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Author Topic: 16 for '16: The Most Talked-About Potential GOP Presidential Candidates  (Read 4582 times)
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« Reply #250 on: August 13, 2014, 01:11:04 PM »

In Iowa, Rick Santorum Testing a Different Message for 2016
Wednesday, 13 Aug 2014
By Jennifer G. Hickey

In Iowa, former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum sent another signal that he plans to run for president, but that he intends to do so by running on a different message that can reach a wider audience.

Santorum had traveled to Ames, Iowa, last weekend to attend the annual Family Leader Summit, one of the events presidential aspirants attend to make their initial pitches to the state's social conservatives.

Beginning his speech, Santorum said he planned to "do something different" by focusing his speech less on attacking Obama and more on laying out a positive agenda that is necessary if the Republican Party wants to broaden its base.

Story continues below video.

He noted that Republicans often speak directly to small business owners despite the fact that only 1 in 10 Americans are entrepreneurs.

"There's a lot of other people in America who are looking to us to see what we can communicate to them," he said, echoing the message in his new book, "Blue Collar Conservatives: Recommitting to an America That Work,'' published by Regnery.

Santorum spoke for almost half an hour about expanding U.S. energy policy, investing in infrastructure, proposing to cut the federal gas tax, and eliminating the Common Core education standards, all issues he says can appeal to the "average American" and "reach them where they are."

Naturally, Santorum touched on the social issues, specifically the need to strengthen the family structure and to fight a government that is "not just an idle bystander, but someone who makes it harder to build families" through tax policies and barriers to marriage.

The day before, Santorum did something really different – he said Republican candidates should end the tradition of  channeling former President Ronald Reagan in their speeches.

"Every single Republican that runs, they talk about the same three things on the economy. No. 1, cut taxes. No. 2, shrink the government. No. 3, balance the budget. Can you imagine Ronald Reagan in 1979 giving a speech and saying, 'as Wendell Willkie said'?" It was a laugh line. "Because that's how long ago, 35 years, it was from Willkie to Reagan. Wendell Willkie!" said Santorum at an appearance at a picnic in Boone County, Slate reports.

Santorum, who won the 2012 Iowa Caucus, knows he must do some things the same way, including nurturing existing relationships in Iowa. He maintained connections with the grass-roots activists through his political action committee, Patriot Voices, he told the National Journal.

"We have a pretty good membership here, a pretty active membership. This is a state that is very much connected to national politics, and it's fun to be back in town," said the former Pennsylvania senator.

Santorum is in eighth place among potential GOP presidential candidates with 6 percent, according to RealClearPolitics.

Chuck Laudner, who ran Santorum's 2012 Iowa operations, stressed the importance of connecting with the activists on the ground.

"Iowa has this enormous number of grass-roots activists, people who have different spheres of influence — maybe in their county, or in a region of the state, or some are even statewide," Laudner told National Journal. "Inside the party, outside the party, on issues for candidates, everybody knows them. These are the most important people here."

Another sign of Santorum's seriousness about 2016 might be that two prominent Iowa conservatives — Bob Vander Plaats, the CEO of the Iowa-based group The FAMiLY Leader, and Sioux City pastor Cary Gordon of Cornerstone World Outreach — will accompany him when he departs for Israel on Aug. 17, according to TheIowaRepublican.com.

Santorum has attempted to differentiate himself from other Republican candidates on the issue of immigration, a subject he addressed during a July interview on Newsmax TV's "The Steve Malzberg Show."

"The sad thing is that … it doubles the level of immigration. We're talking about 50 million new immigrants here in the next 20 years. I'm a first-generation American. I believe in immigration, it's a wise thing,'' he said.

"If we quote 'fix immigration,' we simply create another problem by attracting tens of thousands and millions of more immigrants into this country who will create the next 12 million 20 years from now," he added.

Santorum, 56, served in the U.S. Senate from 1995 to 2007, losing his 2006 re-election bid to Democrat Bob Casey Jr.

http://www.newsmax.com/Politics/Rick-Santorum-Iowa-president/2014/08/13/id/588475/#ixzz3AIwVWDqi
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« Reply #251 on: August 26, 2014, 05:48:03 PM »

Sounds like he's running again.

