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Author Topic: Barry Bonds indicted on perjury, obstruction charges  (Read 2121 times)
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« on: November 15, 2007, 04:37:16 PM »

About time.  Too bad they couldn't do this BEFORE he broke Hank's record.   Undecided

Barry Bonds indicted on perjury, obstruction charges
Associated Press

Updated: November 15, 2007, 6:28 PM ET

 
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) _ Barry Bonds was indicted Thursday for perjury and obstruction of justice, charged with lying when he told a federal grand jury that he did not knowingly use performance-enhancing drugs.

If convicted on all five counts, baseball's home run king could go to prison for up to 30 years.

"During the criminal investigation, evidence was obtained including positive tests for the presence of anabolic steroids and other performance enhancing substances for Bonds and other athletes," the indictment read.

In August, the 43-year-old Bonds passed Hank Aaron to become baseball's career home run leader. Late in the season, the San Francisco Giants told the seven-time National League MVP they didn't want him back next year.

Bonds finished the year with 762 homers, seven more than Aaron, and is currently a free agent. In 2001, he set the season record with 73 home runs.

The indictment culminated a four-year investigation into steroid use by elite athletes.

John Burris, one of Bonds' attorneys, did not know of the indictment before being alerted by The Associated Press. He said he would immediately call Bonds to notify him.

The Indictment
 
Bonds was indicted on four counts of perjury and one count of obstruction. The possible penalties:
Perjury: Five years in prison, three years supervised probation for each count.
Obstruction: 10 years in prison, three years supervised probation.

Read the indictment (.pdf)

"I'm surprised," Burris said, "but there's been an effort to get Barry for a long time. I'm curious what evidence they have now they didn't have before."

Bonds has repeatedly denied knowingly using performance-enhancing drugs. He has never been identified by Major League Baseball as testing positive.

The White House quickly weighed in on the indictment. President Bush is a former owner of the Texas Rangers.

"The president is very disappointed to hear this," Bush spokesman Tony Fratto said. "As this case is now in the criminal justice system, we will refrain from any further specific comments about it. But clearly this is a sad day for baseball."

Former Senate Majority Leader George Mitchell, who is investigating drug use in baseball, declined comment.

The Hall of Fame currently has an exhibit dedicated to Bonds' record-breaking 756th home run.

"As a historic museum, we have no intention of taking the exhibit down," Hall vice president Jeff Idelson said.

Bonds was charged with four counts of perjury and one count of obstruction of justice. He was cited for lying when he said he didn't knowingly take steroids given to him by his personal trainer and longtime friend, Greg Anderson. Bonds also was charged with lying that Anderson never injected him with steroids.

"Greg wouldn't do that," Bonds testified in December 2003 when asked if Anderson ever gave him any drugs that needed to be injected. "He knows I'm against that stuff."

Bonds became the highest-profile figure caught up in the government investigation launched in 2002 with the raid of the Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative (BALCO), the Burlingame-based supplements lab at the center of a steroids distribution ring.

Bonds has long been shadowed by allegations that he used performance-enhancing drugs. The son of former big league star Bobby Bonds, Barry broke into the majors with the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1986 as a lithe, base-stealing outfielder.

By the late 1990s, he'd bulked up to more than 240 pounds -- his head, in particular, becoming noticeably bigger. His physical growth was accompanied by a remarkable power surge.

Speculation of his impending indictment had mounted for more than a year.

In July 2006, the U.S. attorney in San Francisco took the unusual step of going public with the investigation. After the previous panel's 18-month term expired, he announced he was handing it off to a new grand jury.

Anderson was at the center of the investigation. He spent most of the past year in a federal detention center for refusing to testify to the grand jury.

According to testimony obtained by the San Francisco Chronicle, Bonds testified in 2003 that he took two substances given to him by Anderson -- which he called "the cream" and "the clear" -- to soothe aches and pains and help him better recover from injuries.

The substances fit the description of steroids distributed by BALCO founder Victor Conte. But when questioned under oath by investigators, Bonds said he believed Anderson had given him flaxseed oil and an arthritic balm.

Investigators and the public had their doubts.

Aiming to prove Bonds a liar, prosecutors tried to compel Anderson to testify. When he refused, they jailed him for contempt.

Bonds joins several defendants tied to BALCO. Anderson served three months in prison and three months of home detention after pleading guilty to steroid distribution and money laundering.

