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Author Topic: Police State - Official Thread  (Read 68619 times)
poldaktalos
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« Reply #1650 on: June 23, 2014, 03:48:00 PM »

Chicago police shot a 95-year-old WWII veteran to death with bean bag rounds at short range because he refused to go to the hospital, stepdaughter claims

http://www.courthousenews.com/2014/06/23/68943.htm


Let's see how they'll say the usual "the officers feared for their lives", "the suspect assumed a combative stance" etc.
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« Reply #1651 on: June 23, 2014, 05:49:01 PM »

Chicago police shot a 95-year-old WWII veteran to death with bean bag rounds at short range because he refused to go to the hospital, stepdaughter claims

http://www.courthousenews.com/2014/06/23/68943.htm


Let's see how they'll say the usual "the officers feared for their lives", "the suspect assumed a combative stance" etc.

Check out near the end of the article:

Quote
Park Forest officials told the Chicago Tribune claim that Wrana brandished a knife or cane, which justified the officers' response.

Fuck... what a disgrace and how infuriating. These cops deserve to land in prison for the rest of their lives and without the special perks afforded cops in the slammer.
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« Reply #1652 on: June 24, 2014, 08:53:52 AM »

Skip to comments.

Police Overkill (killed 95-year-old WWII vet)
http://www.courthousenews.com/2014/06/23/68943.htm ^
Posted on June 24, 2014 12:30:04 AM EDT by chessplayer

CHICAGO (CN) - Suburban Chicago police shot a 95-year-old WWII veteran to death with bean bag rounds at short range because he refused to go to the hospital, his stepdaughter claims in court.

"On July 26, 2014 [sic], John Wrana, Jr., was twelve days shy of his 96th birthday and a resident at the Victory Centre of Park Forest Assisted Living Center located in Park Forest, Illinois. On that date, Mr. Wrana was alone in his room, suffering from what the facility's staff believed were symptoms indicative of a urinary tract infection in an elderly person," the complaint begins. Victory Center employees tried to get Wrana into an ambulance to go to the hospital for treatment, but he allegedly refused to leave his room. The defendant officers responded to employees' 911 call, and also were unable to persuade Wrana to leave his room and go to the hospital. The officers conferred and decided to seize Wrana by force, according to the complaint.

Upon entering the room, defendant Taylor fired "five rounds of bean bag cartridges from a 12 gauge shotgun within a distance of approximately only six to eight feet from Mr. Wrana, far less than the distance allowed for discharging that shotgun, and, consequently, savagely wounding and killing Mr. Wrana," the lawsuit states. "Mr. Wrana bled to death as a result of the shotgun wounds inflicted upon him by defendants. The Cook County Medical Examiner ruled that Mr. Wrana's death was a homicide caused by blunt force trauma to his abdomen as a result of shots fired from a bean bag shotgun."

After shooting Wrana, the officers handcuffed him, took photos of his injuries, and put him in a four-point restraint before transporting him to the hospital, the complaint states.

(Excerpt) Read more at courthousenews.com ...
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« Reply #1653 on: June 24, 2014, 10:27:10 AM »

From http://www.salon.com/2014/06/24/a_swat_team_blew_a_hole_in_my_2_year_old_son/:

Quote
After the SWAT team broke down the door, they threw a flashbang grenade inside. It landed in my son’s crib.

[...]

I heard my baby wailing and asked one of the officers to let me hold him. He screamed at me to sit down and shut up and blocked my view, so I couldn’t see my son. I could see a singed crib. And I could see a pool of blood. The officers yelled at me to calm down and told me my son was fine, that he’d just lost a tooth. It was only hours later when they finally let us drive to the hospital that we found out Bou Bou was in the intensive burn unit and that he’d been placed into a medically induced coma.

This is just insane.

For more: http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/parents-toddler-injured-flash-bang-botched-raid-call-justice-article-1.1825366
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« Reply #1654 on: June 26, 2014, 10:21:45 AM »



The Watch

Massachusetts SWAT teams claim they’re private corporations, immune from open records laws



http://m.washingtonpost.com/news/the-watch/wp/2014/06/26/massachusetts-swat-teams-claim-theyre-private-corporations-immune-from-open-records-laws/


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By Radley Balko June 26 at 10:27 AM    


As part of the American Civil Liberties Union’s recent report on police militarization, the Massachusetts chapter of the organization sent open records requests to SWAT teams across that state. It received an interesting response.

