Author Topic: Oldtimer1  (Read 298587 times)

oldtimer1

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Re: Oldtimer1
« Reply #875 on: January 17, 2020, 02:52:41 PM »
Trained delt and arms:  Used a new exercise. I never used it before. I saw an old guy doing it. It might be my favorite bicep exercise. The picture is below. Having the arms start behind your back seems to really give a complete contraction.

 Lately I have been training triceps and finishing with one set of body weight dips. Since the triceps are shot it doesn't take many reps to hit failure.

 Used a new crunch machine. Never used this type before. It felt awkward but when I went to my usual seated crunch machine I couldn't get my usual reps so it definitely hit the abs hard.  Going to use it again.

 For delts I lightened the weight for dumbbell delt press. I kept my palms forward in a traditional manner. If I would have done it again I would have done hands facing because my delts throbbed. For some reason keeping the hands facing each other when delt or pec pressing it seems to not aggravate tendons like the traditional method.

I feel I'm slowly getting to where I want to be.

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Re: Oldtimer1
« Reply #876 on: January 17, 2020, 02:56:33 PM »
Trained delt and arms:  Used a new exercise. I never used it before. I saw an old guy doing it. It might be my favorite bicep exercise. The picture is below.  Lately I have been training triceps and finishing with one set of body weight dips. Since the triceps are shot it doesn't take many reps to hit failure. Used a new crunch machine. Never used this type before. It felt awkward but when I went to my usual seated crunch machine I couldn't get my usual reps so it definitely hit the abs hard.  Going to use it again. For delts I lightened the weight for dumbbell delt press. I kept my palms forward in a traditional manner. If I would have done it again I would have done hands facing because my delts throbbed. For some reason keeping the hands facing each other when delt or pec pressing it seems to not aggravate tendons like the traditional method.

I feel I'm slowly getting to where I want to be.
Great,,,,I think if u incorporate a slightly modified diet not starving yourself but cut 10 lbs or so your body will respond to the training and visually you might get where you want to be too

oldtimer1

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Re: Oldtimer1
« Reply #877 on: January 20, 2020, 12:36:23 PM »
Back and chest:


M.A.G. bar pulldown 2 x 10 (Kept back upright and a full range of motion)
M.A.G seated row pulley row with the short bar 2 x 12 170lbs (Just got this bar. Pictured below. Found I had trouble keeping a grip with this and I don't have that problem with the pulldown. I have to get use to this one. I bought it because I'm so impressed with the pulldown bar. On a side note the rubberized coating smells really bad.  Wow.
Dumbbell row off a bench 2 x 10 85lbs
Hammer pulldown 2 x 10

Flat bench hands facing dumbbell bench 2 x 8 70lbs  (felt weird. Never do these. Trying to protect my bad shoulder. Felt like a cheat fly. It still irritated my shoulder so I might as well go back to palms facing my feet again.)
Incline hands facing dumbbell bench 2 x10 (First set felt good. Second one irritated my good shoulder. I'm doomed. LOL)
Dips 2 x 8 ( went deep. Wondering if it's healthy for my bad shoulder but it didn't seem to irritated it though. )
Push ups 1 x max

Dead lift off the floor 2 x 4 315lbs (these were really easy. I should up the weight)
Weighted hyper extensions 2 x 15 25lbs plate behind the head

Ab wheel roll out 2 x 22
Lying ab crunch machine 2 x 15 (Used too much weight being new to this machine. I know better for next time.)

I see an orthopedic surgeon on Friday for my bad shoulder. I'm sure he will order an MRI. Also sure he will want to operate. I hope he gives me a cortisone shot that will take out the inflammation. I've had good results with that in the past. My body seems to get rid of the swollen tendon irritation with a good cortisone shot. Not sure but I might postpone the operation unless he tells me it's completely fucked up and convinces me. I just can't take being out of action for 4 to 6 months. At this age I will deteriorate quick. In the past when I had a bicep operation that put me out of the weight room for serious workouts for 6 months I became really lean from turning my focus into running. I shocked myself how good I got and lean I got.

