Author Topic: Police State - Official Thread  (Read 771947 times)

Skeletor

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Re: Police State - Official Thread
« Reply #5150 on: July 25, 2021, 02:43:10 PM »
19 months of paid vacation.

Didn't work a single day in 2020.

Still gets "officer of the year 2020" award...


Officer of the Year in El Monte didn’t work a single day in 2020

'He did not perform anything in 2020, so how does he get awarded when there were other deserving officers?' asked one city councilman

Detective Eric Walterscheid stood at a podium before the El Monte City Council during its last meeting in June, touting the work of Officer Carlos Molina before honoring him as the Police Officers Association’s Officer of the Year for 2020.

With about a dozen rank-and-file officers looking on, the police union president said of Molina: “He’s been with us for 21 years. I remember when he first walked into the detective bureau — his leather was squeaking. I read his reports. I said, ‘Go into detectives! You’re an excellent investigator!’ He never looked back.”

But Molina seemed an odd choice for the honor, primarily because he didn’t work a single day in 2020. He spent the entire year on paid administrative leave that ultimately lasted 19 months — from September 2019 to April 2021, according to Tom Madruga, a contract attorney for the city.

Molina, a detective at the time, was placed on leave because he spent a year working on a child abuse investigation that yielded little work product, sources close to the investigation said on condition of anonymity. Additionally, he charged the city for 42 hours of overtime pay — equating to more than $4,400 — during that period.

Moilna was probing the alleged physical abuse of 23-month-old Britalin Vasquez at the hands of her mother, Donica Vasquez, and stepfather, Oswaldo Eduardo Chan. Molina’s investigation spanned from Oct. 24, 2018, to Oct. 1, 2019, when the case was yanked from him and turned over to Detective Pedro Yanez.

Yanez closed the case in 44 days, submitting it to the Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Office on Nov. 13, 2019. Meanwhile, the administrative investigation was launched into Molina’s handling of the case. Although he was allowed to return to the force after 19 months off the job, he was reassigned as a patrol officer. The administrative investigation is still pending arbitration, according to sources close to the case.

https://www.sgvtribune.com/2021/07/18/officer-of-the-year-in-el-monte-didnt-work-a-single-day-in-2020/

Skeletor

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Re: Police State - Official Thread
« Reply #5151 on: July 28, 2021, 01:52:22 PM »
"NY's finest".

NYPD cops fired for alleged ‘shocking professional and sexual misconduct’ with teen

Two NYPD cops raped a vulnerable teen member of the police youth program, cruelly taking advantage of the underage girl to “satisfy their depraved interests,” an internal department judge has ruled.

The officers’ “shocking professional and sexual misconduct” included behavior from one of them that “would cause any responsible adult, let alone a parent, to recoil in horror,” the NYPD judge wrote in a scathing ruling made public last week.

Then-Officers Sanad Musallam and Yaser Shohatee “targeted’’ the girl, who was 15 at the time and a member of the NYPD’s Explorers program, according to the disciplinary documents.

Musallam and Shohatee, now 34 and 41, respectively, separately raped her amid dozens of phone chats and hundreds of text exchanges, which included “sexually explicit” photos, between 2015 and 2016, the records claim.

The judge, Assistant Deputy Commissioner of Trials Paul Gamble, recommended dismissing both cops after finding them guilty of the encounters and other internal misconduct charges in a 41-page ruling that forcefully rejected the officers’ narrative.

Both cops had denied the allegations and remained on the force at full pay until they were fired March 25, three weeks after Gamble’s ruling — and four years after the allegations were reported to the Brooklyn District Attorney’s Office and the NYPD’s Internal Affairs Bureau, according to disciplinary and payroll records.

Neither officer was ever criminally charged, with the case falling apart after the teen refused to continue to cooperate with investigators, said a spokesman for the DA’s office.

The accusations were never before made public.
The NYPD began posting the outcomes of their internal trials earlier this year following a related court battle.

https://nypost.com/2021/07/27/two-nypd-cops-fired-over-alleged-sexual-misconduct-with-teen/

Skeletor

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Re: Police State - Official Thread
« Reply #5152 on: August 03, 2021, 05:16:05 PM »
Idaho man fatally shot in own backyard after officer mistakes him for suspect, police say

A police officer in Idaho fatally shot a man who was in his own backyard on Monday after mistaking him for a suspect on the loose in the neighborhood and believed to be armed, authorities said.

Idaho Falls police did not immediately identify the victim or the officer involved in what Chief Bryce Johnson called a "devastatingly tragic" incident.

The incident began just after midnight in Idaho Falls when a deputy from the Bonneville County Sheriff's Office pulled over a vehicle and saw a male passenger wearing a black shirt get out and flee into a residential neighborhood, the police statement said.

Idaho Falls police officers and Bonneville County sheriff's deputies began searching the neighborhood for the suspect, authorities said.

The deputy who had stopped the vehicle spoke with the driver, who identified the suspect as 22-year-old Tanner J.N. Shoesmith, the sheriff's office said in a news release. Deputies learned Shoesmith had multiple active warrants for his arrest, including for felony battery on an officer, resisting or obstructing arrest, and providing false information to law enforcement.

As the search continued, police said a resident told officers they spotted the suspect run through a backyard and believed that he had a gun.

Meanwhile, the driver who had stayed in the vehicle showed officers a message they received from the suspect that showed his GPS location, police said. The GPS appeared to show the suspect in a backyard of a nearby residence. Officers and deputies then surrounded the home.

"Due to the information that the suspect may be armed, and a prior history of violence when interacting with police officers, law enforcement personnel entered the location with their service weapons drawn," the police statement said.

Officers said they heard yelling when approaching the home and found a man wearing a black shirt and wielding a gun in the yard. They told the man to drop the gun, according to the statement.

"We do not currently have the answers as to what exactly occurred during these moments," Johnson said. "We do know that during this interaction, an Idaho Falls police officer discharged his service weapon, firing one shot which struck the man."

Johnson said officers and first responders attempted life-saving measures but they were unsuccessful.

Officers and deputies determined that the man who had been shot was not the suspect but actually the resident of that address.

After the shot was fired, Shoesmith was again spotted running through the area, police said. Officers tracked him to the yard of a nearby home and found him hiding in a shed.

https://www.foxnews.com/us/idaho-police-shoot-man-backyard-mistaken-identity-suspect-search


The cop was not arrested when he killed the poor man, neither was he arrested after being indicted.




I.F. police officer who shot man in backyard indicted for manslaughter

A grand jury has indicted an Idaho Falls Police officer for shooting a man who was in his own backyard during a February manhunt.

Elias Aurelio Cerdas, a 26-year-old officer who graduated from training less than a year before the shooting, was indicted Friday for felony involuntary manslaughter. The Feb. 8 shooting left Joseph “Joe” Johnson, a father of four, dead behind his house.

