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Author Topic: Prayer and Religion in Public Life  (Read 273304 times)
garebear
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« Reply #200 on: December 11, 2011, 05:27:34 PM »

LOL learn how to disprove a point, does the white supremacists being wrong make another group wrong?


moron...
Try to make some sense, even just once in a while. You know, to surprise us.
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« Reply #201 on: December 11, 2011, 05:47:38 PM »

Try to make some sense, even just once in a while. You know, to surprise us.
says the man who is gay yet subscribes to evolution...

tons of sense in that Wink
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Hugo Chavez
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« Reply #202 on: December 11, 2011, 06:02:14 PM »

says the man who is gay yet subscribes to evolution...

tons of sense in that Wink
I missed the joke, let me in on it lol...  by the way, grats on the win today.  nice!!!
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« Reply #203 on: December 11, 2011, 06:12:47 PM »

I missed the joke, let me in on it lol...  by the way, grats on the win today.  nice!!!
To you too sir...Im still not buying into the hype but the man plays with alot of passion and it is fun to watch.

I think more than anything he brings the level of play of those around him up which is they sign of a good leader.

what do you think the meaning of life is to a person who is non religious and believes in evolution?

Well its pretty simple when you think about it, The idea behind evolution itself is to propagate your species, to ensure the continued existence through procreation. As there is no religious aspect to their thinking there isnt anything outside of that natural law that isnt a man made ideal.

Homosexuality is an evolutionary dead end as it doesnt serve the purpose of continuing the existence of our species.

There is clearly a contradiction in belief and action here which is lacking in common sense.
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« Reply #204 on: December 11, 2011, 07:04:45 PM »

your liberalism does have limits, I am impressed sir

once again, good job calling me sir

my "liberalism" exists solely in your head

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Soul Crusher
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« Reply #205 on: December 11, 2011, 07:28:33 PM »

once again, good job calling me sir

my "liberalism" exists solely in your head



Your liberalism fits perfect in the ex USSR. 
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« Reply #206 on: December 11, 2011, 08:02:35 PM »

Your liberalism fits perfect in the ex USSR. 

yeah, that makes a lot of sense
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« Reply #207 on: December 11, 2011, 10:46:01 PM »

To you too sir...Im still not buying into the hype but the man plays with alot of passion and it is fun to watch.

I think more than anything he brings the level of play of those around him up which is they sign of a good leader.

what do you think the meaning of life is to a person who is non religious and believes in evolution?

Well its pretty simple when you think about it, The idea behind evolution itself is to propagate your species, to ensure the continued existence through procreation. As there is no religious aspect to their thinking there isnt anything outside of that natural law that isnt a man made ideal.

Homosexuality is an evolutionary dead end as it doesnt serve the purpose of continuing the existence of our species.

There is clearly a contradiction in belief and action here which is lacking in common sense.
What if it's just nature's way of natural selection?
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« Reply #208 on: December 12, 2011, 04:54:06 AM »

The entire Nebraska and Penn State football teams disagree with you.   Smiley

Have been alerted to the benefits that have occurred from these footballers pray session?

Wasn't Palin's answer to the oil spill crisis to pray for Divine Intervention to come and remove the oil from the ocean?  How'd that turn out?
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« Reply #209 on: December 12, 2011, 10:32:49 AM »

What if it's just nature's way of natural selection?
It undoubtedly is sir, but the drive to procreate is the essence of life especially for a non religious subscriber of evolution.

Homosexuality is partly a genetic abnormality and partially choice. Just like having a propensity for violence is partially genetic and choice to let that predisposition have its way.

A person who believes in evolution and is non religious that chooses to allow their homosexual predisposition from procreating isn't fullfilling the main purpose of their life
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« Reply #210 on: December 12, 2011, 01:30:42 PM »

At one point the vast majority of the country were absolute white supremacists. Were they correct in their racism since they formed a majority?

Learn to think independently, child.

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« Reply #211 on: December 12, 2011, 01:32:02 PM »

Have been alerted to the benefits that have occurred from these footballers pray session?

Wasn't Palin's answer to the oil spill crisis to pray for Divine Intervention to come and remove the oil from the ocean?  How'd that turn out?

Don't understand your first question. 

