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Author Topic: OBAMA'S ASS-KICKING OF SOUL CRUSHER CONTINUES...unemployment down to 7.3%  (Read 2871 times)
andreisdaman
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« Reply #75 on: September 20, 2013, 05:13:14 AM »


Apparently he doesn't.  Even the Obama administration itself acknowledged that fact. Perhaps Da Man should stop spitting into the wind. 

still chasing me from thread to thread I see
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Gregzs
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« Reply #76 on: November 09, 2013, 12:57:23 AM »

http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-505123_162-57611443/explainer-how-to-tell-if-the-job-market-is-improving/?tag=nl.e713&s_cid=e713&ttag=e713&ftag=TRE4cf7aca

 The government's latest jobs report shows unemployment increasing from 7.2 percent in September to 7.3 percent last month. In many ways, however, the employment-to-population ratio is a better indicator of labor market conditions. And even as the economy was adding many more jobs than forecasters had predicted, that key metric fell to 58.3 percent, down 0.3 percentage points from the previous month.

The problem with using changes in the unemployment rate as the most important measure of the job picture is that it can fall even when labor market conditions get worse. When the unemployment rate declines because more jobless people find work, that reduction reflects a positive development in the labor market. But the unemployment rate also falls when people get discouraged about their prospects for finding a job and drop out of the labor force.

Thus, to properly interpret a change in the unemployment rate, it's important to know whether the change is due to a change in the proportion of people finding jobs or from a change in the labor force participation rate.

This is especially important recently because there has been a large change in labor force participation, meaning the number of working-age people who are employed or who are looking for work. The civilian labor force participation rate has fallen from 66 percent at the start of the recession in December 2007 to 62.8 percent in October of this year.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, there are 2.3 million people among those who have dropped out of the labor force who wanted and are available for work. These individuals are not counted as unemployed because they have not searched for work in the previous four weeks. If all of these workers had been counted as part of the labor force, the unemployment rate in October would have been 8.6 percent instead of 7.2 percent, a major difference.

One big unknown for the future is how many of these workers will return to the labor force once labor market conditions improve. If they return in substantial numbers, it would make it harder for the unemployment rate to fall.

The employment-to-population ratio does not have the discouraged worker problem. The civilian working-age population used to calculate this measure of labor market performance includes people both in and out of the labor force, so the movement between the two groups does not change the statistic.

This measure of labor market conditions tells a different story than the unemployment rate. The unemployment rate has fallen steadily from a peak of 10 percent in October 2009 to 7.3 percent as of last month. However, the employment-to-population ratio was 62.7 percent at the start of the recession in December 2007, fell to a low of 58.2 percent in November 2010 and has only increased to 58.3 percent in October of this year.


According to this measure of labor market performance, in other words, there hasn't been much improvement in the job market.


There are other factors besides the discouraged worker problem to watch out for when interpreting movements in either the unemployment rate or the employment-to-population ratio. If, for example, there is demographic change (such as the aging population we are seeing in the U.S.) and this causes a decline in the labor force participation rate as older workers drop out of the labor force, the employment-to-population ratio and unemployment rate calculations will be affected.

But there is an easy way around this problem for the employment-to-population ratio. The employment-to-population ratio for prime age workers aged 25-54 should be relatively independent of demographic change of the type we are currently experiencing because it excludes older workers. However, the story this measure tells is much the same. The ratio was 79.7 percent at the onset of the recession, fell to 74.8 percent in December of 2009 and has only increased to 75.4 percent since. It also has been flat for the last year or so.


So this measure also paints a somewhat gloomier picture of the labor market than the unemployment rate.

There are two other factors that are important to consider when interpreting movements in either the unemployment rate or the employment-to-population ratio. Both measures of labor market performance assume that anyone with a job is working as much as they want to and is in the job he or she is best suited for. But some workers who are counted as fully employed will only be able to find part-time work; they would rather work full-time if they could, and others end up in jobs they are overqualified for.


The Bureau of Labor Statistics publishes an alternative measure of the unemployment rate that corrects for the discouraged worker and part-time worker problems, and when these corrections are made the unemployment rate increases from 7.2 to 13.8 percent in October.

Of course, no single measure of labor market conditions is perfect, so it's best to look at the full range of indicators rather than focusing on any one measure. But the employment-to-population ratio should be among the set of statistics that is more carefully scrutinized, especially when there are substantial changes in labor force participation of the kind we have seen in recent years.
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GigantorX
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« Reply #77 on: November 10, 2013, 07:35:05 AM »

These "Ass Kicking" threads always seem to backfire.
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andreisdaman
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« Reply #78 on: November 17, 2013, 04:08:42 PM »

These "Ass Kicking" threads always seem to backfire.