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Re: Oldtimer1
« Reply #878 on: January 20, 2020, 12:49:07 PM »
Why not just rest the shoulder?

Take a break from whatever's irritating it?

oldtimer1

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Re: Oldtimer1
« Reply #879 on: January 20, 2020, 01:23:30 PM »
Why not just rest the shoulder?

Take a break from whatever's irritating it?

You make too much sense. I'm afraid of deteriorating. I want the MRI to see if there is clear damage.  If there is no real damage like a torn rotator cuff ,bone squeezing a tendon he could shave down or a badly torn labrum I just might take a month off of training. I did take off a week of training a short while ago and it didn't make a difference. I might need a month off of no lifting and no heavy bag work.

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Re: Oldtimer1
« Reply #880 on: January 21, 2020, 06:51:53 PM »
how old are you OT? I'm 50 never had any serious injurys. Knock wood. Good luck with that MRI. Keep us informed. Misery loves company 🙂

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Re: Oldtimer1
« Reply #881 on: January 21, 2020, 07:04:20 PM »
You make too much sense. I'm afraid of deteriorating. I want the MRI to see if there is clear damage.  If there is no real damage like a torn rotator cuff ,bone squeezing a tendon he could shave down or a badly torn labrum I just might take a month off of training. I did take off a week of training a short while ago and it didn't make a difference. I might need a month off of no lifting and no heavy bag work.

Unreasonable fear is a negative emotion which can bring an otherwise healthy person down. One thing I've experienced is that my body takes longer to recover. Several weeks or a month laying low may just get you back to where you prefer to be...in good health.

oldtimer1

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Re: Oldtimer1
« Reply #882 on: January 22, 2020, 05:22:59 PM »
Trained legs hard today. Everything went well and I left feeling it was a great workout. Seeing an orthopedic surgeon on Friday for my shoulder. I'm sure he will xray me that day for bone impingement and order an MRI for next week. Getting back to the leg workout. I did the leg press, dumbbell squats, leg extensions, seated leg curls then finished with body weight deep squats for 52 reps. The weight exercises pre fatigued my thighs and the body weight squats gave them a pump and fried them. Edit:  For hamstrings I left out I did stiff legged dead lifts and seated leg curls.

Did this workout in my basement gym. I don't like using a music ipod for lifting but the wife wanted it quiet because my baby grand daughter was sleeping. Normally I blast music from some nice quality speakers I have.

Regarding the calf part of the workout. We all have heard for decades always go for that stretch in calf training regarding bodybuilding. I always have whether standing, seated or leg press calf variation. I'm beginning to wonder about that advice. I'm questioning a lot of my long held beliefs. Going too deep with calf training and trying to come out of the weakest part of the ROM can cause not only injury but a stretch to the Achilles that can be a negative for athletics. The Achilles not only acts as a tendon but also as a spring in conjunction with the calf muscles for jumping, sprinting, and walking. Forcing an extreme stretch to it under load is like over stretching a rubber band. It loses it's elasticity and it's function to store energy for a powerful explosive push in sprinting.  Anyway that's my bro science but I'm sticking with that explanation. I remember when Ben Johnson was heavily into supplementing his workouts with lifting and yes steroids they stopped direct calf workouts in the weight room. They didn't give an explanation except saying that hip extension through squats and power cleans were more valuable toward improving the sprint than calf work. I speculate that sprint training and calf work led to poorer performance and maybe even calf strain. I always have noticed the more calf work I did in the weight room the more my calves and Achilles would bug me during running.  In the end I believe there should be stretch doing calf work but it shouldn't be exaggerate to push out of under load. Sometimes I trust my empirical knowledge more than some chubby PHD's research in exercise physiology.  

