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Author Topic: Police State - Official Thread  (Read 540553 times)
Agnostic007
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« Reply #450 on: July 02, 2011, 08:47:38 AM »

You make a lot of us vs. them statements in this thread.

I'm with Skip on this one.

Can you produce a couple us vs them statements I've made I would love to see some

 
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« Reply #451 on: July 02, 2011, 11:10:18 AM »

a great example of what I was talking about. The officers actions were out of line. Another officer brought it to the attention of the supervisor. The supervisor reported it and the officer was terminated after an investigation. The officer excercised his right to appeal and against our wishes he was reinstated by the arbitrator. The arbitrator is independant and the department is bound by civil service law to abide by the ruling. He has since bneen removed from patrol

Agree.  This is an example of cops policing themselves. 
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« Reply #452 on: July 05, 2011, 08:55:30 AM »

But the cops DID police themselves. The cops did everything they were supposed to when this was brought to light by another officer.




Now it really seems that you are just being flat out dishonest.

3 supervisors got temp suspensions because they failed to acknowledge what this guy did was wrong.  Only ONE cop, (acting Chief Ellison), found the guys actions out of line and took action to remove him.

Further, he was represented by Stribling, an attorney for the police union!!  You don't get to argue the cops "did everything", when it's the cops' union representing the guy.

Finally, the arbitrator ruled that Austin PD (you know, the uber professional force) never gave the guy appropriate training in the use of excessive force and that's why he got his job back.

BTW, 3 supervisors supporting this guy = the blue wall.

So, one cop at the very top tried to do the right thing, 3 supervisors tried to cover for the guy, the department failed to correctly train the guy, and the police union argued and won on his behalf.  Sorry, but to any reasonably objective person - that's a failure to police yourselves.



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« Reply #453 on: July 05, 2011, 09:23:04 AM »



Now it really seems that you are just being flat out dishonest.

3 supervisors got temp suspensions because they failed to acknowledge what this guy did was wrong.  Only ONE cop, (acting Chief Ellison), found the guys actions out of line and took action to remove him.

Further, he was represented by Stribling, an attorney for the police union!!  You don't get to argue the cops "did everything", when it's the cops' union representing the guy.

Finally, the arbitrator ruled that Austin PD (you know, the uber professional force) never gave the guy appropriate training in the use of excessive force and that's why he got his job back.

BTW, 3 supervisors supporting this guy = the blue wall.

So, one cop at the very top tried to do the right thing, 3 supervisors tried to cover for the guy, the department failed to correctly train the guy, and the police union argued and won on his behalf.  Sorry, but to any reasonably objective person - that's a failure to police yourselves.





How did the cop at the top find out about it?

And as far as Stribling, he is a contract attorney for CLEAT which represents officers who are members of the Association. Any officer who is fired, or suspended for over 3 days has a right to an appeal. That's how it is set up with civil service. Most of the time the arbitrators ruling is correct, sometimes it is off in the administrations opinion. IN this case they obviously didn't agree with the arbitrator.

This incident was brought to the attention of I.A. by the supervisors. In this case, the supervisors (which included a Commander) were disciplined because they did not watch the entire tape which ran for an hour. They watched the incident itself just before and after and addressed the incident. What they missed was comments made by the officer to another officer that appeared on tape well after the incident happened that I.A. found. And honestly, it would have caught most supervisors because until that point it wasn't common practice to watch videos well past the incident.
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« Reply #454 on: July 05, 2011, 10:09:43 AM »



And as far as Stribling, he is a contract attorney for CLEAT which represents officers who are members of the Association. Any officer who is fired, or suspended for over 3 days has a right to an appeal. That's how it is set up with civil service. Most of the time the arbitrators ruling is correct, sometimes it is off in the administrations opinion. IN this case they obviously didn't agree with the arbitrator.

So?  Police officers collectively negotiate for, lobby, and benefit from union representation like this.  Just because it's codified doesn't mean a free pass.  Like I said earlier,
   "Nobody gives a shit about us crying about the bureacracy.  The end result is we fail to police ourselves.  Laws, rules, policies, negotiated agreements all need to be changed so that we can weed out the bad apples."

 


Quote
This incident was brought to the attention of I.A. by the supervisors.

That's your claim, for all we know the guy that took the beating filed a complaint that brought it to light.