I doubt the accuracy of your second question. 
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« Reply #212 on: December 12, 2011, 03:21:02 PM »

haha and that's why we have child molestation because instead of doing something about it, people like you would rather 'pray' about it.  great solution.  How's that working out for ya?  Roll Eyes


Yeah, we have child molestation because people saying prayers.  Roll Eyes

I think it's natural to want to think that people posting about politics are a little more learned and informed than a lot of others.  But, with your level of education and logic, it shoots that idea right down...doh!
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« Reply #213 on: December 15, 2011, 09:56:39 AM »

Why can't these people just enjoy the most wonderful time of the year?  How miserable are their lives?   Roll Eyes

Atheist Group Seeks Banner to Join Christmas Display
Published December 10, 2011
Associated Press

ATHENS, Texas –  A national atheist foundation plans to seek permission to hoist its own banner to join secular and religious Christmas displays on an East Texas courthouse square.

The display surrounding the Henderson County Courthouse in Athens includes a traditional Nativity scene, as well as multiple Santa Clauses, elves, wreathes, garland, trumpeters, dwarfs, snowmen, reindeer and Christmas trees, the Athens Daily Review reported.

"We've got an array of decorations and feel that we are in compliance with federal law," County Judge Richard Sanders told the newspaper. "We're not pushing any religious down anybody's throat. These are holiday decorations we enjoy."

However, county officials received a letter Monday from the Madison, Wis.-based Freedom From Religion Foundation, which argued the seasonal display on courthouse grounds amounts to an unconstitutional endorsement of the Christian faith.

Foundation attorney Stephanie Schmitt says that since the county allows the nonprofit group Keep Athens Beautiful to erect the displays on the town square, they amount to a "public forum." Schmitt told the newspaper the group would ask to put up its own display.

Schmitt said the foundation had received 20 to 25 complaints this holiday season of religious displays it regards as illegal.

In Elmwood City, Pa., the foundation has proposed hoisting a banner that reads: "At this season of the Winter Solstice, LET REASON PREVAIL. There are no gods, no devils, no angels, no heaven or hell. There is only our natural world. Religion is but myth and superstition that hardens hearts and enslaves minds."

Meanwhile, Henderson County Sheriff Ray Nutt said his office received a report Thursday that someone had defaced some of the figures in the display, but the markings were later removed.

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2011/12/10/atheist-group-seeks-banner-to-join-christmas-display/

Pathetic.

Atheist Messages Displace California Park Nativity Scenes
Published December 13, 2011
Associated Press

AP/Ringo H.W. Chiu

A woman walks past a sign displaying an Atheist message along Ocean Avenue at Palisades Park in Santa Monica, Calif. Tuesday, Dec. 13, 2011.

SANTA MONICA, Calif. –  Atheist messages have displaced most of the Christmas nativity scenes that local churches had placed in a California park for nearly six decades, and the churches say it was a coordinated attack.

Local churches have traditionally claimed 14 of the 21 display spaces to illustrate the story of the birth of Jesus Christ.

But atheists got all but three of the spaces this year because of a new lottery system.

"Our belief is that these new applicants have been working together to displace and push out the nativity scenes from the park, rather than erecting a full display of their own," said Hunter Jameson, a spokesman for a coalition of the city's churches.

The Santa Monica Daily Press reported that churches had little or no competition for the spaces during the past 57 years. This year, 13 people bid for spaces, prompting City Hall to use a random lottery system to allot the spots.

Two individuals got 18 spaces. One person can request a maximum of nine.

Damon Vix is behind the effort.

Last year, he put up a sign quoting Thomas Jefferson: "Religions are all alike -- founded on fables and mythologies." There were also selections on U.S. Supreme Court decisions about the importance of separating church and state.

Vix now helps other atheists populate the park spaces, including American Atheists Inc. and the Freedom From Religion Foundation.

Secularists feel a need to be more vocal and express their civil rights, he said.

"For 60 years, it's almost exclusively been the point of view of Christians putting up nativity scenes for a whole city block," Vix said.

Jameson pushed the city to give "local preference" in awarding the spaces, since Dix doesn't live in Santa Monica.

City Attorney Marsha Moutrie wrote, however, that the Christmas displays cross the boundary into First Amendment free speech rights, which know no geographical boundaries.

"Everyone has equal rights to use the streets and parks for expressive activities, irrespective of residency," Moutrie wrote.

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2011/12/13/atheist-messages-displace-california-park-nativity-scenes/?test=latestnews
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« Reply #214 on: December 15, 2011, 09:58:57 AM »

Busy season for paranoid anti-religious extremists. 

The plaintiffs ask for the homeland security law to be stripped of its references to God. They also ask for monetary damages, claiming to have suffered sleeping disorders and "mental pain and anguish."

"Plaintiffs also suffer anxiety from the belief that the existence of these unconstitutional laws suggest that their very safety as residents of Kentucky may be in the hands of fanatics, traitors or fools," according to the suit.


