Getbig Bodybuilding, Figure and Fitness Forums
August 22, 2014, 12:56:33 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
 
   Home   Help Calendar Login Register  
Pages: 1 [2]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: analbolic windows  (Read 2130 times)
Hulkotron
Getbig V
*****
Posts: 16880


The forbidden ritual of the steel palm


View Profile
« Reply #25 on: January 22, 2013, 05:50:07 AM »

Don't you dare let that window close without getting the proper nutrients. Don't even dare...

x2
Report to moderator   Logged
MORTALCOIL
Getbig V
*****
Posts: 5993



View Profile
« Reply #26 on: January 22, 2013, 05:51:15 AM »

Yes, many Bbers ended up having an anal window instead of a smaller type of exit. The "bolic" thing is confusing though.
Report to moderator   Logged
Viking11
Competitors
Getbig IV
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 1508


View Profile
« Reply #27 on: January 22, 2013, 10:30:41 AM »

Wrong, wrong, wrong! The analbolic window is a glass pane in Amsterdam that you can watch whores get assfucked through.
Report to moderator   Logged
Jon Harridan
Time Out
Getbig IV
*
Posts: 2129


My dog fucks the little girl fivesilvernickels.


View Profile
« Reply #28 on: January 22, 2013, 03:13:04 PM »

To even entertain the thought that anything the supplement industry says is true is hilarious to say the least. 'Regulated' drugs companies who make products endorsed by the Government, lie through their teeth at the expense of our health to make money, so why would the protein scammers tell the truth?

Only Rich Gaspari tells the truth these days. The man is a paragon of virtue among all the scamers and cheats. Cheesy

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A_C5o1j8pTU
Report to moderator   Logged
bigmc
Getbig V
*****
Posts: 17560


The Y board are the GET BIG ELITE


View Profile
« Reply #29 on: January 22, 2013, 03:17:38 PM »

To even entertain the thought that anything the supplement industry says is true is hilarious to say the least. 'Regulated' drugs companies who make products endorsed by the Government, lie through their teeth at the expense of our health to make money, so why would the protein scammers tell the truth?

are you saying celltech isnt stronger than dianabol cyp  Huh
Report to moderator   Logged

T
Nomad
Getbig IV
****
Gender: Male
Posts: 3381



View Profile
« Reply #30 on: January 22, 2013, 03:17:51 PM »

Wrong, wrong, wrong! The analbolic window is a glass pane in Amsterdam that you can watch whores get assfucked through.

Cheesy  where   Cheesy
Report to moderator   Logged

all drugs - TPPIIP
El Diablo Blanco
Getbig V
*****
Posts: 17178


Nom Nom Nom Nom


View Profile
« Reply #31 on: January 22, 2013, 03:26:50 PM »

aminos is all you need.  But you should consume them before and during so that they get into your blood stream.  carbs?  Meh.
Report to moderator   Logged
Coach is Back!
Competitors
Getbig V
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 23813


He won by a "landslide" lol


View Profile WWW
« Reply #32 on: January 22, 2013, 03:34:45 PM »

From the NSCA's Performance Training Journal, this article provides evidence behind protein supplementation and its ability to augment gains in lean muscle mass.
PTJ_11.6_Cover
Introduction

In today’s society, especially in the sporting world, the latest trend is to improve one’s athletic performance in order to become the biggest, fastest, and strongest, whether it is on the playing field and/or in a gym or weight room. Some individuals using resistance training may go to great lengths to reach their goals, including the illegal use of steroids. A more appropriate solution for increasing strength and lean muscle mass gained through resistance training is protein supplementation.
Appropriate Protein Supplementation

There are many protein supplements on the market, but few contain the proper ingredients necessary to satisfy an athlete’s optimal nutritional needs after resistance training. The highest quality proteins are the milk proteins, casein and whey (14).

