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Author Topic: Lower back Fibrosis- SI Joint/ Piriformis muscle  (Read 4509 times)
vic86
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« on: March 15, 2011, 12:45:51 PM »

Iam having Fibrosis in my lower back especially on the left side which goes till the glutes causing a irritating pain .It was horrible till Jan where I couldnt even bend to touch my toes fearing a shooting pain untill I got it diagnosed by my orthopedic .Currently I have been out of gym due to personal and professional issues so I have been utilising this time to recuperate ,so been doing body weight drills along with some mobility drills and cardio.Also I am having Enzymes containing Trypsin,Bromelain & Rutoside Trihydrate pills followed by Icing on the local area.I was just curious what does fibrosis mean?inflammation? overuse of the muscle?
JPM ,Montague or Stella any inputs would be appreciated. Smiley
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« Reply #1 on: March 15, 2011, 01:22:53 PM »

I personally have very little knowledge of and no experience with it.
The word fibrosis literally means the formation of (excess) fibrous connective tissue.
There are numerous types, causes, and locations you can find it on your body.
I don't know that overuse is a cause.

Sometimes, it can occur following surgery, radiation therapy, or lymphedema treatment.

When you say it's in your low back, do you mean on the skin, or under it - like on a tendon or ligament?

Early stages of some forms on the skin can produce "pitting edema," which is when an area of skin is puffy/swollen, and if you press into it with your thumb, you will leave a temporary indentation while the skin very slowly returns to its shape.
I've only seen this once, but I don't know what caused it.
I was working in a vascular lab testing patients for circulation problems.

Sorry I don't have more info.
I'm afraid that Google will help you better than I can.
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Butterbean
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« Reply #2 on: March 16, 2011, 07:38:53 AM »

I don't know anything about that either but

I found this at allexperts.com...not sure if it's the same type of fibrosis you are talking about or not:


Questioni have pain in the lower back that feels like the spine is being pressed on from the inside. if i'm standing and i bend at the waist to touch my toes the pressure gets more pronounced. its local is just above the tail bone. i havent been injured there or anything. i'm wondering what it could be. i also have small muscle spasms eminating from this local that sometimes make one or both legs jump. i've been to a couple doctors but since i have no insurance they dont want to run any tests. what do you think?

Answer
Not possible to tell without examining you, but it sounds like it could be a ruptured disc. See if there is a free clinic in your town run by the health department. OK?
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Anatomy of the lumbar spine:   
The vertebral column, also called the backbone, is made up of 33 vertebraes that are separated by spongy disks and classified into four distinct areas. The cervical area consists of seven bony parts in the neck; the thoracic spine consists of 12 bony parts in the back area; the lumbar spine consists of five bony segments in the lower back area; five sacral bones (fused into one bone, the sacrum); and four coccygeal bones (fused into one bone, the coccyx).

Lumbar disc disease occurs in the lumbar area of the spine. The lumbar area of the spine (and other areas of the spine) is made up of two parts, including the following:

vertebral bodies - the parts that are made of bone.



intervertebral discs - also known as the discs; the discs are located between the bony parts of the spine and act as “shock absorbers” for the spine. 

The vertebral bodies are numbered from 1 to 5 in the lumbar spine and the discs are located between two of the vertebral bodies and are numbered accordingly (such as a disc at L2-3, or between the lumbar discs numbered 2 and 3). 

The intervertebral disc is composed of two parts, including the following:

annulus fibrosis - a tough outer ring of fibrous tissue.



nucleus pulposus - located inside the annulus fibrosis; a more gelatinous or soft material.

What is lumbar disc disease (herniated disc, ruptured disc or bulging disc)?
As we age, the intervertebral disc may lose water and become dried out. As this happens, the height of the disc becomes shorter. This may lead to the deterioration of the tough outer ring allowing the nucleus, or the inside of the ring, to bulge out. This is considered a bulging disc. 

As the disc continues to degenerate, or with continued stress on the spine, the inner nucleus pulposus may actually rupture out from the annulus. This is considered a ruptured, or herniated, disc. The fragments of disc material can then press on the nerve roots that are located just behind the disc space. This can cause pain, weakness, numbness, or changes in sensation. 

Most disc herniations happen at the lower lumbar spine, especially at the L4-5 and L5-S1 levels. About 12 million Americans have degenerative disc disease. 

What causes lumbar disc disease?
Lumbar disc disease is due to a change in the structure of the normal disc. Most of the time, disc disease comes as a result of aging and the degeneration that occurs within the disc. Occasionally, severe trauma can cause a normal disc to herniate. Trauma may also cause an already herniated disc to worsen. 

