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« Reply #200 on: October 20, 2014, 02:12:46 PM »

Sunday, October 19th, 2014 | Posted by Duane Vachon
William T. Perkins, Jr. Corporal United States Marine Corps - A NEW KIND OF HERO

Cpl. William T. Perkins, Combat Photographer, Medal of Honor, Vietnam

BY DUANE ALLEN VACHON PH.D.  For many years prior to my retirement I worked at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific.  My job as the cemetery representative was to help the families organize the committal service for their loved one.   Meeting  with the family I would  help organize the service.  This involved coordinating with the funeral director, organizing military honors and, if requested, a representative from the religion the family requested.  Most of all I tried to make the service as painless and dignified as possible.  We conducted as many as seven services a day, five days a week.  Even though it was emotionally draining, two things kept me going. I have a strong faith, and I was mindful that I was responsible for giving these veterans the last benefit they would receive for the service they gave to their country.  It was a privilege and honor to be able to do this for my fellow veterans.

Despite my faith and my deep sense of service, at times I was touched and profoundly moved.  At times  it could be difficult not to be overwhelmed by the pain of the mothers and fathers, wives and children, sisters and brothers that were left behind.

To this day I still find myself at times being deeply moved when I am doing the research for these articles.  This is one of those articles that moved me. Perkins was only 20 years old when he gave up his life.  Not old enough to buy a beer in his home state. He was a Marine and every Marine is a rifleman first. However, his job was a combat photographer.  Despite this he gave up his life to save his fellow Marines.  Perkins is the only combat photographer to have received the Medal of Honor. Secondly, when searching to locate where he was buried, I saw a picture of his grave marker.  He was buried with his younger brother Robert who died in 1978.  His parents suffered the pain of having to bury two sons.

There are 58,282 names on the Vietnam Wall.  It’s impossible to imagine how much collateral damage is associated with those names.  As you read these articles, spare a thought for the hero, but also a thought and, if you are so inclined, a prayer for all of those who were left behind.

William (Bill) T. Perkins, Jr. was born August 10, 1947 in Rochester, New York to William and Marilane Perkins. The family moved to Los Angeles, California and he attended Sepulveda Jr. High and graduated from James Monroe High School in 1965. He received many drama awards and was a member of the swim team and the Photography Club. He also became certified in Scuba diving and spent many hours diving off the coast of California and Catalina Island. While attending Pierce College, he was an apprentice at the Valley Music Theater and appeared at the Century City Playhouse.

Perkins and Jim Priddy joined the Marines on the “buddy system”  on April 27, 1966. He completed his infantry training at Marine Corps Recruit Depot in San Diego and Camp Pendleton, California. His interest in photography and cinema led him to the Photography School at Ft. Monmouth, New Jersey. Perkins arrived in Vietnam on July 12, 1967 and was killed in action exactly three months later October 12, 1967.

Perkins was given a chance to take the US Army's Motion Picture Photography course. The only caveat: those attending the school had to put their new skills to use in Vietnam. Perkins willingly agreed and - after training - arrived in Vietnam in July of 1967. Exactly three months later, he would prove himself a new kind of hero.

Once in country, Perkins quickly earned a reputation as a gifted combat cameraman. Shooting both stills and film, the Southern Californian captured both the mayhem and the monotony of modern warfare. Reticent in the beginning, Perkins' fellow grunts accepted him as one of their own - even if he did go into battle with one eye plastered to a viewfinder. What they never fathomed was the young cameraman's commitment to them. In October of 1967, that became painfully clear. A reconnaissance mission in the Hai Lang forest, Operation MEDINA devolved into a battle of hand grenades. Perkins was in the thick of it, shooting film as he and his buddies found themselves . Perkins did the unthinkable. After yelling 'Incoming!', William T. Perkins, Jr. crawled on top of the grenade, and absorbed its deadly blast.  Saving at least three of his friends' lives, Perkins died with a Eymo motion picture camera in his hand. To this day, he is the only combat photographer to ever receive the Medal of Honor.


Medal of Honor citation
 
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the MEDAL OF HONOR posthumously to
CORPORAL WILLIAM T.. PERKINS, JR.
UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS
for service as set forth in the following CITATION:

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving as a combat photographer attached to Company C, First Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division, in the Republic of Vietnam on 12 October 1967. During Operation MEDINA, a major reconnaissance in force, southwest of Quang Tri, Company C made heavy combat contact with a numerically superior North Vietnamese Army Force estimated at from two to three companies. The focal point of the intense fighting was a helicopter landing zone which was also serving as the Command Post of Company C. In the course of a strong hostile attack, an enemy grenade landed in the immediate Carea occupied by Corporal Perkins and three other Marines. Realizing the inherent danger, he shouted the warning, "Incoming Grenade" to his fellow Marines, and in a valiant act of heroism, hurled himself upon the grenade absorbing the impact of the explosion with his own body thereby saving the lives of his comrades at the cost of his own. Through his exceptional courage and inspiring valor in the face of certain death, Corporal Perkins reflected great credit upon himself and the Marine Corps and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave histhe San Fernando Mis  life for his country.

