Getbig Bodybuilding, Figure and Fitness Forums
December 19, 2014, 07:00:51 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
 
   Home   Help Login Register  
Pages: 1 [2]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: 30 hour work week the "New Normal" to avoid ObamaCare mandates.  (Read 3054 times)
tbombz
Getbig V
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 19171

Psalms 150


« Reply #25 on: December 01, 2012, 08:33:41 PM »

the idea is this = we dont give a fuck what your religion tells you. a law is a law, period. deal with it, broseph.
Report to moderator   Logged
whork
Getbig V
*****
Posts: 5611


Getbig!


« Reply #26 on: December 02, 2012, 09:32:49 AM »

if you dont like the way wal-mart runs its business operation, then boycot. organize rallies. spread the word.

but you have absolutely no right to interfere in the way wal-mart chooses to run its business. as such, neither does the government.

If the citizens have problems with Walmart and the government is elected to work for the citizens doesnt that give the government the right to interfere?

Just a thought its a slippery slope i know.
Report to moderator   Logged
Primemuscle
Getbig V
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 10821


Be honest...


« Reply #27 on: December 02, 2012, 12:06:51 PM »

if you dont like the way wal-mart runs its business operation, then boycot. organize rallies. spread the word.

but you have absolutely no right to interfere in the way wal-mart chooses to run its business. as such, neither does the government.

If Walmart breaks labor laws, the government does have the right to interfere. For example BOLI sets rules for lunchtimes and breaks for hourly employees, when those rules are broken the business can be sited for violating the law. Walmart has a history of labor law violations. They have been sued and have lost in court. This is noted in the list I posted.

One of the Walmart big box stores in Portland, OR was picketed on black Friday. There were several hundred picketers there. It was a peaceful event with only one arrest. I believe Walmart store all around the country were picketed on black Friday. Walmart released a statement that they had the most profitable black Friday yet. Never-the-less, their image is getting tarnished and public awareness of their poor and sometimes illegal labor relations is growing. Most of the people I know won't set foot in a Walmart store.

Walmart opened a neighborhood market in West Linn, OR where I live this year. I compared prices with the other grocery chains in our area, Safeway and Albertsons only to discover that while they were cheaper on some things on other products they were actually more expensive. Whenever I drive by, there are very few cars in their parking lot. I don't believe this store is very profitable. The busiest store in our neighborhood is Market of Choice which is a high end niche market much like Whole Foods. Their employees have fulltime jobs with benefits and regular hours.  
Report to moderator   Logged
tbombz
Getbig V
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 19171

Psalms 150


« Reply #28 on: December 02, 2012, 03:06:39 PM »

legally speaking, anything the majority supports is legal. the government can do whatever the fuck the majority votes for. 

if the majority supports something that the courts knock down as unconstitutional, the majority can amend the constitution to fit their will.

pretty simple really.

so, yes. yourr both right.

however, i dont agree with the idea the majority should be forcing its values down the throats of people; with the sole exception of preventing individuals from oppressing the freedom of other individuals.
Report to moderator   Logged
Soul Crusher
Competitors
Getbig V
*****
Posts: 10334


Doesnt lie about lifting.


« Reply #29 on: December 04, 2012, 07:09:14 PM »

http://health.usnews.com/health-news/news/articles/2012/12/04/study-foresees-shortage-of-primary-care-doctors


Report to moderator   Logged
Primemuscle
Getbig V
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 10821


Be honest...


« Reply #30 on: December 04, 2012, 09:29:54 PM »

legally speaking, anything the majority supports is legal. the government can do whatever the fuck the majority votes for. 

if the majority supports something that the courts knock down as unconstitutional, the majority can amend the constitution to fit their will.

pretty simple really.

so, yes. yourr both right.

however, i dont agree with the idea the majority should be forcing its values down the throats of people; with the sole exception of preventing individuals from oppressing the freedom of other individuals.

I am not convinced when this happens that it is always the will of the majority, but just those most vocal on an issue. Unfortunately, people lose some of their freedoms on many different levels and not just from majority rules or the subsequent laws which are passed.

Quite honestly, being claustrophobic, seat belts make me fairly uncomfortable and yet the law says I have to wear one, mainly for my own safety, which should be my affair. If I don't wear a seat belt, get in a wreck and go flying out the window because of this, neither my family nor I should have recourse because that was the chance I decided to take when I decided to leave the seat belt off.

