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Author Topic: Supporters of 'Personhood Amendment' Make Case to Mississippi Voters  (Read 15615 times)
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« Reply #250 on: February 24, 2016, 11:28:12 AM »

Abortion Clinics Are Closing at a Record Pace
At least 162 providers have closed since 2011.
by Esmé E Deprez 
from Bloomberg Businessweek  Reprints 
February 24, 2016

Abortion access in the U.S. has been vanishing at the fastest annual pace on record, propelled by Republican state lawmakers’ push to legislate the industry out of existence. Since 2011, at least 162 abortion providers have shut or stopped offering the procedure, while just 21 opened.

At no time since before 1973, when the U.S. Supreme Court legalized abortion, has a woman’s ability to terminate a pregnancy been more dependent on her zip code or financial resources to travel. The drop-off in providers—more than one every two weeks—occurred in 35 states, in both small towns and big cities that are home to more than 30 million women of reproductive age.

No region was exempt, though some states lost more than others. Texas, which in 2013 passed sweeping clinic regulations that are under scrutiny by the Supreme Court, saw the most: at least 30. It was followed by Iowa, with 14, and Michigan, with 13. California’s loss of a dozen providers shows how availability declined, even in states led by Democrats, who tend to be friendly to abortion rights.

Stand-alone clinics, not doctors’ offices or hospitals, perform the vast majority of pregnancy terminations. They account for the vast majority of the tally, which was compiled by Bloomberg News over the past three months and builds on a similar undertaking from 2013.

Typically defined by medical researchers as facilities that perform 400 or more abortions per year, the ranks peaked in the late 1980s at 705, according to the Guttmacher Institute, a New York-based reproductive-health research organization. By 2011, the most recent year for which Guttmacher has data, that number had fallen to 553.



Bloomberg’s reporting shows that the downward trend has accelerated to the fastest annual pace on record since 2011, with 31 having closed or stopped performing the procedure each year on average.

State regulations that make it too expensive or logistically impossible for facilities to remain in business drove more than a quarter of the closings. Industry consolidation, changing demographics, and declining demand were also behind the drop, along with doctor retirements and crackdowns on unfit providers.

Texas stands as a case study in the way abortion opponents have changed strategies, opting for legislative action over the clinic blockades and violence of the past.

Most providers there closed after the state became the largest and most populous in the U.S. to require that they become hospital-like outpatient surgical centers, which can cost millions to buy or build. The state also mandates that doctors have admitting privileges at nearby hospitals. The drop-off in access has helped depress the abortion rate in the state by 13 percent, according to a July study, and providers there say full implementation of the law would leave almost a fifth of Texas women 150 miles or more from a facility.

Summit Women’s Center in Bridgeport, Conn., closed in 2015 after 40 years in business, citing reduced demand. In Kalispell, Mont., Susan Cahill said she didn’t have the money to rebuild after her practice got vandalized in 2014. Following the loss of two providers, Missouri is now one of five states in which a sole clinic remains. Of all the facilities in the nation that closed or stopped performing terminations, about a third were operated by Planned Parenthood; of the ones that opened, three-quarters were.

That just 21 new clinics opened in five years underscores the difficulty the industry has faced in replenishing the ranks of health-care providers willing and financially able to operate in such a fraught field. The impact of that challenge is likely to be long-lived: Even rarer than the building of a new clinic is the reopening of one that has shut.

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-02-24/abortion-clinics-are-closing-at-a-record-pace
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« Reply #251 on: March 02, 2016, 09:10:43 PM »

Key Justice Kennedy Wavers as U.S. Top Court Confronts Abortion
Wednesday, 02 Mar 2016

A closely divided U.S. Supreme Court struggled with its biggest abortion case in years on Wednesday, with pivotal Justice Anthony Kennedy voicing concerns about a restrictive Texas law yet stopping short of signaling he would strike it down.

The court's four liberal justices indicated they believed the law, which imposes strict regulations on abortion doctors and clinic buildings, intrudes on a woman's constitutional right to end a pregnancy established in a 1973 ruling.

Conservative justices including Kennedy expressed doubt during the 85-minute oral argument about claims by abortion providers who asserted that the Republican-backed 2013 law forced numerous clinics to shut down.