Cerdas was not arrested after being charged but issued a summons for his arraignment at the Bonneville County Courthouse on Aug. 23. The Idaho Attorney General’s Office is prosecuting the case after the Bonneville County Prosecutor’s Office handed the case over for unspecified reasons.

https://www.eastidahonews.com/2021/08/i-f-police-officer-who-shot-man-in-backyard-indicted-for-manslaughter/

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Re: Police State - Official Thread
« Reply #5154 on: August 05, 2021, 12:32:58 PM »
Terrifying. The more he complained, the crazier he was deemed and the more drugs he was fed. This is horror movie material.

Of course don't expect the cops, the hospital staff or his useless public defenders to go to prison - or be locked up in a mental hospital.


Hawaiian homeless man arrested in case of mistaken identity spent years in mental hospital: report

Hawaii officials wrongly arrested a homeless man for a crime committed by someone else, locked him up in a state hospital for more than two years, forced him to take psychiatric drugs and then tried to cover up the mistake by quietly setting him free with just 50 cents to his name, the Hawaii Innocence Project said in a court document asking a judge to set the record straight.

A petition filed in court Monday night asks a judge to vacate the arrest and correct Joshua Spriestersbach's records. The filing lays out his bizarre plight that started with him falling asleep on a sidewalk. He was houseless and hungry while waiting in a long line for food outside a Honolulu shelter on a hot day in 2017.

When a police officer roused him awake, he thought he was being arrested for the city's ban on sitting or laying down on public sidewalks.

But what he didn't realize was that the officer mistook him for a man named Thomas Castleberry, who had a warrant out for his arrest for violating probation in a 2006 drug case.

It's unclear how this happened as Spriestersbach and Castleberry had never met. Spriestersbach somehow ended up with Castleberry as his alias, even though Spriestersbach never claimed to be Castleberry, according to the Hawaii Innocence Project.

Spriestersbach's attorneys argue it all could have been cleared up if police simply compared the two men's photographs and fingerprints.

Instead, against Spriestersbach's protests that he wasn't Castleberry, he was eventually committed to the Hawaii State Hospital.

"Yet, the more Mr. Spriestersbach vocalized his innocence by asserting that he is not Mr. Castleberry, the more he was declared delusional and psychotic by the H.S.H. staff and doctors and heavily medicated,"
the petition said. "It was understandable that Mr. Spriestersbach was in an agitated state when he was being wrongfully incarcerated for Mr. Castleberry’s crime and despite his continual denial of being Mr. Castleberry and providing all of his relevant identification and places where he was located during Mr. Castleberry’s court appearances, no one would believe him or take any meaningful steps to verify his identity and determine that what Mr. Spriestersbach was telling the truth – he was not Mr. Castleberry."

No one believed him — not even his various public defenders — until a hospital psychiatrist finally listened.

All it took were simple Google searches and a few phone calls to verify that Spriestersbach was on another island when Castleberry was initially arrested, according to the court document.

The psychiatrist asked a detective to come to the hospital, who verified fingerprints and photographs to determine the wrong man had been arrested and Spriestersbach spent two years and eight months institutionalized, the petition said, noting that it wasn't hard to determine the the real Castleberry has been incarcerated in an Alaska prison since 2016.

According to records, a 49-year-old man named Thomas R. Castleberry is in the Spring Creek Correctional Facility in Seward, Alaska. His relatives couldn't be reached for comment. The Alaska public defender listed for him declined to comment Tuesday.

The Hawaii Innocence Project document also claims Spriestersbach had ineffective counsel: the Hawaii public defender's office.

Police, the state public defender's office, the state attorney general and the hospital "share in the blame for this gross miscarriage of justice," the petition said.

Hawaii Public Defender James Tabe, Gary Yamashiroya, special assistant to the attorney general and Matt Dvonch, a spokesman for the Honolulu prosecuting attorney's office, declined to comment Tuesday.

Once the fingerprints and photographs were verified, officials moved quickly, but secretly, to release Spriestersbach in January 2020, the petition said.

"A secret meeting was held with all of the parties, except Mr. Spriestersbach, present. There is no court record of this meeting or no public court record of this meeting. No entry or order reflects this miscarriage of justice that occurred or a finding that Mr. Spriestersbach is not Thomas Castleberry," the court document said.

His lawyers said officials didn't think anyone would believe Spriestersbach or no one would care about the homeless man who fell asleep waiting for food, only to wake up to a living nightmare.

Spriestersbach, 50, who lives with his sister in Vermont, declined to comment for this story.

His sister, Vedanta Griffith, spent nearly 16 years looking for him. He moved to Hawaii with Griffith when her husband was stationed on Oahu with the Army in 2003. He moved to the Big Island and then disappeared, while suffering mental health issues, she said.

"Part of what they used against him was his own argument: ‘I’m not Thomas Castleberry. I didn’t commit these crimes. ... This isn’t me,’" she told The Associated Press. "So they used that as saying he was delusional, as justification for keeping him."

After his release, he ended up at a homeless shelter, which contacted his family.

"And then when light is shown on it, what do they do? They don’t even put it on the record. They don’t make it part of the case," Griffith said. "And then they don’t come to him and say, ‘We are so sorry’ or, how about even ‘Gee, this wasn’t you. You were right all along.’"

Spriestersbach now refuses to leave his sister’s 10-acre property.

"He’s so afraid that they’re going to take him again," Griffith said.

https://www.foxnews.com/us/hawaiian-homeless-man-mistaken-identity-case

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Re: Police State - Official Thread
« Reply #5155 on: August 06, 2021, 12:11:35 PM »

Spokane police officer awaiting trial for rape charges arrested again for allegedly raping another woman

A fired Spokane Police officer awaiting trial for allegedly sexually assaulting a victim of domestic violence was arrested Wednesday on new charges after another woman reported he raped her while on duty.

Nathan Nash, 38, faces charges of second-degree rape and unlawful imprisonment in the new case, the Spokane County Sheriff’s Office reported in a news release.

He was first arrested in 2019 and was soon fired by the Spokane Police Department.

Both sexual assault victims told investigators that Nash responded to their calls for police assistance, then later followed up with them alone. It was during these “follow-ups” that Nash sexually assaulted them, the victims told detectives. Julie Humphreys, a spokesperson for the Spokane Police Department, said it’s not uncommon for officers to follow up on an investigation alone, but corporals would typically be the ones to take pictures for evidence.

https://www.spokesman.com/stories/2021/aug/04/spokane-detectives-arrest-former-officer-in-sexual/

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Re: Police State - Official Thread
« Reply #5156 on: August 13, 2021, 07:05:36 PM »
They should receive no less than life in prison. But as usual it's unlikely they will spend even 1 day in prison.

Three ex-Philly homicide detectives charged with perjury for their testimony during the retrial of an innocent man

Three former longtime Philadelphia homicide detectives were charged Friday with perjury after a grand jury concluded they lied on the witness stand during a landmark 2016 murder retrial that threatened to send an innocent man back to prison for life.

The allegations, unveiled in a presentment filed by the District Attorney’s Office, represent an extraordinary development in a city that has seen dozens of old homicide convictions overturned in recent years — but no significant legal repercussions for the police or prosecutors involved in building those cases. Many of them have since been accused of misconduct in court documents filed by District Attorney Larry Krasner.