Just telling the truth according to the stats.....you guys only want to hear the stats when they don't favor Obama
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« Reply #79 on: March 03, 2014, 08:50:47 PM »

http://ideas.time.com/2014/02/19/unemployment-is-worse-than-death/

Unemployment: A Fate Worse Than Death

When it comes to happiness, being unemployed is worse for you than divorce or the death of a spouse.

Short of death or dismemberment, what do you think the worst thing is that could happen to you? If you answered “divorce” or “losing my husband,” you’re probably wrong — at least as far as future happiness is concerned. Don’t get me wrong: these things will make you very unhappy. (To say nothing of how your husband will feel.) But over time, research shows, you will recover.

Not so with unemployment. Like divorce or the death of a spouse, losing a job will often plunge people into despair. But,unless they spend a lot of time hunting for a new job, unemployed people tend to stay unemployed. Time heals most wounds, but not all of them. A long-term study of how Germans reacted to various life events showed that four years after they’d lost their jobs, they still hadn’t gotten used to it — being unemployed made them just as unhappy as they’d been the day they were laid off.

Remember, this is Germany, which long had generous unemployment benefits. The financial insecurity that usually attends prolonged unemployment is bound to add to one’s misery. But it doesn’t seem to be the primary cause. As much as we may gripe about it, work is not just something you have to do in order to pay the mortgage. It is a daily connection to coworkers and customers. It is the knowledge that you are wanted and useful. Even the most tedious job gives us a place in the world. Unemployment makes us question why we are here.

That’s what is so disturbing about the recent string of lackluster job reports. The Bureau of Labor Statistics reported last week that in January, 145.2 million people were employed — 1.1 million fewer than in January of 2008, even though the population has grown. In the last two months, the economy created fewer than 200,000 jobs. The unemployment rate is falling only because so many people have dropped out of the labor force entirely and stopped looking.

“If you want to work, if you want a job, if you want to be part of America, we’ll find a place for you,” Senator Rand Paul recently promised immigrants. But right now, America can’t even do this for the people who are already here. The administration often seems to be focused on making unemployment more attractive, rather than making it less common, fighting Republicans over extended unemployment benefits (which some research indicates may actually increase unemployment), and not talking much about how to get people back to work. When the Congressional Budget Office recently projected that Obamacare would  cause the economy to lose the equivalent of 2 million full time jobs, the White House argued that this was actually great news, because most of them would be choosing not to work.

Never mind that many of them would be “choosing” unemployment because Obamcare’s subsidy structure effectively makes much work unprofitable. Work is a form of investment: in many careers, pay and promotion opportunities are strongly related to the number of  you’ve worked (and experience you’ve accumulated).

That’s if you can get a job at all. But one thing we know about today’s labor market is that once you’ve left, it’s very hard to get back in. Public outcry may be stopping employers from posting the “no unemployed need apply” ads that triggered such outrage a few years ago, but studies show that their behavior hasn’t actually changed: people whose resumes have a sizeable gap will have a substantially harder time finding another job. That’s true for laid off ironworkers and middle managers, and it’s also true for women who step out of the workforce to care for a family member. You can argue — as I would — that employers shouldn’t do this, but no one’s come up with a way to stop them. That’s why our government policy ought to be focused on keeping people at work, not  making it easier for them to leave.

This is difficult, but not impossible. There are programs, from tax credits for hiring the unemployed to using direct employment programs as a substitute for extended unemployment benefits. None of them seems likely in the current political environment, so Americans who’ve lost their jobs are going to have to help themselves. Fortunately, we do know something about what works, and what doesn’t.

The first thing is pretty obvious: you have to look for work, every day. Research shows that the more time you spend on your job search, the more likely you are to find another job quickly. Interestingly, how you go about looking seems to matter less than the amount of time you spend doing it.

The second is to be willing to accept lower pay. In the current labor market, you are much better off looking for a higher-paying job from a lower-paying job, than from no job at all.

And the third  is move. The whole country has been hit hard by the recession, but some areas were harder hit than others. The farther you are willing to move, the more likely you are to find a job that fits your skills.

