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Author Topic: The USA is Digging Itself Deeper & Deeper....  (Read 24245 times)
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« on: May 06, 2014, 03:47:31 PM »

No Way Out - Stocks, Bond, Real Estate Markets Will Collapse


"When interest rates inevitably go up from these artificially suppressed levels where they are now, the bond market is going to collapse, the stock market is going to collapse, and with it, the real estate market is going to collapse. These pension funds are going to be wiped out. Then what's going to happen? This is a very bad situation. The U.S. is digging itself in deeper and deeper."

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MUeSjdt6_Bo" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MUeSjdt6_Bo</a>
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« Reply #1 on: May 06, 2014, 04:32:39 PM »

Well... what do we have here...

a two year old prediction that appears to be coming true. Cheesy


quick cursory response:
 
SDR's are a basket of fiats, and while they do contain some gold, they are still fiats.
When currencies collapse, they will introduce the IMF fiat the SDR, but again, it is a fiat and unsustainable and will follow the same route as current fiats.

as for Germany's GOLD, well, that's not in Germany, and whether they can repatriate it, is another story.

as for US Gold,... I hear they just picked up a few hundred tonnes in Libya, to fill the empty vaults of Fort Knox.


I'm not banking on anything, ...I'm hedging against something that I see as inevitable.
I don't see fiats recovering. They are all in a race to debase, and debasing against each other is ridiculous, ...however, debasing against GOLD is something they are all capable of doing.

In any event, I'm getting my gold for FREE, and can convert it into cash in any currency I choose, as well as shortly, be able to shop with it as well... eventually down the road. Right now, I'm in the accumulation stage, and not yet shopping with it like some of my European counterparts.

They've just relieved the Ukraine of all it's GOLD...
...and the IMF has just bailed them out of their horrendous debt situation with SDRs.

I guess we all know what's coming don't we? Cool


http://www.getbig.com/boards/index.php?topic=418973.msg6012020#msg6012020
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« Reply #2 on: May 06, 2014, 06:29:33 PM »

of course, the only means of escape are your magic gas pills and your tired cash for gold scam  Roll Eyes
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« Reply #3 on: May 06, 2014, 07:18:53 PM »

A 1 ounce gold coin in 1913 would buy a nice suit.  That same 1 ounce gold coin will still buy a nice suit today.  The dollar, on the other hand, has lost 98% of its purchasing power since 1913.  People that want their dollars can keep them.
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« Reply #4 on: May 06, 2014, 10:52:44 PM »

A 1 ounce gold coin in 1913 would buy a nice suit.  That same 1 ounce gold coin will still buy a nice suit today.  The dollar, on the other hand, has lost 98% of its purchasing power since 1913.  People that want their dollars can keep them.

EXACTLY!!! Gold is a store of value & purchasing power. It preserves the value of your labour, blood, sweat & tears. If you're not storing your money in gold, ...someone's picking your pocket. And when your pockets are empty, ...they'll be picking your bones. Back then it was possible to acquire an ounce of gold for around $20.

In order to print more currency, Roosevelt confiscated all the gov't issued gold coins, and once they had them all, revalued gold at $35 an ounce in order to print more currency. Even if you had purchased it at $35 / ounce, and used that as your savings account, saving your money in gold, you would be ahead of the game, versus saving it in paper or virtual electronic or ledger currency (cash in a bank account)

The same 1 ounce of gold that was saved, would have retained it's purchasing power, buying everything it did in 1913 or in 1933. What will $20 or $35 in paper currency buy you today? It's not the PRICE of gold that matters, it's how much gold you have that matters, ...not in prices, but in weights.

Personally, I wouldn't want a $1,000 bill. It's not practical for transactions, who can make change?
It's difficult enough getting change for a $100 bill. Given a choice, I'd prefer to have a hundred $10 bills or even  two hundred $5 bills than to have ten $100 bills or one $1,000 bill. Larger denominations of anything are less practical and far less transaction friendly, whether we are talking fiat currency or precious metals.