/S/ RICHARD M. NIXON
Corporal William T. Perkins is buried at San Fernando Mission Cemetery Hills Los Angeles County California, USA.
President Nixon presenting Medal of Honor to parents of Cpl. William Perkins

Gravestone for William Perkins and his brother Robert
 
http://www.hawaiireporter.com/william-t-perkins-jr-corporal-united-states-marine-corps-medal-of-honor-vietnam-a-new-kind-of-hero/123
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« Reply #201 on: October 24, 2014, 12:16:24 PM »

70 years after death, Tenn. soldier buried at Arlington
Mary Troyan, The Tennessean, Nashville 1:55 a.m. EDT October 23, 2014


Army Pvt. 1st Class Cecil Harris received full military honors at Arlington National Cemetery. (Photo: Evan Eile, USA TODAY)

WASHINGTON — Almost 70 years after he died battling German troops in northeastern France, Army Pvt. 1st Class Cecil Harris of Shelbyville was buried Wednesday with full military honors at Arlington National Cemetery.

"In life, he honored the flag, and in death, the flag will honor him," U.S. Army Chaplain Capt. Ted Randall said during the graveside service.

Harris was killed Jan. 2, 1945, but his remains weren't found until last year, by French hikers.

In a cold, soaking rain, about 15 family members from Tennessee and several others followed the horse-drawn caisson carrying Harris' flag-draped casket down McClellan Drive at the cemetery while the U.S. Army Band, known as "Pershing's Own," played "Onward Christian Soldiers."

"I'm just proud I got to follow him before they put him in the resting place," said William Edwin "Eddie" Harris, who was an infant the only time he met his father.

Cecil Harris was 19 when he left Shelbyville and his pregnant wife, Helen, to fight in World War II. Helen Harris Cooke, 90, was unable to travel to northern Virginia for the burial, Eddie Harris said. Janice Carlton, who was 10 when her brother died, was among the mourners Wednesday.

"I feel relieved that we got him back and buried with honors where he deserved," Eddie Harris said after the services. "I wondered for 70 years whatever happened to him."

Harris qualified for full military honors, a crisp, dignified ceremony performed by the Army's 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment, known as The Old Guard. The services include a caisson, an escort platoon, a colors team, a casket team, three rifle volleys from a firing team and a band.

The bugler, Army Staff Sgt. Jeffrey Northman, played "Taps" after the chaplain's remarks.

"PFC Cecil Edwin Harris served our nation with honor and distinction," the chaplain said. "He earned his place on these hallowed grounds."

Harris was a member of the rifle platoon with Company D, 179th Infantry Regiment, 45th Infantry Division. He received the Combat Infantryman Badge, the European African Middle Eastern Campaign Medal, the World War II Victory Medal, the Bronze Star and the Purple Heart.

While the band played "America the Beautiful" and the rain fell harder, the Old Guard soldiers folded the U.S. flag that had been covering the casket. The flag was presented to Eddie Harris by retired Lt. Gen. Bill Phillips of Bell Buckle, Tenn., near where Cecil Harris grew up.

Eddie Harris has a frame for the flag at his home in Mountain City, Tenn., and plans to hang it on the wall near his bed.

"I never did think this day would come," he said.

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2014/10/23/tennsoldier-buried-at-arlington/17761145/
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« Reply #202 on: October 24, 2014, 02:11:14 PM »

70 years after death, Tenn. soldier buried at Arlington
Mary Troyan, The Tennessean, Nashville 1:55 a.m. EDT October 23, 2014


Army Pvt. 1st Class Cecil Harris received full military honors at Arlington National Cemetery. (Photo: Evan Eile, USA TODAY)

WASHINGTON — Almost 70 years after he died battling German troops in northeastern France, Army Pvt. 1st Class Cecil Harris of Shelbyville was buried Wednesday with full military honors at Arlington National Cemetery.

"In life, he honored the flag, and in death, the flag will honor him," U.S. Army Chaplain Capt. Ted Randall said during the graveside service.

Harris was killed Jan. 2, 1945, but his remains weren't found until last year, by French hikers.