Casein is slowly digested in the stomach, which allows a sustained elevation of the amino acids in the blood. Whey is digested much more rapidly than casein, and contains a large portion of the branched-chain amino acids, which are the most abundant amino acids in muscle tissue and critical for muscle building (14). Whey protein sources seem to be the most researched of the two, and there is good reason. There appears to be a positive correlation between increased lean muscle mass and increased muscular strength while performing resistance training with the consumption of whey protein supplements (3,4).

Hydrolyzed whey isolate, another type of whey protein, contains the highest concentration of the essential amino acids, including the branched-chain amino acids. In a study comparing whey isolate to casein during 10 weeks of resistance training, the participants supplementing whey isolate showed a greater increase in lean mass, a decrease in fat mass, along with an increase in strength when compared to those participants supplementing casein (6).

Not only is the type of protein important, but the amount of protein ingested is also important. Many times, individuals taking protein supplements will ingest too many grams causing the nitrogen balance in the body to be thrown off. Subsequently, the excess protein is excreted in the urine. The ingestion of excess protein supplements may place additional stress on the kidneys and liver, and may result in dehydration, calcium loss, and gastrointestinal problems (12). Thus, it is important to follow the guidelines in place for protein intake and supplementation. The average person needs approximately 0.8 g/kg bodyweight/day of protein to maintain muscle mass (3). Protein and amino acid requirements are higher for athletes in training (3). Resistance training athletes need 1.6 – 1.7 g/kg bodyweight/day while endurance athletes need approximately 1.2 – 1.4 g/kg bodyweight/day (5,11).

Therefore, it is important for athletes to be aware of the amount of protein needed by the body and not consume more protein in both dietary and supplemental form than is recommended.
Benefits of Protein Supplement Ingestion during Recovery

Research on resistance training has shown that protein consumption prior to resistance training can be effective. However, research on nutrient timing suggests protein consumption after resistance training may be more effective one hour after (5,13). Thus, the timing of protein supplementation is crucial. For the proper synthesis of protein, supplementation should take place during the recovery period after a bout of resistance training. Although, the body stays in an anabolic state for up to 48 hours after training, the one-hour window is most important for optimal synthesis. Anything after this time period will still be used by the body, but it will not provide the best repair of the muscle tissue and protein synthesis (Cool.

Furthermore, protein intake after resistance training has shown to improve protein balance in the body and reduce muscle damage and delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) (1,7,15). The benefits of supplementing protein with resistance training can be an increase in lean body mass as well as strength gains. As shown in a recent study, the strength gains of athletes taking protein supplements were significantly increased as opposed to the strength gains of athletes not consuming protein supplements, which showed little to no significant differences in strength gain (10). In a similar study regarding strength gains with protein supplementation, participants in a 10-week resistance training experiment showed strength adaptations through greater prevention of catabolism and an improved anabolic response. In other words, with protein supplementation, the participants’ bodies were building up proteins (anabolism) in the muscle instead of breaking them down (catabolism) (9).
Conclusion

As based upon published research, protein supplementation, when consumed properly, appears to have a positive impact on strength gains, protein synthesis, lean body mass, and reduce recovery time. Of course, protein supplementation should be used to “supplement” a well-balanced diet already in place, not replace it. While protein supplements may be beneficial, foods can offer the same benefits as long as adequate protein is ingested. Supplementation can be used to help meet the protein demands needed by the body to keep up with a resistance training program, though. As evidenced by research, individuals taking protein supplements can see results in as little as six weeks. It should be noted that currently, there is no published research stating that protein supplementation has a negative long-term effect. When taken in moderation, and by the guidelines specified, protein supplementation can have a positive outcome on performance and health in those individuals involved in resistance training.
References

