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Getbig Misc Discussion Boards => Industry Business Technology Board => Topic started by: 240 is Back on April 19, 2006, 11:36:19 AM

Title: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: 240 is Back on April 19, 2006, 11:36:19 AM
Are you a Personal Trainer?  Are you interesting in becoming one, either part-time or full-time?

This is the palce to talk about rates, certifications, competing, and all the other issues that go into working this complex and ever-changing job!  Chat away!
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: michael arvilla on April 19, 2006, 12:18:12 PM
is it ok to wear "posing trunks" while training clients?
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: 240 is Back on April 19, 2006, 12:22:07 PM
Mike, you're perfect for this place!  How many clients do you take on? What kinda rates do you charge?  I do a few websites for trainers.  Most charge 40 to 50 per hour, and require a 4 week signup/contract.  Seems like it's be a great way to pick up a few bucks, and if you're going to drive to the gym anyway, mighta s well knock out a few clients!
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: VGalanti on April 19, 2006, 12:40:53 PM
is it ok to wear "posing trunks" while training clients?

if you want to keep your client...NO
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: michael arvilla on April 19, 2006, 12:41:30 PM
Mike, you're perfect for this place!  How many clients do you take on? What kinda rates do you charge?  I do a few websites for trainers.  Most charge 40 to 50 per hour, and require a 4 week signup/contract.  Seems like it's be a great way to pick up a few bucks, and if you're going to drive to the gym anyway, mighta s well knock out a few clients!
hmmm, where to begin.  Well I take on as many clients as come into World Gym looking for a personal trainer, so it varies.  The gym charges rates based on the size of the PT package (ie: the more sessions you purchase the less per hour).  You have to bust your ass to get clients as not everyone who goes to the gym thinks they need a trainer...but I have to say, the majority that do go to the gym...should have a PT.  Clients are offered 4 VIP sessions (free personal training sessions).  It is my job to help them understand that they need more training.  Most don't go for it, they think they know all and can handle their training themselves (some can, some are an accident waiting to happen).  PT sessions aren't cheap and that's how most members look at it.  It can sometimes be a cut throat job.  Those who do buy packages expect results (even when they are chowing down pizza on the side) and if they don't see it ... they don't resign.  It can be a lot of pressure and a lot of work.  I spend most nights receiving food logs from my clients and going over what they can and can't eat with them, so my job doesn't end when I walk out of the gym.  It's a face to face job and you always have to put on a smile even when in a bad mood.  Believe me, I love what I do, but it isn't glamorous by any means.
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: alexxx on April 19, 2006, 03:40:44 PM
Charles Glass charges 400$ per hour and is booked all day. 12 hours a day if not more! :o He is a great trainer!
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: candidate2025 on April 19, 2006, 04:36:38 PM
i plan on getting certfied next month and already have a job offer at my gym for over the summer and nest year on the weekends and after school.   problem will be getting poeple to think that they hsould listen to a 16 year old. haha...they never do, but ill be paid a just for being there anyway, regardless of if im trainiing or not.
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: 240 is Back on April 19, 2006, 04:53:49 PM
Charles Glass charges 400$ per hour and is booked all day. 12 hours a day if not more! :o He is a great trainer!

Incredible.  Glass must make a mint. No wonder he looks like he gave up training.  With that much money per hour, it'd be pretttty hard to turn down clients.  I'd prob work 12 hours a day too.
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: alexxx on April 19, 2006, 05:15:39 PM
Incredible.  Glass must make a mint. No wonder he looks like he gave up training.  With that much money per hour, it'd be pretttty hard to turn down clients.  I'd prob work 12 hours a day too.

yes its like equavalent to 15 of your websites in one day! :o
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: buffbodz on April 20, 2006, 12:15:16 PM
yes its like equavalent to 15 of your websites in one day! :o

Do I detect a hint of jealousy in this post?
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: alexxx on April 20, 2006, 02:27:23 PM
Do I detect a hint of jealousy in this post?

 :-[ Oh great webdesigner 240 what are some tips to get work?
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: 240 is Back on April 20, 2006, 02:50:48 PM
:-[ Oh great webdesigner 240 what are some tips to get work?

I approach all clients shirtless.  And sometimes I apply baby oil to seal the deal.  But back to personal training.  I know Mr Intenseone makes a killing doing it.  Does he charge 4 times what the other guys do, or work 4 times as much?
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: Mike on April 20, 2006, 05:40:29 PM
hmmm, where to begin.  Well I take on as many clients as come into World Gym looking for a personal trainer, so it varies.  The gym charges rates based on the size of the PT package (ie: the more sessions you purchase the less per hour).  You have to bust your ass to get clients as not everyone who goes to the gym thinks they need a trainer...but I have to say, the majority that do go to the gym...should have a PT.  Clients are offered 4 VIP sessions (free personal training sessions).  It is my job to help them understand that they need more training.  Most don't go for it, they think they know all and can handle their training themselves (some can, some are an accident waiting to happen).  PT sessions aren't cheap and that's how most members look at it.  It can sometimes be a cut throat job.  Those who do buy packages expect results (even when they are chowing down pizza on the side) and if they don't see it ... they don't resign.  It can be a lot of pressure and a lot of work.  I spend most nights receiving food logs from my clients and going over what they can and can't eat with them, so my job doesn't end when I walk out of the gym.  It's a face to face job and you always have to put on a smile even when in a bad mood.  Believe me, I love what I do, but it isn't glamorous by any means.
I've been doing this a little while, attended lots of seminars and have seen a lot of bad training.  I think I might have some good advice.

First off, leave World Gym.  I was at one of their conventions and I spoke to a few owners and managers and I really think they're tryin to "revamp their image. " This can be good and bad.  I'd opt for a more stable, PT studio-type gym.  You're in Florida right?  Look up IHP (institute for human performance) in Boca Raton.  That's the kinda place you wanna be at.

Second, no more bodybuilding training.  I see these trainers having 80 year old women (literally) doing isolated bb bicep curls supersetted with tricep extensions.  But that will make their arms smaller right?  Wrong!  It's ok to give them what they want but, eventually, you have to give them what they need and convince them it's what they want.  After all, you're the professional.   Look into NASM instead of ISSA, and to incorporate some functional and core training (bad words on this board).  You'd be suprised how much a person will start to listen when you show them how to do a proper floor or stability ball crunch (proper neck alignment, neutral spine position, hyper extension, contraction, foot placement -not against a wall).

Last, try to get them to look beyond the $ signs and see the VALUE of the training.  I call it the "layer beneath the layer."  Sure, 66% of people join gyms to lose weight, but WHY?  Their nephew called them fat.  They can't fit in an airplane seat.  They have to go to Big and Tall stores.  95% of all sales (gym sales included) are based on emotion.  Get that first...their results will follow. 

Sorry, I modified it alitlle, I had one of my front desk girls bust me for looking at "gay porno" i.e. Masters Olympia pics.
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: 240 is Back on April 20, 2006, 05:59:44 PM
Bravo! 
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: michael arvilla on April 21, 2006, 08:31:00 AM
I've been doing this a little while, attended lots of seminars and have seen a lot of bad training.  I think I might have some good advice.

First off, leave World Gym.  I was at one of their conventions and I spoke to a few owners and managers and I really think they're tryin to "revamp their image. " This can be good and bad.  I'd opt for a more stable, PT studio-type gym.  You're in Florida right?  Look up IHP (institute for human performance) in Boca Raton.  That's the kinda place you wanna be at.

Second, no more bodybuilding training.  I see these trainers having 80 year old women (literally) doing isolated bb bicep curls supersetted with tricep extensions.  But that will make their arms smaller right?  Wrong!  It's ok to give them what they want but, eventually, you have to give them what they need and convince them it's what they want.  After all, you're the professional.   Look into NASM instead of ISSA, and to incorporate some functional and core training (bad words on this board).  You'd be suprised how much a person will start to listen when you show them how to do a proper floor or stability ball crunch (proper neck alignment, neutral spine position, hyper extension, contraction, foot placement -not against a wall).

Last, try to get them to look beyond the $ signs and see the VALUE of the training.  I call it the "layer beneath the layer."  Sure, 66% of people join gyms to lose weight, but WHY?  Their nephew called them fat.  They can't fit in an airplane seat.  They have to go to Big and Tall stores.  95% of all sales (gym sales included) are based on emotion.  Get that first...their results will follow. 

Sorry, I modified it alitlle, I had one of my front desk girls bust me for looking at "gay porno" i.e. Masters Olympia pics.

GREAT POST!!!!
thanks.................. ...
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: CQ on April 21, 2006, 08:55:16 AM
hmmm, where to begin.  Well I take on as many clients as come into World Gym looking for a personal trainer, so it varies.  The gym charges rates based on the size of the PT package (ie: the more sessions you purchase the less per hour).  You have to bust your ass to get clients as not everyone who goes to the gym thinks they need a trainer...but I have to say, the majority that do go to the gym...should have a PT.  Clients are offered 4 VIP sessions (free personal training sessions).  It is my job to help them understand that they need more training.  Most don't go for it, they think they know all and can handle their training themselves (some can, some are an accident waiting to happen).  PT sessions aren't cheap and that's how most members look at it.  It can sometimes be a cut throat job.  Those who do buy packages expect results (even when they are chowing down pizza on the side) and if they don't see it ... they don't resign.  It can be a lot of pressure and a lot of work.  I spend most nights receiving food logs from my clients and going over what they can and can't eat with them, so my job doesn't end when I walk out of the gym.  It's a face to face job and you always have to put on a smile even when in a bad mood.  Believe me, I love what I do, but it isn't glamorous by any means.