The grand jury’s findings mark a stunning turnabout for Martin Devlin, Manuel Santiago, and Frank Jastrzembski, who each served more than 25 years in the Philadelphia Police Department. Devlin for years was viewed as a star investigator in one of the nation’s most violent cities, specializing in cold cases and complex investigations that no one else could crack.

But in recent years, questions have emerged about the detectives’ investigative practices, mostly during the 1990s. Krasner’s Conviction Integrity Unit has helped overturn at least five cases the detectives worked on, saying the convictions were marred by coerced confessions, fabricated or hidden evidence, or secret deals with key witnesses.

Marissa Bluestine, the former head of the Pennsylvania Innocence Project and assistant director at the Quattrone Center for the Fair Administration of Justice at University of Pennsylvania, said personal accountability for such crimes by law enforcement is rare. The statute of limitations for criminal charges often runs out, she said, and police and prosecutors are typically shielded from personal liability in civil litigation due to qualified immunity laws.

https://www.inquirer.com/news/philadelphia-homicide-detectives-perjury-devlin-santiago-jastrzembski-20210813.html

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Re: Police State - Official Thread
« Reply #5157 on: August 16, 2021, 02:11:07 PM »
Arrested and jailed without charges for 27 days and they even cut off water supply in her cell. Were they trying to kill this old woman? Had a public defender and judge not noticed she might have stayed in jail and died forgotten and alone. It appears the "sheriff" then tried to bribe the woman to cover up his crimes.

Arizona’s ‘drinking toilet water’ jail lawsuit ends

An Arizona grandmother has settled a lawsuit with Gila County after she was forced to drink toilet water in jail.

Tamara Barnicoat, 63, said she received $130,000 in the case, which stemmed from her 2019 detention. Barnicoat, who is diagnosed with mental illness, said she was delusional at the time of her jailing, which prevented her from advocating for herself. Her lawsuit detailed several civil rights violations.

In one interview, Gila County Sheriff Adam Shepherd admitted that Barnicoat had been subjected to cruel and unusual punishment. Such punishment is a violation of the 8th Amendment.

Globe officers arrested Barnicoat in October 2019 after she threw a cup of water, claiming it was poison, on a car wash employee.

Inside the Gila County Jail, Barnicoat said she did not get her medication nor mental health treatment.

At first, Barnicoat was locked in an isolation cell. A detention officer shut off water to her cell. Violating jail policy, nobody turned the water back on for at least two days. Isolated and dehydrated, Barnicoat resorted to drinking from the toilet. Jail employees, and even the sheriff, confirmed this account through written reports and interviews with ABC15.

While jailed, no criminal charges were filed against Barnicoat, but she was not released for 27 days. At that point, her public defender and a judge noticed, and the judge ordered her immediate release. Barnicoat also sued her public defender, Ray Geiser, and they reached a separate settlement.

Several weeks after ABC15’s initial report on Barnicoat, a sheriff’s official came to her house with a check for $7,500 and a written agreement not to pursue future legal claims, according to court documents.

Barnicoat’s civil lawyers, Robert Campos and Kevin Garrison, later argued that the agreement should be null-and-void. They said the sheriff’s office, which had previously traumatized Barnicoat in jail, was now taking advantage of the mentally ill woman, who did not have a lawyer to help her understand the documents.

After Barnicoat filed a notice of claim, a precursor to a lawsuit, with a $500,000 settlement request, her old criminal case suddenly resurfaced. The Gila County Attorney used the original police report about water throwing to charge her with trespassing, disorderly conduct, and assault.

After ABC15 reported on what many saw as retribution, the criminal case was transferred to an outside county attorney who dropped all the charges.

https://www.abc15.com/news/local-news/investigations/arizonas-drinking-toilet-water-jail-lawsuit-ends

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Re: Police State - Official Thread
« Reply #5158 on: August 20, 2021, 03:32:55 PM »
Skip to comments.

US Capitol cop who shot dead Ashli Babbitt is EXONERATED in internal investigation of the shooting
UK Daily Mail ^ | 08/20/2021 | CHRISTOPHER EBERHART
Posted on 8/20/2021, 5:54:43 PM by DFG

The Capitol Police officer who fatally shot Ashli Babbitt during the January 6 Capitol riot has been exonerated following an internal investigation, according to reports.

Babbitt, 35, was the only person killed on January 6 when the officer - who hasn't been named - opened fire at a mob of Trump supporters as they stormed through the Rotunda.

The commander of the Capitol Police's Office of Personal Responsibility says 'no further action will be taken in this matter,' according to a memo obtained by NBC News.

In April, the Department of Justice said it wouldn't be filing charges against the officer, so the conclusion of the internal probe ends the official investigation.

Babbitt's family told The Washington Examiner earlier this month that they plan on filing a $10million wrongful death lawsuit, claiming a plainclothes officer didn't issue a verbal command.

(Excerpt) Read more at dailymail.co.uk .

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Re: Police State - Official Thread
« Reply #5159 on: August 21, 2021, 04:49:59 AM »
Tucker Carlson sees coverup plot behind announcement FBI found little evidence of coordination among Jan. 6 demonstrators
American Thinker ^ | 21 Aug, 2021 | Thomas Lifson
Posted on 8/21/2021, 7:28:12 AM by MtnClimber

In the penultimate segment of the Friday edition of Tucker Carlson Tonight, he asked, “Why is the FBI exonerating people?” And there is a very disturbing answer.

Most conservative commentators have reacted with glee to a report from Reuters that:

The FBI has found scant evidence that the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol was the result of an organized plot to overturn the presidential election result, according to four current and former law enforcement officials.

“FBI Destroys Insurrection Narrative,” headlined Legal Insurrection. And it’s hard to avoid a sense of triumph that a ridiculous slur against Trump supporters, a plot worthy of comparison to the Reichstag Fire in its effort to discredit opposition, has been repudiated, albeit anonymously from 4 sources.

But Tucker Carlson, the most important conservative commentator of the moment, takes his reasoning a full step farther. In the penultimate segment of the Friday edition of Tucker Carlson Tonight, he asked, “Why is the FBI exonerating people?”

After reviewing the months of the 180 degrees opposite narrative, put out by the FBI and broadcast by the progressive media, that an organized insurrection took place, he suggests a sinister motive behind the leaked story to Reuters. “If there was organization going on, some of it came from the feds.”

As has often been the case, the FBI placed informants, or perhaps agents provocateur is the better term, among the demonstrators. In fact, there are upwards of 20 unindicted co-conspirators from the January 6 incident, and a good number of these may have been ringleaders on the FBI payroll, escaping prosecution for acts that were worse than the crimes for which others have been prosecuted.

(Excerpt) Read more at americanthinker.com ...

Skeletor

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Re: Police State - Official Thread
« Reply #5160 on: August 25, 2021, 12:25:51 PM »
Cops kill an innocent father but it is simply called an "officer-involved shooting". As usual the name of the killer has not been released yet.


