary Robert Reich and civil-rights leader Representative John Lewis, the Georgia Democrat, according to the article. She’s already won the backing of former Howard Dean and Senator Al Franken, of Minnesota.

http://www.Newsmax.com/Newsfront/hillary-clinton-launch-april/2015/01/26/id/620664/#ixzz3PwaRPsnR
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« Reply #128 on: January 27, 2015, 09:10:57 AM »

Democratic stunner: It isn’t even close in Elizabeth Warren vs. Hillary showdown

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., center, accompanied by Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, right, make statements introducing Senate Foreign Relations Chairman Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass., seated at left, to the committee during his confirmation hearing to become secretary of state, ... more >

By David Sherfinski - The Washington Times - Monday, January 26, 2015

As she reportedly lays the groundwork for an all-but-declared presidential run in 2016, former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton leads Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts by commanding margins in new polls testing Democrats’ preference for their 2016 presidential nominee.

In a head-to-head matchup, Mrs. Clinton leads Mrs. Warren, 62 percent to 22 percent, when respondents were asked who they would vote for if the 2016 Democratic presidential primary were held in their state today, according to a Rasmussen poll. Sixteen percent were undecided and 18 percent said they had not heard of Mrs. Warren.

Mrs. Warren has consistently rejected calls for her to enter the race from liberal activist groups, who say her populist broadsides against Wall Street and lobbying in favor of proposals like raising the federal minimum wage would be a welcome part of the party’s debate over a 2016 message.

But Mrs. Clinton led in every demographic in the poll, including liberal Democrats.

In a separate USA Today/Suffolk University poll out Monday, 51 percent of Democrats and Democratic-leaning voters named Mrs. Clinton as their preferred nominee, compared to 31 percent who were undecided and 5 percent who named Mrs. Warren.

Mrs. Clinton also won support from 57 percent of those who identified themselves as liberal or very liberal, the wing of the party seemingly most likely to opt for Mrs. Warren.

Polling ahead of the 2008 Democratic presidential primary contest also showed Mrs. Clinton with commanding leads before then-Sen. Obama announced his candidacy.

http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2015/jan/26/hillary-clinton-has-big-lead-over-elizabeth-warren/#ixzz3Q2SkVBTj
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« Reply #129 on: February 02, 2015, 01:38:51 PM »

. . .  Hillary Clinton is far and away the leader among Democratic candidates. With 46 percent, her next closest competitor is Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, who has 16 percent.

The poll of 402 Republican likely caucus-goers and 401 Democratic likely caucus goers was conducted from Jan. 26-29, with a margin of error of plus or minus of 4.9 percentage points.

http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/scott-walker-surging-hillary-clinton-dominating-new-iowa-poll/article/2559626?utm_campaign=Fox%20News&utm_source=foxnews.com&utm_medium=feed
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« Reply #130 on: February 09, 2015, 01:56:50 PM »

New York Working Families Party Calls On Elizabeth Warren To Run For President In 2016
The Huffington Post   
By Igor Bobic
Posted: 02/08/2015

The New York Working Families Party is calling on Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) to run for president in 2016.

“Senator Warren is the nation's most powerful voice for working families fighting against a set of rules written by and for Wall Street," Director Bill Lipton said in a statement on Sunday. "That's the debate we want to see, and that's why we're urging Senator Warren to run for President."

The party joins other progressive organizations, such as MoveOn.org and Democracy for America, in calling for a challenger to presumptive Democratic front-runner Hillary Clinton. A candidacy by the Massachusetts Democrat, who rose to fame on a platform of economic populism, would provide the party with an opportunity to debate where it stands key issues ahead of the general election.

Warren, however, has repeatedly said she is not running for the nomination. Nor has she made any moves toward a potential run for president, such as the hiring of key staff in early primary states, as many potential Republican candidates have already done.

Ready for Warren, another organization working to push the senator into the race, hailed the announcement on Sunday.

"This is a huge moment for the campaign to draft Elizabeth Warren -- we're thrilled to have the Working Families Party join this fight," said Erica Sagrans, the group's campaign manager.

Several members of the Working Families Party told The New York Times, however, that their move to push Warren to run should not be construed as animosity toward Clinton.

“It’s a vote in the context of two undeclared candidates for president,” said Ed Ott, former head of the New York City Central Labor Council. “What the Warren vote reflects is that people want a Democratic Party with a spine.”