“But that’s obvious!” you may be saying, and it’s true. But you wouldn’t know it from the behavior of job seekers. Many of whom slack off their job search when their first round of leads run dry, and resist taking a lower-paying jobs, especially if it involves moving far away. This is entirely understandable. Job hunting, with all its explicit and implicit rejection, is extremely unpleasant. I know, I’ve been there. So is accepting that you are no longer worth what your last boss paid you. And moving routinely ranks high on the list of life’s most unpleasant experiences. But even if it’s understandable, it’s also terribly dangerous.

If you reconcile yourself to lower pay, and steel yourself to put in the hours and look for a job every single day — even when you don’t feel like it, and even if you aren’t sure you are searching the “right” way — then you are much more likely to keep a brief episode of misery from turning into an extended catastrophe. Unemployment will always be one of the worst things that ever happened to you, but it doesn’t actually have to stay that way.


Read more: Unemployment: A Fate Worse Than Death | TIME.com http://ideas.time.com/2014/02/19/unemployment-is-worse-than-death/#ixzz2uxiYBUCs
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Gregzs
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« Reply #80 on: April 20, 2014, 09:59:33 PM »

http://www.nbcnews.com/business/economy/many-americans-temp-work-becomes-permanent-way-life-n81071

For Many Americans, 'Temp' Work Becomes Permanent Way of Life

or Americans who can’t find jobs, the booming demand for temp workers has been a path out of unemployment, but now many fear it’s a dead-end route.

With full-time work hard to find, these workers have built temping into a de facto career, minus vacation, sick days or insurance. The assignments might be temporary — a few months here, a year there — but labor economists warn that companies’ growing hunger for a workforce they can switch on and off could do permanent damage to these workers’ career trajectories and retirement plans.


 

 



“It seems to be the new norm in the working world,” said Kelly Sibla, 54. The computer systems engineer has been looking for a full-time job for four years now, but the Amherst, Ohio, resident said she has to take whatever she can find.

“I know a lot of people who are doing this temping. It seems to be the way this is going,” she said.

Sibla’s husband, 67, got a buyout offer from his former employer and is now retired, but she has minimal retirement savings in her own name. “When you’re working as a temp you don’t get any of that. Nothing,” she said. The couple is downsizing to a smaller home and trying to sell the one they live in now to reduce expenses.

“You don’t get any benefits to speak of, you only get paid for what you work … no sick time, no paid vacation,” said Brian Dupuy, a computer technician in Des Moines who lost his last full-time job five years ago and has been temping since 2011.

Dupuy, 56, said he’s paid hourly, and the rate comes to about 40 percent less than he was earning at his last full-time job. “After a year, they’ll sign you up for a 401(k) but the salary is so low you have trouble making ends meet to begin with,” he said.

Economists say it’s typical for temporary hiring to rise initially as the economy recovers, before businesses are ready to commit to hiring full-time employees. But Susan Houseman, senior economist at Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, said the current pattern doesn’t fit historic norms.


 

 



“Right now we’re seeing something interesting,” she said. “We’ve seen it surpass its previous highs, so it looks like there could be a structural shift going on, too. There’s a reason to believe we might see some increase in the use of temporary help in general.”

In March, the temp industry added 28,500 jobs, and about 2.8 million workers are employed currently in temporary or contract positions, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. This is a little more than 2 percent of the workforce, a peak last reached in April 2000, said Steve Berchem, chief operating officer of the American Staffing Association, an industry trade group.

Berchem cautioned that drawing conclusions from one month or even a few months’ worth of data could be misleading because the BLS frequently revises its data, but he said the shift to companies using more temporary workers is already under way.

“We argued when the recovery began that there would be a structural shift,” he said. “We were hearing that from members who were hearing that from their clients, (that) they were more likely to use temp and contract workers.”

“There are a lot of perverse incentives for employers to use temps,” said Erin Hatton, an assistant professor of sociology at the State University of New York, Buffalo, and author of "The Temp Economy: From Kelly Girls to Permatemps in Postwar America." For one thing, it’s cheaper. Using temporary labor lets companies avoid the cost of providing benefits like health insurance, workers’ comp, paid sick leave and the like.

“It allows them to increase or reduce their workforce more easily, and in an uncertain environment, that can be very valuable to the firm,” Houseman said.

More kinds of businesses seem to be drawing that conclusion, as industries not thought of as traditional temp work territory are using more contract workers. Hatton pointed out that adjunct college professors face much of the same uncertainty and lower wages than their full-time counterparts. And manufacturing companies make up around 40 percent of the current demand for temp workers, Houseman said.