In a cold, soaking rain, about 15 family members from Tennessee and several others followed the horse-drawn caisson carrying Harris' flag-draped casket down McClellan Drive at the cemetery while the U.S. Army Band, known as "Pershing's Own," played "Onward Christian Soldiers."

"I'm just proud I got to follow him before they put him in the resting place," said William Edwin "Eddie" Harris, who was an infant the only time he met his father.

Cecil Harris was 19 when he left Shelbyville and his pregnant wife, Helen, to fight in World War II. Helen Harris Cooke, 90, was unable to travel to northern Virginia for the burial, Eddie Harris said. Janice Carlton, who was 10 when her brother died, was among the mourners Wednesday.

"I feel relieved that we got him back and buried with honors where he deserved," Eddie Harris said after the services. "I wondered for 70 years whatever happened to him."

Harris qualified for full military honors, a crisp, dignified ceremony performed by the Army's 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment, known as The Old Guard. The services include a caisson, an escort platoon, a colors team, a casket team, three rifle volleys from a firing team and a band.

The bugler, Army Staff Sgt. Jeffrey Northman, played "Taps" after the chaplain's remarks.

"PFC Cecil Edwin Harris served our nation with honor and distinction," the chaplain said. "He earned his place on these hallowed grounds."

Harris was a member of the rifle platoon with Company D, 179th Infantry Regiment, 45th Infantry Division. He received the Combat Infantryman Badge, the European African Middle Eastern Campaign Medal, the World War II Victory Medal, the Bronze Star and the Purple Heart.

While the band played "America the Beautiful" and the rain fell harder, the Old Guard soldiers folded the U.S. flag that had been covering the casket. The flag was presented to Eddie Harris by retired Lt. Gen. Bill Phillips of Bell Buckle, Tenn., near where Cecil Harris grew up.

Eddie Harris has a frame for the flag at his home in Mountain City, Tenn., and plans to hang it on the wall near his bed.

"I never did think this day would come," he said.

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2014/10/23/tennsoldier-buried-at-arlington/17761145/

Did he join the Army voluntarily? 

Seems like a 19-year old having a pregnant wife should have been able to receive a draft deferment.  And if he left his pregnant wife by joining the army voluntarily, then he's not a great anything in my book. 
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« Reply #203 on: October 27, 2014, 10:02:25 AM »

Sunday, October 26th, 2014 | Posted by Duane Vachon
Jimmy Wayne Phipps PFC USMC


Jimmy Wayne Phipps
LEST WE FORGET

BY DUANE ALLEN VACHON, PH.D. Jimmy Wayne Phipps was born on November 1, 1950, in Santa Monica, California. He attended Marina Del Ray Junior High School in Culver City, California and Venice High School in California.  He left high school to enlist in the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve on January 3, 1968 and was discharged on January 7, 1968 to enlist in the Regular Marine Corps.

He completed recruit training with the 2nd Recruit Training Battalion, Recruit Training Regiment, Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego, California on March 14, 1968. Transferred to Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, he underwent individual combat training with Company L, 2nd Battalion, 2nd Infantry Training Regiment, followed by basic infantry training which he completed in May 1968.

From June until August 1968, he was a student with the Marine Aviation Detachment, Naval Air Technical Training Command, Memphis, Tennessee. Transferred to Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, he attended the Marine Corps Engineer Schools, until the following October. He was promoted to private first class on October 1, 1968.

In December 1968, he was transferred to the Republic of Vietnam where he served as a combat engineer with Company B, 1st Engineer Battalion, 1st Marine Division. He was initially attached to Company C, 1st Battalion 5th Marines (C/1/5) as its combat engineer. He was then detached and returned to Company B, but in late May, volunteered to return to the field with C/1/5. While participating in combat in what was referred to as the "Arizona Territory," located in the vicinity of An Hoa on May 27, 1969, he was killed in action during the combat action for which he was awarded the Medal of Honor. His Medal of Honor Citation tells the rest:
 

Medal of Honor citation
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the MEDAL OF HONOR posthumously to
PRIVATE FIRST CLASS JIMMY W. PHIPPS
UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS

for service as set forth in the following CITATION:

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving as a combat Engineer with Company B, First Engineer Battalion, First Marine Division in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 27 May 1969, Private First Class Phipps, was a member of a two-man combat engineer demolition team assigned to locate and destroy enemy artillery ordnance and concealed firing devices. After he had expended all of his explosives and blasting caps, Private First Class Phipps discovered a 175mm high explosive artillery round in a rice paddy. Suspecting that the enemy had attached at the artillery round to a secondary explosive device, he warned other Marines in the area to move to covered positions and prepared to destroy the round with a hand grenade. As he was attaching the hand grenade to a stake beside the artillery round, the fuse of the enemy's secondary explosive device ignited. Realizing that his assistant and the platoon commander were both with a few meters of him and that the imminent explosion could kill all three men, Private First Class Phipps grasped the hand grenade to his chest and dived forward to cover the enemy's explosive and the artillery round with his body, thereby shielding his companions from the detonation while absorbing the full and tremendous impact with his own body. Private First Class Phipp's indomitable courage, inspiring initiative and selfless devotion to duty saved the lives of two Marines and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.