Conte also served three months in prison after he pleaded guilty to steroids distribution.

Patrick Arnold, the rogue chemist who created the designer steroid THG, BALCO vice president James Valente and track coach Remi Korchemny all also pleaded guilty. Korchemny and Valente were sentenced to probation and Arnold sent to prison for four months.

Kirk Radomski, a former New York Mets clubhouse attendant, pleaded guilty April 27 to drug and money laundering charges.

Elite cyclist Tammy Thomas and track coach Trevor Graham have each pleaded not guilty to lying to a grand jury and federal investigators about their involvement with steroids.

Dozens of other prominent athletes have been connected to BALCO, including New York Yankees slugger Jason Giambi who told the grand jury he injected steroids purchased at BALCO and Detroit Tigers outfielder Gary Sheffield who testified that Bonds introduced him to BALCO.

http://sports.espn.go.com/mlb/news/story?id=3112487
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body88
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« Reply #1 on: November 15, 2007, 04:46:06 PM »

Greg Anderson was just released from prison! Hmmmmm?Huh?
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« Reply #2 on: November 15, 2007, 04:54:35 PM »

Greg Anderson was just released from prison! Hmmmmm?Huh?

Really?  Now that speaks volumes.  He must have talked.
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« Reply #3 on: November 15, 2007, 05:03:51 PM »

Greg Anderson was just released from prison! Hmmmmm?Huh?

damn, greg was a rock for his homie...wonder what broke him down if he did? All barry had to do was wire a few mil to him to take that ride for him.

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« Reply #4 on: November 15, 2007, 05:31:59 PM »

Really?  Now that speaks volumes.  He must have talked.

Thats what I am thinking. Looks like he ratted.
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« Reply #5 on: November 15, 2007, 05:32:23 PM »

damn, greg was a rock for his homie...wonder what broke him down if he did? All barry had to do was wire a few mil to him to take that ride for him.



Maybe barry forgot about ol Gregg.
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« Reply #6 on: November 15, 2007, 05:58:44 PM »

Maybe barry forgot about ol Gregg.

they seemed to have been really tight boys, like leather pants on grown a$$ man.

I"m sure barry took care of his boy.....BUT I see where you're coming from. That would be messed up if his sold G out. Greg was a rider in there for his boy. I give him that. My man was doing HARD time like mofo. LOL.
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« Reply #7 on: November 15, 2007, 06:37:21 PM »

He's fucked. His legacy will be destroyed. In no way will he beat a federal trial culminating from a four year investigation.  The prosecution felt securely confident that the possible new and already existing evidence of Bonds was strong enough to go public in every major media market. My guess is that'll have to cop a plea where he'll have to serve at least 6 months to a year in prison, minimum.

Perjury? Obstruction of Justice federal charges??

Whoooooo! He's fucked.

Two Federal indictments against two high profile professional athletes in one year!! (Vick)

Wow.
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« Reply #8 on: November 15, 2007, 07:18:53 PM »

Who cares about Barry Bonds anymore? I am tired of this story
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« Reply #9 on: April 13, 2011, 04:29:40 PM »

He's going to walk. 

Barry Bonds found guilty of obstruction
Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO -- A federal jury convicted Barry Bonds of a single charge of obstruction of justice Wednesday but failed to reach a verdict on the three counts at the heart of allegations that he knowingly used steroids and human growth hormone and lied to a grand jury about it. Following a 12-day trial and almost four full days of deliberation, the jury of eight women and four men could reach a unanimous verdict only on one of the four counts against Bonds. U.S. District Judge Susan Illston declared a mistrial on the others, a messy end to a case that put the slugger -- and baseball itself -- under a cloud of suspicion for more than three years.

ESPN.com's Mark Fainaru-Wada is live from the courtroom during the Barry Bonds perjury trial. Follow along with our up-to-the-minute Twitter coverage.

Bonds sat stone-faced through the verdict, displaying no emotion. His legal team immediately asked that the guilty verdict be thrown out and Illston did not rule on the request. She set May 20 for a hearing in the case.

The case also represented the culmination of the federal investigation into the Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative steroids ring. Federal prosecutors and the Justice Department will have to decide whether to retry Bonds on the unresolved counts.

The counts that the jury could not resolve accused of Bonds of lying to the grand jury investigating BALCO in 2003 when he said he never knowingly took steroids or HGH, and when he said he was never injected by anyone except his doctors.