Likewise, if I choose to load up on steroids or recreational drugs, that should be my affair unless I involve others or put other people in harm's way. My mother killed herself by smoking untold numbers of cigarettes every day of her life from the time she was a teenager. That was her decision. A law that would have denied her the right to do this may have saved her life, but it also would have taken away some of her freedom of choice which is too high a price to pay. And trust me, she would have broken such a law.
Report to moderator   Logged
Soul Crusher
Competitors
Getbig V
*****
Posts: 10334


Doesnt lie about lifting.


« Reply #31 on: December 23, 2012, 07:19:22 AM »

Businesses Cut Employees’ Hours to Prepare for Health Care Reforms
Free Times ^ | 20 November 2012 | Eva Moore
Posted on December 23, 2012 9:10:16 AM EST by MeneMeneTekelUpharsin

With President Barack Obama reelected to a second term, the health care reforms passed during his first term are set to take effect. And some employers are now facing the fact that they’ll be forced to offer health coverage to all employees who work more than 30 hours a week. Here in the Midlands, Lizard’s Thicket owner Bobby Williams is in that position. His company made the decision to cut new employees to 28 hours a week. Long-time employees will continue to work 40 hours a week, he says.

“Absolutely they’re upset about it,” he says of the workers whose hours will be cut. “We’re upset. It’s either that or close the restaurant.” Williams says he’s following the lead of some larger chains. Just in the past week, the restaurant group that owns Red Lobster and Olive Garden announced it will cut the hours of many new employees to below 30 hours a week. Other restaurants have made similar but more politically tinged decisions, with both Papa John’s and an Applebee’s franchise owner drawing fire when they said they’d have to cut hours or freeze hiring because of the law.

A study cited by the Chicago Sun Times found that 18 percent of employers with any part-time employees are cutting workers’ hours in response to the law.The requirement to provide health coverage applies only to businesses with more than 50 employees and takes effect in 2014. Lizard’s Thicket, with 16 locations, employs about 700 people. Williams says it would cost $2 million a year to insure all of them — which would mean raising prices, an ugly choice in this economy. Employers that don’t offer coverage will pay the government a $2,000 penalty per qualifying employee after the first 30 employees. So the fewer employees a business has working more than 30 hours, the smaller the penalty it’ll have to pay.

It’s hard to blame someone in Williams’ position, says South Carolina-based health care economist Lynn Bailey. While most large companies already offer health coverage for employees, it’s less common in industries like restaurants, retail and home health care, Bailey says. There, employees often make a low wage and are uninsured. And she’s worried that even under the new law, some people will still end up uninsured. Under Obamacare, people will be required to have health insurance. If low-income people’s earnings are low enough, they’ll qualify for Medicaid; otherwise, they’ll be asked to purchase subsidized insurance on a health insurance exchange set up by the federal government. (South Carolina has the option to set up its own exchange but declined to do so.)

Even with a subsidy, though, Bailey says it’ll be tough for some people to make up the difference, which could run to several thousand dollars a year. That could mean some people still end up without insurance. “There are lots of unintended consequences of the Rube Goldberg Obamacare,” she says. “This is what you have when you don’t have a single payer. Everyone’s trying to push somebody from one place to another.” In other words, it would have been easier to have the government act as health insurer, rather than trying to preserve the employer-funded model alongside separate programs like Medicare and Medicaid.

When it comes to restaurant workers and other low-wage employees here in South Carolina, there is a fix, according to Frank Knapp, president of the South Carolina Small Business Chamber of Commerce: The state should accept the expansion of Medicaid offered under the health care law. “If the state of South Carolina expands Medicaid as prescribed in the Affordable Care Act, to 130 percent of the Federal Poverty Level, there’s a good chance that restaurant employees will be eligible for Medicaid,” Knapp says. “Then the employer’s not responsible for them.” Gov. Nikki Haley has said the state will not expand Medicaid, calling it “a broken program” in a July statement.

For Williams, the current system works: His employees can go to the emergency room when they’re sick, and they don’t pay. “I think we have a great system now,” Williams says. “Everybody gets treated.” But Bailey and Knapp both disagree that emergency room care is the way to go. “It’s just an unfunded mandate that gets passed on to insurance premium payers, employers, employees and taxpayers,” Bailey says. “It’s not health coverage.”
Report to moderator   Logged
Pages: 1 [2]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Theme created by Egad Community. Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!