Bwahahahahahaha! 

Atheists sue to take God out of state's terrorism law
By John Cheves — jcheves@herald-leader.com
Posted: 12:00am on Dec 2, 2008; Modified: 9:46am on Dec 2, 2008

An atheists-rights group is suing the Kentucky Office of Homeland Security because state law requires the agency to stress "dependence on Almighty God as being vital to the security of the Commonwealth."

American Atheists of Parsippany, N.J., and 10 non-religious Kentuckians are the plaintiffs in the lawsuit, set to be filed Tuesday in Franklin Circuit Court.

Edwin Kagin, a Boone County lawyer and the national legal director of American Atheists, said he was appalled to read in the Herald-Leader last week that state law establishes praising God — and installing a plaque in God's honor — as the first duty of the Homeland Security Office.

The state and federal constitutions both prohibit government from getting involved in religion, Kagin said Monday.

"This is one of the most outrageous things I've seen in 35 years of practicing law. It's breathtakingly unconstitutional," Kagin said.

Gov. Steve Beshear's office had not seen the suit and therefore had no comment, spokesman Jay Blanton said.

The requirement to credit God for Kentucky's protection was tucked into 2006 homeland security legislation by state Rep. Tom Riner, D-Louisville, a Southern Baptist minister.

"This is recognition that government alone cannot guarantee the perfect safety of the people of Kentucky," Riner said last week.

Riner said he expects Homeland Security to include language recognizing God's benevolent protection in its official reports and other materials — sometimes the agency does, and sometimes it doesn't — and to maintain a plaque with that message at the state's Emergency Operations Center in Frankfort.

In the suit, American Atheists argues that Homeland Security should focus on public-safety threats rather than promote religion. The suit notes that the federal and state homeland security agencies were created as a result of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks by Muslim fundamentalists, and it refers to those attacks as "a faith-based initiative."

The plaintiffs ask for the homeland security law to be stripped of its references to God. They also ask for monetary damages, claiming to have suffered sleeping disorders and "mental pain and anguish."

"Plaintiffs also suffer anxiety from the belief that the existence of these unconstitutional laws suggest that their very safety as residents of Kentucky may be in the hands of fanatics, traitors or fools," according to the suit.


http://www.kentucky.com/2008/12/02/612255/atheists-sue-to-take-god-out-of.html
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« Reply #215 on: December 15, 2011, 10:04:11 AM »

School Vows to Fight For Nativity
Dec 15, 2011
By Todd Starnes/TWITTER

The superintendent of a public school district in Arkansas said it’s time for Christians to take a stand and that’s why he’s decided to reinstate a Nativity scene – in spite of possible legal action.

“Enough is enough,” said Jerry Noble, superintendent of the Green County Tech school district. “It’s His birthday. We celebrate Jesus’ birthday. One person should not be offended by that. We don’t leave it up all year. We’re not promoting religion. It’s not an effort to convert anybody.”

Noble told Fox News & Commentary the controversy surrounds a Nativity scene on a bulletin board at Green County Tech Primary School. The bulletin board also included the words, “Happy Birthday, Jesus.”

Noble said they had received some complaints about the decorations and after consulting with an attorney, he decided to remove the Nativity.

“My personal belief is that we should fight this sort of thing, but I didn’t want to put the school district at risk,” he said. “I could not take it upon myself to get the school in a legal entanglement over separation of church and state because we would have to use tax dollars to fight it and that’s not my job to do that.”


Nativity Bulletin Board - photo by KUAR

But his decision sparked a massive outcry in the community – and one organization offered to cover any legal costs the school system might incur over a lawsuit. That offer helped change the superintendent’s mind.

“To be honest with you, we offended a lot more people by taking it down than leaving it up,” Noble said. “So we put it back up.”

Noble, who is a Christian, said he doesn’t understand why anyone would be offended by the Nativity.

“Personally, I’m a Christian and if I’m going to offend somebody, I’d rather offend the non-believer – if it’s legal to do so,” he said.

The American Civil Liberties Union of Arkansas said told radio station KUAR that the school district must obey the Constitution.

“To say that if you have to offend somebody you’d rather offend those in the minority, well that’s just what the Constitution and the First Amendment are all about – not offending the minority, standing up for everybody’s right to practice their religion whether there is one person in your town or a thousand,” ACLU Director Rita Sklar told KUAR. “That the superintendent and perhaps others don’t have respect for that, I think is very sad.”

