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Author Topic: Richard Dawkins Calls O'Reilly Dumbass.  (Read 10203 times)
Coach is Back!
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« Reply #25 on: October 16, 2011, 03:36:40 PM »

Hope this helps......


<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GlZtEjtlirc" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GlZtEjtlirc</a>

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MX7Htg2HxkA" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MX7Htg2HxkA</a>

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« Reply #26 on: October 16, 2011, 03:37:17 PM »



no she doesn't





lol
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« Reply #27 on: October 16, 2011, 03:38:28 PM »

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z5qU4qudJYk" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z5qU4qudJYk</a>
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« Reply #28 on: October 16, 2011, 03:40:27 PM »

Both Einstein and Newton believed in god.

But those intellectual lightweights wouldn't last 3 posts in the GetBig forums. They'd be destroyed.


Oh, and Newton (along w/ Leibniz) invented calculus.

I'm sure getbiggers invent calculus everyday when adding up all their plates.
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The answer is "yes".
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« Reply #29 on: October 16, 2011, 03:41:39 PM »

Did O'Reilly really say that?

There is a reason for the Moon and the Sun...

yes, he did say that.
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« Reply #30 on: October 16, 2011, 03:42:15 PM »

Hope this helps......


<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GlZtEjtlirc" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GlZtEjtlirc</a>

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MX7Htg2HxkA" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MX7Htg2HxkA</a>



haha Epic Fail, Coach. This video was altered and richard dawkins eventually did provide a response.
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suckmymuscle
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« Reply #31 on: October 16, 2011, 03:44:36 PM »

Both Einstein and Newton believed in god.

But those intellectual lightweights wouldn't last 3 posts in the GetBig forums. They'd be destroyed.


Oh, and Newton (along w/ Leibniz) invented calculus.

I'm sure getbiggers invent calculus everyday when adding up all their plates.

  Newton believed in God in a time when it was almost impossible not to. We are talking the 16th century, man. The amount of scientific evidence back then was so small that even a genius would have no choice but to believe is some supernatural explanation. As for Einstein, he never believed in God. This is a myth. He used God as a metaphor for reality or the Universe as an allegory, but he didn't believe in God literally.

SUCKMYMUSCLE
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« Reply #32 on: October 16, 2011, 03:48:46 PM »

  Newton believed in God in a time when it was almost impossible not to. We are talking the 16th century, man. The amount of scientific evidence back then was so small that even a genius would have no choice but to believe is some supernatural explanation. As for Einstein, he never believed in God. This is a myth. He used God as a metaphor for reality or the Universe as an allegory, but he didn't believe in God literally.

SUCKMYMUSCLE

If I recall correctly, both Einstein and Newton were deists. They believed in a god, but that's as far as it went. Newton thought god was like a watchmaker. He (god) made the universe and then lets it run (without interference).

I remember learning about this in college. It stuck in my head that both scientists believed the same thing. If the class was wrong, or if more info has come to light, then that's fine.

Cursory Google searches yield no definite answers. (They go either way...)
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The answer is "yes".
suckmymuscle
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« Reply #33 on: October 16, 2011, 03:51:30 PM »

Hope this helps......


<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GlZtEjtlirc" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GlZtEjtlirc</a>

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MX7Htg2HxkA" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MX7Htg2HxkA</a>



  It is amazing how this Bein Stein idiot misconstrued everything that Dawkins said to make it seem like Dawkins was advocating intelligent design, when nothing could be further from the truth. Epic self-ownage by "Coach" who is just as dumb as Bein Stein.

SUCKMYMUSCLE
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« Reply #34 on: October 16, 2011, 03:52:05 PM »

haha Epic Fail, Coach. This video was altered and richard dawkins eventually did provide a response.

LOL..was that proven by an athiest site?
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« Reply #35 on: October 16, 2011, 03:52:29 PM »

Both Einstein and Newton believed in god.

But those intellectual lightweights wouldn't last 3 posts in the GetBig forums. They'd be destroyed.


Oh, and Newton (along w/ Leibniz) invented calculus.