Kennedy at one point suggested sending the case back to a lower court to get further evidence on the law's impact, including an assessment of the ability of existing Texas clinics to meet the demand for abortions.

If there is evidence new clinics that meet the state's regulations have increased capacity to perform abortions, it would show the law has provided a "beneficial effect," Kennedy said.

The outcome appeared to be in the hands of Kennedy, who often casts the deciding vote in close rulings. In past abortion cases, he has backed a fundamental right to abortion while supporting some restrictions.

The court was shorthanded with only eight justices following the Feb. 13 death of conservative Antonin Scalia, leaving the liberals and conservatives evenly divided.

The best that supporters of the law could hope for would be a 4-4 split that would let stand a lower-court ruling that affirmed the Texas regulations but set no nationwide legal precedent on whether other states could enact similar measures.

However, a such ruling leaving the Texas law intact could encourage other states with anti-abortion legislatures to pass similar laws.

Kennedy gave little indication he would be willing to uphold the law in full, as his three conservative colleagues would be expected to do. If Kennedy sides with the court's four liberals, the court could either send the case back to the lower court or strike it down.

A ruling is due by the end of June. A decision sending the case to a lower court could mean the dispute might not be resolved for years.

Some justices questioned the lack of evidence on why specific clinics closed after the law was passed, which could be addressed if new legal proceedings take place. Abortion providers assert that the law caused 22 of 41 clinics to close, but the state contests those numbers.

"What is the evidence in the record that the closures are related to the legislation?" conservative Chief Justice John Roberts asked.

Texas contends the law, passed by a Republican-controlled legislature and signed by a Republican governor, protects women's health. The abortion providers who have challenged it assert that the regulations are aimed at shutting down their clinics.

MEDICALLY INDUCED ABORTIONS

In a sign that he was not comfortable with aspects of the law, Kennedy sounded concerned about a possible increase in surgical abortions prompted in part by the state's separate new restrictions on medically induced abortions, in which women take pills to terminate a pregnancy. Kennedy said that "this law has really increased the number of surgical procedures as opposed to medical procedures, and that this may not be medically wise."

Abortion rights advocates say surgical abortions increased because of the delays women seeking an abortion faced as a result of the 2013 law.

Liberal Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg questioned the need for a provision of the law requiring clinics to have costly, hospital-grade facilities, when abortions almost always are low-risk procedures for the woman.

"What was the problem the legislature was responding to that it needed to improve the facilities for women's health?" Ginsburg asked.

The Texas law requires abortion doctors to have "admitting privileges," a type of formal affiliation, at a hospital within 30 miles (48 km) of the clinic. Abortion providers say the provision already has forced clinics to close because such an affiliation is hard to obtain.

The abortion providers also challenged a provision, not yet in effect, requiring clinics to have hospital-grade facilities with standards for corridor width, plumbing, parking spaces, room size, the spacing of beds and many other attributes.

Conservative Justice Samuel Alito indicated support for the regulations and referred to evidence that abortion facilities in Texas "have been cited for really appalling violations when they were inspected: holes in the floor where rats could come in, the lack of any equipment to adequately sterilize instruments."

The Supreme Court's last major abortion ruling came in 2007 when it upheld a federal law banning a late-term abortion procedure.

The Supreme Court legalized abortion in the 1973 Roe v. Wade case. But abortion remains a disputed issue in the United States, as it does in many countries, and some states have passed laws aiming to place a variety of restrictions on a woman's ability to terminate a pregnancy.

The court is considering the Texas case in the midst of the heated campaign ahead of the Nov. 8 U.S. presidential election.

http://www.newsmax.com/Newsfront/anthony-kennedy-waivers-abortion/2016/03/02/id/717113/#ixzz41oGGt7OT
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« Reply #252 on: March 08, 2016, 09:36:16 AM »

Why Millennials Lean Pro-Life
Natalie Johnson   / @nataliejohnsonn / March 04, 2016


Pro-life demonstrators wait for the Supreme Court ruling in the “Hobby Lobby” case to be announced June 30, 2014. (Jonathan Ernst /Reuters/Newscom)
Millennials lean more pro-life than the generation preceding them because of advances in medical technology and science, leaders in conservative media said Friday.

Dana Perino, co-host of Fox News Channel’s “The Five,” moderated the panel on the relevance of conservative principles to the millennial generation.