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/02/08/working-families-party-elizabeth-warren_n_6642118.html
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« Reply #131 on: February 11, 2015, 11:34:12 AM »

 Shocked

Shock poll: Warren leads Clinton in Iowa, N.H.
BY PAUL BEDARD | FEBRUARY 11, 2015
 
Populist groups cheering "Run Warren Run," today released 2016 election polls from Iowa and New Hampshire showing Sen. Elizabeth Warren ahead of dominant Democrat Hillary Clinton.

The YouGov poll of likely Democratic voters for MoveOn.org and Democracy for America also found that 79 percent want Warren and majorities support her anti-Wall Street positions.

Warren has said she doesn't plan to challenge Clinton, though several others have indicated that they are looking at a bid, including Vice President Joe Biden and Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt.

The poll of 400 conducted Jan. 30 to Feb. 5 put Warren ahead of Clinton in Iowa, 31 percent to 24 percent. In New Hampshire, her lead is 30 percent to 27 percent.

The groups cautioned that the poll mostly shows that voters are extremely open to her candidacy rather than her being a Clinton killer. They hope to use the poll to encourage Warren to change her position and get into the race.

The poll analysis said: "The results show that, after likely caucus goers and primary voters learn about Elizabeth Warren’s biography and issue positions, not only do a stunning 79 percent say they want her to run, but, in both states, Warren ends up leading all other potential Democratic candidates in a head-to-head ballot question."

Key findings:

— Virtually all likely primary voters and caucusgoers indicate support for a contested race, with 98 percent agreeing that a competitive primary is good for the party, candidates and voters.

— When they are informed about Warren’s biography and issue positions, 79 percent of respondents say they would like her to run for president in 2016.

— After respondents hear about Warren’s positions and biography, without any negative information provided about other candidates, Elizabeth Warren leads all other candidates for the nomination in both states: 31 percent to 24 percent over Hillary Clinton in Iowa (with other potential candidates further behind) and 30 percent to 27 percent in New Hampshire.

The full results are here.

http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/shock-poll-warren-leads-clinton-in-iowa-n.h./article/2560098
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« Reply #132 on: February 11, 2015, 11:55:40 AM »

Shocked

Shock poll: Warren leads Clinton in Iowa, N.H.
BY PAUL BEDARD | FEBRUARY 11, 2015
 
Populist groups cheering "Run Warren Run," today released 2016 election polls from Iowa and New Hampshire showing Sen. Elizabeth Warren ahead of dominant Democrat Hillary Clinton.

The YouGov poll of likely Democratic voters for MoveOn.org and Democracy for America also found that 79 percent want Warren and majorities support her anti-Wall Street positions.

Warren has said she doesn't plan to challenge Clinton, though several others have indicated that they are looking at a bid, including Vice President Joe Biden and Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt.

The poll of 400 conducted Jan. 30 to Feb. 5 put Warren ahead of Clinton in Iowa, 31 percent to 24 percent. In New Hampshire, her lead is 30 percent to 27 percent.

The groups cautioned that the poll mostly shows that voters are extremely open to her candidacy rather than her being a Clinton killer. They hope to use the poll to encourage Warren to change her position and get into the race.

The poll analysis said: "The results show that, after likely caucus goers and primary voters learn about Elizabeth Warren’s biography and issue positions, not only do a stunning 79 percent say they want her to run, but, in both states, Warren ends up leading all other potential Democratic candidates in a head-to-head ballot question."

Key findings:

— Virtually all likely primary voters and caucusgoers indicate support for a contested race, with 98 percent agreeing that a competitive primary is good for the party, candidates and voters.

— When they are informed about Warren’s biography and issue positions, 79 percent of respondents say they would like her to run for president in 2016.

— After respondents hear about Warren’s positions and biography, without any negative information provided about other candidates, Elizabeth Warren leads all other candidates for the nomination in both states: 31 percent to 24 percent over Hillary Clinton in Iowa (with other potential candidates further behind) and 30 percent to 27 percent in New Hampshire.

The full results are here.

http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/shock-poll-warren-leads-clinton-in-iowa-n.h./article/2560098

Damn that is shocking!

I would expect Hillary to be up double digits AT LEAST in both states.  Undecided
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« Reply #133 on: February 11, 2015, 02:49:52 PM »

FAR right or left WINS.

Obama won because he was far left.  Warren could beat Hilary.
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« Reply #134 on: February 11, 2015, 02:54:16 PM »

FAR right or left WINS.

Obama won because he was far left.  Warren could beat Hilary.