I'm sure getbiggers invent calculus everyday when adding up all their plates.
Hope this helps dipshit jr. Don`t ever repeat this bullshit again, ok?

http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/2008/may/12/peopleinscience.religion

Childish superstition: Einstein's letter makes view of religion relatively clear
Scientist's reply to sell for up to 8,000, and stoke debate over his beliefs


  
The Guardian,    Monday 12 May 2008




Albert Einstein, pictured in 1953. Photograph: Ruth Orkin/Hulton Archive/Getty Images


"Science without religion is lame, religion without science is blind." So said Albert Einstein, and his famous aphorism has been the source of endless debate between believers and non-believers wanting to claim the greatest scientist of the 20th century as their own.

A little known letter written by him, however, may help to settle the argument - or at least provoke further controversy about his views.

Due to be auctioned this week in London after being in a private collection for more than 50 years, the document leaves no doubt that the theoretical physicist was no supporter of religious beliefs, which he regarded as "childish superstitions".

Einstein penned the letter on January 3 1954 to the philosopher Eric Gutkind who had sent him a copy of his book Choose Life: The Biblical Call to Revolt. The letter went on public sale a year later and has remained in private hands ever since.

In the letter, he states: "The word god is for me nothing more than the expression and product of human weaknesses, the Bible a collection of honourable, but still primitive legends which are nevertheless pretty childish. No interpretation no matter how subtle can (for me) change this."

Einstein, who was Jewish and who declined an offer to be the state of Israel's second president, also rejected the idea that the Jews are God's favoured people.

"For me the Jewish religion like all others is an incarnation of the most childish superstitions. And the Jewish people to whom I gladly belong and with whose mentality I have a deep affinity have no different quality for me than all other people. As far as my experience goes, they are no better than other human groups, although they are protected from the worst cancers by a lack of power. Otherwise I cannot see anything 'chosen' about them."

The letter will go on sale at Bloomsbury Auctions in Mayfair on Thursday and is expected to fetch up to 8,000. The handwritten piece, in German, is not listed in the source material of the most authoritative academic text on the subject, Max Jammer's book Einstein and Religion.

One of the country's leading experts on the scientist, John Brooke of Oxford University, admitted he had not heard of it.

Einstein is best known for his theories of relativity and for the famous E=mc2 equation that describes the equivalence of mass and energy, but his thoughts on religion have long attracted conjecture.

His parents were not religious but he attended a Catholic primary school and at the same time received private tuition in Judaism. This prompted what he later called, his "religious paradise of youth", during which he observed religious rules such as not eating pork. This did not last long though and by 12 he was questioning the truth of many biblical stories.

"The consequence was a positively fanatic [orgy of] freethinking coupled with the impression that youth is being deceived by the state through lies; it was a crushing impression," he later wrote.

In his later years he referred to a "cosmic religious feeling" that permeated and sustained his scientific work. In 1954, a year before his death, he spoke of wishing to "experience the universe as a single cosmic whole". He was also fond of using religious flourishes, in 1926 declaring that "He [God] does not throw dice" when referring to randomness thrown up by quantum theory.

His position on God has been widely misrepresented by people on both sides of the atheism/religion divide but he always resisted easy stereotyping on the subject.

"Like other great scientists he does not fit the boxes in which popular polemicists like to pigeonhole him," said Brooke. "It is clear for example that he had respect for the religious values enshrined within Judaic and Christian traditions ... but what he understood by religion was something far more subtle than what is usually meant by the word in popular discussion."

Despite his categorical rejection of conventional religion, Brooke said that Einstein became angry when his views were appropriated by evangelists for atheism. He was offended by their lack of humility and once wrote. "The eternal mystery of the world is its comprehensibility."
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« Reply #36 on: October 16, 2011, 03:52:47 PM »

  It is amazing how this Bein Stein idiot misconstrued everything that Dawkins said to make it seem like Dawkins was advocating intelligent design, when nothing could be further from the truth. Epic self-ownage by "Coach" who is just as dumb as Bein Stein.