The Nativity scene was erected by Kay Williams, a counselor at the primary school. She’s been doing it for more than 20 years without any hint of controversy.

“We do live in the Bible Belt,” Williams told the Paragould Daily Press. “One thing that really disturbed most of [the supporters] was we hear about things like this all the time in other parts of the country. But, this is kind of a first for the Bible Belt, here in Arkansas.”

That, Williams told the newspaper, is why they decided to take a stand.

“I think the people realized [this issue] is here and we better take a stand,” she told the newspaper.

Noble said the community support and the offer for free legal services led to his decision to allow the Nativity back into the primary school.

“The Christians in America have been silent for too long,” Noble said. “That’s why I struggled with it in the beginning.”

http://radio.foxnews.com/toddstarnes/top-stories/school-vows-to-fight-for-nativity.html
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« Reply #216 on: December 15, 2011, 04:00:00 PM »

I cant believe these ppl dont have anything better to do with their free time.
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« Reply #217 on: December 15, 2011, 05:28:09 PM »

I cant believe these ppl dont have anything better to do with their free time.

Tell me about.  Especially during the holiday season.  Here is another one:

Atty: ‘Silent Night’ is Unconstitutional
Dec 15, 2011
By Todd Starnes/TWITTER


A group of five, six and seven-year old children will be able to sing ‘Silent Night’ in their Christmas program after Alabama school officials decided to ignore a complaint filed by a group that called the song “unconstitutional.”

The news came as a relief to students and teachers at G.W. Trenholm Primary School in Tuscumbia, AL after they found themselves thrust into the war on Christmas.

“We’ve always sung ‘Silent Night’ and we’ve never had a problem,” Principal Janice Jackson told Fox News & Commentary. “We were just surprised, very surprised.”

Jackson said she received a letter from Americans United for the Separation of Church and State asking them to drop the song from their annual Christmas pageant.

“As a Christian minister, I love the hymn ‘Silent Night, Holy Night,’ but it’s not appropriate in this circumstance,” said Barry Lynn, executive director of Americans United in a statement to Fox News & Commentary. “This play takes place at a public elementary school and involves very young children.”

Lynn noted that the song “celebrates the birth of Christ as the savior, and not all families believe that.”

“Those who do are free to teach it at home or at church,” Lynn said. “Public schools are not the proper places for religious indoctrination.”

The play, called ‘The Reindeer Rebellion’ is a secular production involving Santa’s reindeer going on strike, Lynn said. He accused a teacher of choosing to “graft this Christian hymn onto the play.”

“We were so surprised because we are such a small school and we’re a small community. We can’t believe we were singled out for this,” Jackson said. “I thought it was a joke but the more I checked into it, I immediately called my superintendent.”

David Cortman, senior counsel for the Alliance Defense Fund, told Fox News & Commentary they plan on offering legal services to the school district free of charge in the event someone tries to file a lawsuit.

“Groups on the left such as Americans United have been trying to bully schools across the country all during this Christmas season, Cortman said. “When they tell schools it is unconstitutional to include a song such as ‘Silent Night’ in their Christmas program, they are simply wrong not only as a matter of law but also as a matter of fairness.”

He praised the school system for standing up to Americans United instead of caving in to their demands.

“I think it’s about time that not only Americans but schools specifically stand up to these Grinches who go on this Christmas attack every year yet deny there is any war on Christmas,” Cortman said.

Jackson said the children in grades K-2 didn’t understand the controversy.

“They just love to sing and they were even going to perform sign language with the song,” she said.

The community outcry, though, has been tremendous.

“I think it’s sad,” parent Amy Johnson told television station WHNT in Huntsville. “I don’t think this is the place to make your point politically or religiously. Christmas is about Jesus and that’s what the song is about.”

After consulting with their attorney, the school system decided to allow the students to perform the traditional Christmas carol.

“These children are just five six and seven years old,” Jackson said. “I guess we’re living in that kind of a world.”

She said she is relieved that the boys and girls will be able to sing and sign their song next week at the Christmas program. Had the song been cancelled, Jackson said she worried about how they would have told the children.

http://radio.foxnews.com/toddstarnes/top-stories/school-refuses-to-censor-%E2%80%9Csilent-night%E2%80%9D.html
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« Reply #218 on: January 02, 2012, 11:47:49 AM »

Conversations with God?  Imagine that.   Smiley

Gingrich: I Pray Before Major Decisions
Sunday, 01 Jan 2012

ATLANTIC, Iowa—Newt Gingrich spoke about his Catholic faith at several campaign stops, a nod to the Christian evangelical support he is likely to need to succeed in caucuses scheduled here Tuesday.