As it turns out, a number of SWAT teams in the Bay State are operated by what are called law enforcement councils, or LECs. These LECs are funded by several police agencies in a given geographic area and overseen by an executive board, which is usually made up of police chiefs from member police departments. In 2012, for example, the Tewksbury Police Department paid about $4,600 in annual membership dues to the North Eastern Massachusetts Law Enforcement Council, or NEMLEC. (See page 36 of linked PDF.) That LEC has about 50 member agencies. In addition to operating a regional SWAT team, the LECs also facilitate technology and information sharing and oversee other specialized units, such as crime scene investigators and computer crime specialists.

Some of these LECs have also apparently incorporated as 501(c)(3) organizations. And it’s here that we run into problems. According to the ACLU, the LECs are claiming that the 501(c)(3) status means that they’re private corporations, not government agencies. And therefore, they say they’re immune from open records requests. Let’s be clear. These agencies oversee police activities. They employ cops who carry guns, wear badges, collect paychecks provided by taxpayers and have the power to detain, arrest, injure and kill. They operate SWAT teams, which conduct raids on private residences. And yet they say that because they’ve incorporated, they’re immune to Massachusetts open records laws. The state’s residents aren’t permitted to know how often the SWAT teams are used, what they’re used for, what sort of training they get or who they’re primarily used against.

From the ACLU of Massachusetts’s report on police militarization in that state:





Approximately 240 of the 351 police departments in Massachusetts belong to an LEC. While set up as “corporations,” LECs are funded by local and federal taxpayer money, are composed exclusively of public police officers and sheriffs, and carry out traditional law enforcement functions through specialized units such as SWAT teams . . .

Due to the weakness of Massachusetts public records law and the culture of secrecy that has infected local police departments and Law Enforcement Councils, procuring empirical records from police departments and regional SWAT teams in Massachusetts about police militarization was universally difficult and, in most instances, impossible . . .

Police departments and regional SWAT teams are public institutions, working with public money, meant to protect and serve the public’s interest. If these institutions do not maintain and make public comprehensive and comprehensible documents pertaining to their operations and tactics, the people cannot judge whether officials are acting appropriately or make needed policy changes when problems arise . . .

Hiding behind the argument that they are private corporations not subject to the public records laws, the LECs have refused to provide documents regarding their SWAT team policies and procedures. They have also failed to disclose anything about their operations, including how many raids they have executed or for what purpose . . .



METROLEC, one of the largest of the law enforcement councils covering the metropolitan Boston area, operates a range of specialized resources, including a Canine Unit, Computer Crimes Unit, Crisis Negotiation Team, Mobile Operations Motorcycle Unit, and Regional Response Team, in addition to its SWAT force. The organization maintains its own BearCat armored vehicle, as well as a $700,000 state of the art command and control post. In 2012, METROLEC reportedly used its BearCat 26 times, mostly for drug busts, and applied to the Federal Aviation Administration to obtain a drone license.

The North Eastern Massachusetts Law Enforcement Council (NEMLEC) similarly operates a SWAT team, as well as a Computer Crime Unit, Motorcycle Unit, School Threat Assessment & Response System, and Regional Communications and Incident Management Assistance Team. Its SWAT team members are trained and equipped to “deal with active shooters, armed barricaded subjects, hostage takers and terrorists,” and they dress in military-style gear with the words “NEMLEC SWAT” emblazoned on their uniforms. Given this training, it is not surprising that the NEMLEC SWAT team has over the past decade led numerous operations that involved armored vehicles, flash-bang devices, and automatic weapons.

(Note: In addition to the LEC SWAT teams, the ACLU notes that at least 25 other Massachusetts cities and towns have their own SWAT-like units, along with the state police and the Massachusetts Bay Transit Authority.)