Weren't we seeing polls just a month ago with Hillary blowing away the remaining Democratic field?

Where is all this Elizabeth Warren mojo coming from all of the sudden?

I mean I know she gives the occasional interview here and there but other than that I really haven't even seen her in the news that much.
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« Reply #135 on: February 11, 2015, 02:58:08 PM »

Weren't we seeing polls just a month ago with Hillary blowing away the remaining Democratic field?

Where is all this Elizabeth Warren mojo coming from all of the sudden?

I mean I know she gives the occasional interview here and there but other than that I really haven't even seen her in the news that much.

People are realizing they have to start donating to a dem soon.

An they ain't thrilled about hilary's old, crooked, shady ass... doesn't exactly excite people.  Then they talk to the base and realize they do love warren - she's 65, she has solid experience, and she's smart as shit, even if you consider her to be politically misguided.  She is a smart woman, and she is 100% lib.  Obama was the last combo of this...
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« Reply #136 on: February 11, 2015, 05:05:08 PM »

People are realizing they have to start donating to a dem soon.

An they ain't thrilled about hilary's old, crooked, shady ass... doesn't exactly excite people.  Then they talk to the base and realize they do love warren - she's 65, she has solid experience, and she's smart as shit, even if you consider her to be politically misguided.  She is a smart woman, and she is 100% lib.  Obama was the last combo of this...

They likely have more trust in Warren. She's further to the left. I have to admit the lady brings a ton of fire and the base obviously loves her message.

You could be right about her ability to knock off Hillary.
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« Reply #137 on: February 11, 2015, 05:07:14 PM »

They likely have more trust in Warren. She's further to the left. I have to admit the lady brings a ton of fire and the base obviously loves her message.

You could be right about her ability to knock off Hillary.

she can attack the shit out of hilary, and it's okay because she's a female too.

Her voice is more pleasant than hilary.  She doesn't *need* the job - hilary's legacy is incomplete if she loses the nomination AGAIN.   Her message resonate with MOST on the left.  She doesn't have 30 years of skeletons like hilary.

ABOVE ALL - people are EXCITED ABOUT her.  She's the DLB of the Dem field Smiley
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« Reply #138 on: February 11, 2015, 05:15:16 PM »

she can attack the shit out of hilary, and it's okay because she's a female too.

Her voice is more pleasant than hilary.  She doesn't *need* the job - hilary's legacy is incomplete if she loses the nomination AGAIN.   Her message resonate with MOST on the left.  She doesn't have 30 years of skeletons like hilary.

ABOVE ALL - people are EXCITED ABOUT her.  She's the DLB of the Dem field Smiley

Having Warren in their immediately cuts the nuts off the "he's being sexist" angle from the get go.

If Bernie Sanders ends up throwing his hat in the ring and Warren/Sanders battle each other for "Far Left" supremacy that could give some leverage to Hillary to capture the more moderate constituents.

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« Reply #139 on: February 11, 2015, 05:23:56 PM »

Having Warren in their immediately cuts the nuts off the "he's being sexist" angle from the get go.

If Bernie Sanders ends up throwing his hat in the ring and Warren/Sanders battle each other for "Far Left" supremacy that could give some leverage to Hillary to capture the more moderate constituents.

IF warren is in the race, I doubt many serious donors support Sanders... he's a joke and VERY polarizing.

Warren will peel away people that only vote because the person has a vagina.  moderates, even some womens power people on the right.  I remember poor people I know, loving on Palin, because she was a woman - completely ignorant of any positions she held or a single word she said, one day after she was announced.  We're talking lifetime democrats that said they liked Palin - simply cause she's a woman.

Warren should scare the shit out of dems - and repubs.  She can easily stand there and point out hypocrisy of Hilary, Biden, Jen or Christie - easily.
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« Reply #140 on: February 12, 2015, 12:33:07 PM »

Despite Iowa visit, Biden fading from 2016 campaign chatter
Feb 12, 2015
By JOSH LEDERMAN

(AP) In this Jan. 22, 2105 file photo, Vice President Joe Biden speaks in...
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WASHINGTON (AP) — When Vice President Joe Biden steps off of Air Force Two in Iowa, there will be no shortage of speculation about his political future. It's Iowa, after all — the place where presidential hopefuls flock, making themselves at home in roadside diners and pizza joints as they court voters in the state whose caucuses kick off the presidential primary.