Quote
In this case, the supervisors (which included a Commander) were disciplined because they did not watch the entire tape which ran for an hour. They watched the incident itself just before and after and addressed the incident. What they missed was comments made by the officer to another officer that appeared on tape well after the incident happened that I.A. found. And honestly, it would have caught most supervisors because until that point it wasn't common practice to watch videos well past the incident.



The facts released thus far don't support your claim.  They were suspended because they failed to acknowledge what this guy did was wrong - they covered for a corrupt cop.

"Ellison also handed three of Griffin's supervisors – Cpl. Andrew Haynes, Lt. Deborah Sawyer, and Cmdr. Michael Nyert – temporary suspensions for failing to conclude that Griffin's actions in arresting Cruz were out of line"

http://www.austinchronicle.com/news/2007-01-05/433594/
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« Reply #455 on: July 05, 2011, 11:24:41 AM »

So?  Police officers collectively negotiate for, lobby, and benefit from union representation like this.  Just because it's codified doesn't mean a free pass.  Like I said earlier,
   "Nobody gives a shit about us crying about the bureacracy.  The end result is we fail to police ourselves.  Laws, rules, policies, negotiated agreements all need to be changed so that we can weed out the bad apples."

 


That's your claim, for all we know the guy that took the beating filed a complaint that brought it to light.






The facts released thus far don't support your claim.  They were suspended because they failed to acknowledge what this guy did was wrong - they covered for a corrupt cop.

"Ellison also handed three of Griffin's supervisors – Cpl. Andrew Haynes, Lt. Deborah Sawyer, and Cmdr. Michael Nyert – temporary suspensions for failing to conclude that Griffin's actions in arresting Cruz were out of line"

http://www.austinchronicle.com/news/2007-01-05/433594/

Sorry, but I've little confidence in the Austin Chronicle. Had my own experience with Jordan Smith where she had access to the truth, but chose to ignore it because she does not like cops and the truth didn't fit her story. The supervisors failed to review the entire tape and missed a comment by the officer. Otherwise, had 3 supervisors had no problem with the officers actions, the chief would have never known about it. And the citizen didn't complain.   
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« Reply #456 on: July 05, 2011, 12:48:58 PM »

Upper East Side Woman, Darbe Pitofsky, Ticketed For Using City Trash Can
newyork.cbslocal.com ^ | 07-05-2011 | Staff


________________________ ________________________ ____________________-



An elderly Upper East Side woman claims a sanitation agent chased her, threatened her with arrest and slapped her with a ticket for putting day-old newspapers in a city trash can.

Darbe Pitofsky, 83, said she was on her way for a cup of coffee around 6:30 a.m. on June 25 when she threw a brown bag filled with old papers in a city litter basket near her apartment on East 71st Street.

She said a sanitation worker quickly jumped out of his vehicle and demanded her information to write a summons.

“I froze,” Pitofsky told 1010 WINS’ Carol D’Auria. “He just frightened the hell out of me, scared me to death, I was terrified.”

She said the worker demanded a form of identification and threatened to “put her away” if she didn’t comply.

Pitofsky said it took the worker 25 minutes to write the summons and when she complained that it would cost her $100, she said he threatened to make it $300.

A representative for the Sanitation Department said street baskets are for pedestrian use only but added Pitofsky can challenge the ticket if she thinks there has been a mistake.

Litter baskets across the city are marked with stickers that read “no household trash” or “no business trash,” along with a warning of a $100 fine for violation. The Sanitation Department has a platoon of enforcement agents tasked with enforcing litter basket laws. Their duties even include doing detective work on trash suspected of being illegally dumped.

Pitofsky says she has already filed a complaint.

Her story is similar to that of 80-year-old Delia Gluckin, who last December, was also fined $100 for “improper disposal” for throwing her newspaper in a trash can in Inwood.

Do you think the city’s enforcement of the rules are too harsh? Let us know below…
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« Reply #457 on: July 05, 2011, 12:57:57 PM »

Sorry, but I've little confidence in the Austin Chronicle. Had my own experience with Jordan Smith where she had access to the truth, but chose to ignore it because she does not like cops and the truth didn't fit her story. The supervisors failed to review the entire tape and missed a comment by the officer. Otherwise, had 3 supervisors had no problem with the officers actions, the chief would have never known about it. And the citizen didn't complain.   