Perino noted a survey by the Associated Press found a 12 percent decline nationwide in abortions since 2010, including in blue states such as New York, Washington, and Oregon.

The Daily Signal is the multimedia news organization of The Heritage Foundation.  We’ll respect your inbox and keep you informed.

Americans aged 18 to 29, part of the millennial generation, also have become more pro-life than their parents, according to a Gallup poll cited by Perino. In 2010, it found, 24 percent of millennials agreed abortion should remain legal in all cases, compared with 36 percent of those aged 18 to 29 in 1991.

Robert Bluey, editor in chief of The Daily Signal, said the ability for pregnant women to see an ultrasound of their baby in the womb has helped expand the pro-life movement.

“I’m the father of two children and I think when you see that ultrasound and you have that experience … that changes a lot,” Bluey said during a panel discussion at the annual Conservative Political Action Conference, or CPAC.

Bluey said pregnancy centers strategically located across from Planned Parenthood or other abortion clinics have allowed women to discuss what potentially could be a “challenging situation” and consider options.

Katie Pavlich, editor of Townhall.com and a Fox News contributor, appeared on the panel with Bluey and Benny Johnson, creative director at the Independent Journal Review.

“I’m excited that the millennial generation is pro-life,” Pavlich said. “I think that science has been on our side for a long time on this issue.”

She said the anger from abortion activists after Doritos aired its “ultrasound” commercial during the Super Bowl illustrates how “extreme” the pro-choice movement is.

The ad shows a mother getting an ultrasound while her baby kicks in her womb, supposedly trying to get closer to the expectant, oblivious father who is munching on chips.

NARAL Pro-Choice America, a group that advocates abortion rights, immediately tweeted its opposition to Doritos for “humanizing fetuses.”

She also called on men to join the pro-life movement, pushing back on Johnson for refusing to comment because he is “not a woman.”

“Just because you’re a man doesn’t mean you can’t comment on the issue.”

http://dailysignal.com/2016/03/04/why-millennials-lean-pro-life/?utm_source=heritagefoundation&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=dailydigest
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« Reply #253 on: March 14, 2016, 01:09:44 PM »

Abortion a ‘Totally Joyful Experience’ Says Fusion Reporter
By Daniel Garza | March 13, 2016

In the run-up to the United States Supreme Court’s pending decision on the Texas law that mandates stricter medical requirements for abortion facilities, a reporter for Univision’s extreme left sister network, Fusion, has weighed in with her testimony about the ‘joy’ that comes from getting an abortion.

“I had an abortion and it was a totally joyful experience” is the title of the article by Fusion technology reporter Kristen Brown, replete with emojis including multiple smiles, party celebrations and champagne bottles popping.

In her post, Brown does not take into account even one mention of the fact that she is terminating a human life. In Brown’s world, her abortion was comparable to being cured of some disease. The unmentioned child was essentially tantamount to a cancerous tumor, the removal of which would allow her to live her fairytale dream life filled with career success, rainbows and lollipops.

As Brown tells it, she became pregnant after a night of drunken sex with an ex she hooked up with “on yet another friendless Friday night.” “I drank too much. I don’t especially remember how, but we wound up back at his place. I do remember asking him to wear a condom. I also remember being too out of it to effectively protest when he declined. The next day, I made an appointment for an STD test, blocked his number, unfriended him on Facebook, and sincerely hoped to never see him again.”

She unfriended him on Facebook? Wow.

The author’s evident disregard for the psychological aftermath felt after getting an abortion also fails to respect the experiences of many other women. Brown’s narrative does not take into account the fact that women who have an abortion are more likely to commit suicide, are more likely to have mental health issues and are more prone to depression.

It’s also worth noting that the millennial generation Fusion aims to reach is not as pro-choice as Brown would have you believe. Recent trends have shown not only a steady decrease in the amount of abortions occurring, but also a shift in the stance among millennials, with 58% considering abortion doing “more harm than good.”

Below are relevant portions of the referenced March 1, 2016 segment on Fusion:

KRISTEN BROWN, TECHNOLOGY REPORTER, FUSION: …I worried that my life was over. The pregnancy itself made me physically ill, and the worrying only made me sicker. But once I got an abortion, suddenly, everything was fine again. My life went back to normal—actually it was better than that.