Massachusetts also has a long history of accountability and excessive force problems with SWAT teams. A few examples:
•In 1988, Boston Det. Sherman Griffiths was killed in a botched drug raid later revealed to have been conducted based on information from an informant a subsequent investigation revealed that the police had simply made up.
•Six years later, the Rev. Accelyne Williams died of a heart attack during a mistaken drug raid on his home. The Boston Globe found that three of the officers involved in that raid had been accused in a 1989 civil rights suit of using fictional informants to obtain warrants for drug raids. In testimony for that suit, one witness testified that after realizing they’d just raided the wrong home, a Boston police officer shrugged, apologized and said, “This happens all the time.” The city settled with the plaintiffs.
•In 1996, the Fitchburg SWAT team was already facing a lawsuit for harassing a group of loiterers when it burned down an apartment complex during a botched drug raid. The SWAT team subsequently faced a number of other allegations of recklessness and misconduct.
•In January 2011, a SWAT team raided the Framingham, Mass., home of 68-year-old Eurie Stamps at around midnight on a drug warrant. Oddly, it had already arrested the subject of the warrant — Stamps’s 20-year-old stepson — outside the house. But because he lived in Stamps’s home, the team went ahead with the raid anyway. When the team encountered Stamps, it instructed him to lie on the floor. He complied. According to the police account, as one officer then moved toward Stamps to check for weapons, he lost his balance and fell. As he fell, his weapon discharged, sending a bullet directly into Stamps’s chest, killing him.

“You can’t have it both ways,” Jessie Rossman, a staff attorney for the Massachusetts ACLU, told me in a phone interview. “The same government authority that allows them to carry weapons, make arrests, and break down the doors of Massachusetts residents during dangerous raids also makes them a government agency that is subject to the open records law.”

In some states, police agencies can claim exemptions from open records legislation for certain types of requests, such as for internal personnel files, or investigation documents that could reveal the identities of witnesses or informants. In some parts of the country, like the Virginia suburbs of Washington, police agencies have broadly interpreted open records laws to allow them to turn down just about every request. But this claim in Massachusetts is on a whole different scale.

“They didn’t even attempt to claim an exception,” Rossman says. “They’re simply asserting that they’re private corporations.”

The ACLU is suing five Massachusetts LECS. The press release announcing the suit specifically names NEMLEC. It’s worth noting that in addition to receiving taxpayer funding from its 51 member police agencies, NEMLEC has also received significant federal funding over the years, particularly from the Byrne Grant program. In fact, just last April, NEMLEC made a series of drug busts across the state in an investigation funded at least in part with Byrne Grants. (NEMLEC seems to be involved in a lot of drug raids.) In 2010, NEMLEC received an $800,000 Byrne Grant earmarked by then-Sen. John F. Kerry.




Interestingly, in 2009, NEMLEC had to pay out $200,000 “to settle allegations that it made false claims related to the use of Justice Department grant funds” — specifically, funds obtained through the Byrne Grant program. That sounds like an agency that could use a little oversight.

The argument that the LECs in Massachusetts are private corporations and therefore immune to the state open records law was made by Jack Collins, the general counsel for the Massachusetts Chiefs of Police Association. I have contacted his office to request an interview but haven’t yet heard back.

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« Reply #1655 on: June 26, 2014, 11:09:13 AM »

Someone should rot in jail for that shit,  if not publicly flogged.
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« Reply #1656 on: June 26, 2014, 05:44:05 PM »

A SWAT team blew a hole in my 2-year-old son
Salon ^ | June 24, 2014 | Alecia Phonesavanh
Posted on June 25, 2014 at 6:23:38 PM EDT by Clintonfatigued

After our house burned down in Wisconsin a few months ago, my husband and I packed our four young kids and all our belongings into a gold minivan and drove to my sister-in-law’s place, just outside of Atlanta. On the back windshield, we pasted six stick figures: a dad, a mom, three young girls, and one baby boy.

That minivan was sitting in the front driveway of my sister-in-law’s place the night a SWAT team broke in, looking for a small amount of drugs they thought my husband’s nephew had. Some of my kids’ toys were in the front yard, but the officers claimed they had no way of knowing children might be present. Our whole family was sleeping in the same room, one bed for us, one for the girls, and a crib.

After the SWAT team broke down the door, they threw a flashbang grenade inside. It landed in my son’s crib.

Flashbang grenades were created for soldiers to use during battle. When they explode, the noise is so loud and the flash is so bright that anyone close by is temporarily blinded and deafened. It’s been three weeks since the flashbang exploded next to my sleeping baby, and he’s still covered in burns.

There’s still a hole in his chest that exposes his ribs.