/S/ RICHARD M. NIXON  President
 
Eleven years of combat left their imprint on a generation.  Thousands returned home bearing shrapnel and scars; still more were burdened by the invisible wounds of post-traumatic stress, of Agent Orange, of memories that would never fade.  More than 58,000 laid down their lives in service to our Nation.  Now and forever, their names are etched into two faces of black granite, a lasting memorial to those who bore conflict's greatest cost.  They didn’t all receive a Medal of Honor like Phipps, but they were all heroes.

Our veterans answered our country's call and served with honor, and on March 29, 1973, the last of our troops left Vietnam.  Yet, in one of the war's most profound tragedies, many of these men and women came home to be shunned or neglected -- to face treatment unbefitting their courage and a welcome unworthy of their example.  We must never let this happen again.  Today, we reaffirm one of our most fundamental obligations:  to show all who have worn the uniform of the United States the respect and dignity they deserve, and to honor their sacrifice by serving them as well as they served us.
PFC Jimmy W. Phipps is buried in Woodlawn Cemetery, Santa Monica California Plot: Block 18.
 

Gravesite for PFC Jimmy W. Phipps

The information in this article was sourced from a variety of sources both internal and external. Every effort was made to ensure that the information is current and correct. These articles are presented to honor the heroes they are written about.

If you can read this, thank a teacher. If you can read this in English, thank a veteran.

http://www.hawaiireporter.com/jimmy-wayne-phipps-pfc-usmc/123
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« Reply #204 on: November 06, 2014, 10:50:25 AM »

Long overdue: Obama to award Medal of Honor to Civil War soldier
1st Lt. Alonzo Cushing died at Gettysburg trying to repel Pickett’s Charge


Alonzo Cushing photo provided by the Wisconsin Historical Society shows First Lt. Alonzo Cushing. A Civil War soldier is to be honored with the nation's highest military decoration 151 years after his death.The White House announced Wednesday that President Barack Obama will give the Medal of Honor to Alonzo H. Cushing. His descendants and Civil War buffs have been pushing for the Union Army lieutenant killed at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania to receive the award. (AP Photo/Wisconsin Historical Society)

Alonzo Cushing photo provided by the Wisconsin Historical Society shows First Lt. Alonzo Cushing. A Civil War soldier is to be honored with the nation’s highest military decoration 151 years after his death.The White House announced Wednesday that President Barack ... more >


By Stephen Dinan - The Washington Times - Tuesday, August 26, 2014
President Obama will award the Medal of Honor to 1st Lt. Alonzo Cushing, who gave his life at Gettysburg leading the effort to repel Pickett’s Charge, the White House said Tuesday in an announcement historians say corrects a glaring omission in the rolls of the nation’s top military honor.

Wounded in both his shoulder and stomach, Cushing manned the only remaining artillery piece, defending against the rebel charge that’s been called the high-water mark of the Confederacy. Cushing was cut down by a third wound as he successfully defended the spot, which has become known in military history lore as the Angle.

Those above and below him in rank already have been awarded the Medal of Honor, including Gen. Alexander S. Webb, who led the overall defense against Pickett’s Charge and approved Cushing’s request to advance, and Cushing’s own trusted Sgt. Frederick Fuger, who held up his wounded lieutenant so he could see the battlefield and served as Cushing’s megaphone, calling out the orders the senior officer could only whisper due to his two injuries.

“An awful lot of people have been very interested in seeing Alonzo gets this nation’s highest honor,” said David Krueger, who has served as point man for the Medal of Honor effort in Delafield, Wisconsin, where the Cushing family had a farm at the time of the war. “Standing at the Angle at Cemetery Ridge, what was at stake was the survival of our nation, and this young 22-year-old artillery officer held the line; the men with him held the line. If the line breaks at that point, the war could possibly have ended with a Confederate victory.”

The White House announcement brings to a close a decadeslong campaign by Cushing’s backers and comes as the Medal of Honor itself is increasingly under scrutiny.