    Beelen, M, Burke, LM, Gibala, MJ, and van Loon, LJ. Nutritional strategies to promote post-exercise recovery. Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab 20: 515-532, 2010.
    Burke, DG, Chilibeck, PD, Davison, KS, Candow, DG, Farthing, JJ, and Smith-Palmer, TT. The effect of whey protein supplementation with and without creatine monohydrate combined with resistance training on lean tissue mass and muscle strength. International Journal of Sport Nutrition & Exercise Metabolism 11: 349-364, 2001.
    Campbell, B, and Spano, M. NSCA’s Guide to Sport and Exercise Nutrition. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics; 2011.
    Coburn, JW, Housh, DJ, Housh, TJ, Malek, MH, Beck, TW, Cramer, JT, Johnson, GO, and Donlin, PE. Effects of leucine and whey protein supplementation during eight weeks of unilateral resistance training. J Strength Cond Res 20: 284-291, 2006.
    Cockburn, E, Stevenson, E, Hayes, PR, Robson-Ansley, P, and Howatson, G. Effect of milk-based carbohydrate-protein supplement timing on the attenuation of exercise-induced muscle damage. Appl Physiol Nutr Metab 35: 270-277, 2010.
    Cribb, PJ, Williams, AD, Carey, MF, and Hayes, A. The effect of whey isolate and resistance training on strength, body composition, and plasma glutamine. Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab 16: 494-509, 2006.
    Etheridge, T, Philp, A, and Watt, PW. A single protein meal increases recovery of muscle function following an acute eccentric exercise bout. Appl Physiol Nutr Metab 33: 483-488, 2008.
    Hoffman, JR. Protein intake: Effect of timing. Strength & Conditioning Journal 29: 26-34, 2007.
    Kerksick, CM, Rasmussen, CJ, Lancaster, SL, Magu, B, Smith, P, Melton, C, Greenwood, M, Almada, AL, Earnest, CP, and Kreider, RB. The effects of protein and amino acid supplementation on performance and training adaptations during ten weeks of resistance training. J Strength Cond Res 20: 643-653, 2006.
    Kreider, RB. Effects of nutritional supplementation during off-season college football training on body composition and strength. Journal of Exercise Physiology Online 2: 24-39, 1999.
    Lemon, PR. Effects of exercise on dietary protein requirements. International Journal of Sport Nutrition 8: 426-447, 1998.
    Nemet, D, and Eliakim, A. Protein and amino acid supplementation in sport. International  Sport Med Journal 8: 11-23, 2007.
    Phillips, SM. Dietary protein for athletes: from requirements to metabolic advantage. Appl Physiol Nutr Metab 31: 647-654, 2006.
    Roy, BD. Milk musings: Does it do an athletic body good? Journal of Pure Power 4: 35-37, 2009.
    Van Loon, LC. Application of protein or protein hydrolysates to improve post-exercise recovery. International Journal of Sport Nutrition & Exercise Metabolism 17: S104-S117, 2007.

The NSCA's Performance Training Journal is a bimonthly, online-only publication that provides informative strength and conditioning topics based on sound research and practical application.  The Performance Training Journal is available to NSCA Members.
About the Author

Russell Abaray is currently working as a graduate assistant with the Lamar University Athletic program in the strength and conditioning area. He is a United States Weightlifting Level 1 Sport Performance Coach, and recently completed his Masters degree in Kinesiology. Abaray has also earned the SCCC credential through the Collegiate Strength and Conditioning Coaches Association. Douglas Boatwright is currently a Professor/Department Chair of Exercise Science in the Department of Health and Kinesiology at Lamar University.


This why bodybuilding will never advance without drugs. Most of you refuse to research and read. This is why you have 100 different answers to one question. Put the fucking Flex and Muscle and Fitness down.
Report to moderator   Logged
Jon Harridan
Time Out
Getbig IV
*
Posts: 2129


My dog fucks the little girl fivesilvernickels.


View Profile
« Reply #33 on: January 22, 2013, 03:37:59 PM »

aminos is all you need.  But you should consume them before and during so that they get into your blood stream.  carbs?  Meh.

The carbs raise your blood sugar levels and that triggers your pancreas to produce insulin that can pack away the aminos more effectively.
Report to moderator   Logged
MCWAY
Getbig V
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 15904


Getbig!