Romney on 2016 Run: ‘Circumstances Can Change’
by Eddie Scarry | 6:50 pm, August 26th, 2014 AUDIO

Former Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney has denied he’s not going to make a third bid for the White House but on Tuesday he left open a very small window.

“I know you’re going to press, but you know, this is something we gave a lot of thought to when early on I decided we’re not going to be running this time,” Romney said in an interview with Hugh Hewitt. “And again, we said look, I had the chance of running. I didn’t win. Someone else has a better chance than I do. And that’s what we believe, and that’s why I’m not running. And you know, circumstances can change, but I’m just not going to let my head go there.”

Romney’s former running mate, Rep. Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) recently said he hopes Romney will run again.

Listen via Hugh Hewitt:

http://www.mediaite.com/online/romney-on-2016-run-circumstances-can-change/
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« Reply #252 on: August 26, 2014, 07:12:18 PM »

Obama's numbers were horrible.  He was SO beatable in 2016.  Romney had his chance.

if he will do anything, he will run again... he will spend enough against a divided tea party field and get his 24% of the overall vote and win the nomination... then he'll be destroyed by "any given dem".

If he cannot win against Obama, in the horrible shape obama was in back in 2012... Ugh.

Romney's style of "I flirt with dems and pretend to be tea party" screwed the pooch in 2008 with mccain, it lost the most winnable election in years in 2012, and it'll lose to anyone in 2016.

Romney is amazing at many things - but he's just NOT a people person.  He's not.  They don't like him.  yes, 47% of him like him, and some "repubs" here just adore the dude.  But 52.9% of the population doesn't like him.  Plain and simple.  He's gooda t many thing, but he's just not likeable, sorry, but he's not.  Never will be.
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« Reply #253 on: August 29, 2014, 03:58:45 PM »

Texas Abuzz About Possible Perry-Cruz 2016 Battle
August 28, 2014

AUSTIN, Texas (CBSDFW.COM/AP) – Two Texans, one White House. Is the 2016 Republican campaign trail big enough?

After plummeting from prime contender to political punchline three years ago, Gov. Rick Perry has spent months gearing up for a second run. And he’s turned his recent indictment on felony abuse-of-power charges into a campaign rallying cry.

But even as Perry works to convince conservatives that he’ll be better at coping with the national spotlight this time, he’s increasingly bumping up against his state’s junior senator, tea party darling Ted Cruz, whose firebomb approach on Capitol Hill has grassroots activists clamoring for him to make a White House run.

The prospect of a two-Texan presidential tilt is dominating political conversation in the state, even outshining a fiercely contested governor’s race – and starting to get noticed nationally. Perry’s preparations have long been obvious, while Cruz is working to raise his profile beyond just the far-right base and insert himself into the presidential conversation.

Asked about the 2016 prospects of both, Jim DeMint, president of the conservative Heritage Foundation, replied, “I think Cruz even more than Perry right now.”
Though he’s not endorsing either yet, DeMint added, “Ted has become really the national conservative leader.”

Cruz and Perry, along with potential presidential rival Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul, are addressing this weekend’s national gathering of the conservative political group Americans for Prosperity in Dallas, TX. Cruz has made himself the star of such events, sometimes introduced as “our next president.”

At a recent national gathering organized by the conservative blog RedState, hundreds of attendees bowed their heads to pray for him, calling Cruz an instrument of God’s will.

Cruz himself says “time will tell” if he joins the presidential race. Perry has made no secret he’s seriously considering a run.

Two Texans haven’t competed for the presidency since George H.W. Bush and Ross Perot in 1992. Things got testy that time, as the New England-born incumbent had his true-Texas credentials questioned by the billionaire Dallas businessman, with his exaggerated twang and outlandish axioms like, “If someone as blessed as I am is not willing to clean out the barn, who will?”

“I think they’re both running. They probably don’t like me saying it,” said Texas Republican Party chairman Steve Munisteri, who noted that Texas’ March 1 presidential primary in 2016 should make it the first to vote among large states, and could leave only one Texan standing.