Behind the scenes, though, there are few signs the vice president is taking steps toward mounting a third bid for the top job at the White House. As Hillary Rodham Clinton builds an elaborate campaign-in-waiting, and a few other Democrats nibble around the edges, Biden's name has faded from the mix of expected 2016 candidates.

Biden's aides and longtime political advisers say he isn't organizing in early voting states such as New Hampshire and Iowa, although he'll visit Des Moines on Thursday. He has yet to form an exploratory committee or other apparatus that could rapidly scale up to become a campaign.

Although he stays in close touch with former political aides, no staff has been lined up to take on key roles in a potential bid. Nor are any Democrats in the early voting states organizing a "Draft Joe" movement — the pining of those who aren't ready for Hillary is reserved for Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren.
Biden will arrive in Iowa on an official White House trip. At Drake University in Des Moines, he'll speak about the economy and the Obama administration's policies before traveling to Des Moines Area Community College for a round-table discussion about expanding access to higher education, the White House said.

But while such a visit might normally be a sign of a candidate preparing to get in the race, former Iowa Democratic Party Chairwoman Sue Dvorsky said the only evidence of Democrats organizing in Iowa has come from former Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders.

"Not a whisper from Veep," she said in an email.

Flash back to eight years ago. By this time in 2007, Biden had declared his candidacy for president, launched a website, committed his first campaign gaffe — a set of comments about then-Sen. Barack Obama that rubbed some the wrong way — and cleaned up after the stumble.

This time around, Biden insists it's still possible he'll run a third time and says there's plenty of time to decide.

"There's a chance, but I haven't made my mind up about that," Biden said in a recent appearance on ABC's "Good Morning America."

Biden has told associates that he feels little pressure or political necessity for a quick decision, according to Biden's advisers, who spoke under condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss his deliberations publicly. That's in part because Clinton, who had been expected to announce her candidacy in the spring, is now expected to delay her own launch until the summer. Biden plans to hold off on making a decision for as long as possible, concerned that a campaign launch will undermine the administration's work by hastening Obama's lame-duck status.

"He's hamstrung. He's limited in what he can do without hurting the president," said Dick Harpootlian, a Biden supporter and former chairman of the South Carolina Democratic Party. "It's a difficult balancing act."

Biden isn't the only Democrat waiting to make a possible White House campaign official. So far, former Virginia Sen. Jim Webb is the only Democrat to have taken formal steps toward a run. Other likely candidates are quietly moving ahead, putting the sitting vice president at a potentially significant disadvantage if he does run.

Many of the party's top political minds, as well as major donors, are being snapped up by Clinton's future campaign, including many Obama loyalists who helped twice elect the Obama-Biden ticket. In recent weeks Obama's senior counselor John Podesta, communications director Jennifer Palmieri, pollster Joel Benenson and media strategist Jim Margolis have all indicated they plan to work for Clinton.

If he does run, Biden is likely to turn to the same cadre of advisers who have guided his career for decades, his advisers said, including Larry Rasky, a veteran of both of Biden's previous presidential campaigns. Biden's former personal aide Michael Schrum, who now works in his public engagement office, has been an intermediary in early primary states with supporters and operatives seeking to stay in the loop.

That Biden would start as the underdog, after eight years as vice president, underscores his dilemma in deciding whether to take on Clinton. While polls this early in the race have little value, they still show Clinton with a commanding lead over the rest of the Democratic field. Although Warren has repeatedly said she's not running, she's nevertheless eclipsed Biden as the preferred candidate of the party's liberal wing.

http://apnews.myway.com/article/20150212/us--dem_2016-biden-e1c7c348ca.html
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« Reply #141 on: February 17, 2015, 12:22:12 PM »

Hillary Donor John Catsimatidis: Warren Could Win Iowa Primary

Image: Hillary Donor John Catsimatidis: Warren Could Win Iowa Primary (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Tuesday, 17 Feb 2015
By Melanie Batley

John Catsimatidis, the New York businessman and bundler for former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, said he has heard that if the election were held today, Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren could beat her.

Catsimatidis suggested to Bloomberg News that a Clinton nomination is by no means certain, and before thinking about a message on the economy that would appeal to voters in a general election, she would first have to win the primary.

"One of my staff members who's from Iowa called his friend in Iowa who's the Democratic chairman of Iowa, and if the election was held today, he said that our lady friend from Massachusetts would beat Hillary," said Catsimatidis, who has raised millions of dollars for the Clinton family.