You know how we hate having to break a big bill, ...even though the currency we're getting back in exchange is just as worthless & depreciating just as quickly as the other pieces of currency we just exchanged it for? Well it's even worse with physical gold as a means of exchange, ...UNLESS the physical gold you're exchanging is in transaction friendly weights, and you're getting the same kind of physical gold back as change.

I have no issue exchanging a 5 gram weight to pay for an item priced at 2 or 3 grams, especially if I know I'm going to receive 2 or 3 grams of gold back as change. We don't have the same luxury with a 1 ounce coin though, and God Forbid you should have to try transacting business with a kilo bar. Unless you're buying a car, or an even bigger ticketed item... good luck with that. And when Gold revalues higher... what the heck are we going to do then? If Mike Maloney's predictions are accurate, 1 gram of gold will be upwards of $600, and if Nick Barisheff or Jim Sinclair are on target, 1 gram could be upwards of $1800

I have friends who bought physical silver bars at $5 ounce. They got those big 400 oz bars at ~ $2,000 a piece.
When silver hit $50 and they tried to take their profit, ...guess what? No one had $20,000 laying around.
The dealer had to take a short term loan, which involved plenty of paper work, and you can be rest assured if he had to fill out paperwork, he made damned sure to report to the tax man exactly WHO he was forking over close to $20G's per bar to.

I'd rather have one thousand 1 gram bars, than have to deal with a one kilo bar, ...but that's just me.
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« Reply #5 on: May 07, 2014, 10:34:13 AM »

Big market selloffs like Q4 '07 through Q1 '09, and the corrections in the spring / early summer of 2010 and summer of 2011 are great opportunities to get bargains on great investments.

I like some of everything - gold and other metals, real estate, good corporate stocks and bonds, oil and gas, etc. I also make liberal use of put options and a broad market short position as a hedge.

I'll keep doing what I've been doing for most of the 20 years I've been investing - investing mainly bottom-up on fundamentals in a diversified portfolio, and keeping my emotions out of it. I've found that it works very well overall.
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« Reply #6 on: June 12, 2014, 11:47:16 PM »

Big market selloffs like Q4 '07 through Q1 '09, and the corrections in the spring / early summer of 2010 and summer of 2011 are great opportunities to get bargains on great investments.

I like some of everything - gold and other metals, real estate, good corporate stocks and bonds, oil and gas, etc. I also make liberal use of put options and a broad market short position as a hedge.

I'll keep doing what I've been doing for most of the 20 years I've been investing - investing mainly bottom-up on fundamentals in a diversified portfolio, and keeping my emotions out of it. I've found that it works very well overall.

Good Luck to you. You have much bigger ovaries than me. The markets have been so out of whack for the past 6 years, I haven't felt comfortable about any kind of investments at all. The rules of the game have been thrown out in favour of crony capitalism. You say one should keep their emotions out of it, but that is downright impossible when you're essentially rolling the dice. In my opinion, that's all the investment world has become these days... nothing but a crap shoot in the casinos of Wall Street. I find it hard not to get emotional when I'm being robbed left & right. They aren't even bothering to try to hide it anymore.

These days I'm all about wealth & capital preservation. Perhaps some miracle may occur, and the environment may become conducive to investing again, or perhaps something may come along that would be worth the investment. Until then, I'll simply save what I have, exchange it into real money, ...and maybe perhaps invest it, but only if the markets become conducive to investing again.
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« Reply #7 on: June 14, 2014, 10:46:44 AM »

It can be scary, no doubt. Anything I invest a substantial amount of money in (90-95% of my time, money, and efforts) I get to know very well before I jump in - I read the 10k, everything. The other 5-10% of my time, energy, and effort is on more speculative investments / trades that have something very unusual happen that creates the opportunity for quick profit or may look promising for the longterm. I diversify and go to great lengths to minimize risk.

I feel much more confident investing most of my money and the money of others in a few dozen publicly traded companies I have handpicked than I would be putting money into private businesses, speculative real estate, etc.