Both, meanwhile, would be competing at least to start for the same slice of the Republican base, the religious and social conservatives energized by an intense mistrust of President Barack Obama.

Some Texas donors are already bracing for the prospect. “I’d be splitting dollars, no question,” said George Strake, Jr., a former Texas secretary of state and Perry 2012 donor who also served as Houston finance chairman for Cruz’s Senate campaign. “It’s going to split up a lot of people who used to give to the same one, or who maybe even used to be friends.”

Perry is a monster fundraiser but relies heavily on Texas. Cruz has raised big bucks from a large national base that tends to give in small increments.

Cruz has been unequivocal in standing behind Perry following the governor’s indictment for cutting off state funds to an office investigating statewide corruption after the Democratic district attorney who runs it ignored his calls to resign. But the two Republicans don’t always see eye-to-eye. Perry’s key selling point is his record as a job-creator, overseeing Texas’ white-hot economy. But Cruz counters that only the free market, not politicians offering tax incentives or pulling policy strings, as Perry has done, can create jobs.

Asked about the possibility that Cruz had outpaced him as Texas’ top conservative, Perry quipped in June, “Ask me in eight years if Senator Cruz has made an impact.”

At a recent event, Cruz made a subtle dig when he flubbed while counting off a list of his Senate accomplishments: “Victory number four – five,” Cruz said, adding, “I could say ‘oops,’ but that would make news.” That recalls Perry’s infamous 2011 “oops moment” brain freeze in a 2010 GOP debate that damaged his candidacy.

As the GOP field takes shape, Perry has been to Iowa five times since November, as well as to New Hampshire and South Carolina. Cruz has been to all three states even more often. His former regional director has founded a group called Draft Ted Cruz for President.

Jamie Johnson, a Republican Central Committee member in Iowa, which holds the first presidential caucus, says the buzz about 2016 is growing. Especially about Cruz.

“It’s not just name recognition or likability, it’s how much will people rearrange their schedule to go see someone or meet someone,” Johnson said “and that is happening for Ted Cruz.”

http://dfw.cbslocal.com/2014/08/28/texas-abuzz-about-possible-perry-cruz-2016-battle/
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« Reply #254 on: August 29, 2014, 04:05:39 PM »

James Carville: Romney Will Run Again in 2016
Thursday, 28 Aug 2014
By Greg Richter

Democratic strategist James Carville believes two-time presidential candidate Mitt Romney will go for a third try in 2016, even though the 2012 GOP nominee has said he won't seek the nation's top office again.

"He's run for president twice. I once noted that running for president was like having sex: No one did it once and forgot about it," Carville said Thursday on Fox News Channel's "The O'Reilly Factor."

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Romney said on Tuesday's Hugh Hewitt radio show that "circumstances can change," and put him back in the field. He far outpaced other names in a recent poll of Republicans in Iowa.

"We know he wants to be president; he's run twice," Carville said, adding that 2014 has been a bad year for many expecting to toss their hats in the GOP ring. New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie has faced the "Bridge-gate" scandal, and Texas Gov. Rick Perry recently was indicted on charges that he misused his office in a case that even most Democrats see as political targeting.

"A lot of people who looked promising have sort of faded," Carville said. "Romney would be a classic Republican nominee. They always tend to go with the old, experienced white guy. And he's the old, experienced white guy right now."

http://www.Newsmax.com/Newsfront/James-Carville-Mitt-Romney-president/2014/08/28/id/591547/#ixzz3BpDtB4CO
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« Reply #255 on: August 29, 2014, 10:18:00 PM »

texans will choose Perry over Cruz.  They'll be FOOLS to do it.  But they will.  Watch and see Sad
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« Reply #256 on: Today at 03:44:06 PM »

Poll: Don't change election law for Rand Paul
James R. Carroll, jcarroll@courier-journal.com
8:September 1, 2014

WASHINGTON – Kentucky Republican Rand Paul has suggested that he might run simultaneously for the presidency and re-election to the Senate in 2016, but two-thirds of registered voters in the state — including a majority of Republicans — oppose changing the law to make that easier, according to the latest Bluegrass Poll.

