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Author Topic: WHEN IT COMES TO TRAINING, BALANCE IS KEY FOR MUSCULAR GAINS.  (Read 3331 times)
_bruce_
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« Reply #25 on: March 27, 2011, 10:21:37 AM »

Consistency and a sane game plan made the biggest difference for me.
I have to admit that 90% of my training sessions were fantasy workouts fueled by despair or high hopes.
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Meso_z
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« Reply #26 on: March 27, 2011, 01:07:41 PM »

Consistency and a sane game plan made the biggest difference for me.
I have to admit that 90% of my training sessions were fantasy workouts fueled by despair or high hopes.

Can you be more specific? Like planning your workouts or writing them down ?
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« Reply #27 on: March 27, 2011, 01:14:37 PM »

Can you be more specific? Like planning your workouts or writing them down ?
I think what he means is sticking to a sensible workout plan.

he's saying that his workouts were unscheduled, one minute he's doing giant sets, next he's trying HIT, high volume, etc......

It's very easy to read a training article and get pumped up to try a new routine. But if you're reading a new article every few days, you're never sticking to a single routine......no progress.

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« Reply #28 on: March 27, 2011, 01:17:53 PM »

Same thing applies to diet.

One minute I'm doing high carb, the next day it's Keto, then fasting, etc.

It's very motivating trying a new diet, but you can flip flop different ideas for 6 weeks and at the end of it all...... you still weigh the same.

The guy who doesn't make his diet the center of his life,,,,,sensibly and consistantly reduces calories.....6 weeks later...guess what? He's lost weight
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Hulkotron
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attain great strength lifting heavy weights


« Reply #29 on: March 27, 2011, 01:22:44 PM »

you must balance the relationship between =

-total volume and # of sets to failure.
      a) stimulate, dont annihilate.
                <> inverse relationship between total volume and sets to failure.

-strength training and hypertrophy training.
       a) periodize
                  <> switch back to the other when ever you hit a platue.

-training frequency and recovery time.
        a) dictated by record of personal experience
                   <> usually about 3-5 days depending on a massive number of variables.





http://www.submit2science.org/ws/menu.asp
http://www.nature.com/authors/submit_manuscript.html
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tbombz
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« Reply #30 on: March 28, 2011, 12:20:48 PM »

Consistency and a sane game plan made the biggest difference for me.
I have to admit that 90% of my training sessions were fantasy workouts fueled by despair or high hopes.


yes. too many guys just go in and keep lifting untill they cant lift anymore. delusional or misinformed/misguided. it works for someone brand new to exercise and thats why so many guys get confused i think.


tbombz...i would like your opinion....I never have a set rep scheme..i generally go for 4 up to 15 reps in every workout...mixed and depends on the exersice...do you think it harms my progress?  Undecided

i tend to think that the body works best doing one thing at a time.

specialization breeds effeciency.

some science backs this up as well (cardio[high reps] and weight training[lower reps] send opposite signals to the muscle)

i think its best if you focus on one rep range each workout.  and stick with a certain rep range for at least a few workouts in a row.

but one or two pump sets mixed in with heavy training might not hurt progress and could potentially benefit you.  trial and error is the best way to learn. im just posting up some general guidelines to help out people. there isnt a set best way to trian. there are just some principles that apply. periodization. stimulate, dont annihilate. recovery.

 
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jprc10
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« Reply #31 on: March 28, 2011, 12:53:55 PM »

I agree with the people that said keeping it simple is where its at. But I do think that getting progressively stronger on a given rep range is most important, with a moderate amount of volume.

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_bruce_
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« Reply #32 on: March 29, 2011, 12:10:58 AM »

Can you be more specific? Like planning your workouts or writing them down ?

1 ) e.g. : main goal... bigger, stronger, own job, brazilian girlfriend

2 ) snapshot of all lifts - weights + reps.

3 ) get 1 rep max of each lift(squat, row, bench/dip, chin/pullup, press) and decide which program to use - e.g. 5x5, 4x6, 6x4, 3x8
weight: pyramid up or sets across?

4 ) use excel to plan your cycle - e.g. 8 weeks

5 ) follow the prog and see if you can make it

6 ) evaluate -
    ...e.g. squats at week 1 - 225lbs
    ...after week 8 - 260lbs(5 lbs increment each weak)
    ..."did I get stronger with ease?" or "I barely survived and my technique suffered!"
    ...check weight + midsection

7 ) rest/deload/readjust

8 ) repeat

Read at all cost...
http://startingstrength.wikia.com/wiki/Bill_Starr_5x5
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