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Re: Oldtimer1
« Reply #883 on: January 22, 2020, 05:25:31 PM »
Trained legs hard today. Everything went well and I left feeling it was a great workout. Seeing an orthopedic surgeon on Friday for my shoulder. I'm sure he will xray me that day for bone impingement and order an MRI for next week. Getting back to the leg workout. I did the leg press, dumbbell squats, leg extensions, seated leg curls then finished with body weight deep squats for 52 reps. The weight exercises pre fatigued my thighs and the body weight squats gave them a pump and fried them.  

Did this workout in my basement gym. I don't like using a music ipod for lifting but the wife wanted it quiet because my baby grand daughter was sleeping. Normally I blast music from some nice quality speakers I have.

Regarding the calf part of the workout. We all have heard for decades always go for that stretch in calf training regarding bodybuilding. I always have whether standing, seated or leg press calf variation. I'm beginning to wonder about that advice. I'm questions a lot of my long held beliefs. Going too deep with calf training and trying to come out of the weakest part of the ROM can cause not only injury but a stretch to the Achilles that can be a negative for athletics. The Achilles not only acts as a tendon but also as a spring in conjunction with the calf muscles for jumping, sprinting, and walking. Forcing an extreme stretch to it under load is like over stretching a rubber band. It loses it's elasticity and it's function to store energy for a powerful explosive push in sprinting.  Anyway that's my bro science but I'm sticking with that explanation. I remember when Ben Johnson was heavily into supplementing his workouts with lifting and yes steroids they stopped direct calf workouts in the weight room. They didn't give an explanation except saying that hip extension through squats and power cleans were more valuable toward improving the sprint than calf work. I speculate that sprint training and calf work led to poorer performance and maybe even calf strain. I always have noticed the more calf work I did in the weight room the more my calves and Achilles would bug me during running.  In the end I believe there should be stretch doing calf work but it shouldn't be exaggerate to push out of under load. Sometimes I trust my empirical knowledge more than some chubby PHD's research in exercise physiology.  

Inadequate hamstring work detected.   ;D

oldtimer1

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Re: Oldtimer1
« Reply #884 on: January 22, 2020, 05:28:00 PM »
Unreasonable fear is a negative emotion which can bring an otherwise healthy person down. One thing I've experienced is that my body takes longer to recover. Several weeks or a month laying low may just get you back to where you prefer to be...in good health.

Thanks for the thoughtful input. Always appreciated. I have friend that that pushes some big numbers in the gym. He once said bodybuilding has nothing to do with health among other gems he has spoken. One time he said. "Running is like hitting yourself in the head with a baseball bat. It feels so good when you stop." Due to a life time of lifting weights he has been operated on three times that I know about. I told him about my shoulder issues. He said, " It could be worst. You could have a big nose and big ears."  

oldtimer1

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Re: Oldtimer1
« Reply #885 on: January 22, 2020, 05:29:17 PM »
Inadequate hamstring work detected.   ;D

I must have left out I did stiff legged deadlifts 2 x 6 205lbs off a block going low and seated leg bicep curls for 2 x 15 today.

AbrahamG

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Re: Oldtimer1
« Reply #886 on: January 22, 2020, 05:31:41 PM »
I must have left out I did stiff legged deadlifts 2 x 6 205lbs off a block going low and seated leg bicep curls for 2 x 15 today.

That's more like it. 

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Re: Oldtimer1
« Reply #887 on: January 23, 2020, 12:13:40 AM »
Thanks for the thoughtful input. Always appreciated. I have friend that that pushes some big numbers in the gym. He once said bodybuilding has nothing to do with health among other gems he has spoken. One time he said. "Running is like hitting yourself in the head with a baseball bat. It feels so good when you stop." Due to a life time of lifting weights he has been operated on three times that I know about. I told him about my shoulder issues. He said, " It could be worst. You could have a big nose and big ears."  