Mike, one thing I can guarantee after being a trainer close to 15 years, is the better shape you are in the easier it is to get/retain clientele. You should have a nice little boost in biz from your whole show/prep/weight loss. Use it well.
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: michael arvilla on April 21, 2006, 11:17:22 AM
Mike, one thing I can guarantee after being a trainer close to 15 years, is the better shape you are in the easier it is to get/retain clientele. You should have a nice little boost in biz from your whole show/prep/weight loss. Use it well.


hmmmmmmm............righ t now im so grouchy and irritable (im sure it turns potential clients at my gym off)


your right i should put on a smile and get some new buisness (last month i did like $3.500 in new PT clients)
this month i have done 0 dollars................. .
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: Mr. Intenseone on April 22, 2006, 09:45:42 AM
I've been doing this for a long time, and the one main things I would never do or recommend is working for a facility. I always have been on my own, I have about 25-30 steady clients not including the athletes and I also have a kids group program that I have been doing for some years now. I only pay the facility $450.00 per month. I agree with Mike's post (not Arvilla) about not doing bodybuilding training, although I will use some compound movements, I stick to more funtional training, I will basically train the average person the same way I would train an athlete (ex: strength, conditioning, etc) i also do alot of circut training and to break up the program a little we'll go to the track for some of the conditioning. Bottom line is anyone can teach the basics it's the diversity of the training that separates a good trainer from a GREAT trainer. A trainer can make a very comfortable living doin this provided it's done right!!
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: knny187 on April 22, 2006, 10:08:26 AM
What most people on this board doesn't understand....that functional training is for everyone.  The more knowledge you have on core/stability training, the more money you're going to make.  I know personally 6 personal trainers that make @ 150k (on the books) ....just for tax reasons.  In reality...make over 200k annually.  Most of them are former Marine Bodybuilders with big ego's.  When they started, they had a hard time keeping clients & getting a large referral base going (they were training regualr people like a bodybuilder).  When they took up balance & core stability training they're income doubled.   Over time, their client base increased (huge referral business alone), & the results that people were wanting, were receiving it.


Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: Mike on April 22, 2006, 01:20:44 PM
What most people on this board doesn't understand....that functional training is for everyone.  The more knowledge you have on core/stability training, the more money you're going to make.  I know personally 6 personal trainers that make @ 150k (on the books) ....just for tax reasons.  In reality...make over 200k annually.  Most of them are former Marine Bodybuilders with big ego's.  When they started, they had a hard time keeping clients & getting a large referral base going (they were training regualr people like a bodybuilder).  When they took up balance & core stability training they're income doubled.   Over time, their client base increased (huge referral business alone), & the results that people were wanting, were receiving it.




Functional Training can incorporate Bodybuilding, if that's the function.

Now, am I gonna spend half the session adjusting this Bodybuilders posture and explaining why sitting on unilateral, fixed-plane machines is bad?  Of couse not, that's what he wants. 
Does this client care about balance, stability, flexibility and the like?  Hell no! 

Eventually you will convice them that they can live a longer life and function better outside the gym with these things but, remember, Bodybuilders don't care if they're healthy, they want to look good.

I will, however, use certain Bodybuilding excersises as a foundation of many workouts.  My 80yr old grandma can squat.  Hell yeah she can!  It might be a bodyweight squat, but it's still a squat.

Have you ever seen a 35yr old mother do a perfect clean and press, it's beautiful.  6 in a row and she's wiped.  Much better then the ab machine and bicep curls she was doing with her other trainer. 

phew....I'm done.
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: Mike on April 22, 2006, 01:22:22 PM
I've been doing this for a long time, and the one main things I would never do or recommend is working for a facility. I always have been on my own, I have about 25-30 steady clients not including the athletes and I also have a kids group program that I have been doing for some years now. I only pay the facility $450.00 per month. I agree with Mike's post (not Arvilla) about not doing bodybuilding training, although I will use some compound movements, I stick to more funtional training, I will basically train the average person the same way I would train an athlete (ex: strength, conditioning, etc) i also do alot of circut training and to break up the program a little we'll go to the track for some of the conditioning. Bottom line is anyone can teach the basics it's the diversity of the training that separates a good trainer from a GREAT trainer. A trainer can make a very comfortable living doin this provided it's done right!!

People LOVE to be trained like athletes.  I periodize them as well (General Strenth and Hypertrophy, Strength, Power and Metabolic Circuits), that way they never get bored and I can have some fun.  Great Post!
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: CQ on April 22, 2006, 01:35:06 PM
What most people on this board doesn't understand....that functional training is for everyone.  The more knowledge you have on core/stability training, the more money you're going to make.  I know personally 6 personal trainers that make @ 150k (on the books) ....just for tax reasons.  In reality...make over 200k annually.  Most of them are former Marine Bodybuilders with big ego's.  When they started, they had a hard time keeping clients & getting a large referral base going (they were training regualr people like a bodybuilder).  When they took up balance & core stability training they're income doubled.   Over time, their client base increased (huge referral business alone), & the results that people were wanting, were receiving it.




I am glad you brought up income as people assume it is poorly paid. It all depends on you.For me, I am booked solid, with a waiting list for peak times [6am/6pm etc]. After 14 years I should be, plus I have lost almost 100lbs and milk that for all it's work with my before/after pics plastered everywhere...hehe...It is my own gym, with overhead being covered entirely by the business itself. I charge $45 a session, however they do 30 mins cardio, so in reality I only have them for 1/2 hour...so I do [US dollars] $90 p/hr.

The biggest thing IMO about being a trainer isn't all just certifications and all that trash. It is just about you, your persona, how you relate to people [read: talk shit] and how you can improve their self esteem.

I live in a small area, so I have to focus on client retention as I have a limited client pool to draw from. I cater to the richer type people here.I do all the little gay things, like give them bday cards, email them things I find that they may like and all that crap.

As far as training style - pretty intense. A lot of changes & variety. They pay for results.

Plus, my gym I have alot of amenties people do not think of. Laptops w/internet on the recumbent bikes, my changing rooms are done up super nice like some rich persons house, sugar free easter eggs out now for easter that type of trash. Everyone is different, but my style as worked wel for me over the years. I hope to step right out of training people [in person] in the next 2 years....

Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: knny187 on April 22, 2006, 01:46:50 PM
I am glad you brought up income as people assume it is poorly paid. It all depends on you.For me, I am booked solid, with a waiting list for peak times [6am/6pm etc]. After 14 years I should be, plus I have lost almost 100lbs and milk that for all it's work with my before/after pics plastered everywhere...hehe...It is my own gym, with overhead being covered entirely by the business itself. I charge $45 a session, however they do 30 mins cardio, so in reality I only have them for 1/2 hour...so I do [US dollars] $90 p/hr.

Just depends reallly.  Most of these guys that I know, worked for clubs just to get their feet wet.  They also were able to establish & maintain good records & a large customer following once they left.  They all eventually opened up their own training studios & since then, make a lot more money.

It didn't happen overnight but they had a very detailed personal business plan & stuck to it.


Quote
The biggest thing IMO about being a trainer isn't all just certifications and all that trash. It is just about you, your persona, how you relate to people [read: talk shit] and how you can improve their self esteem.

You hit the nail right on the head.

Quote
I live in a small area, so I have to focus on client retention as I have a limited client pool to draw from. I cater to the richer type people here.I do all the little gay things, like give them bday cards, email them things I find that they may like and all that crap.

As far as training style - pretty intense. A lot of changes & variety. They pay for results.

Plus, my gym I have alot of amenties people do not think of. Laptops w/internet on the recumbent bikes, my changing rooms are done up super nice like some rich persons house, sugar free easter eggs out now for easter that type of trash. Everyone is different, but my style as worked wel for me over the years. I hope to step right out of training people [in person] in the next 2 years....



I would love to go somewhere where they pass out candy

 ;D
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: knny187 on April 22, 2006, 01:53:49 PM
Functional Training can incorporate Bodybuilding, if that's the function.

I can agree with that

Quote
Now, am I gonna spend half the session adjusting this Bodybuilders posture and explaining why sitting on unilateral, fixed-plane machines is bad?  Of couse not, that's what he wants. 
Does this client care about balance, stability, flexibility and the like?  Hell no! 

Although they should if not now....most likely later in life.

Quote
Eventually you will convice them that they can live a longer life and function better outside the gym with these things but, remember, Bodybuilders don't care if they're healthy, they want to look good.


True dat
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: swatranger on April 24, 2006, 09:56:38 AM
What's up fellows? I was approached by a guy last week and he asked me if I wanted to be the trainer at a gym he is opening. It is going to be a 24 hour gym (ANYTIME FITNESS). He is letting me be my own boss in that I am not going to be his employee so that I can set my own rates. Not to blow my own horn but I think that I can do really well with this. I am 6'2" 280 lbs and plan to compete in October. So I have the look that I think helps when someone is looking for a trainer. I train hard and serious when I am in the gym. I plan to take this next couple of months and get my certification through ISSA and would like to start with my rates being $45-$50 an hour. We have two other gyms in the city, one being worlds gym. The demand is out there for trainers because there is only a few in the city and none of them look the part. Any advice that can be given will be greatly appreciated. PEACE!!!
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: CQ on April 24, 2006, 01:13:24 PM
Yeah. I thought the US was big on all of that.

The same here. I am certified in nutrition, but my staff is not. I am very strict with them. I do not allow them to put anything in writing. I do all dietary advice.

Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: knny187 on April 24, 2006, 01:15:51 PM
I think it would depend on the gym of who's doing that (based on who's privy on liability issues).

I would have to say most gyms I know here in So Cal will not & do not offer nutritional advice unless they are a certified nutritionist.
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: Vince G, CSN MFT on April 24, 2006, 07:47:25 PM
Although I no longer do personal training on a regular basis, when I did it I gave out free 30 day supplement kits with every fitness package and a free supplement of their choice with single sessions to attract more customers.  Some gyms will allow you to do it so you'll need to check.

And flower is correct, you must be a certified nutritionists to do diets for most major commerical gyms.  Even so, if you are not certified, you shouldn't giving diets to begin with.  You'll screw up someone's kidneys or something.....  ;)

Hope you're listening 240 ;D
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: michael arvilla on April 25, 2006, 08:12:50 AM
So Mike, are you a certified nutritionist, or does your World's not care?    The one here I believe will fire you if they find out you actually gave a diet.


our  Worlds has it's own diet (ultra -fit diet devoloped by IFBB PRO JOHN DEFENDIS)
we have to know that diet inside and out before we teach it to clients
it's pretty much a basic bodybuilding diet with some differences
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: michael arvilla on April 25, 2006, 08:20:28 AM
I think the one here has something like that, but you have to buy all these products or something?  That is the only one you can use (unless certified) I believe.    I think they even do a training/diet package thing.   :P

yea ours is the same
id post it
but i think id get in trouble
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: Mike on April 25, 2006, 01:15:25 PM
So they have you recommend a bodybuilding diet to non-bodybuilders or does it fit regular diets?   