KRISTEN BROWN, TECHNOLOGY REPORTER, FUSION: I had handled the situation and taken back command of my own body and life. I felt powerful, as if there were no obstacle I couldn’t surmount. I felt a deep sense of freedom, knowing that my only responsibility was to myself. I was overcome with gratitude and optimism and a new-found sense of control. I felt awesome.



KRISTEN BROWN, TECHNOLOGY REPORTER, FUSION: My abortion did change me. The ability to choose for myself when and if I want children was empowering—it affirmed for me that I am in control of how I choose to live my life. There are plenty of situations in life in which control is out of our hands, but thanks to laws that recognize my right to do what I want with my own body, this was not one of them. Becoming pregnant was a grief and a blackness. Getting an abortion was just a relief.



KRISTEN BROWN, TECHNOLOGY REPORTER, FUSION: Certainly, for some women, the decision to get an abortion is difficult and going through with it can be equally traumatic. For me, though, it was neither. I never wavered in my decision and I have not once regretted it since. The right to make that decision—to take control of my body and my life—allowed me to pursue the life I wanted, and to become the person that I wanted to be. I wouldn’t call that dark or painful. Actually, I think I would call it a joy.

http://www.newsbusters.org/blogs/latino/daniel-garza/2016/03/13/abortion-totally-joyful-experience-says-fusion-reporter
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« Reply #254 on: March 25, 2016, 11:13:53 AM »

Indiana Gov. Mike Pence signs new abortion restrictions into law
By Theodore Schleifer, CNN
UThu March 24, 2016

Gov. Pence speaks at a press conference on March 31, 2015 at the Indiana State Library in Indianapolis.

Washington (CNN)Indiana Gov. Mike Pence on Thursday signed a bill that bars women from seeking an abortion because the child will be born with a disability, a controversial restriction that is one of the tightest abortion laws in the country.

Indiana already has some of the most restrictive abortion laws in the nation, and Pence called the bill, House Enrolled Act 1337, a "comprehensive pro-life measure."

"HEA 1337 will ensure the dignified final treatment of the unborn and prohibits abortions that are based only on the unborn child's sex, race, color, national origin, ancestry, or disability, including Down syndrome," he said in a statement. "Some of my most precious moments as Governor have been with families of children with disabilities, especially those raising children with Down syndrome."

Pence has never shied away from legislation that advances the agenda of social conservatives, pushing a religious freedom bill last year that some LGBT rights activists claimed promoted discrimination. He later signed into law a "fix" for the bill.

On Thursday, Pence's bill rose into the national political fray, with Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders criticizing Pence.
"The decision to have an abortion is for a woman to make, not the Governor of Indiana," Sanders tweeted.

Indiana Right to Life, an anti-abortion group in the state, saluted Pence for forbidding women to discriminate against "the unborn."

"We are pleased that our state values life no matter an individual's potential disability, gender or race," Mike Fichter, the organization's president, said in a statement.

In 2013, North Dakota became the first state in the country to pass a law that banned abortions due to abnormalities in the child's genes, among other restrictions.

http://www.cnn.com/2016/03/24/politics/mike-pence-indiana-disability-abortion/index.html
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« Reply #255 on: March 29, 2016, 10:04:52 AM »

Utah Governor Signs Anesthesia Requirement For Some Abortions
Previous state law gave women the choice whether or not to opt for anesthesia.
 03/29/2016

ASSOCIATED PRESS
Utah governor Gary Herbert (R) signed a bill that would make Utah the first state to require doctors to give anesthesia to women having an abortion at 20 weeks of pregnancy or later.

(Reuters) - Utah’s governor on Monday signed a bill requiring doctors to administer anesthesia to women receiving an abortion at the 20th week of gestation, his office said.

The bill, the first of its kind in the nation according to the Salt Lake Tribune, states that an anesthetic or analgesic will “eliminate or alleviate organic pain to the unborn child.”

“The governor is adamantly pro-life. He believes in not only erring on the side of life, but also minimizing any pain that may be caused to an unborn child,” a spokesman for Republican Governor Gary Herbert said in a statement.

Supporters of the bill and anti-abortion groups say that around the 20th week of pregnancy a fetus can feel physical pain, and anesthesia can eliminate discomfort.