Bullshit.  More flat out lying from you.  The link below takes you to the memo written by acting Chief Ellison detailing all of the facts and why Commander Nyert was suspended.  The "full video review" is a minute fraction.

The Chief found out about this from the District Attorney's office who reviewed the tape and recommended an investigation be launched!!

Not to mention that the civil rights suit was also against the 3 supervisors - not the acting Chief.

And, when the corrupt cop Griffin sued for discrimination, he only named the acting Chief, not the 3 supervisors.

How much more evidence is needed?  They tried to cover for the guy.  You're trying to cover for them.

lol, dude, you're a walking case study of the blue wall.

http://home.kxan.com/news_PDFs/Nyert_memo.pdf 
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« Reply #458 on: July 05, 2011, 01:13:04 PM »



Bullshit.  More flat out lying from you.  The link below takes you to the memo written by acting Chief Ellison detailing all of the facts and why Commander Nyert was suspended.  The "full video review" is a minute fraction.

The Chief found out about this from the District Attorney's office who reviewed the tape and recommended an investigation be launched!!

Not to mention that the civil rights suit was also against the 3 supervisors - not the acting Chief.

And, when the corrupt cop Griffin sued for discrimination, he only named the acting Chief, not the 3 supervisors.

How much more evidence is needed?  They tried to cover for the guy.  You're trying to cover for them.

lol, dude, you're a walking case study of the blue wall.

http://home.kxan.com/news_PDFs/Nyert_memo.pdf 

Skip I read the letter and you are right! I was talking about an incident that happened 5 yrs ago from memory but I do recall the officer direct filed the case to avoid getting it reviewed. The officer not only charged the guy with Public Intoxication, but he added Assault on a Police officer or resisting arrest, I can't recall which charge but had he not done that he may have gotten away with it. Because he placed that bogus charge on the guy it was reviewed by the D.A. who raised the flag.

I'm no blue wall, I'm just old. I remember viewing the tape in a room full of officers. I was appauled by the officers actions and to me he was clearly using excessive force. I was surprised that a few officer looking at the same tape thought it was "borderline". I didn't think it was borderline at all and I was not happy with the arbitrators decision. Most of the force wasn't.

I recall his lawsuit against the Chief. She was the decision maker and therefore the only one he could sue. Again, I thought it was a baseless lawsuit and it was.

 

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« Reply #459 on: July 05, 2011, 01:17:02 PM »

Haha.. It's "the liberal media".



Still waiting on those "us vs them" statements....
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« Reply #460 on: July 05, 2011, 02:12:19 PM »

Skip I read the letter and you are right! I was talking about an incident that happened 5 yrs ago from memory but I do recall the officer direct filed the case to avoid getting it reviewed. The officer not only charged the guy with Public Intoxication, but he added Assault on a Police officer or resisting arrest, I can't recall which charge but had he not done that he may have gotten away with it. Because he placed that bogus charge on the guy it was reviewed by the D.A. who raised the flag.

I'm no blue wall, I'm just old. I remember viewing the tape in a room full of officers. I was appauled by the officers actions and to me he was clearly using excessive force. I was surprised that a few officer looking at the same tape thought it was "borderline". I didn't think it was borderline at all and I was not happy with the arbitrators decision. Most of the force wasn't.

I recall his lawsuit against the Chief. She was the decision maker and therefore the only one he could sue. Again, I thought it was a baseless lawsuit and it was.

 





That's fine, but in any event, we as public employees really need to help get some changes through so that dirtbags can be more easily dealt with.  Some people I've come across are so fucking lazy it would make a 3 toed sloth proud.

IMO, until we start truly removing red-tape and administrative crap and really start policing ourselves, the public image isn't likely to change anytime soon.
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« Reply #461 on: July 05, 2011, 03:29:05 PM »

No Tu, I didnt

Skip, here is the delimma. Without recourse, or arbitration, civil servants would not be able effectively enforce the law. Gave my wife a ticket? Your fired.. didn't vote for me for ____ your fired.  Small group of citizens don't like how you handled that call? Your fired...
 
So I think it IS important to have some protections in place like arbitration so that an officer who is disciplined has recourse to in theory make sure he or she got a fair shake. I have seen where a particular officer was fired and reinstated by an arbitrator 3 times before a firing that held up. It does make it harder to get rid of officers who might better serve another career. I've been very frustrated at times by an arbitrators ruling I understand why it's there.