(Excerpt) Read more at salon.com ...
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« Reply #1657 on: June 26, 2014, 07:09:24 PM »

DHS Ransacks couple's home without explanation, strips woman naked
Police State UsA ^ | June 20, 2014 | Site Staff
Posted on June 26, 2014 12:43:47 PM EDT by Altariel

HOMESTEAD, FL — EXCLUSIVE — A Florida couple was traumatized after a dozen heavily armed SWAT agents crashed through their front door, flash-banged their cat, aimed rifles at them and searched their home without explanation.

* * * * *

The raid took place in the pre-dawn hours of June 10th, 2014. At approximately 6:16 a.m., Kari Edwards and her live-in boyfriend were intruded upon by men dressed in full SWAT gear and wielding rifles. After smashing down the couple’s front door, agents tossed concussion grenades and proceeded into the home.

“They busted in like I was a terrorist or something,” said Ms. Edwards.

SWAT enters Kari Edwards’ residence with rifles drawn. HOMESTEAD, FL — EXCLUSIVE — A Florida couple was traumatized after a dozen heavily armed SWAT agents crashed through their front door, flash-banged their cat, aimed rifles at them and searched their home without explanation.

* * * * *

The raid took place in the pre-dawn hours of June 10th, 2014. At approximately 6:16 a.m., Kari Edwards and her live-in boyfriend were intruded upon by men dressed in full SWAT gear and wielding rifles. After smashing down the couple’s front door, agents tossed concussion grenades and proceeded into the home.

“They busted in like I was a terrorist or something,” said Ms. Edwards.

Broken door. (Source: Kari Edwards) Personal belongings tossed everywhere. (Source: Kari Edwards) “[An officer] demanded that I drop the towel I was covering my naked body with,” Ms. Edwards said, “before snatching it off me physically and throwing me to the ground.”

“While I lay naked, I was cuffed so tightly I could not feel my hands. For no reason, at gunpoint,” Edwards said. “[Agents] refused to cover me, no matter how many times I asked.”

Ms. Edwards said her boyfriend told her that an agent holding an assault rifle to her back was gawking at her exposed body. “Eying me up and down like I was eye candy,” she said.

The house was equipped with a surveillance system, which captured video of the agents from a couple different angles. Here is the first angle of the exterior of the property:

“I have never been in any trouble before,” Ms. Edwards told Police State USA. “Haven’t even had a traffic ticket in over ten years.”

In fact, she said she used to work for the Department of Homeland Security, but became disabled from an on-the-job injury in 2006. She identified the raid as a DHS operation.

“I know I saw ‘ICE’ on one shirt and my boyfriend saw ‘Gang Task Force’ on another,” she told Police State USA. “Someone’s just said, ‘Special Agent.’”

Edwards requested to see the agents’ identification but was not obliged. One officer pointed to his uniform that read ‘POLICE’ and allegedly said, “Isn’t this enough ID for you?”

“When I told him that I could buy that [uniform] up in Miami, he called me ‘retarded’ and ‘f***ing stupid,’” Edwards recalled.

Shattered shower door. (Source: Kari Edwards) A scorch-mark from the flashbang. (Source: Kari Edwards) Edwards said that the SWAT team threw a flashbang at her cat, Dusty. She says that Dusty normally had a friendly personality and greets everyone, but now is “fearful and hard of hearing.”

When agents discovered that they were being recorded by home surveillance cameras, they forcefully twisted the cameras, saying that they “can’t be recorded.”

In the below clip, a flashbang was detected and an agent is seen spotting the camera and jarring it so it faced a wall.

“My boyfriend, who is asthmatic, started having trouble breathing from the lingering smoke created by the flashbang grenade, and asked for his inhaler. The agent said, ‘Do I need to call paramedics?’ My boyfriend said, ‘No, I just need my inhaler, can someone to get it for me?’ Again he was answered with the paramedic offer,” Edwards said. Finally another officer gave him his inhaler.

The agents “trashed the house,” and reportedly smashed some clear glass shower doors and broke a vintage statue.