 

 



“In the government data, you see that 17 percent of assembly line workers are hired through the staffing industry,” Houseman said.

With organized labor losing its clout, there’s little to check companies’ ability to shed workers the moment they perceive an economic chill, said Eileen Appelbaum, a senior economist at the Center for Economic and Policy Research. “In the private sector there’s no counterbalancing power,” she said. “The decisions are almost costless to them.”

Appelbaum added that domestic outsourcing — when companies contract with third-party firms to handle everything from their janitorial to their payroll services needs — is on the rise.

It’s all part of a broader shift to an everyone-for-themselves workforce, labor economists say. Business services firm MBO Partners says there were 17.7 million independent workers last year, up 10 percent from 2011.

Berchem called this shift in the labor market a “win-win” for companies as well as workers. “We’ve seen an increase in workers preferring flexibility,” he said. “Family is a big priority for temporary and contract employees and they prefer the flexibility such work allows.”

Lynn Monaghan, 33, began temping after a transition away from her former career in event planning and says there are pros and cons.


 

 



“The pros are, it’s given me a great amount of flexibility,” she said of her current job, which is also nearby where she lives in suburban Boston. “Being a working mother, that has been really beneficial to me. There’s less pressure,” she said.

But flexibility is relative.

“There is certainly a small segment of the workforce ... that does want real flexibility in their lives. The thing is, though, that temp work is very flexible for employers and not that flexible for workers,” Hatton said. “It gives them a profound sense of insecurity.”

As a temp, even something as innocuous as personalizing a workstation can be a gamble. With her unemployment benefits exhausted and “no calls whatsoever,” Dayton, Ohio-area resident Ronda Roberts said she took a temp job in December 2012 doing clerical work that paid a quarter of what she previously made as a developer of training materials. “I kind of felt like I didn’t have a choice,” said Roberts, 55.

A year later, even that rug was pulled out from under her. Roberts said she took a rare sick day, only to get a phone call from the temp agency that evening, telling her that her contract had been ended, effective immediately.

When she asked if she could retrieve her computer case and other personal items, the agency told her she wasn’t allowed back into the office where she had worked for roughly a year, and that she had to wait for the company’s corporate human resources department to contact her.

In the end, it took Roberts two months of waiting and an hour’s drive to the company’s headquarters to get her things back. “If I ever got a temp job again, I would not leave anything on site,” she said. “It bothers me that I wouldn’t be able to go and get my own things.”

Roberts said she had gotten along well with her full-time co-workers and that she felt like part of the team, but her abrupt dismissal and the hoops she had to jump through to retrieve her belongings reminded her of her outsider status. “Your job is dispensable. That’s why you’re a temp,” she said.

This is just one of many ways Hatton said temp workers are marginalized in corporate culture. “There’s a very deep level of unfairness,” she said. “Those workers feel profoundly bitter.”

“When you’re just a contractor at a company … your ID badge is a different color. People treat you differently. They say they don’t, but they just do,” Sibla said.

More alarming to economists, long-term temps also miss out on the opportunity to develop a nest egg for a comfortable retirement.

“It’s almost entirely the burden of the individual,” said Kevin Cahill, a labor economist with the Sloan Center on Aging & Work at Boston College.


 

 



The potential hit to Social Security benefits is two-fold, he said. Since Social Security benefits are based on your earnings over your work history, both low-paying temp work or a gap in employment — a combination many of today’s “permatemps” face — can drag down a worker’s future payments.

These workers also may not have access to a corporate 401(k) plan. Even if they do, they might not be paid enough to be able to put any away for retirement. There’s certainly no employer match.

“Folks who turn to temporary employment because full-time employment is lacking have been hit extra hard. They’ve lost time to accumulate savings and could very well bleed down their savings during their job search.”

This is what happened to Dupuy, who said he used his 401(k) funds to stay afloat during his unemployment. “I figure I’m going to be working way beyond 65 or 67 or whatever it is these days,” he said. “I just know it’s going to be really hard.”

This has broad effects, Hatton warned, not just on the legions of temp workers today, but on the next generation. Their tenuous employment situation can make it harder for them to send their children to college, she said. “The effects ripple out.”
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Soul Crusher
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« Reply #81 on: April 21, 2014, 03:30:40 AM »

Obama is the worst ever - ever.    F hm.   
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dario73
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« Reply #82 on: April 21, 2014, 07:27:50 AM »

Five years later and the UE rate is still not at 5%, but there are twice as many people with part-time jobs or receive some kind of government assistance as people who work full time.
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andreisdaman
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« Reply #83 on: April 26, 2014, 04:47:27 PM »

Five years later and the UE rate is still not at 5%, but there are twice as many people with part-time jobs or receive some kind of government assistance as people who work full time.