We use apex supplements at my gym (www.apexfitness.com) and it's really pretty simple, calories in-calories out.  It's primarily based around different kinds of Multi-Vitamins, MRP's and Nutritional Bars (yes, they have sugar, but they're only 160 calories).  These seem to work the best for your average soccer-mom-looking-to-drop-a-few.
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: michael arvilla on April 25, 2006, 01:16:32 PM
MANNNNNNNN i soo wanna post it




it's a bb diet geared toward the masses
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: body88 on April 25, 2006, 02:09:04 PM
Just post it but change it around.. change words a food source to something comparible etc
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: CQ on April 25, 2006, 05:24:10 PM
MANNNNNNNN i soo wanna post it




it's a bb diet geared toward the masses

Don't.

This site is linked to your site...Why risk them finding out you posted it? If anyone really wants it they can pm you.
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: Princess L on April 25, 2006, 08:14:51 PM
Apex!  That's what the World's here pushes I believe. 

Apex actually has some pretty decent supplements
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: onlyme on April 26, 2006, 02:56:23 AM
APex is made by World Wide (at least their drinks)
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: Mike on April 26, 2006, 11:27:21 AM
They do have RTD's but they're "re-evaluating" them, I don't think that's their market.

If you own a PT studio or a smaller gym I would HIGHLY recommend gettin on the Apex bandwagon.  Check out 24hr fitness, they have a killer Apex program. 
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: CQ on April 26, 2006, 12:03:06 PM
They do have RTD's but they're "re-evaluating" them, I don't think that's their market.

If you own a PT studio or a smaller gym I would HIGHLY recommend gettin on the Apex bandwagon.  Check out 24hr fitness, they have a killer Apex program. 

Please feel free to expand on this point :)
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: Mike on April 26, 2006, 01:21:09 PM
All Apex products/supplements work in conjunction with each other, call it, a supplement system (marketing).  Each new member/client fills out a Vitamin Supplement Questionnaire, which pretty much asseses they're supplement needs (Gain weight, lose weight or maintain) and they're dietary restictions (low carb, anemic, pregnant, obese, etc) and prints out a specialized "shopping list" of supplements that will help in reaching their goal.  Give it to them, go over it with them and you're done. 

Also, they can buy all their supplements on the website, the catch is they need a username and password.  They have to use your gym's name and their designated passord so you get a cut of that as well.

finally, you can't buy Apex products at Walmart, GNC or Vitamin Shoppe, only Apex Certified Clubs.  This means that no one can undercut you on price and you pretty much have a stranglehold on your clients supplemetal needs.
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: buffbodz on May 06, 2006, 09:46:51 AM
My store has a small fitness studio in the back.  It has a multi smith machine, leg press, hack squat combo machine, a life cycle stepper and about 1200 lbs in free weights.  With just these 3 multi use machines and the free weights, they're is not a bodypart that can't be worked and developed any better than in a 10,000 sq ft Worlds Gym.  Plus it's a private 1 on 1 session and you'd be supprised how many clients I have that were made to feel like a trainers specital in a large gym.  Most of the older woman like the privacy, no mater how bad they think they look, no ones looking at them here.  The great thing about My personal training business is that I also own the store and am certified to write diets.  I have a computerized program that gives a very impressive and useful diet that works and is easy to follow.  Having a store I also sell them whatever supplements they need, water, workout clothes.  In other words I'm all inclusive, which clients like not having to run here to get this or their for that.  Plus I do their body fat for them monthly.  I usually don't train more than 6 people a day and only 2 on Sat.  The $$$ is good and when you develop a working releationship with your clients and they will see results, I have some people who I've been training for over 5 years, 4 times per week.  If your gonna do it, do it the right way, not just training, but do it all.
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: swatranger on May 09, 2006, 11:40:35 AM
I need some guidance if someone can help me. I am on my way to starting my own personal training business and I am going crazy trying to make the right decision on my logo for my business cards and flyers. Everyone knows the photo of the barbell with about 12 total 45 plates on it and the bar is bending pretty good. Well, I was going to have that with a outlined photo of one of the IFBB pro's under it. Not their faces or anything just the silhoutte of their body. Does anyone think I should also have a fit female standing next to him maybe military pressing some 5 pound beautybells so that I dont scare off the middle aged housewife who only sees this massive man holding 800 pounds over his head. I know that the middle aged housewife is the going to be my base in this town. Let me know!!! Peace and Train insane!!!!
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: michael arvilla on May 11, 2006, 09:07:45 AM
I need some guidance if someone can help me. I am on my way to starting my own personal training business and I am going crazy trying to make the right decision on my logo for my business cards and flyers. Everyone knows the photo of the barbell with about 12 total 45 plates on it and the bar is bending pretty good. Well, I was going to have that with a outlined photo of one of the IFBB pro's under it. Not their faces or anything just the silhoutte of their body. Does anyone think I should also have a fit female standing next to him maybe military pressing some 5 pound beautybells so that I dont scare off the middle aged housewife who only sees this massive man holding 800 pounds over his head. I know that the middle aged housewife is the going to be my base in this town. Let me know!!! Peace and Train insane!!!!

my card...................(feel free to steal any ideas from it)
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: swatranger on May 11, 2006, 02:46:26 PM
Good looking basic card. That is what I wanted. I have seen some cards that have about 200 words on them and that is not what I want. Thanks Bro!!!!!
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: michael arvilla on May 11, 2006, 07:54:00 PM
Good looking basic card. That is what I wanted. I have seen some cards that have about 200 words on them and that is not what I want. Thanks Bro!!!!!

no problem!
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: buffbodz on May 13, 2006, 10:41:29 AM
I need some guidance if someone can help me. I am on my way to starting my own personal training business and I am going crazy trying to make the right decision on my logo for my business cards and flyers. Everyone knows the photo of the barbell with about 12 total 45 plates on it and the bar is bending pretty good. Well, I was going to have that with a outlined photo of one of the IFBB pro's under it. Not their faces or anything just the silhoutte of their body. Does anyone think I should also have a fit female standing next to him maybe military pressing some 5 pound beautybells so that I dont scare off the middle aged housewife who only sees this massive man holding 800 pounds over his head. I know that the middle aged housewife is the going to be my base in this town. Let me know!!! Peace and Train insane!!!!

Look around for a small store front.  I only pay 600 a month in rent.  A gym would take that much a month with nothing in return.  With the storefront you can do what I do.  Get em comming and going and with the right business plan a bank will loan yuu the roughly 30k you would need to set the place up right.
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: Mike on May 13, 2006, 03:09:27 PM
I need some guidance if someone can help me. I am on my way to starting my own personal training business and I am going crazy trying to make the right decision on my logo for my business cards and flyers. Everyone knows the photo of the barbell with about 12 total 45 plates on it and the bar is bending pretty good. Well, I was going to have that with a outlined photo of one of the IFBB pro's under it. Not their faces or anything just the silhoutte of their body. Does anyone think I should also have a fit female standing next to him maybe military pressing some 5 pound beautybells so that I dont scare off the middle aged housewife who only sees this massive man holding 800 pounds over his head. I know that the middle aged housewife is the going to be my base in this town. Let me know!!! Peace and Train insane!!!!

DO NOT put that bodybuiler guy on your card, please!!!!  Get something classy, something with bold colors and nice lines.  I can't imagine you're going to get too many dudes who want to train to get big.  Most people will want to lose weight and feel better.  Stick with a business plan and design geared towards them and their needs, save the BB mentality for the gym.
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: Vince G, CSN MFT on May 20, 2006, 01:40:03 PM
All Apex products/supplements work in conjunction with each other, call it, a supplement system (marketing).  Each new member/client fills out a Vitamin Supplement Questionnaire, which pretty much asseses they're supplement needs (Gain weight, lose weight or maintain) and they're dietary restictions (low carb, anemic, pregnant, obese, etc) and prints out a specialized "shopping list" of supplements that will help in reaching their goal.  Give it to them, go over it with them and you're done. 

Also, they can buy all their supplements on the website, the catch is they need a username and password.  They have to use your gym's name and their designated passord so you get a cut of that as well.

finally, you can't buy Apex products at Walmart, GNC or Vitamin Shoppe, only Apex Certified Clubs.  This means that no one can undercut you on price and you pretty much have a stranglehold on your clients supplemetal needs.



Don't forget to mention the most important part about Apex Supplements.  They give you free inventory software designed to auto-order when you are running low on product.  I believe its along with the specialized forms customers fill out. 

If I ever run a gym, I'll definitely stock Apex
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: muscleforlife on May 27, 2006, 04:05:09 PM
Hi all,
After a few weeks of being on GetBig, I finally got around to the other boards.


I am also a certifed PT.    I love all of the advice that I've read so far.

I am an independant.  I work out of Apollon Gym in NJ.  Pay the club $55. a month.  Charge clients $50.00 per session, $60.00 if I train in your home or outdoors.
Business flucuates.  Right now it is pretty good.

My business card is short and sweet.  For flyers, I use pics of people that work out in the gym or clients.  Nothing like a person that looks like you working out.  It lets beginners know that not everyone is perfect shape.
Sandra
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: Mike on May 30, 2006, 08:36:04 PM
Hi all,
After a few weeks of being on GetBig, I finally got around to the other boards.


I am also a certifed PT.    I love all of the advice that I've read so far.

I am an independant.  I work out of Apollon Gym in NJ.  Pay the club $55. a month.  Charge clients $50.00 per session, $60.00 if I train in your home or outdoors.
Business flucuates.  Right now it is pretty good.

My business card is short and sweet.  For flyers, I use pics of people that work out in the gym or clients.  Nothing like a person that looks like you working out.  It lets beginners know that not everyone is perfect shape.
Sandra

I'd charge more for an In-home.  You lose the half hour before the session and the half hour after for travel time.  I always do at least 1 1/2 times my gym rate.  If you explain it that way, they usually understand. 
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: Mike on May 30, 2006, 08:38:14 PM


Don't forget to mention the most important part about Apex Supplements.  They give you free inventory software designed to auto-order when you are running low on product.  I believe its along with the specialized forms customers fill out. 

If I ever run a gym, I'll definitely stock Apex

Yes they do, but it always has you order too much, I think that's the point though. 

It is a very easy way to keep track of inventory, you can even sync it up with your Point of Sale software.
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: muscleforlife on May 31, 2006, 05:26:38 AM
I'd charge more for an In-home.  You lose the half hour before the session and the half hour after for travel time.  I always do at least 1 1/2 times my gym rate.  If you explain it that way, they usually understand. 