Broken door jam. (Source: Kari Edwards) Broken door jam. (Source: Kari Edwards) A broken statue. (Source: Kari Edwards) Ms. Edwards said a warrant was finally given to them after 2 hours. She said it lists her address and was signed by Jonathan Goodman, a federal magistrate judge for the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Florida. The warrant says the agents were authorized to look for computers & electronic media.
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« Reply #1658 on: June 27, 2014, 12:53:58 AM »

A SWAT team blew a hole in my 2-year-old son
Salon ^ | June 24, 2014 | Alecia Phonesavanh
Posted on June 25, 2014 at 6:23:38 PM EDT by Clintonfatigued

After our house burned down in Wisconsin a few months ago, my husband and I packed our four young kids and all our belongings into a gold minivan and drove to my sister-in-law’s place, just outside of Atlanta. On the back windshield, we pasted six stick figures: a dad, a mom, three young girls, and one baby boy.

That minivan was sitting in the front driveway of my sister-in-law’s place the night a SWAT team broke in, looking for a small amount of drugs they thought my husband’s nephew had. Some of my kids’ toys were in the front yard, but the officers claimed they had no way of knowing children might be present. Our whole family was sleeping in the same room, one bed for us, one for the girls, and a crib.

After the SWAT team broke down the door, they threw a flashbang grenade inside. It landed in my son’s crib.

Flashbang grenades were created for soldiers to use during battle. When they explode, the noise is so loud and the flash is so bright that anyone close by is temporarily blinded and deafened. It’s been three weeks since the flashbang exploded next to my sleeping baby, and he’s still covered in burns.

There’s still a hole in his chest that exposes his ribs.

(Excerpt) Read more at salon.com ...


Didn't I post this two posts up?
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« Reply #1659 on: June 27, 2014, 07:15:09 AM »

http://www.ijreview.com/2014/06/151451-watch-man-confront-police-officer-shot-dog


Fng thugs
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« Reply #1660 on: June 27, 2014, 07:33:00 AM »

Alright, I think the band Nickelback sucks, too, but detaining some guys for talking about them seems a little excessive, lol.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t1WG2IaM-RY" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t1WG2IaM-RY</a>
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« Reply #1661 on: June 28, 2014, 11:52:02 AM »

Again, Garrity protects what you say to IA from being used against you criminally.. not administratively. If you do not answer every question IA asks you, you will be fired. No ifs, ands or butts.. This is more you not understanding the concept than me being dishonest..

As far as why cops should have a cool down period and nobody else should, I thougt I answered it but here goes.

Everyone else in the world can refuse to talk to the cops. They have a built in 72 hrs. They have a built in "never"... So it is not a "nobody else should" issue

The cop cannot refuse to talk to the investigators (cops). They are required to on condition of employment. So they are given a 72 hr period to collect their thoughts, calm down, review their evidence before they give a statement so that the investigators get the best accurate statement possible. Because that officer will be held to that statement via fine tooth comb   



No, there's no misunderstanding, for some reason you keep dodging the issue.

If I witness a murder, I cannot refuse to talk to the cops.  If I'm suspected of murder, I can refuse.

The exact same thing applies to you.

So, if I can't have 72 hours, why should you?

If anybody at their job refuses to answer questions for administrative shit, they can get canned.  They don't get a waiting period.

You want special treatment...again.

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« Reply #1662 on: June 29, 2014, 12:29:50 PM »

'And that's what happens when they know you're recording': Cop caught by trucker for speeding and talking on his cell phone changes his tune when he sees camera


Trucker Brian Miner pulled over a police officer in Illinois because he says he was speeding and talking on his cell phone
The officer tells Miner he's going to write him a ticket for 'unlawful use of horn'
He also says police are allowed to use technology while driving
He changes his tune when Miner  informs him that he's recording the exchange
The officer then says he won't write a ticket and give Miner a violation-free MCA inspection

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f-dJgFdfl3I" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f-dJgFdfl3I</a>

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2673770/And-thats-happens-know-youre-recording-Cop-pulled-trucker-speeding-talking-cell-phone-changes-tune-sees-camera.html
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« Reply #1663 on: July 03, 2014, 11:09:56 AM »

30-day suspension and supervisory probation for a year...

LPD releases video of wheelchair-shoving incident


http://www.jconline.com/story/news/2014/07/01/lpdofficer-shoves-man-wheelchair/11924485/
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« Reply #1664 on: July 05, 2014, 02:51:46 AM »


<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KetLER8MPIc" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KetLER8MPIc</a>
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« Reply #1665 on: July 07, 2014, 07:04:30 AM »



No, there's no misunderstanding, for some reason you keep dodging the issue.