A gym friend from awhile back had three shoulder surgeries as a direct result of his pushing his body too far. Had he not died of cancer (unrelated), he'd probably have had even more surgeries on his shoulders  (even though his doctor said no more were possible), because some people, like him, never learn. Needless to say, Bill was quite a character. Miss him.

oldtimer1

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Re: Oldtimer1
« Reply #888 on: January 23, 2020, 04:34:39 PM »
Trained delts and arms.  Iím in so much pain right now seven hours later. Maybe itís time for moderate weights.  Not comparing my self to Bill Pearl but he said at 55 he gave up lifting heavy weights.  Iím close to 61.  Maybe itís time to stop the ego lifting and to be more concerned with possible injuries and joint health.

 Read a story in Menís health about a teacher that ruined his shoulder wrestling with a high school kid fooling around. . After the operation the only thing he could do was running and he was modest at first about it.  When he returned to lifting he said he used light weight with high reps going for the burn with perfect form. He basically said he had to get rid of ego.  The results from his picture was a ripped physique with great abs.  Maybe itís time to forget about the weight used.

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Re: Oldtimer1
« Reply #889 on: January 24, 2020, 07:36:38 AM »
Trained delts and arms.  Iím in so much pain right now seven hours later. Maybe itís time for moderate weights.  Not comparing my self to Bill Pearl but he said at 55 he gave up lifting heavy weights.  Iím close to 61.  Maybe itís time to stop the ego lifting and to be more concerned with possible injuries and joint health.

 Read a story in Menís health about a teacher that ruined his shoulder wrestling with a high school kid fooling around. . After the operation the only thing he could do was running and he was modest at first about it.  When he returned to lifting he said he used light weight with high reps going for the burn with perfect form. He basically said he had to get rid of ego.  The results from his picture was a ripped physique with great abs.  Maybe itís time to forget about the weight used.
yes and no,,,what you can handle heavy do what you cant adjust...example i can do all kinds of delt work pain free for the most part'and my right delt is SO SO,,,lateral raise either are smooth and nice or feel like my shoulder is gonna po..15/20/25's are easy and reps 15 like nothing i pick up 30's and it feels like 50's

oldtimer1

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Re: Oldtimer1
« Reply #890 on: January 24, 2020, 07:49:33 AM »
Saw the orthopedic surgeon today. A really young doctor then again every doctor seems young to me now. He had me hold my arms in various positions while he pushed. He couldn't budge my arms. He said, you're really strong and he said you have a lot of shoulder muscle. I guess he is use to dealing with old decrepit people and other badly injured people. Going for an MRI but he said he thinks it a sprain that will take months to heal. I went through this once before. That doctor said you can sprain your  shoulder like you can sprain your ankle. Some ankle sprains take many months to heal. His advice was to lift 30% lighter and to hit the bag at half speed till I heal. He was a a Rugby player in college. So he knows about athletes unlike so many doctors that haven't done a push up in 30 years.


Doing no lifting, cardio, striking training today. Just chillin.   ;D  


oldtimer1

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Re: Oldtimer1
« Reply #891 on: January 24, 2020, 08:34:13 AM »
yes and no,,,what you can handle heavy do what you cant adjust...example i can do all kinds of delt work pain free for the most part'and my right delt is SO SO,,,lateral raise either are smooth and nice or feel like my shoulder is gonna po..15/20/25's are easy and reps 15 like nothing i pick up 30's and it feels like 50's

Yes, we all do what we can do. I don't bench with a bar anymore. Every time I think I can go back reality hits me in the face after a work out or two. Recently a power lifter has me convinced I can bench again if I keep my elbows tightly packed to my sides. I'm tempted but no.

So many things we shouldn't be doing as we age. Will there be exceptions to the rule? Of course there will. There is always going to be a three lift specialist that can do a power lifting half squat with 500 pounds plus that is 65 years old. Below are some things we should be wary of in lifting as you age. These are my opinions and not medical advice. It's my own empirical knowledge and yes call it bro science if you want. Some of it applies just to me. See a doctor for his opinion. I'm not a doc.

