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Author Topic: 'Green Collar' Jobs Are Poised For Growth  (Read 1046 times)
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« on: April 11, 2008, 08:04:17 PM »

'Green Collar' Jobs Are Poised for Growth 
 
by Larry Buhl, for Yahoo! HotJobs
---------------------------------
 
For career changers thinking about growth and advancement potential, forget the blue-collar and white-collar categories: Green is the way to go.

A bull market has begun to develop in green careers and opportunities for job seekers and career changers. Careers promoting environmental responsibility that are now considered cutting edge will become mainstream within a decade, according to Bracken Hendricks, a senior fellow at the Center for American Progress.

"The growth in green careers will be like the Internet boom, which not only created new jobs, but also significantly impacted the overall economy," he says.

Wide Range of New Jobs

A recent study by the Cleantech Network, a venture capital firm for green business, showed that up to half a million new jobs in ecologically responsible trades will blossom in the next three years alone. And jobs will pop up at every income level, from chief sustainability officer to "green" maintenance supervisor.

A few job titles poised for growth include:
  • green product designer -- designs products that use less energy and raw materials to produce and consume less energy and resources to use.
  • energy rating auditor -- performs a comprehensive analysis of a building's energy efficiency. An energy retrofitter can use an auditor's recommendations to create more efficient home heating and cooling systems for existing buildings.
  • environmental manager -- coordinates management of organization's environmental performance to protect and conserve natural resources.
  • biological systems engineer -- designs, manages, and develops systems and equipment that produce, package, process, and distribute the world's food and fiber supplies.
  • permaculture specialist -- analyzes land use and community building to create a harmonious blend of buildings, microclimate, plants, animals, soils, and water.
  • urban arborist -- a landscaper or greenskeeper with an understanding of conservation and renewable resources.

In addition, professionals will find opportunities by adding green to their skill sets, from accountants who can manage corporate carbon emission offsets, to zookeepers who must maintain environmentally sensitive and ecologically friendly animal habitats.

More Growth on the Horizon

Part of the growth in green collar jobs will come from government initiatives: The U.S. House of Representatives recently passed the Green Jobs Act of 2007 that would provide $125 million annually to train people for green vocational fields that offer living wages and upward mobility for low-income communities.

In the private sector, Bank of America launched a $20 billion initiative to support environmentally sustainable business activity to address global climate change, and Citigroup plans to commit $50 billion to environmental projects over the next decade.

With that kind of rapid growth, supply and demand is likely to be unbalanced for a while. "If you look at jobs in solar, wind and renewable energy management, there are very few people with the right training and this could lead to a serious labor shortage," said Rona Fried, president of sustainablebusiness.com, a news and networking service for growing sustainable businesses.

Get in on the Action

For anyone considering a green collar-career path, consider:
  • Can your current job be 'greened'? An employer who values you may be willing to train you to include skills to meet the goals of the company's green initiatives.
  • Can you go back to school? An increasing number of colleges are offering environmental studies programs and green MBAs.
  • Do you already have the skills?

As in traditional careers, personal connections help in finding a green-collar job.
Volunteering for an eco-friendly organization could help build those connections while doing some good for the planet.
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« Reply #1 on: April 18, 2009, 08:49:16 PM »

'Green Collar' Jobs Are Poised for Growth 
 
by Larry Buhl, for Yahoo! HotJobs
---------------------------------
 
For career changers thinking about growth and advancement potential, forget the blue-collar and white-collar categories: Green is the way to go.

A bull market has begun to develop in green careers and opportunities for job seekers and career changers. Careers promoting environmental responsibility that are now considered cutting edge will become mainstream within a decade, according to Bracken Hendricks, a senior fellow at the Center for American Progress.

"The growth in green careers will be like the Internet boom, which not only created new jobs, but also significantly impacted the overall economy," he says.

Wide Range of New Jobs

A recent study by the Cleantech Network, a venture capital firm for green business, showed that up to half a million new jobs in ecologically responsible trades will blossom in the next three years alone. And jobs will pop up at every income level, from chief sustainability officer to "green" maintenance supervisor.

A few job titles poised for growth include:
  • green product designer -- designs products that use less energy and raw materials to produce and consume less energy and resources to use.
  • energy rating auditor -- performs a comprehensive analysis of a building's energy efficiency. An energy retrofitter can use an auditor's recommendations to create more efficient home heating and cooling systems for existing buildings.
  • environmental manager -- coordinates management of organization's environmental performance to protect and conserve natural resources.
  • biological systems engineer -- designs, manages, and develops systems and equipment that produce, package, process, and distribute the world's food and fiber supplies.
  • permaculture specialist -- analyzes land use and community building to create a harmonious blend of buildings, microclimate, plants, animals, soils, and water.
  • urban arborist -- a landscaper or greenskeeper with an understanding of conservation and renewable resources.