If I witness a murder, I cannot refuse to talk to the cops.  If I'm suspected of murder, I can refuse.

The exact same thing applies to you.

So, if I can't have 72 hours, why should you?

If anybody at their job refuses to answer questions for administrative shit, they can get canned.  They don't get a waiting period.

You want special treatment...again.



Help me out here, I'm trying to figure out if you are playing stupid or your hatred really doesn't allow you to have a civil conversation
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« Reply #1666 on: July 13, 2014, 07:34:51 AM »

Help me out here, I'm trying to figure out if you are playing stupid or your hatred really doesn't allow you to have a civil conversation


Yeah...you're calling me stupid and hateful cause you're trying to have a 'civil conversation'.  Roll Eyes

Typical cop mentality. 

But, we'll cut you some slack since the SCOTUS ripped you a new asshole with your bullshit cell phone argument.

You're asking for a special treatment...one you typically don't afford to others or even victims for that matter (could be good or bad depending).  I'm advocating you be treated with equal footing.  Make sense?

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« Reply #1667 on: July 14, 2014, 07:44:23 AM »


Yeah...you're calling me stupid and hateful cause you're trying to have a 'civil conversation'.  Roll Eyes

Typical cop mentality. 

But, we'll cut you some slack since the SCOTUS ripped you a new asshole with your bullshit cell phone argument.

You're asking for a special treatment...one you typically don't afford to others or even victims for that matter (could be good or bad depending).  I'm advocating you be treated with equal footing.  Make sense?



typical of you, you seem to always throw the first punch then when you get smacked upside the head you whine about "typical cop mentality" 
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« Reply #1668 on: July 14, 2014, 04:20:35 PM »

typical of you, you seem to always throw the first punch then when you get smacked upside the head you whine about "typical cop mentality" 


It should not 'seem' that way.  I'm seriously not getting your reasoning for the special treatment.  Some things we can agree with...you need to violate traffic laws to catch crooks or no trespassing signs, etc.

But this makes no sense.  In fact, it was me who pointed out Garrity as it applies to all in the public sector, and you're protected from having to incriminate yourself, when you were conflating the two.  And if we agree that we are talking administratively only, then I would think most people would expect you to be held to the same or more stringent standards as anybody else involved in an incident.

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« Reply #1669 on: July 15, 2014, 07:03:44 PM »

Connecticut Man Arrested for Stabbing Watermelon in ‘Passive-Aggressive Manner’

http://www.boston.com/news/local/connecticut/2014/07/15/connecticut-man-arrested-for-stabbing-watermelon-passive-aggressive-manner/Z0pJMIDSLgK2YWyecYyRCO/story.html
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« Reply #1670 on: July 18, 2014, 05:50:29 PM »

Stolen car found but police can't give it back to its rightful owners. 

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D93xMa1gMbk" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D93xMa1gMbk</a>
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« Reply #1671 on: July 22, 2014, 08:56:44 AM »

New Report Says FBI Entrapped Americans And Charged Them As Terrorists


 

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AP Photo/ Louis Lanzano

Human Rights Watch and the Human Rights Institute at Columbia Law School have just released a damning report in which they accuse the US government of repeated abuses in the investigation and prosecution of terrorism cases.

Duh, right?

Well, you might still be surprised by the report's most troubling allegation: that US government agents, by employing methods of investigation that border on entrapment, have actively encouraged ordinary Americans to become terrorists.

The HRW and HRI focused their investigation on 27 post-9/11 terrorism cases involving 77 defendants. They based their report on information from court documents, publicly available documents, Freedom of Information Act requests, and more than 215 interviews with people involved in terrorism cases, including defendants, lawyers, family members, academics, and government officials.

They found a pattern of encouragement, facilitation, and grooming of targets that's worrying if not illegal.

“Indeed, in some cases,” the report claims, “the Federal Bureau of Investigation may have created terrorists out of law-abiding individuals by conducting sting operations that facilitated or invented the target’s willingness to act... All the high-profile domestic terrorism plots of the last decade, with four exceptions, were actually sting operations, splots conducted with the direct involvement of law enforcement informants or agents, including plots that were proposed or led by informants.”

