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Gregzs
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« Reply #350 on: April 12, 2018, 05:37:40 PM »

Tim O'Connor, Star on 'Peyton Place' and 'Buck Rogers,' Dies at 90

https://www.msn.com/en-us/tv/news/tim-oconnor-star-on-peyton-place-and-buck-rogers-dies-at-90/ar-AAvPn8U?ocid=spartandhp

Tim O'Connor, the busy character actor who portrayed Elliot Carson, Mia Farrow's father and Dorothy Malone's husband, on more than 400 episodes of the 1960s ABC primetime soap Peyton Place, has died. He was 90.
O'Connor died April 5 at his home in Nevada City, California, The Union newspaper reported.

O'Connor also starred as Dr. Elias Huer on the 1979-81 NBC sci-fi series Buck Rogers in the 25th Century, starring Gil Gerard, and on a memorable 1975 episode of All in the Family, he guest-starred as a former sweetheart of Edith's (Jean Stapleton) from Scranton, Pennsylvania, who's interested in rekindling their childhood romance.

In The Naked Gun 2½: The Smell of Fear (1991), O'Connor had a super-brief stint as Fenzwick, "the head of the Society of Petroleum Industry Leaders, better known as S.P.I.L.," and he was twice on Columbo, notably in 1973 as a family lawyer in "Double Shock," in which Martin Landau played twins.

The lanky actor also starred as the captain of a ship hoping to rescue earthlings mired on a distant planet on the 1963 Twilight Zone episode "On Thursday We Leave for Home."

Born on July 3, 1927, on the South Side of Chicago, O'Connor enrolled in a school to study radio acting and engineering. He quickly landed a scholarship at the renowned Goodman Theatre, then worked in local television.
In 1953, he came to New York and did several installments of prestigious DuPont Show of the Month for producer David Susskind, appearing alongside the likes of Jessica Tandy, Boris Karloff and Maureen O'Hara.

O'Connor joined Peyton Place three months into its first season as Elliot, who had been imprisoned for 18 years for murdering his wife (he was innocent, however; the real killer was Mary Anderson's Catherine Peyton Harrington). Elliot then took over the town newspaper, but those days behind bars cast a shadow over him.

As an entry on the Classic TV blog notes: "O'Connor played Elliot as a sage, a man with a new lease on life and a reason to exude optimism, but during the show's long run neither he nor the writers neglected the subterranean well of resentment that Elliot nursed over his lost years in prison. O'Connor's flawless interweaving of these contradictory strands turned into perhaps the most satisfying exercise in character continuity on television during the '60s."

In its heyday, Peyton Place aired as many as three times a week, and O'Connor appeared on 416 episodes, according to IMDb, from 1965-68 until he and Malone were written off the show because, he said, the series was getting too expensive to make.

O'Connor also was on other series like The Fugitive, The Outer Limits, The Rockford Files, Maude, The Streets of San Francisco, Barnaby Jones, M*A*S*H, Gunsmoke, Wonder Woman, Dynasty, Doogie Howser, M.D. and Star Trek: The Next Generation.

More recently, O'Connor co-founded the Children's Theater in Nevada City, served as a director for the town's Foothill Theater Company and appeared with Buck Rogers co-star Erin Gray in Dreams Awake (2011).

He moved to Nevada City in 1982 with his second wife, Sheila. She survives him, as does his son, Timothy.
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« Reply #351 on: April 16, 2018, 05:05:00 PM »

Harry Anderson, ‘Night Court’ Star, Dies at 65

https://www.msn.com/en-us/tv/celebrity/harry-anderson-‘night-court’-star-dies-at-65/ar-AAvXs29?ocid=spartandhp

Harry Anderson, the amiable actor who presided over the NBC comedy “Night Court” for nine seasons, has died at his home in Asheville, N.C., according to a local media report. He was 65.

Anderson was found at his home by police officers early Monday morning, according to a report by WSPA-TV, the CBS affiliate in Spartanburg, S.C. No foul play was suspected, police told the station.

Anderson was a magician-turned-actor who was known as a rabid fan of jazz singer Mel Torme. The affection for Torme was woven into his TV alter ego, Judge Harry Stone, a quirky character who ruled the bench at a Manhattan night court. The sitcom was a mainstay of NBC from 1984 to 1992. Anderson earned three consecutive Emmy nominations for his work on the show from 1985-1987.