1st Lt. Alonzo Cushing (left) poses with other Union troops during the Civil War. Cushing is expected to be awarded the Medal of Honor nearly 150 years after he died defending a Union position during Pickett's Charge at Gettysburg. (Wisconsin Historical Society via Associated Press)
1st Lt. Alonzo Cushing (left) poses with other Union troops during the ... more >
Key lawmakers have questioned whether the process has become too politicized, saying there are other deserving troops from recent conflicts such as the Iraq war.

Usually, those pushing for honors for long-dead military men are descendants. In Cushing’s case, there are no direct descendants, and his cause was taken up by people with much more tenuous personal connections but who saw an injustice to be corrected.

One of those was Kent Masterson Brown, who chronicled the lieutenant’s story in his book “Cushing of Gettysburg: The Story of a Union Artillery Commander.” Another is Margaret Zerwekh, a woman in her 90s who lives on part of what used to be the Cushing family’s farm, located along the Bark River in Delafield, west of Milwaukee.

She wrote her first letter on Cushing’s behalf in 1987, asking then-Sen. William Proxmire to take up the cause.

Congress had to play a role as well, waiving the time limits involved in the Medal of Honor so that Cushing would be eligible. The waiver came in last year’s defense policy bill.

On Tuesday the White House released a statement saying Cushing will finally get his due, along with two veterans of the Vietnam War.

One of those, Army Spc. Four Donald P. Sloat, was killed in action on Jan. 17, 1970, while using his body to absorb a grenade blast, saving the lives of three other soldiers.

The other, Command Sgt. Maj. Bennie G. Adkins, repeatedly braved intense hostile sniper and mortar fire to rescue wounded soldiers, then, despite suffering several wounds, fought off wave after wave of Viet Cong attacks on his position. Unable to reach the last evacuation helicopter, he rallied his comrades and fled into the jungle, where the group survived for two days until being rescued.

The Army, in its nomination for the Medal of Honor, estimated he killed up to 175 enemy troops and sustained 18 wounds himself.

Command Sgt. Maj. Adkins will attend a Sept. 15 ceremony at the White House along with his wife, Mary. Spc. Sloat’s brother will receive his medal at the same ceremony.

The White House said details on Cushing’s award will be announced separately.

Mr. Kreuger said one question is who would get the award, given he has no direct descendants. There is no clear-cut Pentagon protocol in this type of situation, Mr. Kreuger said.

Some residents have pushed for the medal to go to the city of Delafield.

http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2014/aug/26/obama-to-award-belated-medal-of-honor-to-union-civ/#ixzz3Bc6ct9Z3

Civil War officer to receive Medal of Honor from President Obama
Published November 06, 2014
Associated Press

First Lt. Alonzo Cushing is shown in an undated photo provided by the Wisconsin Historical Society. (AP/Wisconsin Historical Society)

A Union Army officer who stood his ground during the Battle of Gettysburg and paid with his life is receiving the nation's highest military honor from President Barack Obama.

Obama on Thursday was bestowing the Medal of Honor on 1st Lt. Alonzo H. Cushing, who was killed in July 1863 during the three-day battle near the Pennsylvania town. The battle often is described as the turning point of the Civil War.

Congress granted an exemption for Cushing's posthumous honor. Recommendations normally must be made within two years of an act of heroism, and the medal presented within three.

Cushing was born in Delafield, Wisconsin, raised in Fredonia, New York, and buried at his alma mater, the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, after his death at age 22. He commanded about 110 men and six cannons, defending the Union position on Cemetery Ridge against Pickett's Charge, a major Confederate thrust that was repelled by Union forces.

On the third day of battle, Cushing's small force stood its ground under severe artillery bombardment and an assault by nearly 13,000 advancing Confederate infantrymen. Wounded in the stomach and right shoulder, Cushing refused to move to the rear despite his wounds and insisted on ordering his guns to the front lines.

He was shot and killed as Confederate forces closed in on his position.

"His actions made it possible for the Union Army to successfully repulse the assault," according to a White House summary of Cushing's actions.

Two of Cushing's cousins were to join Obama and first lady Michelle Obama at a White House ceremony commemorating the lieutenant's service and sacrifice.

Obama and Mrs. Obama were also honoring service members, veterans and their families at an outdoor event Thursday evening featuring musical performances by Mary J. Blige, Willie Nelson and other recording artists. In 2011, Mrs. Obama and Jill Biden, the wife of Vice President Joe Biden, launched "Joining Forces," a nationwide campaign to rally the country to support its troops.