I was involved in a case where a cadet was terminated for incompetence and safety issues. He was also dishonest. He sued because he said the department was biased against christians. It went to federal court and we won, but I could not believe with 6 inches of documentation and video of his incompetence we had to go through a week of court hearings in order to get rid of him. THats a rare case, but it happens.   
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« Reply #462 on: July 06, 2011, 01:27:20 PM »

Teen faces prison after sex doll prank goes awry (Prosecutors gone wild, kid faces 8 years prison)
WSVM ^ | 07/06/2011 | AP News






INDIANAPOLIS (AP) - When 18-year-old Tyell Morton put a blow-up sex doll in a bathroom stall on the last day of school, he didn't expect school officials to call a bomb squad or that he'd be facing up to eight years in prison and a possible felony record.

The senior prank gone awry has raised questions of race, prosecutorial zeal and the post-Columbine mindset in a small Indiana town and around the country, The Indianapolis Star reported in its Tuesday editions.

Legal experts question the appropriateness of the charges against Morton, and law professor Jonathan Turley at George Washington University posed a wider question about Morton's case on his legal blog.

"The question is what type of society we are creating when our children have to fear that a prank (could) lead them to jail for almost a decade. What type of citizens are we creating who fear the arbitrary use of criminal charges by their government?"

(Excerpt) Read more at wsmv.com ...








Typical Nazi police state bs.   
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« Reply #463 on: July 06, 2011, 01:30:06 PM »

LMAO.. Thats fucked up.. blow up dall=bomb
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« Reply #464 on: July 06, 2011, 01:33:57 PM »

City turning red-light cameras back on
http://blog.chron.com/houstonpolitics/2011/07/city-turns-red-light-cameras-back-on




The city of Houston will turn its red-light cameras back on today, Mayor Annise Parker announced after this morning’s City Council meeting.

According to a statement from the mayor’s office, tickets will be issued after a “short period of equipment testing.”

Houston voters approved a referendum to turn off the cameras in November, but a federal judge ruled last month that it had been improperly placed on the ballot, rendering the results invalid. As a result, the city faced a choice to turn the cameras back on or canceling its contract with American Traffic Solutions, which could cost the city $16 million.

At the same time, Parker said, the city seek permission for an appeal of the ruling by U.S. District Judge Lynn Hughes in attempt to honor the will of the voters.

Here is what the city filed with Hughes:




________________________ ________________________ _______

How would it cost the city 16 Million? 

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« Reply #465 on: July 06, 2011, 05:10:03 PM »

No Tu, I didnt

Skip, here is the delimma. Without recourse, or arbitration, civil servants would not be able effectively enforce the law. Gave my wife a ticket? Your fired.. didn't vote for me for ____ your fired.  Small group of citizens don't like how you handled that call? Your fired...
 
So I think it IS important to have some protections in place like arbitration so that an officer who is disciplined has recourse to in theory make sure he or she got a fair shake. I have seen where a particular officer was fired and reinstated by an arbitrator 3 times before a firing that held up. It does make it harder to get rid of officers who might better serve another career. I've been very frustrated at times by an arbitrators ruling I understand why it's there.

I was involved in a case where a cadet was terminated for incompetence and safety issues. He was also dishonest. He sued because he said the department was biased against christians. It went to federal court and we won, but I could not believe with 6 inches of documentation and video of his incompetence we had to go through a week of court hearings in order to get rid of him. THats a rare case, but it happens.   


This is not an either/or issue.  There is a comfortable middle ground.  I'm just arguing, we haven't found it yet.
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« Reply #466 on: July 07, 2011, 07:10:25 AM »

Yes you did... However, you are so warped you don't even see it.

Anonymous cop says he's right and everyone else is wrong.

Oh well.

wow, you really explained it well and made your case... debate team experience Tu?
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« Reply #467 on: July 07, 2011, 09:56:12 AM »

Most cops don't do dick but pat themselves on the shoulder and cry a river why they are not paid 500k a year. 


I grew up with tons of cops, they are by far the worst of the lot.   Mostly overpaid bitches w badges who would be washing cars if they were not cops and will find any reason whatsoever to justify their rape of the taxpayer.     
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« Reply #468 on: July 07, 2011, 11:57:51 AM »

Cop shoots, kills dog during Adams Morgan festival
TBD.com ^ | September 12, 2010 | TBD, ABC7





UPDATE 7:47 p.m. Sept. 13: The Washington Post has obtained the police report on the incident. It describes the dog as appearing "to be out of control" and says the dog "charged" at the officer before it was fatally shot.