90% of all private companies fail. And real estate fluctuates more than most people realize, doesn't guarantee income or anything else, and can be hard to liquidate.

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« Reply #8 on: June 21, 2014, 04:39:35 PM »

It can be scary, no doubt. Anything I invest a substantial amount of money in (90-95% of my time, money, and efforts) I get to know very well before I jump in - I read the 10k, everything. The other 5-10% of my time, energy, and effort is on more speculative investments / trades that have something very unusual happen that creates the opportunity for quick profit or may look promising for the longterm. I diversify and go to great lengths to minimize risk.

I feel much more confident investing most of my money and the money of others in a few dozen publicly traded companies I have handpicked than I would be putting money into private businesses, speculative real estate, etc.

90% of all private companies fail. And real estate fluctuates more than most people realize, doesn't guarantee income or anything else, and can be hard to liquidate.


I guess scared isn't really the right word, ...more infuriating. I don't have a problem with risk,
...but I just think some risks are just plain stupid, so I won't take them. Everybody is different.

Some guys like to cut their flesh, and lower their bleeding body parts into the water to attract shark.
Ya, it certainly may achieve the objective, but it's still stupid in my opinion, so I won't be doing any of that.

I used to do what you do. However, one can read all the 10Ks etc., examine the fundamentals of a company, the market etc., etc., ...however, when I see good companies having to compete against poorly run companies that fudge numbers, or are given advantages, and rewarded for their mismanagement, I don't stick around.  With all the corruption I see in institutions, there is far too little integrity in the markets for me to want to do that. To each his own though.

These days, the only investment I make is in myself, and my commitment to preserve my purchasing power.
I'm using a strategy within a system that gives me zero financial risk exposure, and spins off nothing but pure profit in the form of weekly cash flow and free gold that I didn't have to dip into my own personal finances to acquire. The more cashflow & gold I want, the more I simply intensify my efforts using the system.
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« Reply #9 on: June 22, 2014, 01:53:22 PM »

I think you might be overstating your case, or perhaps you might have irrational fears or just a very bad past experience.

The way I see it, if you insist on day trading or putting everything into 1 or 2 investments that you picked haphazardly or got into because your hairdresser gave you a "tip" and lose most or all of your money in this day and age, you've pretty much brought that on yourself - what with the knowledge and also reputable professional help available at everyone's fingertips these days.

But if you can educate yourself, think longterm, learn to manage risk, keep emotions in check, and buy 10, 30, 50 or 100 companies with mostly sound fundamentals and solid or promising products and services, there's no way you should lose all of your money. If you invest in 10 companies (much less 30, 50, or 100) and they all go under, you're either the unluckiest person on earth or you really, really suck at picking stocks.

People don't go broke from proper investing. They will no doubt have the odd losing year or 2 here and there, but they won't lose it all. People go broke day trading or otherwise being too active, being too egotistical or greedy, panicing, putting everything into one company that fails, buying into investment scams (almost always with independents outside of major broker dealers & that are too good to be true), or shorting companies that end up going to the moon.

Many people far smarter than I started with little or nothing and have become hundred millionaires, billionaires, multi-billionaires, even billionaires times 20 or more in a few cases - just from investing in mostly publicly traded companies. Many middle class people become millionaires or multimillionaires after 30-40 years of contributing the max to work plans and IRAs.

I started with $100k in a taxable account 20 years ago, have averaged 15%, have contributed hundreds of thousands more to it over the years, and have also been maxing out retirement plans during that time each year, averaging 12% on those. If you do the math I guess I'm doing ok.
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« Reply #10 on: June 22, 2014, 08:51:46 PM »

I think you might be overstating your case, or perhaps you might have irrational fears or just a very bad past experience.

Not overstating a thing. I don't like the stock market these days. It's a giant crap shoot with little integrity left IMO

Quote
The way I see it, if you insist on day trading or putting everything into 1 or 2 investments that you picked haphazardly or got into because your hairdresser gave you a "tip" and lose most or all of your money in this day and age, you've pretty much brought that on yourself - what with the knowledge and also reputable professional help available at everyone's fingertips these days.