The Medal of Honor, which was created in 1861 during the war in which Cushing gave his life, has been bestowed on more than 1,500 soldiers who fought in the Civil War, most recently Cpl. Andrew Jackson Smith of Clinton, Illinois. Smith was honored by President Bill Clinton in 2001 just before Clinton left office.

It was unclear why Cushing wasn't similarly honored. His descendants and admirers have pressed for thehonor since the late 1980s.

The Cushing name is prominent in Delafield in southeastern Wisconsin. A monument to Cushing and two of his brothers — Naval Cmdr. William Cushing and Army 1st Lt. Howard Cushing — stands at Cushing Memorial Park, where the town holds most of its Memorial Day celebrations.

Wisconsin's lawmakers in Congress had attached an amendment to honor Cushing to a defense spending bill in 2010, but then-Sen. James Webb, D-Va., stripped it out. Webb argued it was impossible to go back 150 years to determine who should receive a medal. He predicted that doing so could spark a flood of claims.

The Medal of Honor is given to service members who risk their lives in acts of personal bravery above and beyond the call of duty.

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2014/11/06/civil-war-officer-to-receive-medal-honor-from-president-obama/
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« Reply #205 on: November 13, 2014, 10:15:53 AM »

70 years later, a World War II airman returns home
Diane Moore/Special to the Sun

An honor guard carries the casket of Tech Sgt. Hugh Francis Moore at Philadelphia Intl. Airport. His remains, discovered in New Guinea in 2001, were identified by DNA testing. He had been MIA for over 70 years after his plane was shot down in WWII.

Technical Sergeant Hugh Francis Moore

Technical Sergeant Hugh Francis Moore, far right, with some of his military buddies.

Charles Moore is the nephew of Technical Sergeant Hugh Francis Moore.

By Jean Marbella,
The Baltimore Sun

After 70 years, Sgt. Hugh F. Moore coming home to be buried in Maryland.
Charles Moore was about 7 years old at the time, in bed and asleep, when his father and his Uncle Hugh woke him up.

Hugh F. Moore was in the Army Air Forces and had just received orders that would ultimately take him to Papua New Guinea and into a massive bombing campaign against the Japanese in World War II.

"He had this cloth badge, something you'd sew on a shirt, and he wanted me to have it," Charles Moore, 79, recalled Monday. "That's the last time I saw him."

On April 10, 1944, Technical Sgt. Hugh F. Moore and 11 fellow crewmen were shot down in their B-24D Liberator bomber. On Veterans Day on Tuesday, more than 70 years later, the remains of the 36-year-old airman will be buried in his native Elkton, where his survivors will mark a long-delayed homecoming.

While the remains of three of the crewmen were found after the war, the other nine were deemed unrecoverable in the jungles of Papua New Guinea. But in 2001, the wreckage of Moore's aircraft was located, leading to an excavation and recovery of remains and other material.

Using family members' DNA, Moore was identified Sept. 5.

"It's almost like the marrying of 'Cold Case' and 'CSI,' " said Lt. Col. Melinda F. Morgan, a spokeswoman for the Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office. "You have to do a lot of historical research, as well as genealogical research to do the DNA testing."

Morgan said the process of retrieving the remains and other material from the aircraft, and then identifying the airmen, took a long time because of the number of crew members. They were identified by the Defense Department's Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command, or JPAC, which is dedicated to identifying the approximately 83,000 Americans unaccounted for from past conflicts. The unit has even been able to put names to the remains of recovered Civil War sailors.

More than 70 of Moore's surviving relatives will gather at Cherry Hill United Methodist Cemetery in Elkton, where he will be buried with full military honors. He was one of nine children born to Edward and Emma Louise Scarborough Moore, and he joined the Army in July 1942, according to an obituary posted by Hicks Home for Funerals in Elkton.

Some of his relatives, including Charles Moore, a resident of North East, met the flag-draped casket at Philadelphia International Airport on Sunday. Traveling from Honolulu's Pearl Harbor, where JPAC is based, Sgt. Moore's casket was escorted by Army officials to Elkton.

On Tuesday, there will be a memorial service at Hicks Home for Funerals in Elkton, followed by the burial.

"It's an opportunity to know the homecoming has finally come to an end," said Diane Moore, Charles Moore's daughter. "It was a long time coming."

Ed Warrington, 75, a nephew who lives in Townsend, Del., just north of Dover, said his sister and her daughter, both of whom have since died, provided DNA samples to the Army that led to the identification of Sgt. Moore's remains. One way JPAC identifies remains is through mitochondrial DNA, which passes through maternal family lines.

