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Author Topic: Police State - Official Thread  (Read 98726 times)
Skeletor
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« Reply #1850 on: October 29, 2014, 04:16:25 PM »

"Richard Alamia, attorney for the teen’s family, had also said that other Pharr police officers watched Mata commit the sexual assaults and that the department attempted to cover up the case."


Former Pharr police officer indicted on child sexual assault

http://www.brownsvilleherald.com/news/valley/article_f56318ec-28e3-11e4-b6dc-0017a43b2370.html

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Agnostic007
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« Reply #1851 on: November 03, 2014, 06:20:02 AM »

Law Lets I.R.S. Seize Accounts on Suspicion, No Crime Required
New York TImes ^  | October 27, 2014 | Sheila Dewan

Posted on ‎10‎/‎27‎/‎2014‎ ‎7‎:‎43‎:‎20‎ ‎AM by Makana

ARNOLDS PARK, Iowa — For almost 40 years, Carole Hinders has dished out Mexican specialties at her modest cash-only restaurant. For just as long, she deposited the earnings at a small bank branch a block away — until last year, when two tax agents knocked on her door and informed her that they had seized her checking account, almost $33,000.

The Internal Revenue Service agents did not accuse Ms. Hinders of money laundering or cheating on her taxes — in fact, she has not been charged with any crime. Instead, the money was seized solely because she had deposited less than $10,000 at a time, which they viewed as an attempt to avoid triggering a required government report.

“How can this happen?” Ms. Hinders said in a recent interview. “Who takes your money before they prove that you’ve done anything wrong with it?”


(Excerpt) Read more at nytimes.com ...


I read this story last week. She said she always deposited less than the 10,000 to save the bank paper work. I almost spit out my coffee. She was cheating on her taxes. Probably very few small businesses like that report all their sales. BUT...... that is not proven at this point, and the IRS has a history of ruining lives with little or no evidence and this practice should have been stopped years ago. That it still exists indicates to me we as a people have no control of our government.   
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Agnostic007
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« Reply #1852 on: November 03, 2014, 06:22:24 AM »

So it turns out the vermin viewed this as a "game" and have been doing it for years...

Warrant: CHP officer says stealing nude photos from female arrestees 'game' for cops

http://www.contracostatimes.com/my-town/ci_26793090/warrant-chp-officer-says-stealing-nude-photos-from

I've never stolen a picture from a phone, nor have I had any officer share a picture they stole from a phone. Every single officer they find that did that should be fired and be held accountable in criminal and civil court. Fuktards 
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Soul Crusher
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« Reply #1853 on: November 03, 2014, 07:55:17 AM »

http://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2014/10/the-police-are-still-out-of-control-112160.html#.VFeXQ2x0zIV


Good story
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Agnostic007
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« Reply #1854 on: November 03, 2014, 10:32:46 AM »


"And with all due respect to today’s police officers doing their jobs, they don’t need all that stuff anyway. When I was cop I disarmed a man with three guns who had just killed someone. I was off duty and all I had was my snub-nose Smith & Wesson. I fired a warning shot, the guy ran off and I chased him down."

I stopped reading about here...

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Soul Crusher
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« Reply #1855 on: November 03, 2014, 10:47:24 AM »

"And with all due respect to today’s police officers doing their jobs, they don’t need all that stuff anyway. When I was cop I disarmed a man with three guns who had just killed someone. I was off duty and all I had was my snub-nose Smith & Wesson. I fired a warning shot, the guy ran off and I chased him down."

I stopped reading about here...




You do know who Frank Serpico was right?

and no - you don't need a Tank, MRAP, etc
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Agnostic007
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« Reply #1856 on: November 03, 2014, 11:40:13 AM »


You do know who Frank Serpico was right?

and no - you don't need a Tank, MRAP, etc

yes I know. I also know a war story when I hear one
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« Reply #1857 on: November 04, 2014, 12:33:25 PM »

http://www.businessinsider.com/jed-rakoff-attacks-plea-bargains-2014-11



Great article.   Agree w this 100%
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« Reply #1858 on: November 04, 2014, 12:54:12 PM »

Elderly man, 90, and two clergymen face jail time for feeding the homeless
New York Daily News ^  | 11/4/2014 | BY MARC WEINREICH

Posted on ‎11‎/‎4‎/‎2014‎ ‎2‎:‎49‎:‎37‎ ‎PM by SeekAndFind

A senior citizen and a couple of clergymen in Florida face up to two months in jail for feeding the homeless.

A group of volunteers with the non-profit charity Love Thy Neighbor in Broward County face up to a $500 fine and 60 days in jail because they were feeding the homeless last Sunday in Fort Lauderdale, the New Times reports.