SUCKMYMUSCLE

Ok..lol
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SF1900
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« Reply #37 on: October 16, 2011, 03:52:53 PM »

If I recall correctly, both Einstein and Newton were deists. They believed in a god, but that's as far as it went. Newton thought god was like a watchmaker. He (god) made the universe and then lets it run (without interference).

I remember learning about this in college. It stuck in my head that both scientists believed the same thing. If the class was wrong, or if more info has come to light, then that's fine.

Cursory Google searches yield no definite answers. (They go either way...)

Well, of course Newton believed in God. IF he didn't, he would have been burned at the stake. the church ruled back then. I am almost certain that you put Newton in the 21st century and he would be an atheist.
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« Reply #38 on: October 16, 2011, 03:53:07 PM »

you're quite the stupid bitch yourself, stupid
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« Reply #39 on: October 16, 2011, 03:53:45 PM »

Hope this helps dipshit jr. Don`t ever repeat this bullshit again, ok?

http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/2008/may/12/peopleinscience.religion

Childish superstition: Einstein's letter makes view of religion relatively clear
Scientist's reply to sell for up to 8,000, and stoke debate over his beliefs


  
The Guardian,    Monday 12 May 2008




Albert Einstein, pictured in 1953. Photograph: Ruth Orkin/Hulton Archive/Getty Images


"Science without religion is lame, religion without science is blind." So said Albert Einstein, and his famous aphorism has been the source of endless debate between believers and non-believers wanting to claim the greatest scientist of the 20th century as their own.

A little known letter written by him, however, may help to settle the argument - or at least provoke further controversy about his views.

Due to be auctioned this week in London after being in a private collection for more than 50 years, the document leaves no doubt that the theoretical physicist was no supporter of religious beliefs, which he regarded as "childish superstitions".

Einstein penned the letter on January 3 1954 to the philosopher Eric Gutkind who had sent him a copy of his book Choose Life: The Biblical Call to Revolt. The letter went on public sale a year later and has remained in private hands ever since.

In the letter, he states: "The word god is for me nothing more than the expression and product of human weaknesses, the Bible a collection of honourable, but still primitive legends which are nevertheless pretty childish. No interpretation no matter how subtle can (for me) change this."

Einstein, who was Jewish and who declined an offer to be the state of Israel's second president, also rejected the idea that the Jews are God's favoured people.

"For me the Jewish religion like all others is an incarnation of the most childish superstitions. And the Jewish people to whom I gladly belong and with whose mentality I have a deep affinity have no different quality for me than all other people. As far as my experience goes, they are no better than other human groups, although they are protected from the worst cancers by a lack of power. Otherwise I cannot see anything 'chosen' about them."

The letter will go on sale at Bloomsbury Auctions in Mayfair on Thursday and is expected to fetch up to 8,000. The handwritten piece, in German, is not listed in the source material of the most authoritative academic text on the subject, Max Jammer's book Einstein and Religion.

One of the country's leading experts on the scientist, John Brooke of Oxford University, admitted he had not heard of it.

Einstein is best known for his theories of relativity and for the famous E=mc2 equation that describes the equivalence of mass and energy, but his thoughts on religion have long attracted conjecture.

His parents were not religious but he attended a Catholic primary school and at the same time received private tuition in Judaism. This prompted what he later called, his "religious paradise of youth", during which he observed religious rules such as not eating pork. This did not last long though and by 12 he was questioning the truth of many biblical stories.

"The consequence was a positively fanatic [orgy of] freethinking coupled with the impression that youth is being deceived by the state through lies; it was a crushing impression," he later wrote.

In his later years he referred to a "cosmic religious feeling" that permeated and sustained his scientific work. In 1954, a year before his death, he spoke of wishing to "experience the universe as a single cosmic whole". He was also fond of using religious flourishes, in 1926 declaring that "He [God] does not throw dice" when referring to randomness thrown up by quantum theory.

His position on God has been widely misrepresented by people on both sides of the atheism/religion divide but he always resisted easy stereotyping on the subject.

"Like other great scientists he does not fit the boxes in which popular polemicists like to pigeonhole him," said Brooke. "It is clear for example that he had respect for the religious values enshrined within Judaic and Christian traditions ... but what he understood by religion was something far more subtle than what is usually meant by the word in popular discussion."