ROTFLOL!  Grin

I don't know which is funnier, ...the idea of me day trading, or the idea of me getting a hot stock tip from my hairdresser. I wouldn't trust my hairdresser to pick a cold drink for me, let alone an investment.

Quote
But if you can educate yourself, think longterm, learn to manage risk, keep emotions in check, and buy 10, 30, 50 or 100 companies with mostly sound fundamentals and solid or promising products and services, there's no way you should lose all of your money. If you invest in 10 companies (much less 30, 50, or 100) and they all go under, you're either the unluckiest person on earth or you really, really suck at picking stocks.

I do try to educate myself, and I most definitely think long term... very long term. As for my emotions... I think the right word is disgust. Disgust with what I see in the markets, and those who work in them. I used to live on Bay Street. (Toronto's equivalent to NYC's Wall Street) The mentality of the stock brokers that surrounded me was less than impressive at the time. Looking back, it was even more distasteful than I realized at the time, It doesn't surprise me 2008 happened. I'm glad to have made it out of the markets relatively unscathed. I took a tiny bit of a loss in 2008, not much, just a ding, but have since recouped it all. I think most people had some exposure to the hit. The problem for me was I had no control over my own money. The investment vehicles were chosen for me. I saw what they put me in, but I couldn't control the percentages, ...and they only had 5% of my money in gold. I wanted at least 20% in gold. After fall of 2008, I said 'forget this, I'm going to control my own money myself.' Fortunately, being north of our border, the hit wasn't too bad, ...but I don't like the idea of having to call someone to get access to my own money.

Quote
People don't go broke from proper investing. They will no doubt have the odd losing year or 2 here and there, but they won't lose it all. People go broke day trading or otherwise being too active, being too egotistical or greedy, panicing, putting everything into one company that fails, buying into investment scams (almost always with independents outside of major broker dealers & that are too good to be true), or shorting companies that end up going to the moon.

How can someone go broke shorting a company that goes to the moon?
If someone is playing in the markets, and doesn't know enough to put in a stop-loss, that's just plain stupid.

Quote
Many people far smarter than I started with little or nothing and have become hundred millionaires, billionaires, multi-billionaires, even billionaires times 20 or more in a few cases - just from investing in mostly publicly traded companies. Many middle class people become millionaires or multimillionaires after 30-40 years of contributing the max to work plans and IRAs.

Ha! Being a millionaire isn't what it once was, different time, & era. But being a Billionaire on the other hand...  Tongue
I have a few friends in the Billionaire club, mainly from commercial real estate and IPO's, none in the 20 Billion range or above (that I know of) ...however there is one who seems to be on track for that, simply from having the right clients. He's not in the financial field.

Quote
I started with $100k in a taxable account 20 years ago, have averaged 15%, have contributed hundreds of thousands more to it over the years, and have also been maxing out retirement plans during that time each year, averaging 12% on those. If you do the math I guess I'm doing ok.

Congratulations! Glad your strategies are working for you. Let's hope for your sake your currency will still have some purchasing power left in it when you go to use it.  Smiley
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« Reply #11 on: June 23, 2014, 08:38:41 AM »

Stop-losses don't always work. If you're short 100 shares of XYZ at $10 with an $11 stop, what do you think happens when it's announced outside of market hours that XYZ either got bought out for $19, or they open up at $30 the next morning in pre-market trading because it was announced outside of market hours that their cancer drug got FDA approval? If you had bet the ranch on that company hitting the pink sheets eventually, or on that drug not getting approved, you're screwed.

Also, you always need both a buyer and a seller on each end. Depending upon what you're investing in and when, it may sometimes be hard to find someone to sell you something or buy it from you.

And it does happen that sometimes even very smart people let their egos get the best of them. They see a $10 or less book value tech stock trading at $20, and think there's no way it will hold on to double digits. Before you know it, it's at $100, and the bigshot shorts more. Then he completely pigs out at $200. At $400 he's in the poor house and closing up shop. Happened quite a bit before the tech bubble popped.