“I pray before virtually every speech and virtually every major decision,” Gingrich said.

Gingrich has been a Catholic for a few years, having converted after marrying his wife, Callista, whom he credits for his faith.

“Callista is a cradle Catholic and grew up in the Catholic church, I’m a convert. But all I can tell you is I find taking communion an enormously rewarding and deepening experience,” Gingrich said.

Gingrich changed religious denominations several times and his personal life, including his three marriages, has been played out in public. He has said several times he has sought forgiveness in his faith.

“I’ve been very clear publicly I’m not a perfect human being and I’ve made mistakes in my life and I’ve had to apologize to God and to seek reconciliation,” Gingrich said.

http://www.newsmax.com/InsideCover/gingrich-prays-catholic-faith/2012/01/01/id/422728
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« Reply #219 on: February 04, 2012, 12:16:43 PM »

Politicizing the National Prayer Breakfast?  Shocking.   Roll Eyes

Obama reflects on faith in prayer breakfast speech
By Eric Marrapodi, CNN Belief Blog Co-Editor

Washington (CNN) - President Barack Obama spoke of his personal faith Thursday as he delivered remarks for the third year in a row at the National Prayer Breakfast.

In addition, Obama used the platform in front of religious dignitaries and politicians to express his vision of how faith and government intersect and can work together.

After his remarks, the president received a standing ovation from the crowd at the Washington Hilton, the White House pool reporter said. Journalists are barred from attending the breakfast with the exception of the White House pool, which follows the president. CNN requested and was denied access to the event.

The breakfast has hosted every president since Eisenhower.

Obama, who, as one administration official said, identifies as a "committed Christian who spends a lot of time working on his Christian walk," noted in the speech that he prays daily.

"I wake up each morning and I say a brief prayer, and I spend a little time in scripture and devotion," he said.

Since he has been in Washington, Obama has not formally joined a church. For nearly 20 years he was a member of Trinity United Church of Christ in Chicago. The president and his staff have noted the logistical difficulties of a sitting president attending services, but he has visited several churches in Washington and worshiped privately with his family at Camp David.

The president also spoke of praying with Billy Graham, and said, "I have fallen on my knees with great regularity since that moment."

In his speech Obama made specific mention of his calls, visits and prayers with Joel Hunter, a megachurch pastor from Florida, and with Bishop T.D. Jakes, a megachurch pastor from Texas.

"From time to time, friends of mine, some of who are here today, friends like Joel Hunter or T.D. Jakes, will come by the Oval Office or they'll call on the phone or they'll send me an e-mail, and we'll pray together, and they'll pray for me and my family, and for our country," he said.

Hunter, who was at the breakfast, said Obama hit the right notes with the crowd.

"The president made a positive and practical application of Jesus' command to love our neighbors," Hunter said. "He connected that moral mandate to the economic and political issues we face, and he let us know that, for him, that common good compassion is an extension of his personal Christian faith."

Jakes was not at the breakfast but, when reached by phone, said he had read a transcript of the speech.

"Anytime we can have an open dialogue about faith on the highest level it is a very good thing," he said.

Jakes said he had "the privilege to pray" with the past three U.S. presidents, and noted of his time praying with Obama, "It's no different from any other president. My plan was to provide prayerful support regardless of his policies, some of which I agree with and some of which I don't."

An administration official speaking on background said Obama viewed the speech as chance to explain his personal faith practices and to show "his desire to step in the gap for those who are vulnerable."

The president also highlighted faith efforts that are particularly of importance to young evangelicals, a voting block he courted heavily in 2008. The Passion Conference, a massive gathering of young Christians that this year took aim at human trafficking, got a nod from the podium, as did other groups with targeted antipoverty efforts.

CNN Money – Obama: Jesus would back my tax-the-rich policy

Others in the room recounted the ease with which the president presented his case for the integration of his faith and policy.

"Each time that I have listened to the president reflect on his Christian faith, I'm struck by the quiet poignancy of his words as he speaks from the heart," said Stephen Schneck, a professor from Catholic University who has advised the administration in the past.

"This morning we all felt this. Most moving for me was the way he spoke of his concern for the poor and marginalized and the personal responsibility he felt to serve these 'least among us,' a responsibility that the president grounded in his daily prayer life," Schneck told CNN. But he added, "Of course, that doesn't change that he made a serious mistake with the HHS mandate."

Is Obama losing the Catholic vote?