10:16 p.m. Updated with a statement from Third District police that conflicts with the dog handler's spokesman's statement, and an e-mailed statement from the handler himself.

There's never a shortage of police officers at Adams Morgan Day, just in case someone gets out of hand. Today, that someone was a dog.

An officer with the D.C. police department shot and killed a dog — possibly a rottweiler or pit bull — outside The Brass Knob antique store at 2311 18th St. NW. The shooting followed an intense, two-minute scuffle between the dog and what witnesses describe as a "smaller" white dog.

In dispute of the what the dog's handler has said, police tonight released a statement saying the dog was out of control and also bit the handler. Here's the entire e-mail from Third District Capt. Aubrey P. Mongal:

Earlier this afternoon, during the Adams Morgan Day events, an MPD officer encountered a dog in the crowded pedestrian area that got out of the control of it’s handler. The dog attacked another dog and also bit it handler. The officer, after making several attempts to subdue the dog by training tactics, had to finally shoot one time to stop the dog.

On the contrary, says the handler, who only wants to be identified as Aaron. In an e-mail to TBD, Aaron said the apparent foster dog, Parrot, didn't bite anyone.

In my recollection and as the eyewitness accounts will coroborate, the dog was completely under my control when the k9 officer removed me. Parrot bit no human, the only blood he drew was when i thrust my hand into his mouth to get him off the other dog. The k9 officer's injury, which he showed me at the station after, was nothing more than a rope burn from Parrot's leash, suffered when the officer was throwing my dog down a flight of stairs.

 D.C. Police Chief Cathy Lanier, in an earlier response to an e-mail from advisory neighborhood commissioner and candidate for the Ward 1 D.C. Council seat Bryan Weaver, said three people, including a K9 officer, were bitten by the dog. Here's an excerpt of the e-mail:

I don't know all of the facts at this point so it is very difficult for me to comment beyond the facts that I have been given. All I know is that there is one dog who was attacked by the pit bull and 3 people, including a K9 officer, that were bitten by the pit bull.

Police sources had earlier told ABC 7 the officer who shot the dog was a canine handler who was experienced with dogs. He was trying to separate the dogs, and attempted to choke hold the larger dog. While he was trying that, the dog attempted to bite him or did bite him, and he threw him down the stairwell in an attempt to injure the dog. The dog charged the officer and the officer opened fire, the sources said.

An unidentified spokesperson for the dog's handler said the cop didn't try hard enough to subdue the dog.

In an e-mail to TBD, Weaver said the dog had seemed friendly at his booth at the festival just 15 minutes before the incident:

"Aaron is a good guy, he said he had the dog under control and the cop grabbed it from him and threw him down the well at [Marie] Reed and shot him. Dog was playing with kids at my booth 15 min earlier. Aaron is really shaken."

One witness, 46-year-old Harriet Winslow, said that at first, she saw the two dogs — the white-sandy pitbull-looking dog and a cute white fluffy lap dog — barking and fighting.

"Everybody glanced over and the owners of these dogs were frantically trying to pull them apart. We're all looking concerned. Suddenly, the owner of the pitbull was down on the ground trying to subdue his dog. He was really trying hard — I have to give him credit. He was on the ground wrapping his arms around the dog. I could see him down on the ground. I mean he was really trying."

After the two dogs were pulled apart, Winslow says she could see that the smaller dog was fine. But the dogs were still barking at each other.

Then a cop appeared.

"I glanced over again and I saw a very able bodied police officer fully a stride the dog — the cop straddling dog. The pitbull was still animated, still trying to get up. But this cop — I thought 'Wow this guy is good at this, he subdued a really angry dog.' Then I thought 'Good, this is now over.' Then I walk just five or 10 feet away and I hear a gun shot."

Before she heard the shot, she said she thought "the cop was totally in control. ... It's not something I would want to do. He really was on top of this dog."

Noah Siegel, who works at nearby Spaghetti Garden restaurant, says he saw "two or three cops" surrounding the dog. One of the officers, says Siegel, had the dog on a leash and attempted to drag it away from the commotion.