Broker Dealers in recent years have gone more towards a fiduciary relationship with clients, and many brokers at better firms tend to also be registered investment advisors. I haven't been a retail broker for years. I run a small private investment fund dealing strictly with a limited number of accredited investors with an aggregate of well under $150 mil... at $150 mil in assets, all sorts of excess regulatory headaches come into play, so money is returned to investors near that point. I'm not selling anything, anyone, or taking on new clients.

Someone with a few grand may be alright buying an index fund or really digging in and finding a few good investments if they have the time and temperament. Many with 5 figures might do best to invest with a few of the better fund managers if they don't have the time or temperament to pick their own stocks and other investments. Those with 6-7 figures or more will usually need at least some help from professionals at some point - income, principal protection, and tax issues, etc. And those with 8 figures or more definitely need help - taxes, income, estate planning, gifting, etc.
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« Reply #12 on: June 27, 2014, 10:38:58 PM »

Stop-losses don't always work. If you're short 100 shares of XYZ at $10 with an $11 stop, what do you think happens when it's announced outside of market hours that XYZ either got bought out for $19, or they open up at $30 the next morning in pre-market trading because it was announced outside of market hours that their cancer drug got FDA approval? If you had bet the ranch on that company hitting the pink sheets eventually, or on that drug not getting approved, you're screwed.

Also, you always need both a buyer and a seller on each end. Depending upon what you're investing in and when, it may sometimes be hard to find someone to sell you something or buy it from you.

And it does happen that sometimes even very smart people let their egos get the best of them. They see a $10 or less book value tech stock trading at $20, and think there's no way it will hold on to double digits. Before you know it, it's at $100, and the bigshot shorts more. Then he completely pigs out at $200. At $400 he's in the poor house and closing up shop. Happened quite a bit before the tech bubble popped.

Broker Dealers in recent years have gone more towards a fiduciary relationship with clients, and many brokers at better firms tend to also be registered investment advisors. I haven't been a retail broker for years. I run a small private investment fund dealing strictly with a limited number of accredited investors with an aggregate of well under $150 mil... at $150 mil in assets, all sorts of excess regulatory headaches come into play, so money is returned to investors near that point. I'm not selling anything, anyone, or taking on new clients.

Someone with a few grand may be alright buying an index fund or really digging in and finding a few good investments if they have the time and temperament. Many with 5 figures might do best to invest with a few of the better fund managers if they don't have the time or temperament to pick their own stocks and other investments. Those with 6-7 figures or more will usually need at least some help from professionals at some point - income, principal protection, and tax issues, etc. And those with 8 figures or more definitely need help - taxes, income, estate planning, gifting, etc.

What I see in the markets is a lot of smoke & mirrors, and simultaneous bubbles in the making.
I intend for me & my money to be well clear of the monumental crash when it occurs, ...and occur it will IMO
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« Reply #13 on: June 28, 2014, 10:51:19 AM »

I like gold and other metals among other "alternative investments" as part of my portfolio. I also invest in foreign investments via ADRs, emerging markets bonds, etc.

I just don't see gold or anything else alone as the one be-all end-all of everything. Oil and recently gas have also been very good to me.

And if somehow the dollar ever truly becomes worthless and institutions like Goldman, Wells Fargo, and JPM ever truly totally crumble, and the stocks of all publicly traded American companies also become worthless, I think water, nonperishable food, guns & ammo, etc will be far more likely to help one survive than physical gold.

To think that the stocks of all publicly traded companies are essentially worthless is to certainly say that all private companies are the same. Why even bother starting or maintaining a business?
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« Reply #14 on: June 28, 2014, 04:13:24 PM »

I like gold and other metals among other "alternative investments" as part of my portfolio. I also invest in foreign investments via ADRs, emerging markets bonds, etc.

I just don't see gold or anything else alone as the one be-all end-all of everything. Oil and recently gas have also been very good to me.