I will take that into consideration.  I will bump up my rate for june.  I know the people I do at home or at the park can afford an increase.
Sandra
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: JediKnight on May 31, 2006, 10:08:37 AM
if you think Charles Glass makes $400 an hour personal training people then you are very mistaken. First off,,he has to give a certain percentagage to the gym and if he made $400 an hour with even 10 clients per day that would be $4000 a day. Give me a break. He is not a millionaire by any means. He doesn't make $400 an hour. PERIOD  ..Personal Trainers do ok. 
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: Devon97 on July 27, 2006, 07:59:32 AM
What most people on this board doesn't understand....that functional training is for everyone.  The more knowledge you have on core/stability training, the more money you're going to make.  I know personally 6 personal trainers that make @ 150k (on the books) ....just for tax reasons.  In reality...make over 200k annually.  Most of them are former Marine Bodybuilders with big ego's.  When they started, they had a hard time keeping clients & getting a large referral base going (they were training regualr people like a bodybuilder).  When they took up balance & core stability training they're income doubled.   Over time, their client base increased (huge referral business alone), & the results that people were wanting, were receiving it.
I find this very hard to believe and I will explain why. Balancing on a wobble board or trying to sit on a stability/balance ball while you pull against a rubber band or push 10lb weights does nothing to build muscle or reduce bodyfat, which is why 99% of people workout anyway.. to create a body composition shift ( increase muscle-decrease fat) . Listen you can do crunches on a stability ball and stand on a wobble board while holding a medicine ball in one hand all day but you will not LOOK any different, your body WILL NOT change. Now I know what you are going to say.... it strengthens the "core", it improves "core" stability and besides people like it! Performing a Front squat will challenge the muscle of the "core" by compression and stabilization FAR more than any silly balance ball routine. Performing a single leg squat will challange the body in a sagittal plane and for an even greater affect of unilateral training an X-vest can be worn to increase external loading. All this while promoting balance, since most all the muscles of the core are used not to mention the adductors along with the abductors, glutes, quads and hams. All the while reducing any possible muscular imbalance between the legs. Oh and the body composition shift this promotes is extraordinary. I know what your saying, " But wait I can balance on a wobble board for an additional 10 seconds that I could last month , while juggling 4 beanbags!"

" & the results that people were wanting, were receiving it."

Exactly what results were they wanting? TO balance on medicine ball on their head while the squeezed a stability ball between their thighs?? lol


Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: Mike on July 27, 2006, 02:46:14 PM
I find this very hard to believe and I will explain why. Balancing on a wobble board or trying to sit on a stability/balance ball while you pull against a rubber band or push 10lb weights does nothing to build muscle or reduce bodyfat, which is why 99% of people workout anyway.. to create a body composition shift ( increase muscle-decrease fat) . Listen you can do crunches on a stability ball and stand on a wobble board while holding a medicine ball in one hand all day but you will not LOOK any different, your body WILL NOT change. Now I know what you are going to say.... it strengthens the "core", it improves "core" stability and besides people like it! Performing a Front squat will challenge the muscle of the "core" by compression and stabilization FAR more than any silly balance ball routine. Performing a single leg squat will challange the body in a sagittal plane and for an even greater affect of unilateral training an X-vest can be worn to increase external loading. All this while promoting balance, since most all the muscles of the core are used not to mention the adductors along with the abductors, glutes, quads and hams. All the while reducing any possible muscular imbalance between the legs. Oh and the body composition shift this promotes is extraordinary. I know what your saying, " But wait I can balance on a wobble board for an additional 10 seconds that I could last month , while juggling 4 beanbags!"

" & the results that people were wanting, were receiving it."

Exactly what results were they wanting? TO balance on medicine ball on their head while the squeezed a stability ball between their thighs?? lol




Ready for the sad truth:   The most popular trainers are not neccessarily the best trainers, they're the best salespeople. 

Bottom line:  Functional training sells becauses it is DIFFERENT! 

In my expereince the ONLY clients who get resluts are the one's who are self-motivated, the training is just the starting point.  If they have the drive, they will get there.  I just give them the right tools, keep them motivated and keep the program advancing so they are constantly improving.

My clients love front-squatting, deadlifting, long jumping, clean and pressing....those are the types of excersises that produce results in any training paradigm.    1 leg squats are great, do them all the time.  That is a typical functional leg excersise. 

According to IHRSA, 65% of people join gyms for weight management and the number is higher for people who hire trainers.  Now, if your training population is younger people (high school athletes) or the elderly, this percentage drops, they are training to A) Perform better or B) Feel better and functional training will help greatly with both.
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: Devon97 on July 27, 2006, 05:22:10 PM
Ready for the sad truth:   The most popular trainers are not neccessarily the best trainers, they're the best salespeople. 

Bottom line:  Functional training sells becauses it is DIFFERENT! 

In my expereince the ONLY clients who get resluts are the one's who are self-motivated, the training is just the starting point.  If they have the drive, they will get there.  I just give them the right tools, keep them motivated and keep the program advancing so they are constantly improving.

My clients love front-squatting, deadlifting, long jumping, clean and pressing....those are the types of excersises that produce results in any training paradigm.    1 leg squats are great, do them all the time.  That is a typical functional leg excersise. 

According to IHRSA, 65% of people join gyms for weight management and the number is higher for people who hire trainers.  Now, if your training population is younger people (high school athletes) or the elderly, this percentage drops, they are training to A) Perform better or B) Feel better and functional training will help greatly with both.

Outstanding reply !
Here is my beef with stability balls and wobble boards.... they dont do a thing for building muscle or lowering bodyfat and do very little for real world performance.
Mike you sound very experienced and knowledegable , so surely you must agree with me that when minimal to no results follow people are going to leave... usually. Where am I gowing wrong?
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: Mike on July 27, 2006, 06:10:13 PM
Outstanding reply !
Here is my beef with stability balls and wobble boards.... they dont do a thing for building muscle or lowering bodyfat and do very little for real world performance.
Mike you sound very experienced and knowledegable , so surely you must agree with me that when minimal to no results follow people are going to leave... usually. Where am I gowing wrong?

Stability Balls are great if used correctly.  My clients would much rather do a Stablility Ball Pike (http://www.criticalbench.com/exercises/stability-ball-pike.htm) than your standard Leg Raise.  1) You have to use your shoulders and tris to keep you in position.  2)  You have to maintain a neutral spine postion thoughout the excersise and use lower back, abs and obliquest and 3) I can just see Connie (my 55yr old 5am client) getting a hernia trying to crank out 30 leg raises.

Minimal results, again, are usually the result of the client.  I've had clients who have trainined with NPC level Bodybuilders and then came to me and they get equal, if not better, results.  If they want bigger quads, then we do Leg Extensions.  If they want to have "toned" legs and slim down abit, then it's Mountain Climbers and Alternatind Box Step-Ups.  Remember, give them what they want, then give them what they need. 

About wobble/voodoo/balance boards:  I have a 26 year old Male who wants to get bigger.  Great, that's easy!  But, he wakeboards in the summer and skiis in the winter....alot!  So, in between sets of Romainian Deadlifts followed by Resistance Band Shadowboxing, we hit the voodoo board (http://www.vewdo.com/).  He's seen a dramatic improvement in both sports and his balance is impecable. 

And just for the record you WILL see a lot of bad functional/stability training going on in the next 5 years.  Trainers will be using this style of training for the very reason I stated before, it's different.  The only problem is, they will be doing most excersises wrong, that's probably what Devon97 is seeing.  If its done right and explained right, then it makes sense and gets results.
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: Devon97 on July 27, 2006, 06:40:54 PM
Stability Balls are great if used correctly.  My clients would much rather do a Stablility Ball Pike (http://www.criticalbench.com/exercises/stability-ball-pike.htm) than your standard Leg Raise.  1) You have to use your shoulders and tris to keep you in position.  2)  You have to maintain a neutral spine postion thoughout the excersise and use lower back, abs and obliquest and 3) I can just see Connie (my 55yr old 5am client) getting a hernia trying to crank out 30 leg raises.

Minimal results, again, are usually the result of the client.  I've had clients who have trainined with NPC level Bodybuilders and then came to me and they get equal, if not better, results.  If they want bigger quads, then we do Leg Extensions.  If they want to have "toned" legs and slim down abit, then it's Mountain Climbers and Alternatind Box Step-Ups.  Remember, give them what they want, then give them what they need. 

About wobble/voodoo/balance boards:  I have a 26 year old Male who wants to get bigger.  Great, that's easy!  But, he wakeboards in the summer and skiis in the winter....alot!  So, in between sets of Romainian Deadlifts followed by Resistance Band Shadowboxing, we hit the voodoo board (http://www.vewdo.com/).  He's seen a dramatic improvement in both sports and his balance is impecable. 

And just for the record you WILL see a lot of bad functional/stability training going on in the next 5 years.  Trainers will be using this style of training for the very reason I stated before, it's different.  The only problem is, they will be doing most excersises wrong, that's probably what Devon97 is seeing.  If its done right and explained right, then it makes sense and gets results.
Another Oustanding post Mike. You gave excellent examples to everything I asked.
When I mentioned wobble boards or tornado balls or stability balls I see a trainer at the gym I contract out of using such devices. He works with 90% geriatric folks and will toss a med ball back and forth with them or have them stand on a small stability ball and pull on a rubber band. There is almost Zero if any carry over affect in real life. So you see Mike in a situation like this minimal results are the result of the TRAINER! Even if granny and gramps do eat properly they arent going to gain one once of metabolicly active tissue, they wont increase bone density and they wont promote fat loss from EPOC (Excess post oxygen consumption).
As far as the surfer using the voodoo board that is an excellent example of functional training.
However I know very few women that could perform the Pike exercise with the stability ball and if they could the technique would be so poor it would not be worth doing.
SO a client came to you with minimal results after training with a NPC Bodybuilder and to put size on his quads , your exercise of choice was an isolation movement , the Leg extension?? :o I use Mtn Climbers as well but they don't do much at all to promote myogenic tone.
I think that that most of the time a client works with a particular trainer because of the personal relationship that is developed over time. Also very rarely does a client seek out a trainer based off a bizz card , brochure or advertisement.Almost always it is from a personal referral. If Suzzy Q likes her trainer then she will recommend him to all her wealthy friends weather or not he is worth a damn. And so the cycle continues.
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: Mike on July 27, 2006, 06:55:02 PM
Another Oustanding post Mike. You gave excellent examples to everything I asked.
When I mentioned wobble boards or tornado balls or stability balls I see a trainer at the gym I contract out of using such devices. He works with 90% geriatric folks and will toss a med ball back and forth with them or have them stand on a small stability ball and pull on a rubber band. There is almost Zero if any carry over affect in real life. So you see Mike in a situation like this minimal results are the result of the TRAINER! Even if granny and gramps do eat properly they arent going to gain one once of metabolicly active tissue, they wont increase bone density and they wont promote fat loss from EPOC (Excess post oxygen consumption).
As far as the surfer using the voodoo board that is an excellent example of functional training.
However I know very few women that could perform the Pike exercise with the stability ball and if they could the technique would be so poor it would not be worth doing.
SO a client came to you with minimal results after training with a NPC Bodybuilder and to put size on his quads , your exercise of choice was an isolation movement , the Leg extension?? :o I use Mtn Climbers as well but they don't do much at all to promote myogenic tone.
I think that that most of the time a client works with a particular trainer because of the personal relationship that is developed over time. Also very rarely does a client seek out a trainer based off a bizz card , brochure or advertisement.Almost always it is from a personal referral. If Suzzy Q likes her trainer then she will recommend him to all her wealthy friends weather or not he is worth a damn. And so the cycle continues.