Eleven jurors were in favor of convicting Bonds for lying that someone other than his doctors injected him, but were less inclined to convict on the other charges, ESPN's Mark Fainaru-Wada reported Wednesday. The jurors were split 9-3 to acquit that Bonds knowingly received HGH from personal trainer Greg Anderson and 8-4 to acquit that he received steroids from Anderson.

Each count Bonds was tried on carries a maximum sentence of 10 years in prison. However, federal guidelines suggest a total sentence of 15 to 21 months. For similar offenses in the BALCO case, Illston sentenced cyclist Tammy Thomas to six months of home confinement and track coach Trevor Graham to one year of home confinement.

Bonds walked out of the courthouse with his lawyers, who instructed him not to comment because they said the case isn't over.

Impeccably dressed in suit and tie, Bonds flashed a victory sign to a few fans.

"Are you celebrating tonight?" one asked.

"There's nothing to celebrate," he replied.

Lead defense attorney Allen Ruby said the prosecution failed to prove the heart of its case.

The obstruction of justice count was a complicated charge that asked jurors to decide if Bonds was being evasive when making any one of seven statements to the grand jury. He was convicted on a single statement about his childhood as the son of major leaguer Bobby Bonds and his relationship with Anderson -- it did not address performance-enhancing drugs.

The government "has determined it's unlawful for Barry Bonds to tell the grand jury he's a celebrity child and to talk about his friendship with Greg Anderson," Ruby said.

"This trial is a stark illustration of how far this sport has come," MLB commissioner Bud Selig said in a statement released after the verdict was read. "In contrast to allegations about the conduct of former players and the environment of past years, 2011 marks the eighth season of drug testing in the Major Leagues and our 11th season in the Minors. With increased testing, cutting-edge research, proactive security efforts, and extensive education and awareness programs, we have demonstrated an unwavering commitment to keeping illegal substances out of the game.

"We have devoted all of our efforts to achieving the toughest, most comprehensive drug testing program in professional sports, and the generation of young players that has entered our game in recent years has never known anything but the rigorous protocols that have been in place for years. Our game has never been more popular than it is right now, and we must remain vigilant in order to meet all the challenges of the future. Performance-enhancing drugs have no place in baseball."

Now 46, Bonds set baseball's career home run record with 762 while playing for the Pittsburgh Pirates and San Francisco Giants from 1986-2007. The jury met less than two miles from the ballpark where the seven-time NL MVP played for his last 15 years.

Bonds was indicted on Nov. 15, 2007, exactly 50 days after taking his final big league swing and 100 after topping Hank Aaron's career home run mark of 755. He also set the season record with 73 home runs in 2001 with the Giants.

Illston would not let prosecutors present evidence of three alleged positive drug tests by Bonds because Anderson refused to testify and there was no one to confirm the samples came from Bonds.

Bonds acknowledged that he did take steroids but said Anderson misled him into believing they were flaxseed oil and arthritis cream.

Anderson was sentenced by Illston in 2005 to three months in prison and three months in home confinement after pleading guilty to one count of money laundering and one count of steroid distribution. The trainer was jailed on March 22 for the duration of the trial after again refusing to testify against Bonds. He was released last Friday.

Jeff Novitzky, the federal agent who started the BALCO probe, had been hoping the Bonds case would be part of a wider investigation of doping in baseball. Last year, the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that Novitzky and his team of investigators illegally seized urine samples and records from 104 players in 2004.

Separately, Novitzky has helped develop the case against former star pitcher Roger Clemens, who is scheduled to stand trial in July for lying to Congress by denying he used performance-enhancing drugs. Novitzky also is a key player in the federal doping investigation of pro cyclists, including seven-time Tour de France winner Lance Armstrong. Rep. Jack Kingston, a Georgia Republican, recently suggested that the federal agent is motivated by a desire to bring down a celebrity.

http://sports.espn.go.com/mlb/news/story?id=6347014
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« Reply #10 on: April 13, 2011, 04:48:58 PM »

Talk about a nice waste of government dollars.
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« Reply #11 on: April 13, 2011, 04:56:37 PM »

Talk about a nice waste of government dollars.

He might get Probation.
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« Reply #12 on: April 13, 2011, 04:58:55 PM »

He might get Probation.

Even if he gets fined... how much? I bet it doesn't equate to the money that has been spent on the case.