"So is that scary? That's the Obama faction," he said.

President Barack Obama defeated Clinton in the 2008 Democratic caucuses, which set him on the path to taking the nomination for president that year.

Warren has repeatedly said, however, that she is not running for president in 2016.

Last week, the resignation of David Brock from the Clinton organization Priorities USA triggered speculation that there was infighting in Clinton's camp between former Obama supporters and longtime Clinton allies.

Observers said it was reminiscent of problems she had with unity during her 2008 campaign.

http://www.Newsmax.com/Newsfront/John-Catsimatidis-hillary-clinton-warren-iowa/2015/02/17/id/625205/#ixzz3S21yhvY4
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« Reply #142 on: February 17, 2015, 12:31:52 PM »

Asking her not to run?  Offering VP slot? 

Hillary Clinton, Privately, Seeks the Favor of Elizabeth Warren

Hillary Rodham Clinton and Senator Elizabeth Warren in 2013.Credit Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Hillary Rodham Clinton held a private, one-on-one meeting with Senator Elizabeth Warren in December at Mrs. Clinton’s Washington home, a move by the Democrats’ leading contender in 2016 to cultivate the increasingly influential senator and leader of the party’s economic populist movement.

The two met at Whitehaven, the Clintons’ Northwest Washington home, without aides and at Mrs. Clinton’s invitation.

Mrs. Clinton solicited policy ideas and suggestions from Ms. Warren, according to a Democrat briefed on the meeting, who called it “cordial and productive.” Mrs. Clinton, who has been seeking advice from a range of scholars, advocates and officials, did not ask Ms. Warren to consider endorsing her likely presidential candidacy. Aides to Mrs. Clinton did not immediately respond to requests for comment, and aides to Ms. Warren could not be reached.

The conversation occurred at a moment when Ms. Warren’s clout has become increasingly evident. After the November election, Senator Harry Reid, the Democratic leader, appointed Ms. Warren, a Massachusetts freshman, to a leadership role in the Senate; she led a high-profile effort to strip a spending bill of rules sought by large banks; and a patchwork of liberal groups began a movement to draft her into the presidential race.

Ms. Warren has repeatedly said she is not running for president, and she has taken no steps that would indicate otherwise. Still, she is intent on pushing a robust populist agenda, and her confidants have suggested that she will use her Senate perch during the 2016 campaign to nudge Mrs. Clinton to embrace her major causes: addressing income inequality and curtailing the power of large financial institutions.

The get-together represented a step toward relationship-building for two women who do not know each other well. And for Mrs. Clinton, it was a signal that she would prefer Ms. Warren’s counsel delivered in person, as a friendly insider, rather than on national television or in opinion articles. And for Ms. Warren, the meeting offered the opportunity to make clear what she believes are the most pressing national issues.

That Mrs. Clinton — who is currently developing her economic platform — reached out to Ms. Warren suggests that she is aware of how much the debate over economic issues has shifted even during the relatively short time she was away from domestic politics while serving as secretary of state.

Mrs. Clinton was often criticized by the right as a doctrinaire liberal during her husband’s presidency and, as a presidential candidate, ultimately ran as more of an economic populist than Mr. Obama did. But she is now seen by some on the left as insufficiently tough on Wall Street. That perception, denounced by allies as an unfair criticism, has stuck in part because of her husband’s policies, and because of the lucrative speaking fees she has collected from financial firms and private equity groups since she left the State Department in early 2013.

The meeting in December fell two months after a more awkward encounter: Mrs. Clinton and Ms. Warren crossed paths at a Massachusetts rally for the Democratic nominee for governor there last year, Martha Coakley. At that event, Mrs. Clinton repeatedly described Ms. Warren as a champion against special interests and big banks; Ms. Warren, in turn, barely acknowledged Mrs. Clinton, who was the featured guest, in her remarks.

Both Mrs. Clinton and her husband appear eager to keep a close eye on Ms. Warren; Bill Clinton in the past has appeared sensitive about her oblique criticism of his deregulation of financial institutions. Beyond policy differences, the Clintons are eager to demonstrate that they, like Ms. Warren, appreciate the economic difficulties many Americans are facing.