For Warrington, a semiretired farrier, the return of the remains brings back memories of the letters his uncle used to write him and the toy airplanes he would receive as gifts.

"He told me he was an engineer" on the crew," Warrington said, recalling that his uncle told him, " 'That means I know everything about the B-24 and how to fix it.' "

Warrington said his mother Wilamina was close to her brother, and the family never gave up hope he would be found.

"She would never let anyone forget him," Warrington said. "A couple of months ago, I found a little pocket diary of hers. She only had a couple of entries, and on the date Uncle Hugh went down, she had written, 'Hugh declared missing' on that day."

The family remains in awe that the military continued to search and try to identify such long-ago casualties of war.

"It's pretty amazing," said Diane Moore, a communications supervisor for the Pennsylvania House of Representatives, who lives in Lancaster, Pa. "It shows the value they place in the soldier."

Moore's parents had bought a plot for him in the Cherry Hill cemetery in the 1940s in case the airman was found, according to the funeral home, and they also placed a memorial marker there. He had grown up on the family's farm, and worked at a paper mill and a supply company before joining the Army in July 1942, according to his obituary.

According to the Defense Department, Moore's plane was one of as many as 60 B-24 Liberators from the 5th Air Force that attacked enemy anti-aircraft targets and airfields near Hansa Bay on Papua New Guinea's northern coast. His aircraft, a heavy bomber, was nicknamed "Hot Garters" for reasons that are unknown today, according to the Defense Department's Morgan.

The department says witnesses reported that as "Hot Garters" broke off to begin its bombing run, it was hit by flak from Japanese anti-aircraft guns and its No. 2 engine caught fire. A second fusillade provided the fatal blow, and the aircraft was consumed in flames, coming apart in midair and crashing into the jungle.

Four of the crewmen were able to parachute from the aircraft, according to the Defense Department, but they were taken prisoner and died in captivity. Moore died in the crash itself, Morgan said.

News accounts at the time describe a massive attack on Japanese strongholds in Papua New Guinea.

"Japanese bases in New Guinea are being subjected to the biggest aerial offensive of the Pacific war, with gun positions, ammunition, gas and food dumps being ripped to pieces by the 5th Air Force," a correspondent wrote on April 13, 1944, in a dispatch that appeared in the next day's New York Times.

The article reported that 568 tons of bombs had been dropped in three days on Hansa Bay as "Gen. Douglas MacArthur's air arm obviously is intent on destroying the nerve centers of enemy resistance and paralyzing Japanese supply and communications lines."

Allied bombers flew through the "extremely bad weather" of the rainy season and left "destruction and death" up and down the New Guinea coast, the article said, but concluded: "Nevertheless our losses have been almost insignificant."

An article in The Baltimore Sun on March 22, 1945, noted that Moore's mother received an Air Medal with an Oak Leaf Cluster on behalf of her son, who was declared missing in action.

Moore's family decided it would be appropriate to bury him on Veterans Day. The military is planning a group service for the entire crew at Arlington National Cemetery, although a date has not been finalized, Morgan said.

For Charles Moore, whose father, also named Charles, was the eldest brother of the airman, the return of the remains brings back childhood memories that were fast fading.

He remembers his uncle driving a Hudson Terraplane car, although he can't remember the color. He also recalls going with his dad and uncle to watch them trapshooting.

And he remembers that night he was awoken to say goodbye.

"I was glad that happened," he said.

For Ed Warrington, there are also fond if faint memories, and a cache of letters that he still has from Uncle Hugh.

"The big thing I noticed," he said, "was he always closed by saying something like, 'I might not see you again.' "

http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/bs-md-wwii-remains-return-20141110-story.html#page=1
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« Reply #206 on: November 19, 2014, 10:43:02 AM »

He Was a 98-Year-Old Veteran. A Picture Taken of Him Just One Day Before Death Has Moved America.
Nov. 18, 2014    
Erica Ritz

Americans nationwide reacted to a now-viral photo of a 98-year-old veteran who, too ill to attend the annual Veterans Day celebrations last week, asked that he be dressed in his uniform.

Justus Belfield was too weak to leave his bed, but The Daily Gazette of Schenectady reported that he has worn his uniform every Veterans Day since he and his wife moved to a nursing home in upstate New York several years ago.

It was the last time Belfield, who passed away early Wednesday morning, ever wore his uniform.

“I could see him breathing, and I leaned down and I looked at him and I said, ‘Happy Veterans Day. Thank you for your service,’” Christine Camp, who works at the home, recalled.