The dog began "trying to attack the cop," says Siegel. "Next thing I knew, they had it down there in the corner and I heard a shot and that was it," says Siegel, who was interviewed by ABC 7's Brianne Carter.

An onlooker who attempted to intervene in the dogfight sustained a scrape or two. "He's fine," reports ABC 7's Carter.
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« Reply #469 on: July 07, 2011, 12:04:13 PM »


I think your job is fascist and brings no real value to society at large.


I think your opinion is ridiculous on this point.... but you're welcome to it.
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« Reply #470 on: July 07, 2011, 12:05:48 PM »

Most cops don't do dick but pat themselves on the shoulder and cry a river why they are not paid 500k a year. 


I grew up with tons of cops, they are by far the worst of the lot.   Mostly overpaid bitches w badges who would be washing cars if they were not cops and will find any reason whatsoever to justify their rape of the taxpayer.     

Thanks for sharing your opinion of cops. Fortunately your opinion is in the small minority.
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« Reply #471 on: July 07, 2011, 12:07:35 PM »

Thanks for sharing your opinion of cops. Fortunately your opinion is in the small minority.

You know what they say about opinions.   Grin
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« Reply #472 on: July 07, 2011, 12:14:04 PM »

Jailed for cashing Chase check at Chase bank
King 5 ^ | 07/07/2011 | King 5






AUBURN, Wash. - Buying his own home was a big accomplishment for construction worker, Ikenna Njoku, of Auburn. He’s only 28 years old. “I was really excited. For the first time, I actually got to buy a lawn mower, mow my lawn and everything,” said Njoku.

Njoku qualified for the first time home buyer rebate on his tax return.

"It was really important, I had a vehicle I was looking on paying off," said. Njoku. And it wasn’t just any vehicle. “It was a 2001 Infinity I-30, silver…just like my favorite car, “he said.

Njoku signed up to have the rebate deposited directly into his Chase Bank account. But when the IRS rebate arrived, there was a problem. Chase had closed Njoku’s account because of overdrawn checks in the past. The bank deducted $600 to cover what he owed them and mailed him a cashier’s check for the difference--$8,463.21.

But when Njoku showed up at the Chase branch near his house intending to cash the check, he was in for a nasty surprise.

The check had Njoku’s name and address on it and was issued by JP Morgan Chase. But the Chase Customer Banker who handles large checks at the Auburn branch was immediately suspicious.

“I was embarrassed,” Njoku said. “She asked me what I did for a living. Asked me where I got the check from, looked me up and down—like ‘you just bought a house in Auburn, really?’ She didn’t believe that,” he said.

The Customer Banker said the check looked fake, so she took it, along with Njoku’s driver license and credit card, and called Bank Support.

After waiting for about 15 minutes, Njoku said he got impatient and told Chase he was leaving to do an important errand. By the time he got back, the bank was closed. Njoku said he called customer service and asked them what he should do. He says they told him to go back to the bank the next day to get his money.

But when Njoku arrived, it wasn’t the money that was waiting for him.

“They just threw me in jail; they called the police and said this guy has a fraudulent check,” Njoku said.

Auburn police arrested him for forgery - a felony crime.

“I was like - you’re making a mistake, you’re making a mistake, don’t take me to jail, I got work tomorrow. I can’t afford to miss work,” he said.

Njoku was taken to jail on June 24, 2010, which was a Thursday. The next day, Chase Special Investigations, realized it was a mistake. The check was legitimate. The Investigator called Auburn Police and left a message with the detective handling the case, but it was her day off. So Njoku stayed in jail for the entire weekend. Finally, on Monday, he was released.

Auburn Police Commander Dave Colglazier said Chase could have done a lot more to let them know they’d locked up an innocent man.

“We do have a main line that comes into our front office,” he said. “There are ways to reach someone 24/7 at a police department.”

For Njoku, going to jail for five days meant a lot more than just losing his freedom. He said the entire time he was “just stressed out…trying to figure out what was going on with my vehicle. I love my vehicle,” he said.

Njoku’s car had been towed from the bank parking lot and his check seized as evidence.

“I had to wait a couple of weeks,” he said, “and my car got sold, auctioned off."

Njoku says he didn’t have the money to pay the impound fees and fines to get his car back before it was sold. He said he also lost his job because he didn’t show up for work while he was in jail.