Barbell squat: As we age the space between vertebra can crush nerves. Pushing into the bar is compressing your spine. This stenosis can put you in a world of hurt. You can also accelerate the hip joint wear. I believe Clarence Bass, Grimek, Paul Anderson, and Ferrigno all had hip joint operations.

Leg Press: I think it's a safe exercise for the most part but when using crushing weights with partial range it's grinding your knees to dust. Will it affect all? Of course not.

Hack squats: Many think these are safe but again if you use a partial movement one can compress the spine in a perfect storm of pushing the shoulders into the pads and your strongest muscles the hip jamming the spine.

Bench press: So many have ruined shoulders and elbow from the bar bench. It might take benching in your 20's, 30's and 40's but it appears few escape damage from this lift. It's an unnatural movement. By it's very nature of lying on a narrow bench it articulates the delts and pecs in an unnatural movement. It also through time makes for very inflexible shoulder joints priming a tear.

Press behind the neck: I have done these for around 40 years plus but had to stop recently because they hurt. I read an interesting article that said the press behind the neck doesn't cause delt problems. It does reveals inflexible shoulders that will lead to a tear. In other word it doesn't cause delt problems. It reveals a problem.Don't know what to believe with this but the author's reasoning struck a chord with me.

Extreme range of motion doing calf work: We have all been advised through decades of magazines to use the maximum range of motion for the best results. I think using an extreme range under load puts the tendon in it's weakest stretched position to come out of.

Stiff leg deadlift: For the most part I always used this lift when I had back pain. It stretches the bicep femoris or hamstrings. Often that's the culprit with lower back pain.  Also the lower back gets stretched.  As you age with the cushions between vertebra become compressed and now you're bending under a load squeezing them in one direction. I still always include this lift but I use a slow cadence and slow negative. I also limit the sets.  

Preacher bench curls: I know a few that have detached their bicep doing them. Never jerk from the stretched position. It might be wise not to go to failure with this.

Deadlifts: Using the alternate hand grip puts the supinated hand in peril of a ripped bicep. While not common it's a risk. Better to use a double hands over with a hook grip. One thing that young men can get away with but it's insanity for older is the rip the bar off the ground method. Jerking the weight off the floor to get that momentum is putting a crazy amount of force on the body. I believe an older man should gradually apply pressure till the bar is off the ground. You might lift less but it will be safer.

I think the best advice is if the exercise hurts don't do it.

Primemuscle

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Re: Oldtimer1
« Reply #892 on: January 24, 2020, 01:18:25 PM »
Trained delts and arms.  Iím in so much pain right now seven hours later. Maybe itís time for moderate weights.  Not comparing my self to Bill Pearl but he said at 55 he gave up lifting heavy weights.  Iím close to 61.  Maybe itís time to stop the ego lifting and to be more concerned with possible injuries and joint health.
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 Read a story in Menís health about a teacher that ruined his shoulder wrestling with a high school kid fooling around. . After the operation the only thing he could do was running and he was modest at first about it.  When he returned to lifting he said he used light weight with high reps going for the burn with perfect form. He basically said he had to get rid of ego.  The results from his picture was a ripped physique with great abs.  Maybe itís time to forget about the weight used.

Slowly but surely, you are coming to realize that it is time to make some changes. I don't know that I agree with giving up weights altogether. But, there comes a time when you realize (if you are smart) you have nothing to prove and no need to try. I am all for going lighter and allowing the body more recovery time. it's that or possibly end up incapacitated or cripple. I have 15 years on you and zero injuries from sports. Pay attention to what your body is trying to tell you. It's not easy, but it can be done.

Primemuscle

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Re: Oldtimer1
« Reply #893 on: January 24, 2020, 01:20:34 PM »
Saw the orthopedic surgeon today. A really young doctor then again every doctor seems young to me now. He had me hold my arms in various positions while he pushed. He couldn't budge my arms. He said, you're really strong and he said you have a lot of shoulder muscle. I guess he is use to dealing with old decrepit people and other badly injured people. Going for an MRI but he said he thinks it a sprain that will take months to heal. I went through this once before. That doctor said you can sprain your  shoulder like you can sprain your ankle. Some ankle sprains take many months to heal. His advice was to lift 30% lighter and to hit the bag at half speed till I heal. He was a a Rugby player in college. So he knows about athletes unlike so many doctors that haven't done a push up in 30 years.