The administration was still doing damage control over a U.S. Department of Health and Human Services policy that forces religious schools and institutions that offer employee health insurance to cover FDA-approved contraceptives. The move has angered many Catholics in particular, who oppose the use of contraceptives on religious grounds, and view the policy as an intrusion on their religious liberty.

Hunter, who has been a strong vocal supporter of the president, noted that while there was no rancor in the room about the HHS decision, "there is real disappointment with that decision."

Obama did not directly address the issue in his speech but did allude to it when describing his guiding principles on coming to tough policy decisions.

"We know that part of living in a pluralistic society means that our personal religious beliefs alone can't dictate our response to every challenge we face," he said. He added later, "Our goal should not be to declare our policies as biblical. It is God who is infallible, not us. Michelle reminds me of this often."

White House stands firm on contraception policy

Not long after the president's speech, the White House sent a fact sheet to reporters from Cecilia Munoz, director of the White House Domestic Policy Council. It laid out a point-by-point articulation of the HHS policy, making specific mention that churches will be exempt from the policy and noting Catholic opposition by highlighting the work they have done together.

"The administration has provided substantial resources to Catholic organizations over the past three years, in addition to numerous non-financial partnerships to promote healthy communities and serve the common good," the statement from Munoz reads. "This work includes partnerships with Catholic social service agencies on local responsible fatherhood programs and international anti-hunger/food assistance programs. We look forward to continuing this important work."

Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Alabama, also spoke at the prayer breakfast about the complexity of the balance between religion and governing.

"I think we all had two different experiences of what can happen when we bring faith into the world of government and business," he said. "Sometimes it creates conflict, and when we look at our planet's history, even wars. But in other times - more often, really - true faith can be a reconciling force of amazing power, a power that can make an entire society better."

http://religion.blogs.cnn.com/2012/02/02/obama-reflects-on-faith-in-prayer-breakfast-speech/
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« Reply #220 on: February 04, 2012, 03:49:58 PM »

Gingrich: 'While I want your vote, I need your prayers'
by Joy Lin | February 04, 2012

LAS VEGAS -- Newt Gingrich appeared to wipe a tear away Friday night after singing along to a moving rendition of "God Bless America" during a prayer meeting.

"While I want your vote, I need your prayers," the candidate told a congregation of approximately 500 people. "I hope that both Callista and I can be in your prayers because we will need them every day that we serve this country."

Other than attending Mass in the morning and holding a media avail tonight, Gingrich - who until now had maintained a busy public schedule every voting day - has nothing else on his calendar Saturday. The candidate says he has the "hope" of finishing second in the Nevada caucuses but is mindful that Ron Paul's organization may trump his chances.

"We're going all out to see if we can't be a good solid second here," an optimistic Gingrich told Greta Van Susteren Friday. "And then we're on to Colorado and Minnesota. Voting has already started in Arizona and in Ohio. We're going to be competing there."

The candidate called upon children in the congregation to join him on stage Friday night, the first time he had done so since South Carolina. It was a move that evoked memories of his earlier success, fitting given the Gingrich team's efforts to rejigger its operation after losing momentum in Florida.

On Fox News, Gingrich hinted at a potential path toward winning the nomination, saying he hoped to be "even with or slightly ahead" of Romney in total delegates by April 3.

"We're working our way toward Super Tuesday," Gingrich said to Van Susteren. "And we think we'll do very, very well on Super Tuesday, and then in Alabama and Mississippi the following week. And then we think we will clean up in Texas on the 3rd of April.'

A bullish Newt Gingrich ratcheted up his populist attacks on Mitt Romney Friday, abandoning his "Massachusetts Moderate" rhetoric for more forceful language that coupled the former governor with the current president. Romney, Gingrich said at a morning venue which featured a mechanical bull, is "Obama lite ... Obama is big food stamp, he's little food stamp." Criticizing Romney for his support of indexing federal minimum wage to inflation, Gingrich said such a policy would raise barriers for unemployment.

"Truth is I don't think he understands the free market," he said. "I think he understands a lot about finance. But finance isn't the free market and Wall Street isn't Main Street, and giant businesses aren't small businesses, and what matters in America is the ability of the local business person, man or woman, to create enough jobs, to hire enough people, to start people down the road."

At church Friday night, Gingrich took to the stage to once again attack Governor Romney for saying he isn't concerned about the "very poor" so long as there are "safety nets."