Thats a function of where America is headed....businesses can get by with using part time workers....technology is a part of this....don't need to hire a bookkeeper, accountant, or lots of office staff when my computer can keep the books, do my taxes and perform other tasks i used to need five people to do.
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« Reply #84 on: April 29, 2014, 05:52:49 AM »



Thats a function of where America is headed....businesses can get by with using part time workers....technology is a part of this....don't need to hire a bookkeeper, accountant, or lots of office staff when my computer can keep the books, do my taxes and perform other tasks i used to need five people to do.

O-TWINK promised to fix it remember?
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dario73
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« Reply #85 on: April 29, 2014, 09:52:15 AM »

O-TWINK promised to fix it remember?

Nah. They forget that part. They forget that he was going to CHANGE everything.

The stim bill was needed in order to bring the UE rate down to 5%. It failed and since libtards can't accept failure, they now claim the high UE rate as normal. They rather accept mediocrity instead of accepting the reality THAT LIBTARD IDEOLOGY NEVER WORKS!!!!!!!!
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andreisdaman
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« Reply #86 on: June 09, 2014, 03:28:45 PM »

Down to 6.3% and still falling...or are the figures STILL made up according to all the idiots on here? Undecided
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« Reply #87 on: June 09, 2014, 03:50:42 PM »

GDP growth at less than .5%.....

Obama is doing nothing. Except going on vacations.
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« Reply #88 on: June 09, 2014, 03:54:27 PM »

The labor participation rate continues to plummet....it's at the lowest since the late 70's.  For the millionth time, the UE rate is comprised of people LOOKING FOR WORK who can't find it.  If you've thrown in the towel because you have no hope in hell of finding work, you're not counted as "unemployed"
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« Reply #89 on: June 10, 2014, 11:18:57 AM »

The labor participation rate continues to plummet....it's at the lowest since the late 70's.  For the millionth time, the UE rate is comprised of people LOOKING FOR WORK who can't find it.  If you've thrown in the towel because you have no hope in hell of finding work, you're not counted as "unemployed"
no, we are retired.
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dario73
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« Reply #90 on: June 10, 2014, 11:46:38 AM »

no, we are retired.

Ah, no. You are stupid if you think the bulk of those people are retired.

Dammnnnnnnnn, can you get any dumber? I guess you can.
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GigantorX
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« Reply #91 on: June 10, 2014, 02:22:30 PM »

LPR is the reason yhe U-3 rate is at 6.3%

The actual employment picture is an absolute disaster.
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« Reply #92 on: June 10, 2014, 03:07:45 PM »

LPR amongst 16-29 year olds is at a historically low level....are they retired too?   That's a hell of a plan...destroy economy to the point that all we can do is "retire" and wait for that government check.    And we'll pay for it by printing money!!

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-06-10/carls-jr-ceo-explains-why-nobody-hiring-young-people
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andreisdaman
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« Reply #93 on: June 21, 2014, 09:29:07 PM »

the LPR will always go up because our population keeps rising.....its been going up for thirty years...I guess thats Obama's fault too huh?HuhHuh??
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« Reply #94 on: June 22, 2014, 11:34:54 AM »

You obviously don't understand what the LPR is...so you should probably STFU before you make an even bigger fool of yourself.
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« Reply #95 on: June 22, 2014, 12:56:03 PM »

You obviously don't understand what the LPR is...so you should probably STFU before you make an even bigger fool of yourself.
to quote SC:
'says someone who doesn't lift or have a girlfriend' LOL
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flipper5470
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« Reply #96 on: June 22, 2014, 01:01:58 PM »

T o quote your mom when you asked her for dinner..."fuck you"
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« Reply #97 on: June 22, 2014, 04:18:08 PM »

You obviously don't understand what the LPR is...so you should probably STFU before you make an even bigger fool of yourself.

I understand that your mom left your dad for a brother and that you feel very scorned.  Hope this helps.
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« Reply #98 on: June 22, 2014, 10:25:35 PM »

Weak ...all the stupid racist responses won't change the fact that the economy has underperformed durinng lord Bumblefuck's Presidency
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« Reply #99 on: June 25, 2014, 06:17:50 AM »

GDP contracted at a 2.9% clip in Q1 2014....Obama's ass kicking of America continues.
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