Police shoot and kill bystander while firing at suspect in Santa Barbara County

A police officer in Guadalupe, Calif., shot and killed a bystander while firing at a suspect over the weekend, Santa Barbara County Sheriff’s Office officials said.

The shooting happened around 9:40 p.m. Saturday in the small town of Guadalupe, 10 miles east of Santa Maria, the Sheriff’s Office said in a statement Sunday.

Officers with the Guadalupe Police Department responded to Birch and Obispo streets after a suspect wanted on an outstanding felony warrant was spotted, authorities said. A bystander — 59-year-old Juan Luis Olvera-Preciado — was sitting in his car when police began firing at the suspect. It was not immediately clear what prompted police to open fire.

Olvera-Preciado was struck and pronounced dead at the scene, police said.

https://www.latimes.com/california/story/2021-08-23/california-police-kill-bystander-while-shooting-at-suspect

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Re: Police State - Official Thread
« Reply #5161 on: August 25, 2021, 12:30:02 PM »
Get ready for the hagiographic interview of the "hero". It would be interesting to see if his identity matches a name that has been floating for a while (Byrd).


The police officer who shot and killed Capitol rioter Ashli Babbitt will reveal his identity in a Lester Holt interview

The Capitol Police officer who shot and killed Ashli Babbitt during the January 6 riot at the US Capitol will reveal his identity in an interview with NBC News' Lester Holt airing Thursday.

"Speaking out and revealing his identity publicly for the first time, the officer will share his perspective on the events of that day, including the aftermath of the deadly insurrection and the threats he has received," NBC News said in a press release announcing the upcoming interview.

The interview with air Thursday night at 6:30pm E.T. on "NBC Nightly News," which is anchored by Holt. Other portions of the officer's interview will air on other NBC News platforms, including on "TODAY" and on MSNBC.

https://www.businessinsider.com/cop-who-killed-ashli-babbitt-identity-nbc-interview-2021-8

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Re: Police State - Official Thread
« Reply #5162 on: August 25, 2021, 10:14:22 PM »
This attack was not investigated until after the victim filed a lawsuit, that is 536 days (!) after the incident and to cover up the crimes the footage was classified as a "citizen encounter". As usual the cop resigned so he can work for another department.


White Louisiana trooper seen pummeling black man repeatedly with flashlight: 'Pain compliance'



Graphic body camera video kept secret for more than two years shows a Louisiana State Police trooper pummeling a black motorist 18 times with a flashlight — an attack the trooper defended as "pain compliance."

"I’m not resisting! I'm not resisting!" Aaron Larry Bowman can be heard screaming between blows on the footage obtained by The Associated Press. The May 2019 beating following a traffic stop left him with a broken jaw, three broken ribs, a broken wrist, and a gash to his head that required six staples to close.

Bowman's encounter near his Monroe home came less than three weeks after troopers from the same embattled agency punched, stunned, and dragged another Black motorist, Ronald Greene, before he died in police custody on a rural roadside in northeast Louisiana. Video of Greene’s death similarly remained under wraps before AP obtained and published it earlier this year.

Federal prosecutors are examining both cases in a widening investigation into police brutality and potential cover-ups involving both troopers and state police brass.

State police didn’t investigate the attack on Bowman until 536 days after it occurred — even though it was captured on body camera — and only did so weeks after Bowman brought a civil lawsuit.

The state police released a statement Wednesday saying that Jacob Brown, the white trooper who struck Bowman, "engaged in excessive and unjustifiable actions," failed to report the use of force to his supervisors, and "intentionally mislabeled" his body camera video.

Before resigning in March, Brown tallied 23 use-of-force incidents dating to 2015 — 19 of them targeting black people, according to state police records.

Aside from the federal investigation, Brown faces state charges of second-degree battery and malfeasance in Bowman’s beating. He also faces state charges in two other violent arrests of black motorists, including one he boasted about last year in a group chat with other troopers, saying the suspect is "gonna be sore" and "it warms my heart knowing we could educate that young man."

On the night Bowman was pulled over for a traffic violation, Brown came upon the scene after deputies had forcibly removed Bowman from his vehicle and taken him to the ground. The trooper later told investigators he "was in the area and was trying to get involved."

Wielding an 8-inch aluminum flashlight reinforced with a pointed end to shatter car glass, Brown jumped out of his state police vehicle and began bashing Bowman on his head and body within two seconds of "initial contact" — unleashing 18 strikes in 24 seconds, detectives wrote in an investigative report.

"Give me your fucking hands!" the trooper shouted. "I ain't messing with you."

Bowman tried to explain several times that he was a dialysis patient, had done nothing wrong, and wasn't resisting, saying, "I'm not fighting you, you're fighting me."

Brown responded with: "Shut the fuck up!" and "You ain’t listening."

Bowman later can be heard moaning, still on the ground. "I’m bleeding!" he said. "They hit me in the head with a flashlight!"

Brown, 31, later said Bowman had struck a deputy and that the blows were "pain compliance" intended to get Bowman into handcuffs. Investigators who reviewed Brown’s video months after the fact determined his use of force was not reasonable or necessary.

Brown did not respond to several messages seeking comment.

Bowman, 46, denied hitting anyone and is not seen on the video being violent with officers. But he still faces a list of charges, including battery of a police officer, resisting an officer and the traffic violation for which he was initially stopped, improper lane usage.

Brown not only failed to report his use of force but mislabeled his footage as a "citizen encounter" in what investigators called "an intentional attempt to hide the video from any administrative review."

Bowman’s defense attorney, Keith Whiddon, said he was initially told there was no body-camera video.

Robert Tew, the district attorney in Monroe, declined to discuss Brown’s case or anything to do with the state police. "We’ll see what the DOJ has to do," he said during a brief interview outside his home.

Bowman himself hadn’t seen the footage until recently, when prosecutors from the U.S. Justice Department showed it to him and his civil attorney.

https://www.foxnews.com/us/white-louisiana-trooper-seen-pummeling-black-man-flashlight-pain-compliance


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Re: Police State - Official Thread
« Reply #5163 on: August 26, 2021, 03:11:43 PM »
ip to comments.

FBI Agent, Army Reserves Col. charged with sex crimes against children
mypanhandle ^ | 08/26/2021
Posted on 8/26/2021, 6:05:46 PM by devane617

An FBI agent who investigated sex crimes against children has been arrested and charged with multiple sex crimes against children across several states, according to the Franklin County Sheriff’s Office.

Deputies said Supervisory Special Agent David Harris was tasked with investigating crimes against children, including child pornography. But in February of this year, he was accused of exposing himself to a 14-year-old girl in a “lewd and lascivious manner,” while on vacation in St. George Island

The investigation began in Franklin County but because of Harris’ role in the FBI, his status as a colonel in the U.S. Army Reserves, and the locations of the witnesses, victim(s), and suspect the Department of Justice and the Office of Inspector General joined the case.