Reproductive health advocates, including Planned Parenthood of Utah, told the Tribune the position is scientifically unproven and lawmakers have inserted politics into a private medical matter.

Under the new law, doctors performing abortions would be required to administer anesthesia to women seeking an elective abortion around 20 weeks. Previous state law gave women the choice whether or not to opt for anesthesia.

Abortions are prohibited in Utah after the point when the fetus is viable, which is around 22 weeks.

The law will not affect a large number of women, the Tribune reported, with 17 women in Utah receiving abortions at 20 weeks of pregnancy or later in 2014, it said.

Republican state Senator Curt Bramble, who sponsored the bill, had originally wanted to ban abortions after 20 weeks but was told the move would be unconstitutional, the Salt Lake Tribune reported.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/utah-abortion-law_us_56fa3b5de4b014d3fe240b0b
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« Reply #256 on: April 11, 2016, 09:33:10 AM »

Planned Parenthood, ACLU Sue Indiana Over Law Banning Abortions of Down Syndrome Babies

world-down-syndrome-day poster
by DR. SUSAN BERRY
8 Apr 20161,523

Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky and the ACLU are suing the state of Indiana over its new law that bans abortions sought for genetic abnormalities such as Down syndrome, or for undesirable sex or race.

The lawsuit, filed in federal court, also challenges a provision of the law that requires aborted babies to be buried or cremated, a direct response to the practice of abortion clinics contracting with waste management companies that ultimately burn aborted babies with biohazard medical waste.

“The United States Supreme Court has repeatedly stressed that a woman, not the state, is to determine whether or not to obtain an abortion,” ACLU of Indiana legal director Ken Falk said, reports CBS News. “The State of Indiana’s attempt to invade a woman’s privacy and to control her decision in this regard is unprecedented and unconstitutional.”

Republican Gov. Mike Pence’s signature on the bill last month made Indiana only the second state in the nation, following North Dakota, to prohibit abortions for fetal abnormalities. The new law sparked a social media campaign called “Periods for Pence,” which asked women to call Pence’s office to talk about their menstrual periods with him.

According to Pence’s deputy press secretary, Stephanie Hodgin, the governor “has every confidence this law is constitutional.”

“We will work with the Attorney General to defend the law that enhances information expectant mothers receive and enhances protection for the unborn,” Hodgin said.

The Indiana attorney general’s office said challenges to new laws are part of the legislative process.

“It is important to recognize that all laws passed by the elected legislators and signed by the Governor are presumed constitutional until a court determines otherwise, and I would ask that everyone respect this legal process,” a statement from the attorney general’s office said.

Indiana Right to Life observed that Planned Parenthood is a key player in the abortion industry and that the lawsuit reflects the organization’s desire to protect its profit margin.

“This is the same song and dance we have seen from the abortion provider anytime they feel their lucrative abortion business is threatened,” the pro-life group’s president Mike Fichter said in a statement. “They oppose any common sense law that protects women and children because they want to protect their bottom line.”

Planned Parenthood claims in its lawsuit that the new law places “undue burden on women’s right to choose an abortion,” and that it violates women’s privacy since the abortion business does not ask women the reason for seeking an abortion. Regarding the mandate to bury or cremate the aborted baby, Planned Parenthood says such a requirement introduces further costs for medical waste.

The Hillary Clinton campaign denounced Indiana’s new abortion law. This past week, Clinton said unborn children have no constitutional rights.

Maya Harris, senior policy adviser for Clinton’s campaign, said:

Once again, Hoosier women’s reproductive rights are under attack, and people across Indiana are rightfully standing up against this unprecedented assault on women. Republicans signed into law one of the country’s most restrictive bills that puts women’s health and rights at risk. Politicians like Governor Pence should not interfere with personal medical decisions, which should be left to a woman, her family and her faith, in consultation with her doctor or health care provider.

Clinton received Planned Parenthood’s first-ever endorsement in a primary. As the Washington Free Beacon reported, “Clinton received financial support from the organization, collecting more than $20,000 from executives and employees of the national organization and its regional affiliates—20 times more money than the rest of the presidential field combined.”