The December meeting recalled another private session between Mrs. Clinton and a Democratic upstart: In 2005, shortly after he was sworn in to the Senate, Barack Obama paid a visit to Mrs. Clinton in her Senate office. In that instance, though, it was Mr. Obama who was seeking counsel.



http://www.nytimes.com/politics/first-draft/2015/02/17/hillary-clinton-met-with-elizabeth-warren-in-december/?smid=nytpolitics&_r=0
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Hillary Clinton Seen Launching Presidential Bid in April
Move would ease uncertainties in the Democratic Party and rev up front-runner’s fundraising
By PETER NICHOLAS and  CAROL E. LEE
March 1, 2015

Clinton aides have spoken of the earlier timetable in private meetings, according to people engaged in recent discussions about the presumed Democratic front-runner’s emerging 2016 campaign. Many within her camp have advocated her staying out of the fray until the summer.

Jumping in sooner would help the Democratic field take shape, reassuring party leaders and donors that the former first lady, senator and secretary of state is running. A super PAC loyal to Mrs. Clinton has faced hesitation from donors who don’t want to make big pledges until she is a candidate. Such concerns would evaporate after she announces.


Hillary Clinton at the Watermark Silicon Valley Conference for Women on Feb. 24 in Santa Clara, Calif. ENLARGE

Hillary Clinton and her close advisers are telling Democratic donors that she will enter the presidential race sooner than expected, likely in April, a move that would allay uncertainties within her party and allow her to rev up fundraising.

But Mrs. Clinton would become an even larger target for Republicans when she enters the race. She also would be pressed to opine on a raft of thorny issues in the news, including how to combat the military advances of Islamic State militants in the Middle East.

One influential proponent of an earlier announcement is John Podesta, who is expected to play an important role in Mrs. Clinton’s presidential campaign, one person familiar with the matter said. Mr. Podesta, who in January resigned as senior adviser in the Obama White House, declined to comment, as did a spokesman for Mrs. Clinton.

Many Democratic activists say they would like to see the race begin in earnest—something that won’t happen until Mrs. Clinton jumps in.

Mrs. Clinton “should get in right now. If she’s going to run, get a campaign going,” said Jason Frerichs, a county Democratic chairman in Iowa, the state that holds the first contest of the 2016 campaign.

Mrs. Clinton, according to some close associates, doesn’t relish the campaign trail and is in no particular hurry to announce, especially given the scant competition for her party’s nomination. Most polls show Mrs. Clinton running far ahead of her nearest potential challenger, Vice President Joe Biden .

“She’s obviously biding her time before she gets out there,” said Delaware Gov. Jack Markell, a Democrat.

Mrs. Clinton, 67 years old, made known her feelings about grueling campaigns in a private meeting last month with London Mayor Boris Johnson. Mr. Johnson later said she had bemoaned the lengthy U.S. presidential campaigns.

During her 2008 bid, she teared up at a campaign event in New Hampshire when describing the rigors of campaign life: lack of sleep, an overreliance on pizza and limited ability to exercise.

“If I were taking this on, seeing what candidates went through last time around, I’d sure want to put it off as long as I could,” said Doug Goldman, a major fundraiser for President Barack Obama who lives in San Francisco. At this point in the 2008 cycle, Mrs. Clinton already was a candidate.


Hillary Clinton, who has bemoaned long presidential campaigns, speaks in December at the Massachusetts Conference for Women in Boston.

Mrs. Clinton’s team has considered first forming an exploratory committee, a common in-between step candidates use to signal they are running while avoiding the formal launch of a campaign. But her camp now appears likely to scrap that idea.

A later entrance into the race comes with certain perils. She hopes to raise more than $1 billion for the campaign, people familiar with her plans said, and some Democratic donors are concerned that if she waits until the summer, she would be hard-pressed to meet that goal.

Mr. Obama’s campaign collected $716 million during the 2012 race, according to the Center for Responsive Politics.

With no apparatus in place, Mrs. Clinton also has a limited capability to rapidly respond to potential threats to a campaign. Republicans and even some Democrats have questioned the foreign contributions collected by her family’s charitable foundation, as recounted in a spate of recent news stories.

As yet, the response from the Clinton side mostly has come in the form of prepared statements from the Bill, Hillary & Chelsea Clinton Foundation.

Behind the scenes, the Clinton team is busy preparing for the race. Mrs. Clinton has been meeting with numerous policy experts as she crafts a message and platform. Close adviser Huma Abedin has been holding private meetings with supporters the campaign would call on for help after it is officially under way. Several donors described Ms. Abedin’s meetings as outreach to various constituencies who would prove helpful in winning the election.

http://www.wsj.com/articles/hillary-clinton-seen-launching-presidential-bid-in-april-1425254392
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