“In the course of this investigation, evidence was obtained that led to other felony crimes committed by Harris of a sexual nature with minors and adults in the States of Louisiana and Texas, five jurisdictions and three states in all,” deputies wrote. “Records were obtained from Harris’ issued government electronic devices finding conversation excerpts from Harris claiming his sexual preference to underage females and admitting to his exploits (including the St George Island incident).”

Harris, 51, is now in jail in Louisiana and “faces a string of criminal charges — including indecency with a child, crimes against nature and sexual battery,” deputies wrote.

Harris was arrested earlier this summer in Ascension Parish and is being held without bond. Harris also has outstanding arrests warrants pending from East Baton Rouge and Orleans Parish. He also has an outstanding arrest warrant out of Tyler, Texas. Investigators said evidence in Texas suggested that crimes go back for several years.

Franklin County deputies added that Harris has been fired by the FBI.

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Re: Police State - Official Thread
« Reply #5164 on: August 26, 2021, 05:58:42 PM »
Once again the FBI somehow gets "unauthorized access" to data they were not allowed to.

Meanwhile the FBI regularly arrests people who are claimed to have gained "unauthorized access" to data.

Palantir glitch allegedly granted some FBI staff unauthorized access to a crypto hacker's data

Peter Thiel's AI company Palantir, whose clients have included the CIA and US immigration agency ICE, is back in the spotlight for all the wrong reasons. A new report claims a glitch in its secretive software program used by the FBI allowed unauthorized personnel to access private data for more than a year. According to The New York Post, the mishap was revealed in a letter by prosecutors in the Manhattan federal court case against accused hacker Virgil Griffith. Palantir denied the claims in a statement and said the fault was caused by the FBI's incorrect use of the software.

Griffith was arrested in 2019 for allegedly providing North Korea with information on how cryptocurrency and blockchain tech could help it to evade US sanctions. The incident in question revolves around the alleged hacker's social media data, obtained through a federal search warrant in March 2020. According to the letter, the Twitter and Facebook information was uploaded to Palantir's program through the default settings, effectively allowing unauthorized FBI employees to access it

Between May 2020 to August 2021, the material was accessed four times by three analysts and an agent. The FBI case agent assigned to Griffith's case was alerted to the issue by a colleague earlier this month, according to the letter. Those who accessed the info reportedly told prosecutors that they did not recall using it in their investigations.

https://ph.news.yahoo.com/palantir-glitch-allegedly-granted-fbi-131557110.html

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Re: Police State - Official Thread
« Reply #5165 on: August 26, 2021, 08:13:47 PM »
The All-Seeing "i": Apple Just Declared War on Your Privacy

By now you've probably heard that Apple plans to push a new and uniquely intrusive surveillance system out to many of the more than one billion iPhones it has sold, which all run the behemoth's proprietary, take-it-or-leave-it software. This new offensive is tentatively slated to begin with the launch of iOS 15⁠—almost certainly in mid-September⁠—with the devices of its US user-base designated as the initial targets. We’re told that other countries will be spared, but not for long.

You might have noticed that I haven’t mentioned which problem it is that Apple is purporting to solve. Why? Because it doesn’t matter.

Having read thousands upon thousands of remarks on this growing scandal, it has become clear to me that many understand it doesn't matter, but few if any have been willing to actually say it. Speaking candidly, if that’s still allowed, that’s the way it always goes when someone of institutional significance launches a campaign to defend an indefensible intrusion into our private spaces. They make a mad dash to the supposed high ground, from which they speak in low, solemn tones about their moral mission before fervently invoking the dread spectre of the Four Horsemen of the Infopocalypse, warning that only a dubious amulet—or suspicious software update—can save us from the most threatening members of our species.

Suddenly, everybody with a principled objection is forced to preface their concern with apologetic throat-clearing and the establishment of bonafides: I lost a friend when the towers came down, however... As a parent, I understand this is a real problem, but...

As a parent, I’m here to tell you that sometimes it doesn’t matter why the man in the handsome suit is doing something. What matters are the consequences.

Apple’s new system, regardless of how anyone tries to justify it, will permanently redefine what belongs to you, and what belongs to them.

How?

The task Apple intends its new surveillance system to perform—preventing their cloud systems from being used to store digital contraband, in this case unlawful images uploaded by their customers—is traditionally performed by searching their systems. While it’s still problematic for anybody to search through a billion people’s private files, the fact that they can only see the files you gave them is a crucial limitation.

Now, however, that’s all set to change. Under the new design, your phone will now perform these searches on Apple’s behalf before your photos have even reached their iCloud servers, and—yada, yada, yada—if enough "forbidden content" is discovered, law-enforcement will be notified.

I intentionally wave away the technical and procedural details of Apple’s system here, some of which are quite clever, because they, like our man in the handsome suit, merely distract from the most pressing fact—the fact that, in just a few weeks, Apple plans to erase the boundary dividing which devices work for you, and which devices work for them.

Why is this so important? Once the precedent has been set that it is fit and proper for even a "pro-privacy" company like Apple to make products that betray their users and owners, Apple itself will lose all control over how that precedent is applied. ​​​​​​As soon as the public first came to learn of the “spyPhone” plan, experts began investigating its technical weaknesses, and the many ways it could be abused, primarily within the parameters of Apple’s design. Although these valiant vulnerability-research efforts have produced compelling evidence that the system is seriously flawed, they also seriously miss the point: Apple gets to decide whether or not their phones will monitor their owners’ infractions for the government, but it's the government that gets to decide what constitutes an infraction... and how to handle it.

For its part, Apple says their system, in its initial, v1.0 design, has a narrow focus: it only scrutinizes photos intended to be uploaded to iCloud (although for 85% of its customers, that means EVERY photo), and it does not scrutinize them beyond a simple comparison against a database of specific examples of previously-identified child sexual abuse material (CSAM).

If you’re an enterprising pedophile with a basement full of CSAM-tainted iPhones, Apple welcomes you to entirely exempt yourself from these scans by simply flipping the “Disable iCloud Photos” switch, a bypass which reveals that this system was never designed to protect children, as they would have you believe, but rather to protect their brand. As long as you keep that material off their servers, and so keep Apple out of the headlines, Apple doesn’t care.

So what happens when, in a few years at the latest, a politician points that out, and—in order to protect the children—bills are passed in the legislature to prohibit this "Disable" bypass, effectively compelling Apple to scan photos that aren’t backed up to iCloud? What happens when a party in India demands they start scanning for memes associated with a separatist movement? What happens when the UK demands they scan for a library of terrorist imagery? How long do we have left before the iPhone in your pocket begins quietly filing reports about encountering “extremist” political material, or about your presence at a "civil disturbance"? Or simply about your iPhone's possession of a video clip that contains, or maybe-or-maybe-not contains, a blurry image of a passer-by who resembles, according to an algorithm, "a person of interest"?

If Apple demonstrates the capability and willingness to continuously, remotely search every phone for evidence of one particular type of crime, these are questions for which they will have no answer. And yet an answer will come—and it will come from the worst lawmakers of the worst governments.

This is not a slippery slope. It’s a cliff.