Your trainer sucks.  Sorry to say.  I hope you have insurance becasue granny is likely to take a spill.  In this case, yes, it is the trainer.  I think he's trying to promote good balance, posture and stablility, which is good for that crowd.  Nothing worse than a slip-and-fall resulting and a broken wrist, hand or hip.  Limited mobility/flexibility and loss of balance is something that needs to be addresses when you train anyone over 40 or the deconditioned but it seems like he's going about it all wrong.  Again, you'll see a lot of this bad training popping up in the coming years.

You're right, the pike is advanced ,we'd start with a Jacknife or just hold in that position for a beginner.   I still thinks that's better, and safer, than lying leg raises. 

To clarify, she got good results from her NPC trainer (despite giving her a rotate cuff injury that led to surgery).  She did NOT want bigger legs, I was just using that as an example.  Sure, Leg Extensions are not the best for size but it's a great example of an excersise people typically use to "tone" their legs when, in reality,  they're doing the exact opposite.  I'd rather see her doing a cardio-based leg excersise (mountain climbers, box jumps, shuffles, resisted running...) and have her burn kcals as well as feeling sore in the targeted areas.  That's giving her what she wants and needs.

I think we're both on the same page here
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: Devon97 on July 28, 2006, 02:22:25 AM
Your trainer sucks.  Sorry to say.  I hope you have insurance becasue granny is likely to take a spill.  In this case, yes, it is the trainer.  I think he's trying to promote good balance, posture and stablility, which is good for that crowd.  Nothing worse than a slip-and-fall resulting and a broken wrist, hand or hip.  Limited mobility/flexibility and loss of balance is something that needs to be addresses when you train anyone over 40 or the deconditioned but it seems like he's going about it all wrong.  Again, you'll see a lot of this bad training popping up in the coming years.

You're right, the pike is advanced ,we'd start with a Jacknife or just hold in that position for a beginner.   I still thinks that's better, and safer, than lying leg raises. 

To clarify, she got good results from her NPC trainer (despite giving her a rotate cuff injury that led to surgery).  She did NOT want bigger legs, I was just using that as an example.  Sure, Leg Extensions are not the best for size but it's a great example of an excersise people typically use to "tone" their legs when, in reality,  they're doing the exact opposite.  I'd rather see her doing a cardio-based leg excersise (mountain climbers, box jumps, shuffles, resisted running...) and have her burn kcals as well as feeling sore in the targeted areas.  That's giving her what she wants and needs.

I think we're both on the same page here

Your right I think we are on the same page.
Just for the record, the trainer I described is not working for me in fact he is very successful with almost 70 clients and 2 other trainers working under him. Very friendly guy but very poor trainer. Good points.
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: legbreaker on July 28, 2006, 02:52:42 PM
What most people on this board doesn't understand....that functional training is for everyone.  The more knowledge you have on core/stability training, the more money you're going to make.  I know personally 6 personal trainers that make @ 150k (on the books) ....just for tax reasons.  In reality...make over 200k annually.  Most of them are former Marine Bodybuilders with big ego's.  When they started, they had a hard time keeping clients & getting a large referral base going (they were training regualr people like a bodybuilder).  When they took up balance & core stability training they're income doubled.   Over time, their client base increased (huge referral business alone), & the results that people were wanting, were receiving it.
........................ ........................ ........................ .........
The average person coming into a gym wants "cosmetic" changes....appearance.  Functional training is not gonna do that.  Yeah I see some yo-yo doing dyna disc squats on a smith machine...core stability, proprioception, blah, blah, blah.  I've been training people for 21 years.  Trained throughout many populations, coach for NY state games for physically challenged, athletes, BB's and typical men and women looking to lose weight or just simply look good.  While some trainers have their clients balancing on dyna discs lifting medecine balls throughout a certain plane, I have my 70 year old clients doing chair squats for reps of 15 throughout a comfotable range of motion with bodyweight then slowly progressing with bells until one guy was doing 35 pound bells in each hand for sets of 20.  Of course he was gardening and moving around like a 25 year old...strength, endurance, balance etc improved tremendously. 

I laugh when I hear these trainers saying "functional training", Calos santana created it etc...the fact is speak to any gymnast, ice skater and you'll see this stuff has been done for decades.  People see medi balls and think wow this is new...take a look at jack demsey training in 1920 and you'll see plenty of upper body plyo's and medicine ball work.  take the circus out of the gym and keep it real.  Atheletes should be incorporating some of this stuff into their training (like I do personally) but not the average joe looking to get in the best shape of their life.  I live right near IHP...it's an awesome place and Calos DOES incorporate a lot of legit weight training into his training.  He is very good because he realizes the value of weight training, but to suggest that anything he does is new and cutting edge and innovative isn't accurate.  Rope climbing has been done for a hundred years..simple pys ed to the military to athletics it's been done as has alll the other stuff.  He does look to find way to simulate movements done for sports and stuff, but that has been done.  Tom Kinney of TK star exercise equipment based some of his designs on simulating move,ments in sports.  His reverse squat is really just created from a linemans explosive push off at the snap.  NOTHING IS NEW...things are tweeked a bit but seriously nothing is new.
Also, too bad that your success in terms of finaces does NOT reflect the trainer you are.  Just like in Boxing some of the best trainers in the world are in the dingy gyms across america.  It's all marketing...Perception is reality.  You DO NOT have to be good to earn a lot of money personal training you just have to market your self.  Throughout my years in the gym I've seen many people, my friends included, that have earned in excess of 100 bucks and hour and they do not know more than the average person in a gym.  Remember perception is reality and if you want to make everyone think you are good start by getting a good certification..In places that are high end clubs you are judged only by certification.  Don't worry about difficulty, they take as much effort to pass as a bach level first semester exam...My friend came from a hair dresser backround, studied for two months and took NSCA and passed.  I gave her a high five as she raised her fee from 50 to 100 and got it because the clubs members were MISLEAD to believe that it actually meant anything.  I'm not putting down education, research just the fact that many use it as the sole basis of their judgement. 


Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: Mike on July 28, 2006, 03:27:07 PM
What most people on this board doesn't understand....that functional training is for everyone.  The more knowledge you have on core/stability training, the more money you're going to make.  I know personally 6 personal trainers that make @ 150k (on the books) ....just for tax reasons.  In reality...make over 200k annually.  Most of them are former Marine Bodybuilders with big ego's.  When they started, they had a hard time keeping clients & getting a large referral base going (they were training regualr people like a bodybuilder).  When they took up balance & core stability training they're income doubled.   Over time, their client base increased (huge referral business alone), & the results that people were wanting, were receiving it.
........................ ........................ ........................ .........
The average person coming into a gym wants "cosmetic" changes....appearance.  Functional training is not gonna do that.  Yeah I see some yo-yo doing dyna disc squats on a smith machine...core stability, proprioception, blah, blah, blah.  I've been training people for 21 years.  Trained throughout many populations, coach for NY state games for physically challenged, athletes, BB's and typical men and women looking to lose weight or just simply look good.  While some trainers have their clients balancing on dyna discs lifting medecine balls throughout a certain plane, I have my 70 year old clients doing chair squats for reps of 15 throughout a comfotable range of motion with bodyweight then slowly progressing with bells until one guy was doing 35 pound bells in each hand for sets of 20.  Of course he was gardening and moving around like a 25 year old...strength, endurance, balance etc improved tremendously. 

I laugh when I hear these trainers saying "functional training", Calos santana created it etc...the fact is speak to any gymnast, ice skater and you'll see this stuff has been done for decades.  People see medi balls and think wow this is new...take a look at jack demsey training in 1920 and you'll see plenty of upper body plyo's and medicine ball work.  take the circus out of the gym and keep it real.  Atheletes should be incorporating some of this stuff into their training (like I do personally) but not the average joe looking to get in the best shape of their life.  I live right near IHP...it's an awesome place and Calos DOES incorporate a lot of legit weight training into his training.  He is very good because he realizes the value of weight training, but to suggest that anything he does is new and cutting edge and innovative isn't accurate.  Rope climbing has been done for a hundred years..simple pys ed to the military to athletics it's been done as has alll the other stuff.  He does look to find way to simulate movements done for sports and stuff, but that has been done.  Tom Kinney of TK star exercise equipment based some of his designs on simulating move,ments in sports.  His reverse squat is really just created from a linemans explosive push off at the snap.  NOTHING IS NEW...things are tweeked a bit but seriously nothing is new.
Also, too bad that your success in terms of finaces does NOT reflect the trainer you are.  Just like in Boxing some of the best trainers in the world are in the dingy gyms across america.  It's all marketing...Perception is reality.  You DO NOT have to be good to earn a lot of money personal training you just have to market your self.  Throughout my years in the gym I've seen many people, my friends included, that have earned in excess of 100 bucks and hour and they do not know more than the average person in a gym.  Remember perception is reality and if you want to make everyone think you are good start by getting a good certification..In places that are high end clubs you are judged only by certification.  Don't worry about difficulty, they take as much effort to pass as a bach level first semester exam...My friend came from a hair dresser backround, studied for two months and took NSCA and passed.  I gave her a high five as she raised her fee from 50 to 100 and got it because the clubs members were MISLEAD to believe that it actually meant anything.  I'm not putting down education, research just the fact that many use it as the sole basis of their judgement. 