A former FBI agent, Michael German, explained it to HRW and the HRI this way:


"Today’s terrorism sting operations reflect a significant departure from past practice. When the FBI undercover agent or informant is the only purported link to a real terrorist group, supplies the motive, designs the plot and provides all the weapons, one has to question whether they are combatting terrorism or creating it. Aggrandizing the terrorist threat with these theatrical productions only spreads public fear and divides communities, which doesn’t make anyone safer."

Take the case of Hosam Smadi. The FBI began investigating Smadi in Jan. 2009 because he'd been posting to jihadist discussion boards. FBI agents initiated contact with him online, and during these early conversations, Smadi insisted that he didn’t want to hurt innocent people and was unsure about violent jihad.

The FBI placed him in the “first stage of the radicalization process known as pre-radicalization,” but rather than discourage further radicalization, the agents actively pushed him toward violence.

After months of encouragement and conversation, Smadi agreed to participate in a terrorist act. He'd plant a bomb in the parking garage below a large Dallas building. When the day arrived, he deposited the explosive, which the FBI agents had made, and then met an undercover agent in a car. There he dialed a number into his cell phone, believing that it would detonate the device. He was charged with attempted use of a weapon of mass destruction and sentences to 24 years in prison.

What would have happened to Smadi if the FBI had just left him alone?

The HRW and HRI report finds lots of other reasons to be concerned about the handling of terrorism investigations and prosecutions. Check out the report and you'll find plenty of information about the use of "material support" charges, the admission of various types of inappropriate evidence, and the reliance on pre-trial solitary confinement.

This article originally appeared at GlobalPost. Copyright 2014. Follow GlobalPost on Twitter.


Read more: http://www.globalpost.com/dispatch/news/regions/americas/united-states/140721/the-fbi-entraps-americans-and-charges-them-terro#ixzz38DI5g29G
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poldaktalos
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« Reply #1672 on: July 22, 2014, 12:14:01 PM »

The blue code of silence...

Internal NYPD report on incident with Staten Island dad Eric Garner does not mention chokehold, states he was not 'in great distress'

Supervising officers who were interviewed after Eric Garner's death failed to mention the chokehold and told investigators that 'the perpetrator's condition did not seem serious,' a preliminary report obtained by the Daily News shows. A recording captures officers violently taking down Garner on Thursday as he cries that he can't breathe.

http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/exclusive-internal-nypd-report-staten-island-dad-mention-chokehold-article-1.1875221
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« Reply #1673 on: July 25, 2014, 03:52:49 PM »

 July 21, 2014 6:10 PM
It’s Time for Conservatives to Stop Defending Police
There is nothing conservative about government violating the rights of citizens.

By A. J. Delgado

Imagine if I were to tell you there is a large group of government employees, with generous salaries and ridiculously cushy retirement pensions covered by the taxpayer, who enjoy incredible job security and are rarely held accountable even for activities that would almost certainly earn the rest of us prison time. When there is proven misconduct, these government employees are merely reassigned and are rarely dismissed. The bill for any legal settlements concerning their errors? It, too, is covered by the taxpayers. Their unions are among the strongest in the country.

No, I’m not talking about public-school teachers.

I’m talking about the police.

We conservatives recoil at the former; yet routinely defend the latter — even though, unlike teachers, police officers enjoy an utter monopoly on force and can ruin — or end — one’s life in a millisecond.

For decades, conservatives have served as stalwart defenders of police forces. There have been many good reasons for this, including long memories of the post-countercultural crime wave that devastated, and in some cases destroyed, many American cities; conservatives’ penchant for law and order; and Americans’ widely shared disdain for the cops’ usual opponents. (“Dirty hippies being arrested? Good!” is not an uncommon sentiment.) Although tough-on-crime appeals have never been limited to conservative politicians or voters, conservatives instinctively (and, it turned out, correctly) understood that the way to reduce crime is to have more cops making more arrests, not more sociologists identifying more root causes. Conservatives are rightly proud to have supported police officers doing their jobs at times when progressives were on the other side.

But it’s time for conservatives’ unconditional love affair with the police to end.

Let’s get the obligatory disclaimer out of the way: Yes, many police officers do heroic works and, yes, many are upstanding individuals who serve the community bravely and capably.

But respecting good police work means being willing to speak out against civil-liberties-breaking thugs who shrug their shoulders after brutalizing citizens.


More of this great read here: 
http://www.nationalreview.com/article/383312/its-time-conservatives-stop-defending-police-j-delgado
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