One particular frustration for me is that I know some people at Apple, and I even like some people at Apple—bright, principled people who should know better. Actually, who do know better. Every security expert in the world is screaming themselves hoarse now, imploring Apple to stop, even those experts who in more normal circumstances reliably argue in favor of censorship. Even some survivors of child exploitation are against it. And yet, as the OG designer Galileo once said, it moves.

Faced with a blistering torrent of global condemnation, Apple has responded not by addressing any concerns or making any changes, or, more sensibly, by just scrapping the plan altogether, but by deploying their man-in-the-handsome-suit software chief, who resembles the well-moisturized villain from a movie about Wall Street, to give quotes to, yes, the Wall Street Journal about how sorry the company is for the "confusion" it has caused, but how the public shouldn't worry: Apple “feels very good about what they’re doing.”

Neither the message nor the messenger was a mistake. Apple dispatched its SVP-for-Software Ken doll to speak with the Journal not to protect the company's users, but to reassure the company's investors. His role was to create the false impression that this is not something that you, or anyone, should be upset about. And, collaterally, his role was to ensure this new "policy" would be associated with the face of an Apple executive other than CEO Tim Cook, just in case the roll-out, or the fall-out, results in a corporate beheading.

Why? Why is Apple risking so much for a CSAM-detection system that has been denounced as “dangerous” and "easily repurposed for surveillance and censorship" by the very computer scientists who've already put it to the test? What could be worth the decisive shattering of the foundational Apple idea that an iPhone belongs to the person who carries it, rather than to the company that made it?

Apple: "Designed in California, Assembled in China, Purchased by You, Owned by Us."

The one answer to these questions that the optimists keep coming back to is the likelihood that Apple is doing this as a prelude to finally switching over to “end-to-end” encryption for everything its customers store on iCloud—something Apple had previously intended to do before backtracking, in a dismaying display of cowardice, after the FBI secretly complained.

For the unfamiliar, what I’m describing here as end-to-end encryption is a somewhat complex concept, but briefly, it means that only the two endpoints sharing a file—say, two phones on opposite sides of the internet—are able to decrypt it. Even if the file were being stored and served from an iCloud server in Cupertino, as far as Apple (or any other middleman-in-a-handsome-suit) is concerned, that file is just an indecipherable blob of random garbage: the file only becomes a text message, a video, a photo, or whatever it is, when it is paired with a key that’s possessed only by you and by those with whom you choose to share it.

This is the goal of end-to-end encryption: drawing a new and ineradicable line in the digital sand dividing your data and their data. It allows you to trust a service provider to store your data without granting them any ability to understand it. This would mean that even Apple itself could no longer be expected to rummage through your iCloud account with its grabby little raccoon hands—and therefore could not be expected to hand it over to any government that can stamp a sheet of paper, which is precisely why the FBI (again: secretly) complained.

For Apple to realize this original vision would have represented a huge improvement in the privacy of our devices, effectively delivering the final word in a thirty year-long debate over establishing a new industry standard—and, by extension, the new global expectation that parties seeking access to data from a device must obtain it from that device, rather than turning the internet and its ecosystem into a spy machine.

Unfortunately, I am here to report that once again, the optimists are wrong: Apple’s proposal to make their phones inform on and betray their owners marks the dawn of a dark future, one to be written in the blood of the political opposition of a hundred countries that will exploit this system to the hilt. See, the day after this system goes live, it will no longer matter whether or not Apple ever enables end-to-end encryption, because our iPhones will be reporting their contents before our keys are even used.

I can’t think of any other company that has so proudly, and so publicly, distributed spyware to its own devices—and I can’t think of a threat more dangerous to a product’s security than the mischief of its own maker. There is no fundamental technological limit to how far the precedent Apple is establishing can be pushed, meaning the only restraint is Apple’s all-too-flexible company policy, something governments understand all too well.

I would say there should be a law, but I fear it would only make things worse.

https://edwardsnowden.substack.com/p/all-seeing-i

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Re: Police State - Official Thread
« Reply #5166 on: August 28, 2021, 04:58:58 PM »
Are the police chief and the city complicit in supporting a convicted murderer in uniform?

Huntsville still paying police officer convicted of murder two months ago

The records show that Darby has been on sick leave since a jury found him guilty two months ago. He is off work under the Family and Medical Leave Act, a federal law requiring employers to allow workers unpaid extended time off for medical or family reasons.

The most recent pay records, from mid-June, show that Darby is paid about $2,162 before taxes every two weeks.

The city also appears to have asked other police officers to donate accrued sick leave while Darby awaits sentencing.

https://www.al.com/news/2021/07/huntsville-still-paying-police-officer-convicted-of-murder-two-months-ago.html

About time.

But notice the disturbing mindset: despite murdering an old man by shooting him in the face with a shotgun, even overriding a senior officer at the scene who was trying to de-escalate, the prosecutors still make excuses saying no one in their office wants to prosecute a cop.

Keep thinking that these thugs care about "justice" or "protecting and serving".


William Ben Darby, Huntsville officer convicted of murder, sentenced to 25 years for shooting Jeff Parker



William Ben Darby, the Huntsville police officer convicted of murder for shooting and killing Jeff Parker, was sentenced today to 25 years in prison.

Court security officers took 28-year-old Darby to the Madison County jail from Circuit Judge Donna Pate’s courtroom after the hearing. Darby is not eligible for an appeal bond, so he will begin serving his sentence immediately.

A Madison County jury on May 7 found Darby guilty of murder for shooting and killing Parker, a 49-year-old man threatening suicide, three years ago.

Robert Tuten, Darby’s defense attorney, said they will appeal the case immediately.

“This is obviously an extremely important case — not only for Ben and his family, not only for the Parker family — but for law enforcement in the state of Alabama,” Tuten said at a press conference after the hearing. “This case is going to have a huge impact on how police officers enforce the law and how they do their jobs.”

Tim Gann, chief deputy district attorney in Madison County, said no one in his office wanted to prosecute a police officer.

“I think that’s the worst thing we face is making that decision,” he said, “because we do understand it’s a dangerous job, we do understand that they’re in harms way.”

https://www.al.com/news/2021/08/william-ben-darby-huntsville-officer-convicted-of-murder-sentenced-to-25-years-for-shooting-jeff-parker.html

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Re: Police State - Official Thread
« Reply #5167 on: September 01, 2021, 02:33:25 PM »
About time.

Notice also: "The report even suggested investigators designed questions to help exonerate the officers involved." That's some "back the blue" shit there.

Police Officers, paramedics indicted on 32 counts in Elijah McClain’s death

Three officers and two paramedics have been indicted on 32 counts by a grand jury in the death of Elijah McClain. The charges come two years after the 23-year-old was placed in a carotid hold by Aurora officers – which deprives oxygen from a person’s brain – and injected with the powerful sedative ketamine by paramedics. McClain died six days after the incident.

A 157-page independent investigation outlined several missteps in the police department’s handling of the internal investigation into what happened. The report even suggested investigators designed questions to help exonerate the officers involved.

Gov. Jared Polis issued an executive order in June 2020, assigning Attorney General Phil Weiser as a special prosecutor to investigate McClain’s death.