Awesome Post!  Circus show is right, that's the problem with peoples interpretation of "functional training."

My boss has done the IHP Mentorship program and we've had Carlos at our gym several times to give presentations.  I shape my training around his approach and how he does it.  I've seen all his videos (a MUST have) and read most of his books (read Essence of Program Design Manual if you want to see how its done) and it never ceases to amaze me how simple he makes it. 

Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: Devon97 on July 28, 2006, 05:25:10 PM
What most people on this board doesn't understand....that functional training is for everyone.  The more knowledge you have on core/stability training, the more money you're going to make.  I know personally 6 personal trainers that make @ 150k (on the books) ....just for tax reasons.  In reality...make over 200k annually.  Most of them are former Marine Bodybuilders with big ego's.  When they started, they had a hard time keeping clients & getting a large referral base going (they were training regualr people like a bodybuilder).  When they took up balance & core stability training they're income doubled.   Over time, their client base increased (huge referral business alone), & the results that people were wanting, were receiving it.
........................ ........................ ........................ .........
The average person coming into a gym wants "cosmetic" changes....appearance.  Functional training is not gonna do that.  Yeah I see some yo-yo doing dyna disc squats on a smith machine...core stability, proprioception, blah, blah, blah.  I've been training people for 21 years.  Trained throughout many populations, coach for NY state games for physically challenged, athletes, BB's and typical men and women looking to lose weight or just simply look good.  While some trainers have their clients balancing on dyna discs lifting medecine balls throughout a certain plane, I have my 70 year old clients doing chair squats for reps of 15 throughout a comfotable range of motion with bodyweight then slowly progressing with bells until one guy was doing 35 pound bells in each hand for sets of 20.  Of course he was gardening and moving around like a 25 year old...strength, endurance, balance etc improved tremendously. 

I laugh when I hear these trainers saying "functional training", Calos santana created it etc...the fact is speak to any gymnast, ice skater and you'll see this stuff has been done for decades.  People see medi balls and think wow this is new...take a look at jack demsey training in 1920 and you'll see plenty of upper body plyo's and medicine ball work.  take the circus out of the gym and keep it real.  Atheletes should be incorporating some of this stuff into their training (like I do personally) but not the average joe looking to get in the best shape of their life.  I live right near IHP...it's an awesome place and Calos DOES incorporate a lot of legit weight training into his training.  He is very good because he realizes the value of weight training, but to suggest that anything he does is new and cutting edge and innovative isn't accurate.  Rope climbing has been done for a hundred years..simple pys ed to the military to athletics it's been done as has alll the other stuff.  He does look to find way to simulate movements done for sports and stuff, but that has been done.  Tom Kinney of TK star exercise equipment based some of his designs on simulating move,ments in sports.  His reverse squat is really just created from a linemans explosive push off at the snap.  NOTHING IS NEW...things are tweeked a bit but seriously nothing is new.
Also, too bad that your success in terms of finaces does NOT reflect the trainer you are.  Just like in Boxing some of the best trainers in the world are in the dingy gyms across america.  It's all marketing...Perception is reality.  You DO NOT have to be good to earn a lot of money personal training you just have to market your self.  Throughout my years in the gym I've seen many people, my friends included, that have earned in excess of 100 bucks and hour and they do not know more than the average person in a gym.  Remember perception is reality and if you want to make everyone think you are good start by getting a good certification..In places that are high end clubs you are judged only by certification.  Don't worry about difficulty, they take as much effort to pass as a bach level first semester exam...My friend came from a hair dresser backround, studied for two months and took NSCA and passed.  I gave her a high five as she raised her fee from 50 to 100 and got it because the clubs members were MISLEAD to believe that it actually meant anything.  I'm not putting down education, research just the fact that many use it as the sole basis of their judgement. 




Outstanding post my friend. We are on the same page as well and your views reflect mine.

Your right knny187 has alot to learn.
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: Matt4Muscle on September 18, 2006, 03:01:33 PM
I too have been training clients a long time, own a pt studio etc. I have a cert from the Cooper Institute and also NASM which is a far superior cert. Some clients want to lean out and lose weight, some want to gain muscle but a lot just want to be able to age gracefully and continue to get up and down stairs, wipe their own ass, etc. This is where "functional training is essential. Balance and core training are far more beneficial to the average person over 40 than bodybuilding. To be an excellent trainer you must know both and have an open mind. If you view the body as a building then the core is the foundation. Makes sense you want a strong and solid foundation before you worry about painting the walls doesn't it? You must also realize that a muscle can only move what a joint can stablize. Core and stabaliztion training have their place in bodybuilding too. Don't negate something because of what you hear the tough guys in the gym say or because you don't understand it. The first thing I do with Bbuilders is take them through a month to six weeks of stability training doing all traditional moves but adding an unstable environment. You do this by taking away the bench and having them do unilateral moves on stability balls or train them on their feet on a free motion machine or have them do one leg squats etc.What this does is forces the stabilizer muscles to catch up with the already strong primary movers. Now guess what happens when you go back to old school training. Correct....you break plateaus and come back that much stronger. To be honest, most bbuilders I have worked with have horrible balance and core strength. EVERYONE benefits from this kind of training. It does not have to be forever but it does have everyday benefits. Balance and stability are essential as we age but  also helps athletes, including bodybuilders at all levels. So next time you see a trainer having a client stand on one leg or do something you don't understand, look up the word proprioception and learn something new. You may yourself benefit from this. Getting someone lean or buff is easy and I don't say this to sound arrogant but it's true. Fixing somebody's muscle imbalances, postural distortions, increasing range of motion and balance, getting rid of chronic pain and greatly improving their quality of life......well that brings untold rewards and believe me, gets you a lot of clients. Great trainers never stop learning and also realize they will never know it all. Good luck to all of you and if you are in the area of Tarpon Springs FL feel free to look me up and come by and train
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: Minihulk on September 18, 2006, 06:47:21 PM
This is some information that I am very concerned about finding out so if all you personal trainers on here can answer these few questions for me?

 1.)Do you set your own hours or are you on a "timeclock"?

 2.)Do you have to be certified or liscensed? If certified do you have to re-certify periodically or due you need more education everytime you re-certify.

 3.)How long due you have to attend college?

 4.)What kind of classes do you have to take?

 5.)How much pay do you recieve at starting pay?

 6.)How much can you earn after 10 to 15 years?

 7.)What other benefits (insurance, paid leave, retirement) are included?

Thanks any info will be helpful.
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: swatranger on November 10, 2006, 06:06:12 AM
What's up fellows? Haven't been in here for a while and I need some help from my fellow trainers on this board. I have been running my own training business out of a gym for about 1 1/2 months now and I have grossed about $7,000.00. Excited but, I have went about three weeks without getting a new client.

I have been approached by former Olympia and still a stud (Larry Scott) in regards to using his Biophase system in the gym and to become Larry Scott certified which is not nationally recognized but holds some clout due to who he is. I am wondering if any of you know of any gyms that use his system and any trainers who are on board with his company. I would become an employee of his company. He would train me on his system, I would sell his supplements, he would give me a computer with his programs there for me to use in which I can tap into the nutrition side of training which you all know is the REAL part of training. Of course he gets a % of the earnings and now I am getting 100% of my earnings. They do my marketing monthly for me instead of me never having any time to do any. Once I get bigger into it they cover my medical insurance which I am on my own owning my own business. Of course the rep said that I should earn 30% more then I earn now by using this program but I need some info if you have it before I make this decision. As always, I am excited to hear what you guys have to say.



Train Insane!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: Mike on November 15, 2006, 07:27:18 PM
What's up fellows? Haven't been in here for a while and I need some help from my fellow trainers on this board. I have been running my own training business out of a gym for about 1 1/2 months now and I have grossed about $7,000.00. Excited but, I have went about three weeks without getting a new client.

I have been approached by former Olympia and still a stud (Larry Scott) in regards to using his Biophase system in the gym and to become Larry Scott certified which is not nationally recognized but holds some clout due to who he is. I am wondering if any of you know of any gyms that use his system and any trainers who are on board with his company. I would become an employee of his company. He would train me on his system, I would sell his supplements, he would give me a computer with his programs there for me to use in which I can tap into the nutrition side of training which you all know is the REAL part of training. Of course he gets a % of the earnings and now I am getting 100% of my earnings. They do my marketing monthly for me instead of me never having any time to do any. Once I get bigger into it they cover my medical insurance which I am on my own owning my own business. Of course the rep said that I should earn 30% more then I earn now by using this program but I need some info if you have it before I make this decision. As always, I am excited to hear what you guys have to say.



Train Insane!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I don't know too much about it but it seems like you're doing fine alredy, depending on where you live, $5K a month is good for a trainer. 

From the website it looks like you'll be puttin they're information in a computer, printing out a program and going though it with them.  Then you'd be selling his supplements and making 20% all whilst paying $1,500 to do so.  It sounds pretty insulting to the client if you ask me.
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: swatranger on November 17, 2006, 01:17:13 PM
Mike, I appreciate you posting your thoughts Bro!! I do not want to be insulting at all to my clients. Tell me why you would feel that way so I can better understand.
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: Mike on November 27, 2006, 06:19:26 PM
Mike, I appreciate you posting your thoughts Bro!! I do not want to be insulting at all to my clients. Tell me why you would feel that way so I can better understand.

Well, for one, this system can't possibly know the specific needs of each of your clients.  Think about their daily lives: Some have 4 small children, some are bodybuilders, some are young athletes, some are recovering from an injury and some might be old.   Now add on the fact that each of those populations lead different lives within their own populations and you have a set of goals and needs that can't possibly be predicted using a computer system.

Just give it a little thought, do some research and check out some seminars from some respected speakers and you should have more than enough knowledge to help your clients.
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: Stubborn on November 30, 2006, 11:24:54 PM
I have just read this entire thread. Im upset I didnt see it sooner, I dont frequent the business board. I should being a business owner (landscape design/build). I am going to start PTing at a new gym the end of this month so I thought I would take in all everyone has to offer. GREAT THREAD!