World War II veteran Arnold Abbott, founder of the interfaith organization, and members of a local church were confronted by Fort Lauderdale police officers because they had reportedly been in violation of the new laws against food sharing — laws that were ironically enacted on Halloween, a night reserved for, well, sharing candy.

Trays of hot food intended to be distributed to the lines of homeless people on the street last weekend were instead thrown directly into the trash by the officers, who ordered Abbott to “drop that plate right now.” In total, four police cruisers and a half dozen uniformed cops arrived to the scene.

Abbott and two clergymen were subsequently issued citations and are due to appear in court in the coming weeks.

The new law comes on the heels of an announcement from the city in January that restrict camping, panhandling, food sharing and other “life sustaining” activities.

Not to be deterred, Abbott, who has been feeding the homeless for years, talked in the report about how his recent run-in with the law will change things.


(Excerpt) Read more at nydailynews.com ...
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Skeletor
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« Reply #1859 on: November 05, 2014, 10:16:43 AM »

Three new alleged victims spur more sex crime charges against Oklahoma City police officer

An Oklahoma City police officer accused of raping and sexually assaulting women while on duty was charged with six more counts in Oklahoma County District Court on Tuesday.

http://newsok.com/three-new-alleged-victims-spur-more-sex-crime-charges-against-holtzclaw/article/5363617
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« Reply #1860 on: November 07, 2014, 07:04:21 AM »

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/11/07/fbi-impersonates-ap-reporter_n_6118970.html


Geez! 
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Skeletor
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« Reply #1861 on: November 07, 2014, 12:56:04 PM »

The cop kicked the man in the testicles and then grabbed the phone from a witness who was filming and deleted the video (whole scene was captured on the cop's lapel camera)..


Case dismissed against man who lost testicle

http://krqe.com/2014/10/30/case-dismissed-against-man-who-lost-testicle/
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« Reply #1862 on: November 08, 2014, 08:27:09 PM »

http://nypost.com/2014/11/08/manhattan-prosecutor-arrested-for-beating-woman-at-a-bar/?utm_campaign=SocialFlow&utm_source=NYPFacebook&utm_medium=SocialFlow
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« Reply #1863 on: November 10, 2014, 12:34:25 PM »

Police Use Department Wish List When Deciding Which Assets to Seize
The New York Times ^  | 09 Nov 2014 | SHAILA DEWAN

Posted on ‎11‎/‎10‎/‎2014‎ ‎1‎:‎24‎:‎22‎ ‎PM by Theoria

The seminars offered police officers some useful tips on seizing property from suspected criminals. Don’t bother with jewelry (too hard to dispose of) and computers (“everybody’s got one already”), the experts counseled. Do go after flat screen TVs, cash and cars. Especially nice cars.

In one seminar, captured on video in September, Harry S. Connelly Jr., the city attorney of Las Cruces, N.M., called them “little goodies.” And then Mr. Connelly described how officers in his jurisdiction could not wait to seize one man’s “exotic vehicle” outside a local bar.

“A guy drives up in a 2008 Mercedes, brand new,” he explained. “Just so beautiful, I mean, the cops were undercover and they were just like ‘Ahhhh.’ And he gets out and he’s just reeking of alcohol. And it’s like, ‘Oh, my goodness, we can hardly wait.’ ”

Mr. Connelly was talking about a practice known as civil asset forfeiture, which allows the government, without ever securing a conviction or even filing a criminal charge, to seize property suspected of having ties to crime. The practice, expanded during the war on drugs in the 1980s, has become a staple of law enforcement agencies because it helps finance their work. It is difficult to tell how much has been seized by state and local law enforcement, but under a Justice Department program, the value of assets seized has ballooned to $4.3 billion in the 2012 fiscal year from $407 million in 2001. Much of that money is shared with local police forces.


(Excerpt) Read more at nytimes.com ...


http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/10/us/police-use-department-wish-list-when-deciding-which-assets-to-seize.html?_r=1
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Skeletor
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« Reply #1864 on: November 12, 2014, 11:01:19 AM »

New bill would require cops to get suspect’s search consent

Members of the City Council are going to sock it to the NYPD again by introducing a bill that would force cops to get written or audio permission from a suspect before they could conduct a search, The Post has learned.

http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2014/11/12/new-bill-would-require-cops-to-get-suspects-search-consent
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Agnostic007
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« Reply #1865 on: November 12, 2014, 04:54:47 PM »

New bill would require cops to get suspect’s search consent

Members of the City Council are going to sock it to the NYPD again by introducing a bill that would force cops to get written or audio permission from a suspect before they could conduct a search, The Post has learned.

http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2014/11/12/new-bill-would-require-cops-to-get-suspects-search-consent

We've been doing that for years
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Skeletor
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« Reply #1866 on: November 12, 2014, 05:19:43 PM »

We've been doing that for years

Is this state law (you're in TX if I'm not mistaken?) or your department's policy?
I think it is a step in the right direction. As expected the police union is always the first to react to such proposals.
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Agnostic007
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« Reply #1867 on: November 12, 2014, 05:47:14 PM »

Is this state law (you're in TX if I'm not mistaken?) or your department's policy?
I think it is a step in the right direction. As expected the police union is always the first to react to such proposals.