In return, Clinton’s campaign sent four separate payments to Planned Parenthood as “reimbursements for staff time” for get out the vote efforts against Clinton rival Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT).

http://www.breitbart.com/abortion/2016/04/08/planned-parenthood-aclu-sue-indiana-law-banning-abortions-syndrome-babies/
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« Reply #257 on: May 25, 2016, 02:09:16 PM »

South Carolina governor signs 20-week abortion ban
Associated Press
Updated May 25, 2016


Protesters called for South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley to veto a bill that would outlaw most abortions in the state past 19 weeks, today, in Columbia, S.C. The only exceptions would be to save the life of the mother or if the fetus cannot survive outside the womb.
   
COLUMBIA, S.C. » Republican Gov. Nikki Haley signed legislation today that immediately outlaws most abortions in South Carolina at 20 weeks beyond fertilization.

The only exceptions are if the mother’s life is in jeopardy or a doctor determines the fetus can’t survive outside the womb.

Doctors face up to $10,000 in fines and 3 years in prison for each violation; prison time is mandatory on a third conviction.

These bans are now in effect in at least 13 states and blocked by court challenges in three others. South Dakota’s ban takes effect July 1.

Women nationwide have the right to obtain abortions under the U.S. Supreme Court’s 1973 Roe v. Wade ruling, which said states could restrict abortions after viability — the point when a fetus has a reasonable chance of surviving outside the uterus. “Viability is usually placed at about seven months (28 weeks) but may occur earlier, even at 24 weeks,” the ruling said.

The Supreme Court has yet to rule on bans that would limit even earlier abortions.

As in other states, South Carolina’s law ties the fetus’ age to conception, rather than a women’s monthly cycle. But since this date cannot be scientifically pinpointed, the ban actually refers to what doctors consider a gestational age of 22 weeks.

Supporters of the bill cite the disputed claim that a fetus can feel pain at 20 weeks. Opponents say later-term abortions usually happen with wanted pregnancies that go horribly wrong.

“The reality is that abortion later in pregnancy is extremely rare and often takes place in complex and difficult situations where a woman and her doctor need every medical option available,” said Alyssa Miller, a Planned Parenthood spokeswoman for South Carolina.

South Carolina’s definition of “fetal anomaly” makes it illegal to abort a fetus with a severe disability if the child could live. Such anomalies are generally detected around 20 weeks.

Advocates for abortion rights contend these measures are aimed at restricting women’s access to a safe, legal abortion.

The sponsor of South Carolina’s law, state Rep. Wendy Nanney, said the killing needs to stop, and sees this law as a step to eventually “get rid of abortion altogether.”

Haley’s signature comes only days after Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin vetoed legislation to outlaw the procedure at any stage, by making it a felony for doctors to perform an abortion. Fallin, a Republican who opposes abortion, said the measure would not withstand a legal challenge.

Abortion-rights supporters rallied Tuesday at the Statehouse to ask Haley to veto the measure. But Haley’s signature was no surprise.

“I’m strongly pro-life, very pro-life and not because my party tells me to be, but my husband was adopted, and so every day I know the blessings of having him there,” Haley said during her 2010 campaign for governor.

As a House member that year, Haley voted to end abortion coverage for victims of rape and incest in the state health plan for employees. The Senate defeated that proposal.

In 2012, Haley signed a bill intended to ensure that a fetus surviving an abortion attempt is not treated as medical waste. It defined a person as anyone who is breathing and has a beating heart after birth, whether by labor, cesarean section, or abortion, copying a 2002 federal law enforceable on federal property.

The ban would affect only hospitals, since none of the three abortion clinics in South Carolina provide abortions beyond 15 weeks.

On average, fewer than 30 abortions yearly are performed at 20 weeks gestation or beyond in South Carolina, according to data since 1990 from the state’s public health agency. Most of these women have been white, married and older than 24, according to the agency.

http://www.staradvertiser.com/breaking-news/south-carolina-governor-signs-20-week-abortion-ban/
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« Reply #258 on: June 27, 2016, 12:50:02 PM »

Supreme Court strikes down Texas abortion law
Published June 27, 2016
FoxNews.com

The Supreme Court on Monday struck down a Texas law regulating abortion clinics, delivering a 5-3 decision that was the high court’s first major foray into the abortion issue in nine years.

Justice Stephen Breyer wrote the majority opinion for the court, with Justices Anthony Kennedy, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan joining him. Chief Justice John Roberts and Justices Samuel Alito and Clarence Thomas dissented.