What are the symptoms of lumbar disc disease?
The symptoms of lumbar disc disease vary depending on where the disc has herniated, and what nerve root it is pushing on. The following are the most common symptoms of lumbar disc disease. However, each individual may experience different symptoms. Symptoms may include: 

intermittent or continuous back pain (this may be made worse by movement, coughing, sneezing, or standing for long periods of time)



spasm of the back muscles



sciatica - pain that starts near the back or buttock and travels down the leg to the calf or into the foot.



muscle weakness in the legs



numbness in the leg or foot



decreased reflexes at the knee or ankle



changes in bladder or bowel function

The symptoms of lumbar disc disease may resemble other conditions or medical problems. Always consult your physician for a diagnosis. 

How is lumbar disc disease diagnosed?
In addition to a complete medical history and physical examination, diagnostic procedures for lumbar disc disease may include the following:

x-ray - a diagnostic test which uses invisible electromagnetic energy beams to produce images of internal tissues, bones, and organs onto film.



magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) - a diagnostic procedure that uses a combination of large magnets, radiofrequencies, and a computer to produce detailed images of organs and structures within the body.



myelogram - a procedure that uses dye injected into the spinal canal to make the structure clearly visible on x-rays. 

Treatment for lumbar disc disease:
Specific treatment for lumbar disc disease will be determined by your physician based on:   

your age, overall health, and medical history

extent of the condition

type of condition

your tolerance for specific medications, procedures, or therapies

expectations for the course of the condition

your opinion or preference 

Typically, conservative therapy is the first line of treatment to manage lumbar disc disease. This may include a combination of the following:

bed rest


patient education on proper body mechanics (to help decrease the chance of worsening pain or damage to the disc)


physical therapy, which may include ultrasound, massage, conditioning, and exercise programs


weight control


use of a lumbrosacral back support


medications (to control pain and/or to relax muscles)

When these conservative measures fail, surgery for removal of a herniated disc may be recommended. Surgery is done under general anesthesia. An incision is placed in the lower back over the area where the disc is herniated. Some bone from the back of the spine may be removed to gain access to the area where the disc is located. Typically, the herniated part of the disc and any extra loose pieces of disc are removed from the disc space.

After surgery, restrictions may be placed on the patient's activities for several weeks while healing is taking place to prevent another disc herniation from occurring. Your physician will discuss any restrictions with you.

There are other experimental therapies that are being used to treat lumbar disc disease. Discuss these treatment options with your physician. 




Hope you get well soon vic!
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vic86
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« Reply #3 on: March 17, 2011, 12:01:42 PM »

Thanks for the much expert insight Stella & Montague,I`ll be visiting the doctor again in 2 days to get more information.Earlier when my doctor diagnosed me he didnt mention that I had a spasm and if it were a ruptured disc I wouldnt be able to walk properly but the muscles surrounding the area was strained from the inside causing a nagging pain and over the due time it became tight causing me hip flexion issues .When ever I do chiropractor kind of streches it gives me a lot of relief with some icing and anti inflamatory oinments and Enzymes so now my hands can reach my toes but it has to be little gradual..My case I have to admit its has been over-training,under eating and under resting  Sad . I intend to make things better again and give you fellows an update.  Smiley
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« Reply #4 on: March 23, 2011, 07:33:00 AM »

What did the doc say vic?
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vic86
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« Reply #5 on: March 23, 2011, 12:49:39 PM »

Hi Stella, yes I went to my doc 2 days back and he told me I can start my training in couple of weeks but I have to add some strengthining and stretching excercises to fasten the healing effect. I have to say these Enzyme pills have made me a lot better.Man I seriously miss squats and deadlifts.
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« Reply #6 on: March 25, 2011, 10:49:12 AM »

Hi Stella, yes I went to my doc 2 days back and he told me I can start my training in couple of weeks but I have to add some strengthining and stretching excercises to fasten the healing effect. I have to say these Enzyme pills have made me a lot better.Man I seriously miss squats and deadlifts.



I have stopped weight-training in support of you being unable to train so you don't feel alone.

Actually it's just because I'm lazy Embarrassed

Glad you're feeling better!
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vic86
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« Reply #7 on: March 25, 2011, 12:17:12 PM »


I have stopped weight-training in support of you being unable to train so you don't feel alone.

Actually it's just because I'm lazy Embarrassed

Glad you're feeling better!
Thanks Stella  Tongue, Iam hoping to get back in gym as soon as possible !
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vic86
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« Reply #8 on: December 05, 2011, 11:33:07 AM »

Iam trying to be careful with Squats and deadlifts.Mobility drills and stretching are helping me a lot to loosen the area along with softball mayofascial release.
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