It's our departments policy. Consent is the BEST way to search for an officer. An attorney can argue probable cause till the cows come home, but with consent, either they gave it voluntarily or they didnt. So just verbally giving it to an officer is okay, it will still be argued whether it was voluntary or not but more often than not, it will stand..but having you sign a form that lists out all your rights and that the search is voluntary and you can stop it at any time is much better.  Having you sign it on camera with audio is even better. Having you sign it on camera in blood while holding a bible is the best. 
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« Reply #1868 on: November 14, 2014, 08:34:08 AM »


Justice Department Admits It Misled Court About FBI’s Secret Surveillance Program

“We regret this inadvertent inaccuracy and apologize for any confusion that may have been caused.”




By Dustin Volz
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(Shutterstock)
 



November 13, 2014 The Justice Department acknowledged that it misled a federal Appeals Court during oral arguments last month in a case reviewing whether the government should be able to secretly conduct electronic surveillance of Americans without a warrant.

In a newly unsealed letter, a Justice Department lawyer told the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit that it spoke erroneously when describing the disclosure restrictions placed upon the FBI's use of so-called national security letters. NSLs, as they are often referred, can compel companies to hand over communications data or financial records of certain users to authorities conducting a national security investigation.



Companies are often given an NSL with an accompanying gag order that prevents them from publicly revealing any details regarding the NSL, or disclosing that it even exists. But during arguments, government lawyers indicated to the contrary that a company could reveal that it had received a specific NSL and "discuss the quality" of it.

"That suggestion was mistaken," wrote Justice Department lawyer Jonathan Levy. "We regret this inadvertent inaccuracy and apologize for any confusion that may have been caused."

Levy additionally noted the letter, addressed to the Appeals Court, was an attempt to "correct that error."
 



 
The Electronic Frontier Foundation, a digital-freedom group which represented an unidentified telecommunications company in the case, said the government's mea culpa "significantly undermines its case."

"During oral arguments, we were surprised to hear the government retreat from its position that NSLs gag recipients from talking about the 'very fact of having received' an NSL," said Cindy Cohn, EFF's legal director, in a statement. "But now we learn that the government's position remains unchanged. Because the government's argument to the Ninth Circuit depended in part on the assertion that the NSL gag order does nothing to stifle public debate, this later retraction significantly undermines its case."

Cohn called the mistake a "very strategic error" by the government, noting that the correction was given only after her organization asked for specific clarification.

"They didn't draw the attention to the Court, I did," Cohn said. "You can call it an error ... but we've seen the government willing to shave the truth and mislead Congress" on surveillance matters.



In the wake of the Snowden leaks, the government relaxed some restraints on what tech companies can disclose about the government's surveillance requests. A deal announced earlier this year allows reporting on the quantity of NSLs received over the course of six months, but only within bands of 1,000. (A company that received zero NSLs, for example, could only disclose it had received between zero and 999.)

National security letters have been in use since the late 1970s, although they have grown in importance and frequency in recent years. Hundreds of thousands of NSLs have been issued since the post-9/11 USA Patriot Act expanded their authority, and an overwhelming majority have been accompanied by gag orders. The Justice Department argues the letters are necessary to protect national security and thwart terrorist attacks.

An unidentified telecommunications company, represented by EFF, challenged the legal authority of an NSL it received in 2011, as well as the gag order that prevented disclosure.


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A federal judge last year ruled that the FBI's use of NSLs violated the First Amendment, a decision privacy advocates cheered. The judge additionally found the government's limited judicial oversight over NSLs was lacking, ordered the cessation of their use, and said the FBI must halt enforcement of its gag orders.

Enforcement of the ruling was stayed due to the "significant constitutional and national security issues at stake," however, and the government appealed the decision to the 9th Circuit.

The case is one of several makings its way through the courts that challenges the legal authority of government surveillance. A decision is expected in the coming months, and many observers say it could ultimately land before the Supreme Court.