"We agree with the District Court that the surgical center requirement, like the admitting-privileges requirement, provides few, if any, health benefits for women, poses a substantial obstacle to women seeking abortions, and constitutes an 'undue burden' on their constitutional right to do so," Breyer wrote.

President Obama said in a statement that he was "pleased" with the outcome.

"As the brief filed by the Solicitor General makes clear and as the Court affirmed today, these restrictions harm women's health and place an unconstitutional obstacle in the path of a woman's reproductive freedom," Obama said. "We remain strongly committed to the protection of women's health, including protecting a woman's access to safe, affordable health care and her right to determine her own future."

Presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton, in a series of Tweets, hailed the decision as "a victory for women" -- but said there's more work to be done.

"This fight isn't over: The next president has to protect women's health. Women won't be 'punished' for exercising their basic rights. -H," Clinton tweeted.

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott decried the decision in a statement Monday.

"The decision erodes States’ lawmaking authority to safeguard the health and safety of women and subjects more innocent life to being lost," Abbott said. "Texas' goal is to protect innocent life, while ensuring the highest health and safety standards for women."

Texas abortion clinics had challenged a 2013 state law and regulations that cut the number of abortion providers in half, to roughly 20. Fewer than 10 would have remained open if the law was allowed to take full effect. The Center for Reproductive Rights had sued Texas, on behalf of a coalition of abortion clinics.

The Texas law required all clinics performing abortions in the state to operate as certified “ambulatory surgical centers,” which would be regulated under the same standards as hospitals. Doctors who performed abortions were also required to first obtain admitting privileges at nearby hospitals. Proponents of the law argued it would improve patient care and safety, though abortion rights groups contended the law made it nearly impossible to operate a clinic in Texas.

"When we decide cases on particularly controversial issues, we should take special care to apply settled procedural rules in a neutral manner," Alito wrote in his dissent. "The Court has not done that here."

Alito also referenced the Kermit Gosnell case, in which an abortion doctor in Pennsylvania was convicted of the murder of three infants who were born alive and the death of a patient. Alito said the Texas law was designed to prevent similarly shoddy medical practices from remaining open.

Thomas quoted the late Justice Antonin Scalia, who died in February, in his dissent.

Thomas wrote that the decision "exemplifies the court's troubling tendency `to bend the rules when any effort to limit abortion, or even to speak in opposition to abortion, is at issue."'

Several dozen activists on both sides of the abortion issue gathered at the Supreme Court early Monday, chanting, holding signs and awaiting the ruling. Some abortion rights activists played Madonna’s song “Like A Virgin.”

Some court watchers pointed to a decision in the case a year ago, when the court gave a temporary 5-4 victory to the clinics, allowing them to remain fully operational while the Texas law was appealed. One of the dissenters, Scalia, has not yet been replaced on the court. Kennedy, typically thought of as swing vote, voted with the four liberal members of the court to issue that order, just as he did in Monday's decision.

The court had last ruled on abortion in a 2007 case, upholding the constitutionality of the Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act.

With the ruling, the eight-person court avoided yet another split decision after twice tying on Thursday in the aftermath of Scalia’s death. President Obama’s nominee to fill Scalia’s seat, Judge Merrick Garland, waits in limbo as the Republican-controlled Senate has refused to give him a hearing or vote during an election year.

The abortion ruling was one of three high-profile cases decided on Monday, likely the final day of the court’s session before a summer break. Decisions on public corruption and guns were also handed down.

http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2016/06/27/supreme-court-strikes-down-texas-abortion-law.html?intcmp=hpbt1
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« Reply #259 on: June 27, 2016, 02:02:54 PM »

Supreme Court strikes down Texas abortion law
Published June 27, 2016
FoxNews.com

The Supreme Court on Monday struck down a Texas law regulating abortion clinics, delivering a 5-3 decision that was the high court’s first major foray into the abortion issue in nine years.

Justice Stephen Breyer wrote the majority opinion for the court, with Justices Anthony Kennedy, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan joining him. Chief Justice John Roberts and Justices Samuel Alito and Clarence Thomas dissented.

"We agree with the District Court that the surgical center requirement, like the admitting-privileges requirement, provides few, if any, health benefits for women, poses a substantial obstacle to women seeking abortions, and constitutes an 'undue burden' on their constitutional right to do so," Breyer wrote.