Anderson gained national attention after he guest starred as grifter Harry “the Hat” Gittes on NBC’s “Cheers” in the early 1980s. On “Night Court,” Anderson played a goofy but big-hearted judge who encountered a host of oddball characters and cases every week.

The series also starred John Larroquette, Richard Moll, Charles Robinson, Marsha Warfield, and Markie Post. Anderson also directed two episodes of the series and wrote or co-wrote five episodes during its long run.

After “Night Court,” Anderson co-starred as columnist Dave Barry in the CBS comedy “Dave’s World,” which ran for four seasons. Anderson moved to New Orleans in 2000 to open the nightclub Oswald’s Speakeasy, where he performed a mix of comedy and magic, and a magic and curio shop dubbed Sideshow.

Anderson logged a guest spot in FX’s “Son of the Beach” in 2002 and a 2008 appearance on NBC’s “30 Rock.” But for the most part, he stayed away from Hollywood. He moved to North Carolina in 2006 after New Orleans was ravaged by Hurricane Katrina.

Born in Rhode Island, Anderson reportedly had a difficult childhood and moved frequently with his mother, who he once described in an interview with Playboy as “a hustler.” He moved to California at the age of 16 to be with his father. He became a street performer and reportedly ran a lucrative shell game on the streets of San Francisco for a time.

Anderson made his way to L.A.’s famed Magic Castle in the early 1980s, where he connected with an agent, according to TCM.com. He made several appearances on “Saturday Night Live” around this time. After “Night Court” made him a star, Anderson hosted “SNL” in 1985.

Anderson’s other credits included guest shots on “Tales From the Crypt” and HBO’s “Tanner ’88,” “Parker Lewis Can’t Lose,” and “The John Larroquette Show.” He starred in the 1990 ABC miniseries adaptation of Stephen King’s “It.”
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« Reply #352 on: April 24, 2018, 04:29:48 PM »

Bob Dorough, ‘Schoolhouse Rock!’ Performer and Writer, Dies at 94

https://www.msn.com/en-us/music/news/bob-dorough-‘schoolhouse-rock’-performer-and-writer-dies-at-94/ar-AAwfRGX?ocid=spartandhp

Bob Dorough, the jazz musician who was instrumental in the 1970s educational cartoon series "Schoolhouse Rock!" died Monday in Mt. Bethel, Pennsylvania, a spokesperson for Dorough told TheWrap. He was 94.
During his run with "Schoolhouse Rock!" Dorough wrote and performed iconic numbers including "My Hero, Zero" and "Three Is a Magic Number."

Dorough, born in Arkansas and raised in Texas, took to music early,joining his high school's band and serving three years in a special services army band unit.

Dorough was a conductor, accompany player, arranger and conductor for a number of years before recording his first effort of his own, "Devil May Care," in 1956 for the Bethlehem label. Among the artists Dorough worked with was Miles Davis, recording "Nothing Like You" and "Blue Xmas," both of which Dorough composed, with Davis in 1962.

"In 1971 he received a commission to 'set the multiplication tables to music.' This led to a small industry, being the beginning of ABC-TV's 'Schoolhouse Rock,' Saturday morning cartoons that entertained and instructed unsuspecting children during the years 1973-1985," Dorough's biography reads.

The bio adds, "The impact of this media exposure was unpredictably immense. The show came back for another five years in the 90's and is now enjoying its 40th anniversary with a DVD edition of the entire, five-subject series, for which Dorough worked as the Musical Director."

In 1995, Dorough signed with the prestigious Blue Note Records label, recording three CDs -- "Right on My Way Home," "Too Much Coffee Man" and "Who's On First" -- for the label.
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« Reply #353 on: April 24, 2018, 06:03:36 PM »

Harry Anderson, ‘Night Court’ Star, Dies at 65

https://www.msn.com/en-us/tv/celebrity/harry-anderson-‘night-court’-star-dies-at-65/ar-AAvXs29?ocid=spartandhp

Harry Anderson, the amiable actor who presided over the NBC comedy “Night Court” for nine seasons, has died at his home in Asheville, N.C., according to a local media report. He was 65.

Anderson was found at his home by police officers early Monday morning, according to a report by WSPA-TV, the CBS affiliate in Spartanburg, S.C. No foul play was suspected, police told the station.