The investigations “need to be thorough. They need to inspire public confidence,” Polis said at the time. “I’m confident that the process is in place to do so with a special prosecutor. These are decisions that need to be well done rather than done too quickly.”

Weiser made the announcement on the indictment Wednesday morning. Each of the five defendants face one count of manslaughter and one count of criminally negligent homicide.

The indictment is against Aurora police officers Nathan Woodyard and Randy Roedema, former Aurora police officer Jason Rosenblatt, and Aurora Fire Rescue paramedics Jeremy Cooper and Peter Cichuniec for their alleged conduct on the night of Aug. 24, 2019 that resulted in the death of McClain.

Weiser said officers Rodema and Rosenblatt also face a count of second-degree assault with the intent to cause bodily injury and caused serious bodily injury to McClain. Both also face one count of a crime of violence.

In addition to the manslaughter and criminally negligent homicide charges, paramedics Cooper and Cichuniec also face one count of second-degree assault with intent to cause bodily injury and caused bodily injury. As well as one count of second-degree assault for recklessly causing serious injury by means of a deadly weapon– ketamine.

The paramedics also face one count of second-degree assault for a purpose other than medical or therapeutic treatment intentionally causing stupor unconsciousness or other physical or mental impairment or injury to McClain by administering ketamine without consent.

https://kdvr.com/news/local/colorado-ag-to-make-announcement-wednesday-on-elijah-mcclain-grand-jury-investigation/

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Re: Police State - Official Thread
« Reply #5168 on: September 02, 2021, 12:35:54 PM »
Another case of the biggest organized crime syndicate in the US.

A former Marine was pulled over for following a truck too closely. Police took nearly $87,000 of his cash

The Nevada trooper first told Stephen Lara the highway patrol was educating drivers “about violations they may not realize they’re committing,” and that he’d been pulled over for following a tanker truck too closely. Eventually the trooper admitted having an ulterior purpose: stopping the smuggling of illegal drugs, weapons and currency as they crossed the state.

Lara — a former Marine who says he was on his way to visit his daughters in Northern California — insisted he was doing none of those things, though he readily admitted he had “a lot” of cash in his car. As he stood on the side of the road, police searched the vehicle, pulling nearly $87,000 in a zip-top bag from Lara’s trunk and insisting a drug-sniffing dog had detected something on the cash.

Police found no drugs, and Lara, 39, was charged with no crime. But police left with his money, calling a Drug Enforcement Administration agent to coordinate an “adoption,” which allows federal authorities to seize cash or property they suspect is connected to criminal activity without levying criminal charges.

“I left there confused. I left there angry,” Lara said in an interview with The Washington Post. “And I could not believe that I had just been literally robbed on the side of the road by people with badges and guns.”

It was only after Lara got a lawyer, sued and talked with The Washington Post about his ordeal that the government said it would return his money.

Asked for comment on this story Tuesday, spokespeople for the Justice Department, DEA and Nevada Highway Patrol all declined. But Wednesday, after this story first published online, DEA spokeswoman Anne Edgecomb said the agency had made a decision to return Lara’s money and Justice Department spokesman Joshua Stueve said the government “is reviewing existing policy on adoptive forfeitures.”

https://www.washingtonpost.com/national-security/stephen-lara-nevada-asset-forfeiture-adoption/2021/09/01/6f170932-06ae-11ec-8c3f-3526f81b233b_story.html



In case you are wondering about who advocated for and supported this sort of government-run crime spree: current President, Joseph Robinette Biden Jr.

S.948 - Comprehensive Forfeiture Act of 1984
Sponsor: Sen. Biden, Joseph R., Jr. [D-DE] (Introduced 03/24/1983)

https://www.congress.gov/bill/98th-congress/senate-bill/948

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Re: Police State - Official Thread
« Reply #5169 on: September 03, 2021, 02:03:59 PM »
Australia debuts 'Orwellian' new app using facial recognition, geolocation to enforce quarantine

The government of South Australia, one of the country's six states, has implemented a new policy requiring Australians to use an app with facial recognition software and geolocation to prove that they are abiding by a 14-day quarantine for travel within the country.

While a conservative expert described the policy as "Orwellian," he told Fox News that it represents an improvement over the current COVID-19 policy. Australians voluntarily choose the quarantine app over alternative quarantine measures.

Australia has banned international travel, unless residents have a permit to leave the country. The country has also severely restricted domestic travel. Residents must spend 14 days in quarantine upon return.

Steven Marshall, premier of the state of South Australia, launched the quarantine app policy in late August. Residents returning from New South Wales and Victoria, two other Australian states, may spend their 14 days in post-travel quarantine at home, rather than in a hotel, so long as they download and use the "Orwellian" app, developed by the South Australian government, ABC News Australia reported.

The app uses geolocation and facial recognition software to track those in quarantine. The app will contact people at random, asking them to provide proof of their location within 15 minutes.

https://www.foxnews.com/world/australia-debuts-new-orwellian-app-using-facial-recognition-geolocation-to-enforce-quarantine


Well surely something like that could never happen in the "land of the free"....

Federal Use of Facial Recognition Technology Expanding: GAO Report

A recent Government Accountability Office (GAO) survey shows that at least 10 federal agencies have plans to expand their use of facial recognition technology over the next two years—a prospect that alarms privacy advocates who worry about a lack of oversight.

The GAO released the results of a survey of 24 federal agencies, finding that 18 of them use facial recognition technology. Fourteen of those agencies use the tech for routine activity, such as unlocking agency-issued smartphones, while six reported using facial recognition software for criminal investigations and five others use the technology for surveillance, the Aug. 24 report found.

“For example, [U.S. Department of Health and Human Services] reported that it used an FRT system (AnyVision) to monitor its facilities by searching live camera feeds in real-time for individuals on watchlists or suspected of criminal activity, which reduces the need for security guards to memorize these individuals’ faces,” the GAO said. “This system automatically alerts personnel when an individual on a watchlist is present.”

According to the GAO, at least 10 government agencies plan to expand their use of facial recognition technology through 2023. To do so, many agencies are turning to the private sector.

For example, “[the] U.S. Air Force Office of Special Investigations reported it began an operational pilot using Clearview AI in June 2020, which supports the agency’s counterterrorism, counterintelligence, and criminal investigations,” the GAO said.

“The agency reported it already collects facial images with mobile devices to search national databases and plans to enhance searches by accessing Clearview AI’s large repository of facial images from open sources to search for matches.”

The GAO’s Aug. 24 report follows June research that focused specifically on law enforcement’s use of facial recognition technology. The GAO’s June report revealed the vast troves of data held by federal law enforcement, including 836 million images held by the Department of Homeland Security alone.

The June report also revealed the lack of oversight regarding facial recognition technology. According to the report, 13 of the 20 federal law enforcement agencies that use the technology didn’t know what systems they use.

“For example, when we requested information from one of the agencies about its use of non-federal systems, agency officials told us they had to poll field division personnel because the information was not maintained by the agency,” the report said.