Any books that you would say are a must have in respect to the profession?
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: Mike on December 02, 2006, 03:58:05 PM
I have just read this entire thread. Im upset I didnt see it sooner, I dont frequent the business board. I should being a business owner (landscape design/build). I am going to start PTing at a new gym the end of this month so I thought I would take in all everyone has to offer. GREAT THREAD!

Any books that you would say are a must have in respect to the profession?

JC Santana : Essence of Program Design:


http://www.performbetter.com/detail.aspx_Q_ID_E_4561_A_CategoryID_E_252

Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: Stubborn on December 02, 2006, 05:07:28 PM
JC Santana : Essence of Program Design:


http://www.performbetter.com/detail.aspx_Q_ID_E_4561_A_CategoryID_E_252



Looks like a great buy! You have used it I assume? How has it changed your views on program design?
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: Mike on December 02, 2006, 06:54:02 PM
Looks like a great buy! You have used it I assume? How has it changed your views on program design?

A lot of what he has in there I already knew from working with him and going to various seminars but it's a great tool for someone looking for multiple types of programs for multiple types of clients at all skill levels and need.  It takes you through various sample workouts, gives you a giant excersise catolog with picutres and has some great training articles.  It's a must have for any trainer looking to improve their program design or general training.
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: Princess L on December 03, 2006, 09:27:23 AM
JC Santana : Essence of Program Design:


http://www.performbetter.com/detail.aspx_Q_ID_E_4561_A_CategoryID_E_252



JC is the greatest  ;D

I think I only paid $38 for that book  :-\
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: Stubborn on December 03, 2006, 10:18:09 AM
I'll get it this week! ;D
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: muscleforlife on December 13, 2006, 01:58:55 PM
I've taken a few courses at an ECA convention with J C.

Learned a whole lot.

Sandra
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: TestDummy on January 17, 2007, 03:40:43 AM
Hey guys, I just got NFPT certified and in about 2 months I'll be certified as a physical therapist tech.  I've already been offered a job at my gym once I finish school, I would now but I have no time.  I'm very excited to start working as a personal trainer.  How much do you think I can expect to make just starting out?  Just in general, I know the area has alot to do with it too....  Also what do you guys think of NFPT?
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: spiderman405 on February 12, 2007, 02:10:15 PM
I wanted to get some advice. I have 20 years of workout experience and lots of knowledge as far as training. i have personal trained over the years but never more than a handful of clients.

I now have a private studio that i can train at in a good wealthy area. i have no clients as of now. I have a website, fliers and business cards. I wanted to hang around this area and get some business locally. there is a whole foods grocery store and plenty of people walking around this area.

my question is how do i get the fliers or business cards out without feelling like a solicitor? I am not a pushy person

should i put them on cars? what should i say to people if i am just randomly passing out cards to everyone?

i am good with people. its just that getting the first few is the hardest part for me.

any advice would be nice. thanks.
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: Reality on February 26, 2007, 12:19:36 PM
Do you mind putting your website link up so we can see it?

Or just send me an email at Scott@bodybuildersreality.com and I'll be happy to offer some feedback!

Thanks,

Scott
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: Mike on February 26, 2007, 12:33:08 PM
I wanted to get some advice. I have 20 years of workout experience and lots of knowledge as far as training. i have personal trained over the years but never more than a handful of clients.

I now have a private studio that i can train at in a good wealthy area. i have no clients as of now. I have a website, fliers and business cards. I wanted to hang around this area and get some business locally. there is a whole foods grocery store and plenty of people walking around this area.

my question is how do i get the fliers or business cards out without feelling like a solicitor? I am not a pushy person

should i put them on cars? what should i say to people if i am just randomly passing out cards to everyone?

i am good with people. its just that getting the first few is the hardest part for me.

any advice would be nice. thanks.

General flyering is good.  You're gonna have to suck it up and get your name out there anyway possible.  Get some family members or some high school kids to help you and just get out and talk to people.

You can also just introduce yourself to as many people as possible and offer your services.  You can do it at the whole food, just make sure you get their information as well as giving them yours, this way you can follow up with them.  I recommend having a clip board and just jot down phone numbers and email address.

For a more professional approach you can do direct mail.  You can get some postcards designed and sent out with all the information you want.  This is a lot better because you can target a certain demographic (age, maritial status, income leve...).  We do them all the time.  $.37/postcard for design, demographics, actual card and mailing.  I'd recommend doing anywhere from 1,000 - 10, 000.  Let me know if you need any resources. 
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: Reality on February 26, 2007, 01:36:19 PM
Dude, flyers and postcards are the LAST thing that you should do.

Once again, study marketing and business.  Find others that are already successful doing what you would like to do.

The successful ones don't trade time for dollars.

They leverage their time and choose their own destiny.

They don't waste their time with flyers. ;)

Scott
www.fitnessandfigurereal ity.com



Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: Mike on February 26, 2007, 05:38:02 PM
Dude, flyers and postcards are the LAST thing that you should do.

Once again, study marketing and business.  Find others that are already successful doing what you would like to do.

The successful ones don't trade time for dollars.

They leverage their time and choose their own destiny.

They don't waste their time with flyers. ;)

Scott
www.fitnessandfigurereal ity.com





Direct mail is the BEST money I have ever spent and we run a very successful business here.  I've consulted for numerous PT studios and they have all had great results.  I go to alot of seminars and I here a lot of speakers, they recommend this as well. 

I would say word-of-mouth is your best marketing but you can't really control that.  Take a calculated, market research-based approach and invest in some direct mail. 

I would also take a more grass-roots approach and get involved in the community.  Go to meetings and various business mixers and attend functions, just to help get your name out there.
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: Quickerblade on February 26, 2007, 06:09:39 PM
(http://www.tonyrogers.com/humor/images/brian_peppers2.jpg)
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: spiderman405 on September 19, 2007, 07:25:42 PM
General flyering is good.  You're gonna have to suck it up and get your name out there anyway possible.  Get some family members or some high school kids to help you and just get out and talk to people.

You can also just introduce yourself to as many people as possible and offer your services.  You can do it at the whole food, just make sure you get their information as well as giving them yours, this way you can follow up with them.  I recommend having a clip board and just jot down phone numbers and email
address.

For a more professional approach you can do direct mail.  You can get some postcards designed and sent out with all the information you want.  This is a lot better because you can target a certain demographic (age, maritial status, income leve...).  We do them all the time.  $.37/postcard for design, demographics, actual card and mailing.  I'd recommend doing anywhere from 1,000 - 10, 000.  Let me know if you need any resources. 


Hey i just check this email. i know its been a while. i had a major shoulder surgery. i am back in shape though and ready to build my personal training business. i will look into this direct mail thing. you know i work full time right now from 2pm-10pm for around $32,000 per year at a hospital. i am living paycheck to paycheck. $370-$3700 for postcards is alot of money to me but i will consider it when i have an extra $370 to blow.

how long have you been training people personally and how is your business now?
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: Quickerblade on September 20, 2007, 06:19:40 AM
(http://www.tonyrogers.com/humor/images/brian_peppers2.jpg)
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: Andy Griffin on November 23, 2007, 03:26:35 PM
I've been doing this a little while, attended lots of seminars and have seen a lot of bad training.  I think I might have some good advice.

First off, leave World Gym.  I was at one of their conventions and I spoke to a few owners and managers and I really think they're tryin to "revamp their image. " This can be good and bad.  I'd opt for a more stable, PT studio-type gym.  You're in Florida right?  Look up IHP (institute for human performance) in Boca Raton.  That's the kinda place you wanna be at.

Second, no more bodybuilding training.  I see these trainers having 80 year old women (literally) doing isolated bb bicep curls supersetted with tricep extensions.  But that will make their arms smaller right?  Wrong!  It's ok to give them what they want but, eventually, you have to give them what they need and convince them it's what they want.  After all, you're the professional.   Look into NASM instead of ISSA, and to incorporate some functional and core training (bad words on this board).  You'd be suprised how much a person will start to listen when you show them how to do a proper floor or stability ball crunch (proper neck alignment, neutral spine position, hyper extension, contraction, foot placement -not against a wall).

Last, try to get them to look beyond the $ signs and see the VALUE of the training.  I call it the "layer beneath the layer."  Sure, 66% of people join gyms to lose weight, but WHY?  Their nephew called them fat.  They can't fit in an airplane seat.  They have to go to Big and Tall stores.  95% of all sales (gym sales included) are based on emotion.  Get that first...their results will follow. 

Sorry, I modified it alitlle, I had one of my front desk girls bust me for looking at "gay porno" i.e. Masters Olympia pics.

Good evening.  I have a quick question.  You state that you would "look into NASM instead of ISSA."  Why?

I am slowly getting back into shape, and I've been thinking along the lines of using "before and after" pics (someone else mentioned using that technique).  I obviously have to get certified, and ISSA has been in contact with me (I haven't committed to anything, of course).  What makes NASM a better option in your opinion?
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: Stubborn on November 23, 2007, 03:58:13 PM
Good evening.  I have a quick question.  You state that you would "look into NASM instead of ISSA."  Why?

I am slowly getting back into shape, and I've been thinking along the lines of using "before and after" pics (someone else mentioned using that technique).  I obviously have to get certified, and ISSA has been in contact with me (I haven't committed to anything, of course).  What makes NASM a better option in your opinion?


NASM just has more substance really. They tell you all the same things but a little more in depth. They also focus on all that core crap out there, if you like that stuff. ISSA is quick and easy! If you are looking to pick one up just to get started, go with ISSA because it will take you no more than a week to complete it even without prior training. NASM is preferred at 24 Hour but I wouldnt recommend working there unless you just want to count reps. I believe you can find examples of what each program will teach you and what the tests are like on their respective websites.

Good luck!
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: Andy Griffin on November 23, 2007, 06:27:36 PM
NASM just has more substance really. They tell you all the same things but a little more in depth. They also focus on all that core crap out there, if you like that stuff. ISSA is quick and easy! If you are looking to pick one up just to get started, go with ISSA because it will take you no more than a week to complete it even without prior training. NASM is preferred at 24 Hour but I wouldnt recommend working there unless you just want to count reps. I believe you can find examples of what each program will teach you and what the tests are like on their respective websites.

Good luck!