Anderson was a magician-turned-actor who was known as a rabid fan of jazz singer Mel Torme. The affection for Torme was woven into his TV alter ego, Judge Harry Stone, a quirky character who ruled the bench at a Manhattan night court. The sitcom was a mainstay of NBC from 1984 to 1992. Anderson earned three consecutive Emmy nominations for his work on the show from 1985-1987.

Anderson gained national attention after he guest starred as grifter Harry “the Hat” Gittes on NBC’s “Cheers” in the early 1980s. On “Night Court,” Anderson played a goofy but big-hearted judge who encountered a host of oddball characters and cases every week.

The series also starred John Larroquette, Richard Moll, Charles Robinson, Marsha Warfield, and Markie Post. Anderson also directed two episodes of the series and wrote or co-wrote five episodes during its long run.

After “Night Court,” Anderson co-starred as columnist Dave Barry in the CBS comedy “Dave’s World,” which ran for four seasons. Anderson moved to New Orleans in 2000 to open the nightclub Oswald’s Speakeasy, where he performed a mix of comedy and magic, and a magic and curio shop dubbed Sideshow.

Anderson logged a guest spot in FX’s “Son of the Beach” in 2002 and a 2008 appearance on NBC’s “30 Rock.” But for the most part, he stayed away from Hollywood. He moved to North Carolina in 2006 after New Orleans was ravaged by Hurricane Katrina.

Born in Rhode Island, Anderson reportedly had a difficult childhood and moved frequently with his mother, who he once described in an interview with Playboy as “a hustler.” He moved to California at the age of 16 to be with his father. He became a street performer and reportedly ran a lucrative shell game on the streets of San Francisco for a time.

Anderson made his way to L.A.’s famed Magic Castle in the early 1980s, where he connected with an agent, according to TCM.com. He made several appearances on “Saturday Night Live” around this time. After “Night Court” made him a star, Anderson hosted “SNL” in 1985.

Anderson’s other credits included guest shots on “Tales From the Crypt” and HBO’s “Tanner ’88,” “Parker Lewis Can’t Lose,” and “The John Larroquette Show.” He starred in the 1990 ABC miniseries adaptation of Stephen King’s “It.”

Night Court star Harry Anderson‘s cause of death has been revealed.

Anderson, who died on April 16 at the age of 65, suffered a cardioembolic cerebrovascular accident — a type of stroke — according to his death certificateobtained by TMZ.

The certificate also mentions influenza and a heart disease as contributing causes that led to his death.

Anderson died at his home in Asheville, North Carolina, PEOPLE confirmed.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/tv/celebrity/harry-andersons-cause-of-death-revealed-night-court-star-died-of-a-stroke/ar-AAwiCul?ocid=spartandhp
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« Reply #354 on: May 28, 2018, 03:00:22 PM »

Atari Co-Founder Ted Dabney Dead At 81

https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/atari-ted-dabney-obituary_us_5b0aefc4e4b0568a880c878b

Ted Dabney, who co-founded Atari in 1972 and helped launch the video game industry, died Saturday at the age of 81.

Dabney had been diagnosed with esophageal cancer late last year and was told he had just eight months to live, according to Eurogamer.

Video game historian and scholar Leonard Herman told HuffPost he heard of Ted’s death from a colleague and then phoned Dabney’s wife, Carolyn, to confirm the news and offer his condolences. Herman relayed the news to his Facebook followers on Saturday.

“RIP dear friend. Your legacy will live on a long time!” he wrote.

Though Dabney’s time with Atari was short, he was very influential. He and co-founder Nolan Bushnell released the first commercially available video game, “Computer Space,” in 1971.
The circuit technology Dabney designed for “Computer Space” was later used to make the hugely popular game “Pong,” a key contribution in the history of gaming.

After Atari, Dabney worked at electronics companies like Fujitsu, Raytheon and Teledyne. When he had had enough of the industry, Dabney and his wife moved to the more natural setting of the Sierra Nevada mountains, where they owned and operated a small grocery store, according to an oral history.