President Obama said in a statement that he was "pleased" with the outcome.

"As the brief filed by the Solicitor General makes clear and as the Court affirmed today, these restrictions harm women's health and place an unconstitutional obstacle in the path of a woman's reproductive freedom," Obama said. "We remain strongly committed to the protection of women's health, including protecting a woman's access to safe, affordable health care and her right to determine her own future."

Presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton, in a series of Tweets, hailed the decision as "a victory for women" -- but said there's more work to be done.

"This fight isn't over: The next president has to protect women's health. Women won't be 'punished' for exercising their basic rights. -H," Clinton tweeted.

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott decried the decision in a statement Monday.

"The decision erodes States’ lawmaking authority to safeguard the health and safety of women and subjects more innocent life to being lost," Abbott said. "Texas' goal is to protect innocent life, while ensuring the highest health and safety standards for women."

Texas abortion clinics had challenged a 2013 state law and regulations that cut the number of abortion providers in half, to roughly 20. Fewer than 10 would have remained open if the law was allowed to take full effect. The Center for Reproductive Rights had sued Texas, on behalf of a coalition of abortion clinics.

The Texas law required all clinics performing abortions in the state to operate as certified “ambulatory surgical centers,” which would be regulated under the same standards as hospitals. Doctors who performed abortions were also required to first obtain admitting privileges at nearby hospitals. Proponents of the law argued it would improve patient care and safety, though abortion rights groups contended the law made it nearly impossible to operate a clinic in Texas.

"When we decide cases on particularly controversial issues, we should take special care to apply settled procedural rules in a neutral manner," Alito wrote in his dissent. "The Court has not done that here."

Alito also referenced the Kermit Gosnell case, in which an abortion doctor in Pennsylvania was convicted of the murder of three infants who were born alive and the death of a patient. Alito said the Texas law was designed to prevent similarly shoddy medical practices from remaining open.

Thomas quoted the late Justice Antonin Scalia, who died in February, in his dissent.

Thomas wrote that the decision "exemplifies the court's troubling tendency `to bend the rules when any effort to limit abortion, or even to speak in opposition to abortion, is at issue."'

Several dozen activists on both sides of the abortion issue gathered at the Supreme Court early Monday, chanting, holding signs and awaiting the ruling. Some abortion rights activists played Madonna’s song “Like A Virgin.”

Some court watchers pointed to a decision in the case a year ago, when the court gave a temporary 5-4 victory to the clinics, allowing them to remain fully operational while the Texas law was appealed. One of the dissenters, Scalia, has not yet been replaced on the court. Kennedy, typically thought of as swing vote, voted with the four liberal members of the court to issue that order, just as he did in Monday's decision.

The court had last ruled on abortion in a 2007 case, upholding the constitutionality of the Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act.

With the ruling, the eight-person court avoided yet another split decision after twice tying on Thursday in the aftermath of Scalia’s death. President Obama’s nominee to fill Scalia’s seat, Judge Merrick Garland, waits in limbo as the Republican-controlled Senate has refused to give him a hearing or vote during an election year.

The abortion ruling was one of three high-profile cases decided on Monday, likely the final day of the court’s session before a summer break. Decisions on public corruption and guns were also handed down.

http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2016/06/27/supreme-court-strikes-down-texas-abortion-law.html?intcmp=hpbt1
I bet you are upset.  HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA 
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« Reply #260 on: June 27, 2016, 02:05:38 PM »

I bet you are upset.  HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA 

Not one bit.

Are you upset about Bernie?  Have you apologized to all those people you insulted who disagreed with you about Bernie?   Smiley
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« Reply #261 on: June 27, 2016, 02:15:55 PM »

Not one bit.

Are you upset about Bernie?  Have you apologized to all those people you insulted who disagreed with you about Bernie?   Smiley

They should be the ones apologizing to him, though.  Now we've got Hillary on the horizon.
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« Reply #262 on: June 27, 2016, 02:16:50 PM »

They should be the ones apologizing to him, though.  Now we've got Hillary on the horizon.

The whole situation stinks. 
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« Reply #263 on: June 27, 2016, 02:24:28 PM »

The whole situation stinks. 

It does.  Just unbelievable.
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