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Author Topic: Powerlifting vet's, what are the fundamental's of the sport??  (Read 1457 times)
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« on: September 19, 2007, 09:45:26 PM »

to the experienced out there, ive done some research but im looking to hear it from the beast's mouth, really. I have the size for it  but im actually pretty weak by PL'n standards.

So i ask,when you first took up the sport(seriously) what did you learn right off the bat? help me out here  Cool
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« Reply #1 on: September 20, 2007, 01:02:10 AM »

You shouldn't train to be strong per se, but rather train to lift much in the three lifts.

Which means, sticking with the three lifts and different versions of those when training.

Eg, some people do the mistake of thinking they should do a lot of triceps excersises to improve their lockouts, when they should instead do benchpresses with a board.
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« Reply #2 on: September 20, 2007, 03:42:37 AM »

Recovery time between training sessions and bodyparts. recovery is the key.
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« Reply #3 on: September 20, 2007, 08:31:55 AM »

Don't be afraid of the weights. 

If this means slapping 10 more lbs on the bar or doing a triple vs a double vs a single, do it.   If you look around the typical gym, the average gym goer is afraid of a heavy barbell.  They won't squat heavy because they don't want to hurt their knees, they don't bench heavy because they don't want to get stuck, they don't deadlift heavy becasue they are afraid of their back getting torqued.   


Take the average powerlifter, we all like the heavy weights, but even then, we are afriad of them to a degree.... I saw it myself with my hernia surgery last year.  It took me months to get over that mental block of blowing out the hernia again.  Once I did, I started racking up new PR's one after the other.  Your brain is the single most powerful lifting aid you've got.  Don't shortchange yourself by being afraid of the weights. 
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« Reply #4 on: September 20, 2007, 09:40:22 AM »

Don't be afraid of the weights. 

If this means slapping 10 more lbs on the bar or doing a triple vs a double vs a single, do it.   If you look around the typical gym, the average gym goer is afraid of a heavy barbell.  They won't squat heavy because they don't want to hurt their knees, they don't bench heavy because they don't want to get stuck, they don't deadlift heavy becasue they are afraid of their back getting torqued.   


Take the average powerlifter, we all like the heavy weights, but even then, we are afriad of them to a degree.... I saw it myself with my hernia surgery last year.  It took me months to get over that mental block of blowing out the hernia again.  Once I did, I started racking up new PR's one after the other.  Your brain is the single most powerful lifting aid you've got.  Don't shortchange yourself by being afraid of the weights. 



Good advice.      Cool
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« Reply #5 on: September 20, 2007, 02:02:40 PM »

Great advice!

Hedge = Do the lifts, not just the accessory moves.

Nash = Recovery is KEY!!!

Vet = Practice your mental game, its the most difficult part of lifting heavy.

And I will add: DO NOT FORGET ABOUT DIET AND CARDIO! They definately count and you will find out IF you neglect them.

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« Reply #6 on: September 20, 2007, 02:52:24 PM »

Great advice!

Hedge = Do the lifts, not just the accessory moves.

Nash = Recovery is KEY!!!

Vet = Practice your mental game, its the most difficult part of lifting heavy.

And I will add: DO NOT FORGET ABOUT DIET AND CARDIO! They definately count and you will find out IF you neglect them.



yea, good stuff guys!

how important is cardio really,and what about reps? working on muscle endurance might slow gains?
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« Reply #7 on: September 20, 2007, 03:19:12 PM »

yea, good stuff guys!

how important is cardio really,and what about reps? working on muscle endurance might slow gains?

I would say that some cardio should always be done, although most lifters unfortunately skip this.

One or two brisk walks for 30 minutes per week is good.

The cardio helps with recovery, it helps with the general health as well.

Your concern about muscle endurance is legit, and that's why I generally don't think powerlifters should be doing High intensity cardio.

Westside barbell does cardio by pulling sleds and other things, they call it GPP (General Physique Preparedness). I think that kind of cardio promotes slow twitch fibres, and therefore should be avoided, if your competing in sport that is based on explosive power.

It's JMO though.

Lots of people are happy with GPP.
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« Reply #8 on: September 20, 2007, 03:44:19 PM »

I would say that some cardio should always be done, although most lifters unfortunately skip this.

One or two brisk walks for 30 minutes per week is good.

The cardio helps with recovery, it helps with the general health as well.

Your concern about muscle endurance is legit, and that's why I generally don't think powerlifters should be doing High intensity cardio.

Westside barbell does cardio by pulling sleds and other things, they call it GPP (General Physique Preparedness). I think that kind of cardio promotes slow twitch fibres, and therefore should be avoided, if your competing in sport that is based on explosive power.

It's JMO though.

Lots of people are happy with GPP.

I personally make better gains when I do some moderate cardio 2-3 times a week for 20 mins. I, as many others, dont always get it done and then I notice a plateau starting. I also do strongman, not PL. My needs are different but SOME cardio is still highly recommended!
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« Reply #9 on: September 20, 2007, 04:35:29 PM »

what about high rep lifts though? i made the revalance to muscle endurance, do you think it slows progress rather then speeding it up?
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« Reply #10 on: September 20, 2007, 05:12:44 PM »

If you're gonna PL you want to keep your reps low on the big lifts. Of course you will have heavy and light days so this will somewhat determine your rep scheme.

Are you using a protocol? What does your plan look like?
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« Reply #11 on: September 20, 2007, 05:28:54 PM »

i have no set protocol as of yet, im still gathering some info together  Cool
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« Reply #12 on: September 20, 2007, 05:39:39 PM »

So i ask,when you first took up the sport(seriously) what did you learn right off the bat? help me out here  Cool


Proper technique of the lifts & the rules to the organization I joined.
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« Reply #13 on: September 20, 2007, 06:21:46 PM »

I would say that some cardio should always be done, although most lifters unfortunately skip this.

One or two brisk walks for 30 minutes per week is good.

The cardio helps with recovery, it helps with the general health as well.

Your concern about muscle endurance is legit, and that's why I generally don't think powerlifters should be doing High intensity cardio.

Westside barbell does cardio by pulling sleds and other things, they call it GPP (General Physique Preparedness). I think that kind of cardio promotes slow twitch fibres, and therefore should be avoided, if your competing in sport that is based on explosive power.

It's JMO though.

Lots of people are happy with GPP.

I think there is a difference in Westside's sled dragging "GPP" and "cardio".   

That said, you need to have some sort of baseline cardiovascular conditioning.    I personally ride the exercise bike at least 2 days per week.  I then do either a 3rd bike session or I do a "active work" type workout---basically something like moving feed sacks, unloading a trailer of hay, mowing the grass with a weighted vest on.   I do this and don't consider it as part of the sled work I do for powerlifting.  The sledwork is part of my weight training. 

I will say when I don't do these, I feel like crap.  The cardio loosens both joints and muscles up.  I tend to stretch afterward, so it gives me the added benefit of improving recovery through "active" rest.   
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« Reply #14 on: September 20, 2007, 06:25:26 PM »

what about high rep lifts though? i made the revalance to muscle endurance, do you think it slows progress rather then speeding it up?

It depends on how you incorporate it.   Say you are scheduled to do a DE workout, but you are sore, your brain isn't into it, you are rundown.  I think then there is some value of going in and benching sets of 30 with 30% of your 1rm for 3 or 4 sets and doing some minmal light accessory work.   This isn't something you do on a regular basis, but its a way to get into tthe gym, work the muscle, and not overtax an already fatigued recovery ability. 

its also a very, very good way to work with rehabilitation from injuries, especially shoulder, elbow, and ankle issues. 
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