Appreciators of video game history touted Dabney’s accomplishments on social media and celebrated his lasting impact.
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« Reply #355 on: August 04, 2018, 05:04:19 PM »

Patrick Stewart to star in new Star Trek TV series

https://www.msn.com/en-us/tv/news/patrick-stewart-to-star-in-new-star-trek-tv-series/ar-BBLuEB3?ocid=spartandhp&pfr=1

It’s really truly happening: Patrick Stewart has been cast in a new Star Trek series.

Stewart will reprise his iconic character, Jean-Luc Picard, for a CBS All Access series that “will tell the story of the next chapter of Picard’s life.”

Stewart himself just announced the news in a surprise appearance at the Las Vegas Star Trek Convention.

“I will always be very proud to have been a part of Star Trek: The Next Generation, but when we wrapped that final movie in the spring of 2002, I truly felt my time with Star Trek had run its natural course,” Stewart said. “It is, therefore, an unexpected but delightful surprise to find myself excited and invigorated to be returning to Jean-Luc Picard and to explore new dimensions within him. Seeking out new life for him, when I thought that life was over.”

Stewart added that now, in particular, seems like a good time to bring back the character, who exemplified calm, moral, reasoned leadership. “During these past years, it has been humbling to hear many stories about how The Next Generation brought people comfort, saw them through difficult periods in their lives or how the example of Jean-Luc inspired so many to follow in his footsteps, pursuing science, exploration and leadership,” he said. “I feel I’m ready to return to him for the same reason – to research and experience what comforting and reforming light he might shine on these often very dark times. I look forward to working with our brilliant creative team as we endeavor to bring a fresh, unexpected and pertinent story to life once more.

Star Trek: Discovery showrunner Alex Kurtzman will be an executive producer on the new series, and stated, “With overwhelming joy, it’s a privilege to welcome Sir Patrick Stewart back to the Star Trek fold. For over 20 years, fans have hoped for the return of Captain Jean-Luc Picard and that day is finally here. We can’t wait to forge new ground, surprise people, and honor generations both new and old.”

CBS isn’t releasing any additional information at this time, such as the show’s title or release date. But Star Trek: Discovery returns in January.
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« Reply #356 on: October 24, 2018, 05:48:32 PM »

'Poltergeist' Actor James Karen Dies at 94

https://comicbook.com/horror/2018/10/24/james-karen-actor-dies-poltergeist-return-of-the-living-dead/?fbclid=IwAR05EQgsvKQ9t86PYE1nWc-s2h_epYtAfS00YY6BhvA7cTib0io592-0N10

James Karen, who starred in films such as Poltergeist, The Return of the Living Dead, and The China Syndrome, has passed away at 94.

Karen's wife Alba confirmed that he had passed away in his home on Tuesday, though the cause of death wasn't confirmed.

In his Hollywood career, Karen earned more than 200 credits, ranging movies and TV shows across various genres. While you might not have known the actor by name, he was an instantly recognizable character actor that contributed his often authoritative presence to a number of different projects.

In Poltergeist, a family moves into a newly-constructed townhouse community, which was developed by Karen's Mr. Teague, only for a series of bizarre occurrences to begin unfolding. When the family's patriarch confronts Teague, he discovers that the developer had relocated a cemetery to make room for the houses, though he opted to save money by moving only the headstones and leaving the corpses underneath the homes.

Karen might have had minimal on-screen time in the film, though his role and the confrontation his character has with Craig T. Nelson are some of the film's most memorable components.

Karen returned to the horror world for 1985's Return of the Living Dead as the manager of a warehouse that held the remains of a zombie that was "killed" during the events of Night of the Living Dead. Unfortunately, the remains are burned, creating a toxic cloud that ultimately turns to rain that resurrects nearby corpses.

While most of the film embraced the inherent goofiness of the premise, Karen's performance gave the film one of its more emotional sequences.

“It was the deal where he figures out he’s becoming a zombie and decides to incinerate himself in the crematorium,” Karen detailed to DVD Talk in 2006. “He kisses his wedding ring as he goes in. It was a very emotional scene, but it also got me out of being one of the rain-drenched zombies milling around outside the place at the end of the film. I didn’t really want to do all that muddy stuff.”

Karen also appeared in films such as Capricorn One, Mulholland Drive, The Pursuit of Happyness, 13 Days, and dozens more.

On the small screen, Karen appeared in Little House on the Prairie, Seinfeld, The Larry Sanders Show, and The Golden Girls, among many others.


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