After all of that, Njoku said he never heard a word from Chase.

“They haven’t even sent me a letter or apologized,” he said. “It’s been a year we’ve been trying to contact these guys.”

Finally, A Seattle attorney offered to help. Last week, Felix Luna sent Chase a scathing letter. Read the attorneys' letter to Chase

“It’s one thing to make a mistake,” Luna said. “It’s one thing to make multiple errors of judgment like Chase has made and then, once you realize that your error has caused such harm to somebody else, to just ignore it for a year. I think he deserved better. I think all their customers do.”

Like Njoku, KING 5 had a difficult time getting answers from Chase. A week after first contacting them, they sent a two line e-mail.

"We received the letter and are reviewing the situation. We'll be reaching out to the customer," wrote Darcy Donoahoe-Wilmot, from Chase Media Relations.

Njoku said that even after he got out of jail, he said was confused and upset. "For a month, two months, I was just down and depressed," he said.

He’s still happy he bought his house, but sad that his experience with his own bank was so humiliating.

“They treated me like a criminal,” he said.
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« Reply #473 on: July 07, 2011, 07:48:16 PM »

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New Bill Prevents Cops from Visually Judging Speed (OH)
Fox8News ^ | 7/7/11
Posted on July 7, 2011 11:15:33 PM EDT by EBH

AKRON, Ohio— State lawmakers have passed a bill forbidding law enforcement officers from 'guesstimating' the speed of a moving vehicle.

The law was changed after a Summit County man was ticketed on Route 21 by a policeman who visually determined how fast he was driving. Last year, he fought the ticket all the way to the Ohio Supreme Court and lost. But his attorney worked with legislators who recently re-wrote the law.

"I knew it would probably upset a few, but not to the level that it did," said Attorney John Kim, from Akron. Kim represented the defendant for more than two-years and he's thrilled the issue has been resolved. "It all begins with principle and looking my client directly in the eyes, he was absolutely adamant that he was not guilty of speeding," said Kim.

State Representative Barbara Sears, R-Lucas County, worked to get the measure passed. "I took the cause up, just because, to me it didn't seem appropriate, it seemed like we certainly have the ability to have a better, more concrete way of measuring speed and that seemed like the best way to do it," said Rep. Sears.

Bath resident Jonathan Emerson isn't comfortable with the idea that a police officer could make a visual determination of speed. "It seems unrealistic to think that a police officer would be able to judge within five miles an hour," said Emerson.

(Excerpt) Read more at fox8.com ...

TOPICS: Government; News/Current Events; US: Ohio; Click to Add Topic
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1 posted on July 7, 2011 11:15:39 PM EDT by EBH
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2 posted on July 7, 2011 11:16:48 PM EDT by EBH ( Whether you eat your bread or see it vanish into a looter's stomach, is an absolute.)
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« Reply #474 on: July 07, 2011, 07:50:11 PM »

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TSA employee arrested after theft string
7 News ^ | July 7, 2011
Posted on July 7, 2011 10:44:19 PM EDT by BulletBobCo

FORT LAUDERDALE-HOLLYWOOD INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT, Fla. (WSVN) -- Police have arrested a TSA employee after he is responsible for a string of thefts over the past months.

Thirty-year-old Nelson Santiago was arrested Thursday after stealing electronics from passengers checked luggage and then sell them online. "He had this down to a science. He'd take an item then he would photograph it with his cell phone, post it on Craigslist and most often it was sold by the time his shift had ended," said Broward Sheriff's Office Dani Moschella.

According to Broward Sheriff's Office, Santiago was allegedly caught by a Continental Airlines employee slipping an iPad out of a suitcase and into his pants.

BSO said the scam when on for six months and the sale of the stolen items added up to $50,000. "He stole most of the electronic equipment. A lot of iPads, computers, some small video cameras, a GPS device," said Moschella.

Rosanne Ambrico is a frequent travel and is in shock with the news. "It's a TSA worker. They are screened, they go through background checks and obviously he should have been cleared but I don't know what happen,"

Santiago has been charged with grand theft. He has been a TSA officer since January 2009 but no longer works with the agency.

TOPICS: Crime/Corruption; Culture/Society; Front Page News; News/Current Events; US: Florida; Click to Add Topic
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1 posted on July 7, 2011 10:44:22 PM EDT by BulletBobCo
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