As a matter of fact, only 15 percent of Kentucky registered voters think Paul should run for both offices, the survey finds. By a 24-22 percent split, slightly more believe he should run only for his Senate seat than make a bid for the White House. And a third of voters oppose the freshman senator running for anything.

Paul enjoys a 39 percent favorability rating in the state, the poll shows. Thirty-two percent of registered voters view the senator unfavorably, while 24 percent say they are neutral.

"I can see the dilemma," said Harvey Tincher, 67, of Waddy, Ky., referring to Paul's dual-office challenge. But Tincher, a farmer retired from a technology company, said the law doesn't need changing — the senator needs to make a choice.

"You've got to run for one or run for the other," Tincher said. "The backup is the fear of losing. … If you're going to do it, go all the way."

However, he is among those who would prefer that Paul try to stay in the Senate. The senator's world view would be a problem as president, Tincher said.

"He's more of an isolationist, and we don't live in an isolated world," he said.

The Bluegrass Poll asked the opinions of 647 registered Kentucky voters Aug. 25-27, with a margin of error of plus or minus 3.7 percentage points on the question about changing the law; and plus or minus 3.9 percentage points on questions about Paul's favorability ratings and whether he should run for president, the Senate or both. The poll was conducted by SurveyUSA for The Courier-Journal, Louisville's WHAS-TV, The Lexington Herald Leader and Lexington's WKYT-TV.

Mary Dean is among that small group favoring a double candidacy by Kentucky's junior senator — and she's a Democrat.

"I do think he's a good senator and I think he'd make an excellent president, if they would change the law to allow that in the state of Kentucky," said the 58-year-old retired registered nurse, who lives in Liberty, Ky.

Dean's party affiliation is no barrier to her positive view of Paul. "I think he's a personable candidate — you can talk to him and he will answer you," she said.

Kentucky's junior senator has maintained a furious travel pace this year, including visits to early caucus and primary states of Iowa and New Hampshire. That has fueled speculation in the media and Republican Party circles that he intends to be a presidential candidate in 2016.

The senator was among a group of possible 2016 Republican presidential hopefuls who spoke Friday and Saturday at a conference in Dallas sponsored by the conservative political group Americans for Prosperity.

Paul told The Courier-Journal in a July interview that a decision on mounting a presidential campaign "will be made in the beginning of 2015 sometime or the spring of 2015."

However, the senator also has told Kentucky Republicans his name will be on the ballot as a Senate candidate in 2016.

Kentucky law prohibits a candidate's name from appearing for two separate offices on the same ballot in most cases.

An effort earlier this year by Republicans in the Kentucky Legislature to change the state law was blocked by the Democrats running the state House.

Allowing Paul to run for two offices at the same time is not popular, with 54 percent of Republicans, 57 percent of independents and 78 percent of Democrats opposed to changing state law, according to the poll.

Stick to running for the Senate and never mind changing the law, advised Betty Jean Simmons, a 74-year-old Republican who lives in Paul's home town of Bowling Green. She is a retired farmer and newspaper carrier.

Simmons said Paul should not run for president because it's too soon.

"He doesn't have enough experience," she said. "I just don't think he's capable."

Paul's positive ratings with voters are helped by the 61 percent of Republicans who view him favorably. While 36 percent of independents also view him favorably, an identical percentage say they are neutral on the senator.

More women — 35 percent — view Paul unfavorably than favorably — 33 percent. Conversely, 45 percent of men have a favorable opinion of Paul, while 28 percent have an unfavorable view.

Although Paul has been making much-publicized efforts to reach out to black voters, that group in Kentucky is not swayed: 48 percent view him unfavorably, while just 13 percent have a favorable opinion. A third of black voters say they are neutral.

Paul's potential bid for the White House divides Republicans as much as Kentucky voters in general. The poll finds that 33 percent of registered Republicans in the state favor such a run, while 31 percent prefer Paul to seek a second term in the Senate. Just 19 percent of Republicans think Paul should pursue both the presidency and the Senate.

http://www.courier-journal.com/story/news/politics/rand-paul/2014/09/01/bluegrass-poll-two-thirds-oppose-changing-law-help-rand-paul-run-two-offices/14944351/
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