"My good friend, the governor from Massachusetts, said it was okay not to worry about the poor because after all they have a safety net," Gingrich said. "It's not a safety net, it's a spider web. It traps them in poverty. It keeps them at the bottom. It deprives them of independence. One of the reasons I'm running is because I want to replace the spider web with a trampoline that launches them into the middle class and gives them a future."

http://politics.blogs.foxnews.com/2012/02/04/gingrich-while-i-want-your-vote-i-need-your-prayers/
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« Reply #221 on: April 04, 2012, 09:40:37 PM »

Who the heck is complaining about this?  Good grief.
 
School Removes “God” From Lee Greenwood Song
Apr 5, 2012
By Todd Starnes

Parents at a Massachusetts elementary school are furious after educators first removed the word ‘God’ from the popular Lee Greenwood song, “God Bless the U.S.A.” and then pulled the song all together from an upcoming concert.

Fox 25 in Boston is reporting that children at Stall Brook Elementary School in Bellingham were told to sing, “We love the U.S.A.” instead of “God Bless the U.S.A.”

After parents started complaining, school officials removed the song from the school assembly concert. The school’s principal released a statement to Fox 25 stating they hope to ”maintain the focus on the original objective of sharing students’ knowledge of the U.S. States, and because of logistics, will not include any songs.”

Greenwood released a statement to Fox News condemning the school’s actions.

“The most important word in the whole piece of music is the word God, which is also in the title ‘God Bless The USA,” Greenwood said. “Maybe the school should have asked the parents their thoughts before changing the lyrics to the song. They could have even asked the writer of the song, which I of course, would have said you can’t change the lyrics at all or any part of the song.”

Greenwood said the phrase “God Bless the USA” has a “very important meaning for those in the military and their families, as well as new citizens coming into our country.” He said it’s also played at every naturalization ceremony behind the national anthem.

“If the song is good enough to be played and performed in its original setting under those circumstances, it surely should be good enough for our children,” Greenwood said.

An online poll taken by the television station indicated more than 80 percent of viewers were outraged by removing God from the song.

“I don’t have a problem with the song if somebody else does I guess it’s there business,” resident Patrick Grudier said. “I mean It’s on our currency (God).”
But not everyone agreed – including parent Matthew Cote.

“I don’t think there’s anything wrong with changing the song,” he told the television. “It’s a public school. If you want to have the word God in the song, go to a private school.”

Reaction on Facebook has been overwhelmingly in favor of the traditional patriotic song.

“Here we go again, more war on Christianity,” wrote one Facebook user. “You can remove God all you want, but the good news — there is still a loving God and He lives.”

Another Facebook user called it sad and disgusting. “I’d like to say unbelievable — but it is so totally believable.”

LEE GREENWOOD’S STATEMENT TO TODD STARNES
“Maybe the school should have asked the parents their thoughts before changing the lyrics to the song.   They could have even asked the writer of the song, which I of course would have said you can’t change the lyrics at all or any part of the song.  The most important word in the whole piece of music is the word God, which is also in the title God Bless The USA.  We can’t take God out of the song, we can’t take God out of The Pledge of Allegiance, we can’t take God off of the American currency.  Let us also remember, the phrase God Bless the USA has a very important meaning for those in the military and their families, as well as new citizens coming to our Country.  The song is played at every naturalization ceremony behind The National Anthem.   If the song is good enough to played and performed in its original setting under those circumstances, it surely should be good enough for our children.” – Lee Greenwood

http://radio.foxnews.com/toddstarnes/top-stories/school-removes-god-from-lee-greenwood-song.html
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« Reply #222 on: May 03, 2012, 11:30:40 AM »

Shocking.  Not.  "But while President George W. Bush hosted interfaith events at the White House to observe the day, Obama has not publicly observed the day and has no such events scheduled Thursday."


National Day of Prayer, A Largely Christian Event, Grows In Popularity As It Stirs Debate
Posted: 05/ 3/2012 11:12 am

Selena Lockwood of Byram, Miss., holds her hand up in a prayerful salute during the National Day of Prayer at the Capitol in Jackson, Miss., last year. Hundreds of Texans are expected to come to downtown Dallas Thursday for an eight-hour string of faith-based celebrations that will include Sikh drummers, Islamic prayers, Hindu singers, a Jewish cantor and Methodist and Baptist congregations.

It may sound like a standard interfaith event, another of the many that have become popular in increasingly diverse American cities, but the revelry at the the city's Thanks-Giving Square in observance of the National Day of Prayer is unique in how far it's departed from its Protestant roots.