Your tax dollar at work.
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« Reply #13 on: April 13, 2011, 05:11:37 PM »

Even if he gets fined... how much? I bet it doesn't equate to the money that has been spent on the case.

Your tax dollar at work.

Meanwhile, Drug dealers are dealing on street corners and Juice Heads will always be dealing at gyms.  Shocked Hell, i know cops that buy Roids from guys at my gym.  Shocked
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« Reply #14 on: April 13, 2011, 05:35:50 PM »

Meanwhile, Drug dealers are dealing on street corners and Juice Heads will always be dealing at gyms.  Shocked Hell, i know cops that buy Roids from guys at my gym.  Shocked

Of course... I know cops who take plenty of blow too... That's why the war on drugs is completely retarded.... It's simply a money making scheme for the criminal justice enterprise.
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« Reply #15 on: April 13, 2011, 05:59:10 PM »

Of course... I know cops who take plenty of blow too... That's why the war on drugs is completely retarded.... It's simply a money making scheme for the criminal justice enterprise.


I train with a guy who works with Drug informants and he says that the worst drugs are Perc's, Roxy's and basically prescription shit. He has told me on many occasions that you cannot stop it and he has four years till he retires. Dude says he is moving to lake Havasu and then just gonna Fish, workout and have a good time.
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« Reply #16 on: April 13, 2011, 06:00:14 PM »

I train with a guy who works with Drug informants and he says that the worst drugs are Perc's, Roxy's and basically prescription shit. He has told me on many occasions that you cannot stop it and he has four years till he retires. Dude says he is moving to lake Havasu and then just gonna Fish, workout and have a good time.

Sounds like a plan to me... My old boss just got back from Havasu... He was out there camping last week. Had to call and rub it in my nose this morning.

Fucking jackass.
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« Reply #17 on: August 27, 2011, 12:38:32 PM »

Judge upholds Barry Bonds' conviction
By Bill Mears, CNN
August 27, 2011

(CNN) -- A federal judge late Friday rejected former baseball star Barry Bonds' effort to dismiss his criminal conviction on obstruction of justice.

San Francisco-based Judge Susan Illston issued a 20-page order also denying a new trial for the disgraced slugger, who holds the all-time home run record.

Federal prosecutors had charged him with perjury and misleading statements stemming from a 2003 grand jury appearance related to alleged steroid use.

"It is clear from the language of the indictment, as well as from the manner in which the government has proceeded prosecuting this case, that defendant was at risk of being convicted of obstruction of justice on the basis of any and all statements that he made to the grand jury that were evasive, false, or misleading," wrote Illston, in rejecting Bonds' request for dismissal of the conviction.

The judge had presided over a half-hour hearing Thursday to consider Bonds' motion.

A jury in April convicted the seven-time Most Valuable Player of a single count of obstructing the grand jury probe into illegal use of performance enhancing substances in sports.

The jury could not agree on three other charges-- including perjury.

Bonds has denied lying on the stand, offering misleading statements and using steroids or other illegal drugs.

The Justice Department has not decided whether to retry Bonds on the three outstanding perjury charges.

There was no immediate comment from Bonds' attorneys or the government.

The case is U.S. v. Bonds (cr-07-732).

http://www.cnn.com/2011/SPORT/08/27/barry.bonds.denial/index.html?hpt=hp_t2
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« Reply #18 on: August 31, 2011, 06:12:27 PM »

Government drops perjury counts against Barry Bonds
Published August 31, 2011
Reuters

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - The government on Wednesday dismissed three counts of perjury against home-run king Barry Bonds that had left jurors deadlocked in his trial stemming from an investigation into athletes' use of performance-enhancing drugs.

In the government's long-running prosecution of Bonds related to the probe, jurors convicted him in April of a single count of obstruction of justice but could not reach a verdict on the three counts of whether he lied to a grand jury.

All the charges arose from Bonds' testimony to a 2003 grand jury investigating the Bay Area Laboratory Co-operative in a scandal that tarnished some of the biggest names in Major League Baseball.

The government did not detail its decision to dismiss the three counts. Last Friday, a federal judge overseeing the Bonds case denied a request by his lawyers to set aside the obstruction of justice conviction.

Bonds was indicted three months after breaking Hank Aaron's career home-run record in 2007. Bonds finished his career in 2007 with 762 home runs, the most in Major League Baseball history.