This article appears in the November 14, 2014 edition of NJ Daily.
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avxo
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« Reply #1869 on: November 19, 2014, 09:02:03 PM »


It's our departments policy. Consent is the BEST way to search for an officer. An attorney can argue probable cause till the cows come home, but with consent, either they gave it voluntarily or they didnt. So just verbally giving it to an officer is okay, it will still be argued whether it was voluntary or not but more often than not, it will stand..but having you sign a form that lists out all your rights and that the search is voluntary and you can stop it at any time is much better.  Having you sign it on camera with audio is even better. Having you sign it on camera in blood while holding a bible is the best.  

Egads... hearing you describe this department you work for one is left with the impression that you don't just work as a police offer, but as an incorruptible guardian of truth, justice and the American way - the last line of defense between decent people and scum - as a member of the super-mega-ultra-bestest police department ever!

Now, I do not wish to doubt your ability to subdue ruffians with but a flex of your 30" biceps, but I am forced to question the rosy picture you paint.
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Soul Crusher
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« Reply #1870 on: November 20, 2014, 10:40:47 AM »

Prosecutor Will Go to Jail for Wrongfully Convicting an Innocent Man
Huffington Post ^  | 11/08/2013 4:12 pm EST | Mark Godsey

Posted on ‎11‎/‎20‎/‎2014‎ ‎9‎:‎27‎:‎05‎ ‎AM by CorporateStepsister

Today in Texas, former prosecutor and judge Ken Anderson pled guilty to intentionally failing to disclose evidence in a case that sent an innocent man, Michael Morton, to prison for the murder of his wife. When trying the case as a prosecutor, Anderson possessed evidence that may have cleared Morton, including statements from the crime's only eyewitness that Morton wasn't the culprit. Anderson sat on this evidence, and then watched Morton get convicted. While Morton remained in prison for the next 25 years, Anderson's career flourished, and he eventually became a judge.

In today's deal, Anderson pled to criminal contempt, and will have to give up his law license, perform 500 hours of community service, and spend 10 days in jail. Anderson had already resigned in September from his position on the Texas bench.

What makes today's plea newsworthy is not that Anderson engaged in misconduct that sent an innocent man to prison. Indeed, while most prosecutors and police officers are ethical and take their constitutional obligations seriously, government misconduct--including disclosure breaches known as Brady violations--occurs so frequently that it has become one of the chief causes of wrongful conviction.


(Excerpt) Read more at huffingtonpost.com ...
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Skeletor
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« Reply #1871 on: November 20, 2014, 01:22:58 PM »

Prosecutor Will Go to Jail for Wrongfully Convicting an Innocent Man
Huffington Post ^  | 11/08/2013 4:12 pm EST | Mark Godsey

Posted on ‎11‎/‎20‎/‎2014‎ ‎9‎:‎27‎:‎05‎ ‎AM by CorporateStepsister

Today in Texas, former prosecutor and judge Ken Anderson pled guilty to intentionally failing to disclose evidence in a case that sent an innocent man, Michael Morton, to prison for the murder of his wife. When trying the case as a prosecutor, Anderson possessed evidence that may have cleared Morton, including statements from the crime's only eyewitness that Morton wasn't the culprit. Anderson sat on this evidence, and then watched Morton get convicted. While Morton remained in prison for the next 25 years, Anderson's career flourished, and he eventually became a judge.

In today's deal, Anderson pled to criminal contempt, and will have to give up his law license, perform 500 hours of community service, and spend 10 days in jail. Anderson had already resigned in September from his position on the Texas bench.

What makes today's plea newsworthy is not that Anderson engaged in misconduct that sent an innocent man to prison. Indeed, while most prosecutors and police officers are ethical and take their constitutional obligations seriously, government misconduct--including disclosure breaches known as Brady violations--occurs so frequently that it has become one of the chief causes of wrongful conviction.


(Excerpt) Read more at huffingtonpost.com ...


10 days and 500 hours community service for knowingly sending an innocent man to prison for 25 years and destroying so many lives. The absolute minimum he should get is the time the innocent man spent in prison-25 years. Corrupt prosecutors, judges and cops should be made an example of.
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Agnostic007
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« Reply #1872 on: November 20, 2014, 01:45:44 PM »

10 days and 500 hours community service for knowingly sending an innocent man to prison for 25 years and destroying so many lives. The absolute minimum he should get is the time the innocent man spent in prison-25 years. Corrupt prosecutors, judges and cops should be made an example of.

This happened in my neck of the woods. Total disgrace. Ken Anderson should have done 25 yrs
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avxo
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« Reply #1873 on: November 21, 2014, 01:46:03 AM »

10 days and 500 hours community service for knowingly sending an innocent man to prison for 25 years and destroying so many lives. The absolute minimum he should get is the time the innocent man spent in prison-25 years. Corrupt prosecutors, judges and cops should be made an example of.

Fucking insane...
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