Belfield’s response, pictured below, will never be forgotten:

This Nov. 11, 2014 photo provided courtesy of Nancy McKiernan of Baptist Health Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Glenville, N.Y., shows 98-year-old World War II veteran Justus Belfield saluting on Veterans Day. (AP Photo/Courtesy of Nancy McKiernan/Baptist Health Nursing and Rehabilitation Center)
“Godspeed Sarge,” one Daily Gazette commenter wrote. Another added: “God bless and rest you, sir. Thank you for your service.”

Commenters at The Huffington Post were equally full of praise for the 98-year-old veteran.

“I was approached a few years ago by on old vet,” one wrote. “[He wore a] WW2 victory medal, his Pacific campaign ribbon, and a bronze star with four clusters, an arrowhead, and a ‘V’ device. I felt unworthy to polish this old man’s boots. Respect for these old guys. They were tougher than we are.”

“That’s a powerful picture, and it exemplifies everything about that generation. RIP,” another commenter wrote.

The Associated Press reports that Belfield served for 16 years in the Army, participating in — among other historic battles — the Battle of the Bulge.

The Daily Gazette adds that Belfield was discharged multiple times, but always re-enlisted “right away.”

He told the paper in 2013: “I loved it because it was my country. It’s still my country. I don’t like the president. I don’t like the way he handles things, but it’s still the United States. It’s still my country.”

Camp said Belfield lit up the hallways of the nursing home, waking up each day with a smile saying: “Thank you, Jesus, for another day.”

“He loved the family, he loved his country, and he loved God,” Robert Stubbs, Belfield’s son in law, said. “Those three things right there will be his legacy.”

http://www.theblaze.com/stories/2014/11/18/he-was-a-98-year-old-veteran-what-he-did-in-his-bed-just-a-day-before-death-has-moved-america/
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« Reply #207 on: November 19, 2014, 11:12:10 AM »

You seem to hold the veterans in high regard so why do you defend the GOP's action to shoot down any veterans bill?
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« Reply #208 on: November 19, 2014, 11:15:32 AM »

You seem to hold the veterans in high regard so why do you defend the GOP's action to shoot down any veterans bill?

I'm glad you liked the story and the picture.  I think it's pretty awesome too. 
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« Reply #209 on: November 19, 2014, 11:38:11 AM »

I'm glad you liked the story and the picture.  I think it's pretty awesome too. 

I cant think of a reason to dislike veterans.

So why does the GOP fuck them over? And you support it?
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« Reply #210 on: November 19, 2014, 12:20:34 PM »

I cant think of a reason to dislike veterans.

So why does the GOP fuck them over? And you support it?

Thank you for supporting our veterans. 
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« Reply #211 on: November 19, 2014, 12:27:23 PM »

You seem to hold the veterans in high regard so why do you defend the GOP's action to shoot down any veterans bill?

I can't recall the GOP ever doing such a heinous thing.    I'll consider this a liberal lie until proven otherwise.

Waiting. 
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« Reply #212 on: November 19, 2014, 01:29:46 PM »

I can't recall the GOP ever doing such a heinous thing.    I'll consider this a liberal lie until proven otherwise.

Waiting. 


I know you are trolling but google "GOP blocks veterans bill" and the results are in.
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« Reply #213 on: November 19, 2014, 03:13:31 PM »


I know you are trolling but google "GOP blocks veterans bill" and the results are in.

The google results are a little shocking actually   Undecided

http://bit.ly/1zDXeRq
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« Reply #214 on: November 19, 2014, 03:20:13 PM »

The google results are a little shocking actually   Undecided

http://bit.ly/1zDXeRq

Take your pick:


https://www.google.dk/search?hl=en-DK&source=hp&q=GOP+blocks+veterans+bill&gbv=2&oq=GOP+blocks+veterans+bill&gs_l=heirloom-hp.3..0j0i22i30l9.916.916.0.1723.1.1.0.0.0.0.82.82.1.1.0....0...1ac.1.34.heirloom-hp..0.1.82.5RuLiLBV7QM
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« Reply #215 on: November 19, 2014, 10:57:21 PM »


Aside from those numerous factual links proving exactly what you claimed, I see no evidence of this. 

Sorry man, seriously, you're correct here.    Inexcusable.  I doubt anyone here can defend them on this. 
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« Reply #216 on: November 19, 2014, 11:12:57 PM »

Aside from those numerous factual links proving exactly what you claimed, I see no evidence of this. 

Sorry man, seriously, you're correct here.    Inexcusable.  I doubt anyone here can defend them on this. 


Look at Beach Bum's replies.

He makes a whole thread regarding the veterans but when its time to put his money where his mouth is nothing. Just like the GOP's policy regarding veterans.

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