And if somehow the dollar ever truly becomes worthless and institutions like Goldman, Wells Fargo, and JPM ever truly totally crumble, and the stocks of all publicly traded American companies also become worthless, I think water, nonperishable food, guns & ammo, etc will be far more likely to help one survive than physical gold.

To think that the stocks of all publicly traded companies are essentially worthless is to certainly say that all private companies are the same. Why even bother starting or maintaining a business?


water, non-perishable food, guns & ammo etc., are always good to have as a form of insurance IMO, however, I'm not talking survival insurance, I'm talking about what I choose to do as a form of financial insurance.

If big institutions were to crumble, I'm sure there will be all sorts of bails-in before that occurs, but who knows?  Huh What I see is a systemic issue that will result in an inevitable outcome. Too many lies, too many liars, and a lot of systemic institutional corruption leaves me with little confidence. It matters not to me how honest my broker, or banker may be. I see an issue systemically that leaves me with little confidence in their system.

In any event, whatever dustup occurs, a reset will take effect, and in the meantime, commerce will need to continue, ...and economic energy & purchasing power will be preserved until we are able to see ourselves out of the other side of the reset.

I'm not very confident in the markets, so I am exchanging currency that I would otherwise put into a savings account, into gold, as a preservation of value & purchasing power. I'm using the gold as a storehouse for the economic energy contain in the currency at the time of my gold acquisitions.

I'm talking about SAVING, not INVESTING. Investments are a whole different matter.

When I choose to invest, I will allocate currency from my investment accounts into suitable investments, if & when I find something worthy of my investment. Until then, I am choosing to preserve the value, economic energy, and purchasing power of the currency that I allocate for savings into a vessel that will retain & preserve their value.

I'm of the opinion that paper derivatives, stocks, bonds etc., are like buckets with holes. They leak value & purchasing power. The numbers of dollars on the balance sheet may go up, the listed "value" (priced in dollars) may go up, however, it means nothing to me when inflation has outpaced the rate at which those stated values (priced in dollars) have gone up. Smoke & Mirrors.


In 1971:
  • $1 in paper currency bought 4 loaves of bread.
  •  1 gram of gold bought 5 loaves of bread

Today:
  • $1 in paper currency barely buys 8 slices of bread
  •  1 gram of gold buys 20 loaves of bread

Even with a 500% return on that initial $1 in paper currency, I would not have preserved value, and still have a 75% loss of purchasing power of my initial capital, even though I'm thinking I'm doing well with a 500% increase in value (priced in paper currency)

And I'm suppose to use paper currency as a means of storing wealth, economic energy or purchasing power??

I DON'T THINK SO.   Shocked

So for me, my conclusions are obvious... GOLD is my preferred vehicle to preserve the value, economic energy, and purchasing power of my money.

I see too much counter-party risk in a traditional savings account for far too little return. The possibility  likelihood of bail-INs, the certainty of inflation eating away at it's purchasing power... no thank you. Therefore, instead of putting savings into a digital or paper currency savings account that will never pay me enough interest to stay ahead of inflation, I choose to put it into a form that preserves it's economic energy & purchasing power that cannot be hacked or printed out of thin air.

$100,000 stored in paper currency from 1913 has the same purchasing power of $2,000 today.

The same $100,000 from 1913, had it been saved in gold, rather than in paper, or as a digital ledger entry would have the purchasing power of close to $4.5 million today.

Because of this, I am choosing to use Gold as my long term vessel for my savings in order to preserve it's value.

When we choose an institution or entity to store our savings, most often the savings are held in digital or paper derivative, and the only perks they offer is a toaster, an iPad, or some such nonsense... before they fee you to death, or penalize you for withdrawing your own savings before they're done profiting off it, and further devaluing it in the process.