Doing no lifting, cardio, striking training today. Just chillin.   ;D

Your doctor seems like a smart man with great advice.  



Primemuscle

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Re: Oldtimer1
« Reply #894 on: January 24, 2020, 01:41:37 PM »
Yes, we all do what we can do. I don't bench with a bar anymore. Every time I think I can go back reality hits me in the face after a work out or two. Recently a power lifter has me convinced I can bench again if I keep my elbows tightly packed to my sides. I'm tempted but no.

So many things we shouldn't be doing as we age. Will there be exceptions to the rule? Of course there will. There is always going to be a three lift specialist that can do a power lifting half squat with 500 pounds plus that is 65 years old. Below are some things we should be wary of in lifting as you age. These are my opinions and not medical advice. It's my own empirical knowledge and yes call it bro science if you want. Some of it applies just to me. See a doctor for his opinion. I'm not a doc.

Barbell squat: As we age the space between vertebra can crush nerves. Pushing into the bar is compressing your spine. This stenosis can put you in a world of hurt. You can also accelerate the hip joint wear. I believe Clarence Bass, Grimek, Paul Anderson, and Ferrigno all had hip joint operations.

Leg Press: I think it's a safe exercise for the most part but when using crushing weights with partial range it's grinding your knees to dust. Will it affect all? Of course not.

Hack squats: Many think these are safe but again if you use a partial movement one can compress the spine in a perfect storm of pushing the shoulders into the pads and your strongest muscles the hip jamming the spine.

Bench press: So many have ruined shoulders and elbow from the bar bench. It might take benching in your 20's, 30's and 40's but it appears few escape damage from this lift. It's an unnatural movement. By it's very nature of lying on a narrow bench it articulates the delts and pecs in an unnatural movement. It also through time makes for very inflexible shoulder joints priming a tear.

Press behind the neck: I have done these for around 40 years plus but had to stop recently because they hurt. I read an interesting article that said the press behind the neck doesn't cause delt problems. It does reveals inflexible shoulders that will lead to a tear. In other word it doesn't cause delt problems. It reveals a problem.Don't know what to believe with this but the author's reasoning struck a chord with me.

Extreme range of motion doing calf work: We have all been advised through decades of magazines to use the maximum range of motion for the best results. I think using an extreme range under load puts the tendon in it's weakest stretched position to come out of.

Stiff leg deadlift: For the most part I always used this lift when I had back pain. It stretches the bicep femoris or hamstrings. Often that's the culprit with lower back pain.  Also the lower back gets stretched.  As you age with the cushions between vertebra become compressed and now you're bending under a load squeezing them in one direction. I still always include this lift but I use a slow cadence and slow negative. I also limit the sets.  

Preacher bench curls: I know a few that have detached their bicep doing them. Never jerk from the stretched position. It might be wise not to go to failure with this.

Deadlifts: Using the alternate hand grip puts the supinated hand in peril of a ripped bicep. While not common it's a risk. Better to use a double hands over with a hook grip. One thing that young men can get away with but it's insanity for older is the rip the bar off the ground method. Jerking the weight off the floor to get that momentum is putting a crazy amount of force on the body. I believe an older man should gradually apply pressure till the bar is off the ground. You might lift less but it will be safer.

I think the best advice is if the exercise hurts don't do it.

Almost all exercises can be replicated using machines. In my opinion, when exercising this way, you can better concentrate on strict form and controlled speed....no jerky movements which increase the chance of fucking something up, like your shoulder joints.

Due to degenerative disc disease, my spine has compressed at least 2" over many years. I haven't done traditional barbell squats in ages. Most gyms have a good selection of squat machines that control the movement. For balance, I do body weight squats and lunges. Keeping my balance doing lunges takes a lot of concentration.