View Profile
« Reply #34 on: January 24, 2013, 01:19:41 PM »

As usual, you have the two extremes here, both reeking of paranoia.

One thinks they'll shirnk if they dont' get a shake the instant they finish training; the other thinks the concept of having a meal or shake shortly after a workout is merely a plot by those EEEEEVVVVIIILLLL supplement companies, to fleece them of their dinero.

It's quite simple. If you're hungry after training, GET SOMETHING TO EAT or HAVE A PROTEIN SHAKE.

I've done this for years, since my teens. In high school, I'd be ravenous after training. So, I'd head to the cafeteria and inhale as much food as I could. There's something to the anabolic window thing, as I could (and still can) eat WAAAAAY more food shortly after training than I usually eat as a meal.

In college, I just simplified it further by having my last weight gainer shake about a half hour after training. That was usually the time it took for me to shower and hit the whirlpool or swim for a bit.
Report to moderator   Logged
Jon Harridan
Time Out
Getbig IV
*
Posts: 2129


My dog fucks the little girl fivesilvernickels.


View Profile
« Reply #35 on: January 24, 2013, 01:31:19 PM »

As usual, you have the two extremes here, both reeking of paranoia.

One thinks they'll shirnk if they dont' get a shake the instant they finish training; the other thinks the concept of having a meal or shake shortly after a workout is merely a plot by those EEEEEVVVVIIILLLL supplement companies, to fleece them of their dinero.

It's quite simple. If you're hungry after training, GET SOMETHING TO EAT or HAVE A PROTEIN SHAKE.

I've done this for years, since my teens. In high school, I'd be ravenous after training. So, I'd head to the cafeteria and inhale as much food as I could. There's something to the anabolic window thing, as I could (and still can) eat WAAAAAY more food shortly after training than I usually eat as a meal.

In college, I just simplified it further by having my last weight gainer shake about a half hour after training. That was usually the time it took for me to shower and hit the whirlpool or swim for a bit.

There's no plot by the supplement companies. Having a shake straight after your workout is based on hard science.
Report to moderator   Logged
MCWAY
Getbig V
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 15904


Getbig!


View Profile
« Reply #36 on: January 24, 2013, 01:35:20 PM »

There's no plot by the supplement companies. Having a shake straight after your workout is based on hard science.

In terms of sports nutrition, hard science tends to lag behind real-world, in-the-trenches experience (or as it's called today, "broscience").

Hard science may get into the weeds, regarding how something works. But, real-world, trial-and-error experience shows simply THAT something works.

I believe such is the case with the "anabolic window".
Report to moderator   Logged
Jon Harridan
Time Out
Getbig IV
*
Posts: 2129


My dog fucks the little girl fivesilvernickels.


View Profile
« Reply #37 on: January 24, 2013, 02:24:29 PM »

In terms of sports nutrition, hard science tends to lag behind real-world, in-the-trenches experience (or as it's called today, "broscience").

Hard science may get into the weeds, regarding how something works. But, real-world, trial-and-error experience shows simply THAT something works.

I believe such is the case with the "anabolic window".

It's common sense too.
Report to moderator   Logged
ukjeff
Time Out
Getbig V
*
Posts: 6637



View Profile
« Reply #38 on: January 24, 2013, 03:17:35 PM »

Quote
There's no plot by the supplement companies. Having a shake straight after your workout is based on hard science.
The plot is by gym owners selling you a shake that cost them pennies to make for £3.00.
Just go home and eat something later
Anabolic window my arse.
Report to moderator   Logged
Jon Harridan
Time Out
Getbig IV
*
Posts: 2129


My dog fucks the little girl fivesilvernickels.


View Profile
« Reply #39 on: January 24, 2013, 03:36:32 PM »

The plot is by gym owners selling you a shake that cost them pennies to make for £3.00.
Just go home and eat something later
Anabolic window my arse.

You can just bring your own shake/shakes to the gym then have another meal when you go home later.
Report to moderator   Logged
Pages: 1 [2]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Theme created by Egad Community. Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!