The entity I have chosen with which to accumulate my savings, provides me with better perks & incentives, and rewards me with cash amounts that are well ahead of inflation, gives me free gold, and doesn't penalize me if I want to withdraw my savings.
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« Reply #15 on: June 29, 2014, 01:46:04 PM »

Cash saving is not something I'm big on, at least not long term. Cash to me is temporary liquid currency that allows me to buy things - especially valuable things like sound investments and a nice home. And most of the stocks I buy are issued by companies who earn large sums and tend to have lots of valuable assets. A highly diversified high yield debt portfolio at certain times is another favorite tool of mine and others.
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« Reply #16 on: June 29, 2014, 11:56:40 PM »

Cash saving is not something I'm big on, at least not long term. Cash to me is temporary liquid currency that allows me to buy things - especially valuable things like sound investments and a nice home. And most of the stocks I buy are issued by companies who earn large sums and tend to have lots of valuable assets. A highly diversified high yield debt portfolio at certain times is another favorite tool of mine and others.

I'm not big on cash saving either, that's why I save in gold. Tongue
And not just any gold, the same asset class of gold used by all central banks & Govt's worldwide to settle debts between themselves, in smaller, more transaction friendly weights for maximum flexibility & liquidity.

Unfortunately, we do need cash to function in society, (at the moment) so I let my system for saving, generate the cash flow we're required to have in order to function in society, AND generate for me free gold to save.

I don't consider a house an asset unless or until it's generating a positive cash flow.

I consider a house a bank's or municipality's asset that you get to live in, pay for, and maintain.
For the "home owner" it's a pure liability.

I only consider it an investment if it's purchased with the intent to sell and make a profit, but I don't consider it an investment to purchase a home worth $500K and waiting for it to be valued at $750K to make a quarter million profit. To me, that's a speculative gamble. It could be a very calculated speculative gamble with all i's dotted & all t's crossed, well researched with strong indicators that it will soon be valued at $750K, but it is still a speculative gamble, to me. However, a house valued at $750,000 purchased for $500,000 ?? For me, THAT's an investment... I only consider it an investment when your profit is made at the time of the purchase, rather than at the time of the sale. That's just how my crazy mind works Cheesy

I prefer to steer clear of debt, ...my own, as well as anybody else's.
I consider Indebtedness simply a form of enslavement, and I prefer freedom, for myself, ...and others.

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« Reply #17 on: June 30, 2014, 01:56:31 PM »

I haven't carried debt for 5 years - beyond the odd small monthly credit card balance payoff each month I make on the one card I keep open and use for a small purchase once a month just to maintain an open credit file. I hope to never have to borrow again, but you just never know what life may throw at you.

I pay cash for everything now - homes, cars, etc. I only own 1 dwelling, and it's a rather fine home I just had built. I do own some vacant land, and the oil and gas they pull out of the ground there and pay me my 20% of each month makes it worth holding on to.  Grin
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« Reply #18 on: July 03, 2014, 11:33:11 AM »

I haven't carried debt for 5 years - beyond the odd small monthly credit card balance payoff each month I make on the one card I keep open and use for a small purchase once a month just to maintain an open credit file. I hope to never have to borrow again, but you just never know what life may throw at you.

I pay cash for everything now - homes, cars, etc. I only own 1 dwelling, and it's a rather fine home I just had built. I do own some vacant land, and the oil and gas they pull out of the ground there and pay me my 20% of each month makes it worth holding on to.  Grin


Good Stuff! Well done!  Smiley

Btw, you do carry debt. That paper stuff in your wallet, ...those digits in your bank account, ...it's all debt IMO.  Tongue
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« Reply #19 on: August 19, 2014, 02:27:44 PM »

No Way Out - Stocks, Bond, Real Estate Markets Will Collapse


"When interest rates inevitably go up from these artificially suppressed levels where they are now, the bond market is going to collapse, the stock market is going to collapse, and with it, the real estate market is going to collapse. These pension funds are going to be wiped out. Then what's going to happen? This is a very bad situation. The U.S. is digging itself in deeper and deeper."

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MUeSjdt6_Bo" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MUeSjdt6_Bo</a>
Your life must be full of dread and despair.
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