“These agency officials also told us that the field division personnel had to work from their memory about their past use of non-federal systems and that they could not ensure we were provided comprehensive information about the agency’s use of non-federal systems.”

The lack of oversight of the government’s use of surveillance technology is an issue that has drawn the attention of lawmakers from both sides of the aisle. Democrats have largely focused on the racial disparities in the accuracy of facial recognition, while some Republicans have expressed concerns about domestic surveillance.

Michigan resident Robert Williams, a black man who was wrongly arrested in January after Detroit police incorrectly identified him as a felon based on shoddy facial recognition technology, testified about such problems at a U.S. House Judiciary Committee hearing.

https://www.theepochtimes.com/federal-use-of-facial-recognition-technology-expanding-gao-report_3970284.html

https://www.gao.gov/assets/gao-21-518.pdf

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Re: Police State - Official Thread
« Reply #5170 on: September 04, 2021, 11:43:23 AM »
The FBI employed pedophiles to investigate other pedophiles? Not uncommon for pedophiles and child abusers to work in law enforcement and other positions of authority to facilitate their vileness.


FBI agent who investigated sex crimes against children is charged for sex crimes against children



An FBI agent assigned to investigate crimes against children was arrested for alleged sex crimes across three states that included minors.

David Harris, 51, of Prairieville, Louisiana, was arrested earlier this summer on sexual assault and related charges involving a number of victims dating back to 2016, according to the Franklin County Sheriff's Office and media reports.

He is facing additional charges involving a girl he victimized while he was vacationing on St. George Island, Florida.

Harris, who worked as a supervisory special agent with the FBI, was fired during the course of multiple investigations involving victims in Louisiana, Texas and Florida.

On Thursday, Franklin County Sheriff A.J. "Tony" Smith  announced that an arrest warrant was issued for Harris' arrest over allegations reported to the Sheriff's Office in February.

"Records were obtained from Harris' issued government electronic devices finding conversation excerpts from Harris claiming his sexual preference to underage females and admitting to his exploits (including the St. George Island incident)," the Sheriff's Office said.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2021/08/31/fbi-agent-charged-sex-crimes-against-children-florida/5663692001/

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Re: Police State - Official Thread
« Reply #5171 on: September 08, 2021, 12:26:30 PM »
The whistleblower cop who revealed the abuse was arrested and faces up to 20 years in prison. This department should be treated like any other criminal organization.

Illinois attorney general will investigate department that retaliated against police whistleblower

State Attorney General Kwame Raoul announced Wednesday that his office launched a sweeping investigation into possible systemic civil rights violations by the Joliet Police Department, where a video leaked by a whistleblower last year showed officers slapped a man, restricted his breathing and demeaned him as he was dying of a drug overdose.

Raoul's announcement came 20 months after the death of 37-year-old Eric Lurry, and a day after USA TODAY published an investigation detailing how law enforcement officials  kept information about the case under wraps for months and retaliated against the veteran officer who exposed the video.

Raoul said his office will conduct a civil patterns and practices investigation into Joliet police but it won't make any specific findings about Lurry's death or about the alleged retaliation against Sgt. Javier Esqueda, who was arrested on official misconduct charges for leaking video of Lurry's death in custody to a television reporter. Esqueda could face a maximum 20 years in prison.

Raoul's investigation into Joliet marks the first time such an investigation has happened on the state level. Lawmakers in Illinois empowered Raoul's office to pursue these kinds of probes as part of a larger police reform bill enacted in July.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/investigations/2021/09/08/illinois-attorney-general-to-investigate-joliet-police-civil-rights-violations/5714588001/

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Re: Police State - Official Thread
« Reply #5172 on: September 09, 2021, 07:40:23 AM »
The ruiner in chief.


" According to CNN, the Biden Admin will no longer allow workers to get tested weekly instead of taking the vaccine. Instead, he's signing an executive order Thursday requiring all workers to get the vaccine or face indefinite suspension.

What's more, Biden's order will extend to employees of government contractors. "




https://www.zerohedge.com/political/biden-eliminates-testing-opt-out-requiring-all-public-workers-and-contractors-get

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Re: Police State - Official Thread
« Reply #5173 on: September 09, 2021, 04:15:14 PM »
Big Brother is watching.


Fury as Biden tries to let IRS snoop on your bank accounts, Venmo, PayPal and crypto deals in plan that could 'violate the Fourth Amendment'

One key prong of President Biden's plan to bankroll Democrats' $3.5 trillion budget plan is to monitor every inflow and outflow of an individual's bank account.

The Biden administration says such surveillance would target audits and prevent tax evasion, but some are concerned that it might run up against the Fourth Amendment and those who can't afford to fight tax audits or move their money into offshore accounts. 

The proposal would require banks to report to the IRS every deposit and withdrawal from an account, including transactions from Venmo, PayPal, crypto exchanges and the like in an effort to fight tax evasion. The IRS would know how much money is in an individual's bank account in a given year, whether the individual earned income on that account and exactly how much was going in an and out.

Biden, Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen, IRS chief Charles Rettig and a number of Democrats in the Senate, most especially Elizabeth Warren, are pushing for the deep dive into individual financial transactions as part of an $80 billion plan to enforce tax compliance.

Patrick Hedger, vice president of policy at the Taxpayers' Protection Alliance, warned that such a proposal could violate the Fourth Amendment, which protects citizens from search and seizure without probably cause.

'The IRS is first and foremost, a law enforcement agency, and the Fourth Amendment protects against unreasonable searches and seizures in pursuit of, of looking for wrongdoing and criminal actions, so I think this is going to run into severe Fourth Amendment headwinds,' Hedger told DailyMail.com.

Other parts of the plan include setting up a global minimum corporate tax rate  of 15% and a system that prevents multinational companies from registering profits in the lowest-tax jurisdictions and raising taxes on the rich.

A Treasury Department report from May claimed that the tax gap totaled nearly $600 billion in 2019 and would rise to $700 trillion over the next decade if left unchecked, roughly 15% of taxes owed.   

The IRS estimates that compliance on taxes due on wages is 99% while compliance on 'less visible' sources of income is only 45%.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9973671/Bidens-plan-let-IRS-SNOOP-bank-accounts.html

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Re: Police State - Official Thread
« Reply #5174 on: September 09, 2021, 04:17:05 PM »
The ruiner in chief.


" According to CNN, the Biden Admin will no longer allow workers to get tested weekly instead of taking the vaccine. Instead, he's signing an executive order Thursday requiring all workers to get the vaccine or face indefinite suspension.

What's more, Biden's order will extend to employees of government contractors. "




https://www.zerohedge.com/political/biden-eliminates-testing-opt-out-requiring-all-public-workers-and-contractors-get

Same Biden, same (?) handlers, different day. Biden in December 2020 on mandatory vaccines:

"I don't think it should be mandatory, I wouldn't demand it be mandatory. But I would do everything in my power – just like I don't think masks have to be made mandatory nationwide – I'll do everything in my power as president of the United States to encourage people to do the right thing and when they do it demonstrate that it matters,"