Despite his categorical rejection of conventional religion, Brooke said that Einstein became angry when his views were appropriated by evangelists for atheism. He was offended by their lack of humility and once wrote. "The eternal mystery of the world is its comprehensibility."

Another cut and paste TA? lol
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« Reply #40 on: October 16, 2011, 03:55:08 PM »

If I recall correctly, both Einstein and Newton were deists. They believed in a god, but that's as far as it went. Newton thought god was like a watchmaker. He (god) made the universe and then lets it run (without interference).

I remember learning about this in college. It stuck in my head that both scientists believed the same thing. If the class was wrong, or if more info has come to light, then that's fine.

Cursory Google searches yield no definite answers. (They go either way...)

  Einstein liked to say in his debates with Max Planck that "God doesen't throw the dice", talking about the implausibility of quantum mechanics. But this is no evidence that Einstein believed in God. He was using allegorical and metaphorical speach, talking about God as some prime principle that ordained reality as it is. "God" could just be used by Einstein as synonymous with "final explanation" which he didn't know which is.

SUCKMYMUSCLE
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« Reply #41 on: October 16, 2011, 03:55:18 PM »

Another cut and paste TA? lol

it doesnt matter if its cut and paste, it proves that einstein was NOT a theist. plain and simple.
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« Reply #42 on: October 16, 2011, 03:57:35 PM »

Another cut and paste TA? lol
Why do you make fun of cut and paste? I don't understand. Maybe you aren't used to citing sources or showing evidence for claims and that is why this is a totally new and strange concept to you?
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« Reply #43 on: October 16, 2011, 04:02:56 PM »

Why do you make fun of cut and paste? I don't understand. Maybe you aren't used to citing sources or showing evidence for claims and that is why this is a totally new and strange concept to you?
Its a common theme with people of his ilk (largely Republicans) who cannot discern where a fact comes from or what a Primary source is, so they instead then institute a system where somehow opinions of unqualified individuals (or even their own opinions) take precedence over everything which are made up of myths, fables, exaggerations or even outright lies.  Truth, fact and Evidence be damned.

These people are also the easiest to manipulate.  Cheesy
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« Reply #44 on: October 16, 2011, 04:04:46 PM »

I would LOVE to beat the shit out of ben stein. What an insanely, despicably, cunting retard of a human being. Fuck him.
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« Reply #45 on: October 16, 2011, 04:05:13 PM »

Coach is def. plugged in.
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« Reply #46 on: October 16, 2011, 04:05:35 PM »

Its a common theme with people of his ilk (largely Republicans) who cannot discern where a fact comes from or what a Primary source is, so they instead then institute a system where somehow opinions of unqualified individuals (or even their own opinions) take precedence over everything which are made up of myths, fables, exaggerations or even outright lies.  Truth, fact and Evidence be damned.

These people are also the easiest to manipulate.  Cheesy

so youre saying that citing peer reviewed journal articles is a good thing?  Cheesy Cheesy and that coach doesnt know this!  Shocked Shocked Shocked
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The True Adonis
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« Reply #47 on: October 16, 2011, 04:07:16 PM »

so youre saying that citing peer reviewed journal articles is a good thing?  Cheesy Cheesy and that coach doesnt know this!  Shocked Shocked Shocked
Nobody around here cites anything and that is part of the problem.  They would rather interject themselves somehow into a debate when they lack evidence to back anything up they are putting forth. 
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« Reply #48 on: October 16, 2011, 04:09:02 PM »

Nobody around here cites anything and that is part of the problem.  They would rather interject themselves somehow into a debate when they lack evidence to back anything up they are putting forth. 

Agreed. However, it appears that coach is against citing evidence  Undecided Undecided
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« Reply #49 on: October 16, 2011, 04:10:23 PM »

Well, of course Newton believed in God. IF he didn't, he would have been burned at the stake. the church ruled back then. I am almost certain that you put Newton in the 21st century and he would be an atheist.

Who knows what Newton would believe if he were alive today? Ironically, I bet he'd be an Android guy.  Wink
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