The National Day of Prayer, which has been observed on the first Thursday in May for 24 years, is still a largely Christian event, in which millions of Americans from thousands of churches across the country will participate, bowing their heads to God in prayer on the day that traces its history to the nation's earliest years. There will be Bible read-a-thons in front of city halls, police officers will pay tribute to the nation's first-responders at churches, and the devout will descend upon courthouse steps across American cities to grace the buildings with prayer.

But the event, designated via presidential proclamation, has increasingly faced accusations of encouraging an uncomfortable mingling of church and state and being too narrowly focused in practice on Christianity.

On one side, secular humanists and atheists have responded by promoting their own event, Thursday's National Day of Reason. Now in its ninth year, the nonreligious celebration has expanded to more than a dozen cities, where it's observed with blood drives, training on pro-secular policy lobbying and voter registration drives, as well as social events.

On the other hand, believers such as those in Dallas have tried to change the day's legacy by broadening its appeal. The Thanks-Giving Foundation, which typically observes the National Day of Prayer with an interfaith breakfast or luncheon, has made this year's event into a day-long festival, where more than half the events are purposefully devoted to non-Christians.

"We believe in the idea that gratitude is something that all faith traditions and all cultures value," said Chris Slaughter, a Christian Scientist who is president of the Thanks-Giving Foundation, which will be celebrating its 30th National Day of Prayer. "It can be used as a beginning point of conversation to learn about each other to gain respect and understanding."


That's a stark contrast to the theme of the Colorado Springs-based National Day of Prayer Task Force, one of the largest prayer event organizations. The group, which is chaired by Shirley Dobson, wife of evangelical group Focus on the Family's founder James Dobson, aims to "preserve America's Christian heritage," according a statement on its website.

A representative from the National Day of Prayer Task Force did not reply to a request for comment, but the website includes listings for thousands of events across the nation on Thursday. Representatives for the organization have said in interviews that interest in hosting Christian prayer events has increased by 35 percent this year.

John Inazu, a law professor who specializes in the First Amendment at Washington University in St. Louis, said the increasing popularity of Christian and interfaith National Day of Prayer events and the National Day of Reason reflects a growing conflict over the role of religion in public life.

Inazu pointed out that it's been 50 years since organized prayer in public schools was declared unconstitutional in Engel v. Vitale, a landmark Supreme Court case, but that laws that allow for voluntary prayer or moments of silence in schools and initiatives to have prayers in government buildings and in public spaces have gotten more popular.



"Some religious believers will likely use the Day of Prayer to call attention to what they view as a regrettable and consequential court decision," Inazu said. "But there's an important distinction between official school or government prayer or a public school or public space that allows prayer. The key is that it's voluntary and the guidance is made as non-sectarian and as general as possible."

The National Day of Prayer has met few legal challenges since it was made official in 1952 by President Harry Truman, who left it to subsequent presidents to decide its date each year. In 1988, President Ronald Reagan signed a proclamation that set its observation to the first Thursday in May.

Two years ago, a federal judge in Wisconsin ruled that the government-sponsored National Day of Prayer violated the First Amendment, which prohibits the government from establishing religion. After an appeal from President Barack Obama's administration, a higher court reversed the decision last year and ruled that the government proclamation did not require anyone's participation.

As is customary, Obama issued a proclamation this week on the Day of Prayer in which he asked "all citizens of our Nation, as their own faith directs them, to join me in giving thanks for the many blessings we enjoy" and called for "individuals of all faiths to pray for guidance, grace, and protection for our great Nation."

But while President George W. Bush hosted interfaith events at the White House to observe the day, Obama has not publicly observed the day and has no such events scheduled Thursday.

Shin Inouye, a White House spokesman, said in an email that Obama "has been honored to celebrate prayer and faith through events like his recent Easter Prayer Breakfast, an annual event for Christian leaders begun in the Obama Administration, and speaking at the National Prayer Breakfast ... As a devoted Christian, the President prays daily and deeply appreciates the important role that prayer plays in the lives of millions of Americans."

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/05/03/national-day-of-prayer_n_1473966.html
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« Reply #223 on: May 30, 2012, 02:32:58 AM »

I cant believe these ppl dont have anything better to do with their free time.
They're actually doing something.

You're wining on a message board.








And only to say that the other people doing something have nothing to do with their time.

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« Reply #224 on: May 30, 2012, 02:50:03 PM »

They're actually doing something.

You're wining on a message board.

And only to say that the other people doing something have nothing to do with their time.
YAYYYYY!!!! I got trolled!!!!

im posting on a message board b/c I dont find this topic so compelling that I need to go to such idiotic heights as your friends.

I have plenty of things to take my time work, school, gym, booze etc...I would rather spend my time doing more constructive things.
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