Bonds, who spent much of his career with the San Francisco Giants, also set the single-season home run record with 73 in 2001 and was the National League's most valuable player seven times.

The case in U.S. District Court, Northern District of California is United States of America v. Barry Lamar Bonds, 07-cr-0732.

http://www.foxnews.com/sports/2011/08/31/us-drops-perjury-counts-against-barry-bonds/
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« Reply #19 on: August 31, 2011, 09:16:25 PM »

hammer this fucker. he violated the law! I will only feel safe when he's behind bars. Sure, obstructing justice today, but tomorrow = raping white women and jacking cars.....slippery slope bitches, slippery slope!
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« Reply #20 on: December 16, 2011, 12:59:27 PM »

Judge stays Barry Bonds' sentence
ESPN.com news services

SAN FRANCISCO -- A federal judge has stayed Barry Bonds' sentence on a conviction for obstruction of justice pending appeal.

The sentence was put on hold after Bonds was ordered to serve two years' probation and 30 days house arrest on Friday.

Bonds, Major League Baseball's all-time home runs leader, faced up to 21 months in prison for giving misleading testimony before a grand jury.

A jury convicted Bonds in April.

http://espn.go.com/mlb/story/_/id/7360235/barry-bonds-sentenced-two-years-probation-30-days-house-arrest
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« Reply #21 on: December 16, 2011, 07:26:58 PM »

For 240.

Cost of trying Barry Bonds... 75 Million Dollars.

Cost of 9-11 Inquiry... 15 Million Dollars.


Barry Bonds... Convicted of Lying to a room full of liars.

Talk about Irony.
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« Reply #22 on: December 18, 2011, 12:18:08 AM »

This is getting so old....leave the friggin baseball players alone....go after the crooked politicians.
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« Reply #23 on: August 07, 2012, 06:34:34 PM »

Will be interesting to see if he gets in.

Barry Bonds says he belongs in Hall
Updated: August 7, 2012
ESPN.com news services

Whether baseball's tarnished home run king is a Hall of Famer won't be determined for months, but in Barry Bonds' mind, he belongs in Cooperstown.

"Oh, without a doubt. There's not a doubt in my mind," Bonds said in a recent interview with MLB.com at San Francisco's AT&T Park.

The Hall of Fame ballot will be released in November. Final voting will be announced in January. Bonds will be appearing on the ballot for the first time, alongside fellow greats such as Mark McGwire, Sammy Sosa and Roger Clemens, who also were connected to performance-enhancing drugs during their careers.

Bonds hit 762 home runs and won seven MVP awards during a 22-year career that ended in 2007.

"I respect the Hall of Fame, don't get me wrong. I really, really, really respect the Hall of Fame. And I think we all do," Bonds told MLB.com. "I love the city of San Francisco and to me that's my Hall of Fame. I don't worry about it because I don't want to be negative about the way other people think it should be run. That's their opinion, and I'm not going to be negative.

"I know I'm going to be gone one day. If you want to keep me out, that's your business. My things are here in San Francisco. These are the people who love me. This is where I feel I belong. This is where I want to belong. If [the voters] want to put me in there, so be it, fine. If they don't, so be it, fine."

Bonds continues to fight his April 2011 conviction of one count of obstruction of justice, in which a trial jury found he gave an evasive answer in 2003 to a grand jury investigating illegal steroids distribution. The jury deadlocked on three counts of making false statements, charges that then were dropped.

He was sentenced in December to 30 days of house arrest, two years' probation and a $4,000 fine.

After his Giants contract expired after the 2007 season, Bonds wanted to continue playing but could not find a job. He told MLB.com that he was disappointed in the way his career flamed out.

"I will never agree with that at all. But at the same token, I had a great 22 years," the 48-year-old Bonds said. "Would I have liked things to have been different? Sure, I would have loved them to be different. On one side of it, I'm disappointed. I should have been able to play one more year. That's all I wanted. Play the one more year in San Francisco. I knew one more year would have been it for me. That's what I wanted to do. It didn't work out that way.

"I have no animosity toward anyone. I'm very grateful. This is my hometown. I have family here. I don't have fans, these people are my family and I love them to death. I played for them and performed for them. I was lucky."

http://espn.go.com/mlb/story/_/id/8243675/barry-bonds-believes-belongs-hall-fame
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« Reply #24 on: August 09, 2012, 04:59:06 AM »

Anyone seen a recent pic of how skinny he is now!
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