I like your advice, "If it hurts, don't do it." Much better than 'no pain, no gain'.

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Re: Oldtimer1
« Reply #895 on: January 24, 2020, 02:12:53 PM »
Yates said if he didn't push it to the limit he would have no injuries. He also said he wouldn't be Mr. Olympia. I have pushed it to the limit for so many decades. I never played it safe. I take great pride that I can go for a run with a 25 year old for a three mile run at a good pace. I take pride I can go in a pick up two hand touch football game with young people and out sprint a young man for a touch down. I take pride that I can run most young men into the ground lifting. I take pride that the black belts in my gym say I punch like a mule and never seen anything like it. I also have paid the price for that. A big price.

There is definitely nothing wrong with being proud of your accomplishments. There is also nothing wrong with taking good care of your physical health.

Oldtimer's Epitaph

He could keep pace with a 25 year-old in a 3 mile run.
He could out sprint a young man in a touchdown during a pickup football game.
He could out power lift most young men.
He could punch like a mule, according to black belt holder's at his gym.
He was willing to pay whatever price it took to maintain his pride.

oldtimer1

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Re: Oldtimer1
« Reply #896 on: January 24, 2020, 02:25:37 PM »
There is definitely nothing wrong with being proud of your accomplishments. There is also nothing wrong with taking good care of your physical health.

Oldtimer's Epitaph

He could keep pace with a 25 year-old in a 3 mile run.
He could out sprint a young man in a touchdown during a pickup football game.
He could out power lift most young men.
He could punch like a mule, according to black belt holder's at his gym.
He was willing to pay whatever price it took to maintain his pride.


I say with all modesty.  ;D

oldtimer1

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Re: Oldtimer1
« Reply #897 on: January 25, 2020, 03:15:05 PM »
Looking to forward to Monday and a  volume routine.  Doc told me to lower my weight till I'm better and I think I will listen. Waiting for my MRI to get approved so I can see if there is any damage that shows up on the image.  If it's truly a bad shoulder sprain I will be pissed but grateful I don't need an operation. Meanwhile taking powerful anti inflammatory drugs. They really take out the pain to a major extent.

Primemuscle

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Re: Oldtimer1
« Reply #898 on: January 25, 2020, 06:50:54 PM »
Looking to forward to Monday and a  volume routine.  Doc told me to lower my weight till I'm better and I think I will listen. Waiting for my MRI to get approved so I can see if there is any damage that shows up on the image.  If it's truly a bad shoulder sprain I will be pissed but grateful I don't need an operation. Meanwhile taking powerful anti inflammatory drugs. They really take out the pain to a major extent.

One thing you forgot to mention, of which you should be most proud, is your tenacity. You never give up. You are always looking to the future.

Anti-inflammatory meds are great. Even over the counter Aleve helps the pain in my hands subside. So, now that you've mentioned anti-inflammatory meds, I am going to go take an Aleve because my hands presently hurt like shit.

oldtimer1

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Re: Oldtimer1
« Reply #899 on: January 27, 2020, 11:02:44 AM »
I don't think my shoulder could handle volume at this point so I stuck with moderate weights but I still went to failure for one work set. Chest and bicep day.

Flat dumbbell bench 1 x 13
Incline dumbbell bench 1 x 13
Flat dumbbell flies 1 x 22
Push ups 1 x max

EZ bar curl 1 x 20
Alternate dumbbell curls 1 x 15 each arm
Straight bar pulley 1 x 15
Dumbbell preacher curl 1 x 25

forearm wrist curl 1 x 35
Reverse wrist extensions 1 x 30

Incline sit ups 1 x 25
Crunches 1 x max
Pulley crunches 1 x 50

After I ran two slow miles after lifting.  I did some stretching after mainly for shoulders and calves. I want to do volume but I feel the set after set would lead to inflammation in my shoulder.