Thank you for the info.  I am a long way from being worthy to train anyone, but I can certainly use the knowledge. 
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: Quickerblade on November 24, 2007, 12:17:53 AM

Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: Jeriko on February 11, 2008, 04:59:47 PM
For those of you lookin to become PTs and living in San Diego; i'm looking to add 2 part-time trainers. 10-15hrs/wk Evenings/Sat morn.  $10-$12hr + bonuses

We have a specific program and you must be willing to train our members according to that program. Perfect for responsible college students.  We cater to well known and influential people in the community. You must have a strong presence and the ability to both motivate and hold our members accountable without feeling intimidated. Men PTs only. www.athleticnation.com
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: Quickerblade on February 11, 2008, 06:29:39 PM
For those of you lookin to become PTs and living in San Diego; i'm looking to add 2 part-time trainers. 10-15hrs/wk Evenings/Sat morn.  $10-$12hr + bonuses

We have a specific program and you must be willing to train our members according to that program. Perfect for responsible college students.  We cater to well known and influential people in the community. You must have a strong presence and the ability to both motivate and hold our members accountable without feeling intimidated. Men PTs only. www.athleticnation.com
hahahaa i like that
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: emn1964 on February 26, 2008, 08:43:27 AM

Hey i just check this email. i know its been a while. i had a major shoulder surgery. i am back in shape though and ready to build my personal training business. i will look into this direct mail thing. you know i work full time right now from 2pm-10pm for around $32,000 per year at a hospital. i am living paycheck to paycheck. $370-$3700 for postcards is alot of money to me but i will consider it when i have an extra $370 to blow.

how long have you been training people personally and how is your business now?

My two cents for what it is worth.  To get your business started you need clients.  Not necessarily paying clients though.  Get together some flyers that have a free workout coupon on them.  Take them to local businesses and introduce yourself.  Tell the gate keeper (secretary or whatever) that these are freebies for the employees, that you only have a few free slots left so time is critical.  Hit every single business in a 5-7 mile area.  I wouldn't go to many retail businesses because of the low wage rate.  I guarantee you that you will have clients in a week.  During the free session, that is your opportunity to sell your service to them.  You have to get out there and pound the pavement.  This is a very low cost way to market but I can almost guarantee you a few clients out of it.

Another way to market yourself that won't cost you anything but time is thru volunteering.  Volunteer for the special olympics.  This will get your name out into the community.  Volunteer for the local high school sports teams.  Volunteer for the local rec council.  Volunteer at camps for disabled kids.  Just volunteer.

Direct mail--I get absolutely nothing out of direct mail.  The return rate is very small and not worth the cost.
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: wnybodybuildingfan on December 06, 2008, 05:17:22 PM
I got certified in June of this year through I.S.S.A.  I train clients in their own homes.  My clientele has mainly been from the teaching profession.  Age groups have ranged in the 45-65 age bracket.  Nice thing is I don't have a lot of overhead and with gas prices coming down it has become more profitable. 
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: Zach Trowbridge on March 18, 2009, 01:58:33 PM
For those of you lookin to become PTs and living in San Diego; i'm looking to add 2 part-time trainers. 10-15hrs/wk Evenings/Sat morn.  $10-$12hr + bonuses

That's a pretty tough hourly rate.  Even at a place like 24 hour you can get just under $20 an hour with no experience. 
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: Stubborn on March 18, 2009, 02:07:42 PM
That's a pretty tough hourly rate.  Even at a place like 24 hour you can get just under $20 an hour with no experience. 

At 24hour fitness with no experience you make $15/hr. The highest is $23/hr, I believe, and thats for a "Master Trainer" (someone who has trained 2000+ sessions and has 3 or more certs). Plus you make $$$ for pedalling supps. I do not recommend working for them or any other major chain gym if you want to train YOUR way. You must follow strict guidelines. It is better to work at a fair volume smaller gym and seek outside clients as well. Just my $.02.
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: Earl1972 on March 18, 2009, 07:05:58 PM
don't most of the people that use personal trainers just want to lose weight?  that's the impression i get at bally's, where the majority of people using trainers are middle aged and obese

why should they be trained like athletes if they just want to lose weight?  i laugh when i see these trainers counting pushups or have them do some kind of sqaut with the ball pressed up against the wall

none of these personal trainers do those exercises, heck most of them do bodybuilding type exercises

and doing pushups and jumping jacks is something anybody can do at home, why pay somebody to watch you do them in the gym?

these people just want to get their weight down and look somewhat decent, why not train them like a bodybuilder?  teach them how to properly lift weights because most don't have a clue and bodybuilding is a great way to take off the pounds, which is the goal of most clients wouldn't you say?

E

Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: webcake on March 18, 2009, 07:48:25 PM
don't most of the people that use personal trainers just want to lose weight?  that's the impression i get at bally's, where the majority of people using trainers are middle aged and obese

why should they be trained like athletes if they just want to lose weight?  i laugh when i see these trainers counting pushups or have them do some kind of sqaut with the ball pressed up against the wall

none of these personal trainers do those exercises, heck most of them do bodybuilding type exercises

and doing pushups and jumping jacks is something anybody can do at home, why pay somebody to watch you do them in the gym?

these people just want to get their weight down and look somewhat decent, why not train them like a bodybuilder?  teach them how to properly lift weights because most don't have a clue and bodybuilding is a great way to take off the pounds, which is the goal of most clients wouldn't you say?

E



With most clients, yes they do want to lose weight and "tone-up".

Training them like a bodybuilder could work, but it isn't always ideal for weight loss. And it can get boring for an average client. Do a set, rest, do another, rest, another exercise, rest etc etc

That's why circuits are probably the best. You are always moving, good momentum and you can change them up quite easily. Going to the gym 4-5 days a week may be fine for you, but for others they cannot sacrifice the time and don't really enjoy going to the gym.

It's all about keeping the client motivated and interested. Typical bb'ing style training is boring.
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: Earl1972 on March 18, 2009, 08:59:25 PM
i don't think these people enjoy any type of physical activity, that's a large part of the reason they are obese

the trainers at my gym have their clients do pushups, situps, bodyweight squats, machine pullups, cable exercises and occaisionally watch them do laps around the track
 
how are those exercises more interesting than bodybuilding training? and why the hell are trainers so fascinated by those exercise balls?

i've never seen a decent physique on a man or woman in a gym that didn't lift weights

these clients never look any thinner and what is all this talk about functional training?  as if a guy that benches 300 lbs doesn't have any functional strength ::)

E
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: webcake on March 18, 2009, 09:07:24 PM
i don't think these people enjoy any type of physical activity, that's a large part of the reason they are obese

the trainers at my gym have their clients do pushups, situps, bodyweight squats, machine pullups, cable exercises and occaisionally watch them do laps around the track
 
how are those exercises more interesting than bodybuilding training? and why the hell are trainers so fascinated by those exercise balls?

i've never seen a decent physique on a man or woman in a gym that didn't lift weights

these clients never look any thinner and what is all this talk about functional training?  as if a guy that benches 300 lbs doesn't have any functional strength ::)

E

I can't really comment on American PT.....but i am a Personal Trainer/Fitness specialist and i studied for 18 months.

I think the average Aussie PT is better qualified/trained than the average American PT. That being said, you can do the quick route in Aus and be a PT in all of 6 weeks.....but those guys never last more than a year or so.

"Cross Fit" is very popular here in Aus now. Quick, outdoors and just do like boxing/running drills/BW exercises and stuff with kettle bells and stuff.

There's always going to be shit trainers.......just make sure you aren't one of them.  ;D
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: Earl1972 on March 18, 2009, 09:12:42 PM
i'm not a trainer, i just don't think the trainers in my gym are helping their clients achieve their goals

i think they should be taught how to properly lift weights, why pay somebody to watch you do jumping jacks and waddle around the track?

E
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: webcake on March 18, 2009, 09:16:50 PM
i'm not a trainer, i just don't think the trainers in my gym are helping their clients achieve their goals

i think they should be taught how to properly lift weights, why pay somebody to watch you do jumping jacks and waddle around the track?

E

I totally agree, and any trainer who wants to make ok money and build a good reputation should too.

Watching someone run laps on a track is poor effort.....teach them how to exercise correctly, motivate them and keeping it interesting for the cleint is all there is to it.
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: loco on January 31, 2011, 05:12:44 AM
How has the economy the past three years affected business for personal trainers here?
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: Rhino on February 08, 2012, 10:16:07 PM
good thread here.
Title: Re: Personal Trainers Talk
Post by: exoticnfit on January 23, 2018, 07:52:40 AM
if you think Charles Glass makes $400 an hour personal training people then you are very mistaken. First off,,he has to give a certain percentagage to the gym and if he made $400 an hour with even 10 clients per day that would be $4000 a day. Give me a break. He is not a millionaire by any means. He doesn't make $400 an hour. PERIOD  ..Personal Trainers do ok. 

Actually I wouldn't doubt that he makes close to it!

A decade and a half ago when I was doing the 20hr a week grind for PT I was charging $100-$150/hr and at that time I had 8yrs as a Professional in the industry, a Natural Pro, with clients mostly from the Film/TV/Entertainment industry along with Doctors/Lawyers/CEO's.

* I really enjoyed the clients in Film/TV because they would usually get production to pay for my training services and thus whether I was union or not (I was a Union Performer myself) they would pay me $250 for the hour session based on production agreements which was easier than negotiating a separate contract. That was a day rate back then for specialty services/special ability extras but you need only sign the contract and even if you were let go for the day after 10mins you still got the min day rate.*

I was not at the Charles Glass level but still demanded a good amount of money for the demographic I was working with at 25yrs of age because I brought more value than any average trainer with just high level schooling/certification behind them. I was a Pro athlete and full union performer, I understood the dynamics of how productions worked and threw in a 30min-40 min drive time Free, since location for set was sometimes not at the main production studio.

From what I heard he is charging upwards of $250/hr and whether he chooses to train clients all day or not (never catch me doing more than 6hrs per day max) even $400/hr is not out of reach if he were to decide limiting his time or knowing that a good chunk of clients are super rich and the rest are usually athletes who have sponsors that pay the tab.

No matter your industry of choice your "academia" time is merely theorhetical for the most part and/or with a small portion of practical.

It means ZERO in regards to experience however.

That is what a Charles Glass has...decades and decades of EXPERIENCE that will always out match any amount of degrees/certifications a person could get.

I'm confident he charges a minimum of $250/hr as there are other trainers that charge that and much more per hour given the demographic of clients they seek out and the cost of living for that general area as well.