In addition, professionals will find opportunities by adding green to their skill sets, from accountants who can manage corporate carbon emission offsets, to zookeepers who must maintain environmentally sensitive and ecologically friendly animal habitats.

More Growth on the Horizon

Part of the growth in green collar jobs will come from government initiatives: The U.S. House of Representatives recently passed the Green Jobs Act of 2007 that would provide $125 million annually to train people for green vocational fields that offer living wages and upward mobility for low-income communities.

In the private sector, Bank of America launched a $20 billion initiative to support environmentally sustainable business activity to address global climate change, and Citigroup plans to commit $50 billion to environmental projects over the next decade.

With that kind of rapid growth, supply and demand is likely to be unbalanced for a while. "If you look at jobs in solar, wind and renewable energy management, there are very few people with the right training and this could lead to a serious labor shortage," said Rona Fried, president of sustainablebusiness.com, a news and networking service for growing sustainable businesses.

Get in on the Action

For anyone considering a green collar-career path, consider:
  • Can your current job be 'greened'? An employer who values you may be willing to train you to include skills to meet the goals of the company's green initiatives.
  • Can you go back to school? An increasing number of colleges are offering environmental studies programs and green MBAs.
  • Do you already have the skills?

As in traditional careers, personal connections help in finding a green-collar job.
Volunteering for an eco-friendly organization could help build those connections while doing some good for the planet.

Unemployed seek training for 'green collar' jobs
By Terence Chea,
Associated Press Writer
  Mon Apr 13, 4:50 pm ET

SAN JOSE, Calif. As the economy sheds jobs, community colleges across the country are reporting a surge of unemployed workers enrolling in courses that offer training for "green-collar" jobs.

Students are learning how to install solar panels, repair wind turbines, produce biofuels and do other work related to renewable energy.

"I think the opportunities in this field are going to be huge," said Rudy Gastelo, a part-time handyman who left the construction industry two years ago. "I'm not getting that 9-to-5 paycheck, so I'm looking forward to maybe getting a job within a solar company."

To meet growing demand, two-year colleges are launching or expanding green job training with money from the federal stimulus package.

Students and schools are betting that President Barack Obama's campaign to promote alternative energy and curb global warming will create millions of well-paying green jobs that do not require a four-year degree.

Gastelo, 32, is learning how to install solar power systems at San Jose City College, which has long waiting lists for such classes.

But the steep economic downturn has not spared the green energy industry, which had been expanding rapidly before the financial crisis. Many renewable-power firms are now canceling projects, laying off workers or selling themselves to competitors because business has dried up.

"It's going to be a very tough year. A lot of companies are not going to make it," said Ron Pernick, co-founder of the market research firm Clean Edge Inc.

Many newly trained workers are having trouble finding jobs, and some people worry that schools could end up producing too many workers for too few jobs.

"Even in these areas with great potential, the number of actual positions is way down from where they could be," said Barry Sedlick, who chairs the California Green Collar Jobs Council.

But many college officials believe there will be strong demand for green-collar workers once the economy rebounds and governments move to limit greenhouse gas emissions and require more alternative energy.

The federal stimulus package sets aside tens of billions of dollars to promote renewable energy and energy efficiency. It will also create thousands of jobs retrofitting government buildings and public housing to make them more energy-efficient.

"The recovery package will help move industry forward and offer a lot of opportunities for workers at all levels," said Mindy Feldbaum, director of workforce development programs at the National Institute for Work and Learning.

The renewable energy industry generated about 500,000 jobs and $43 billion revenue in the U.S. in 2007. The much broader energy-efficiency industry generated 8.6 million jobs and $1 trillion in revenue, according to a report issued in January by the American Solar Energy Society.

The study projected that the two sectors could employ 16 million to 37 million people by 2030, depending on government policy.

In Florida, Palm Beach Community College expects to enroll 200 students this fall up from 20 students last fall and 150 students this spring in a new associate degree program that focuses on alternative energy sources such as wind, solar or hydroelectric power.

Associate Dean Sam Freas is optimistic about green energy's long-term prospects, but he is careful to set realistic expectations among students.

"They look at me and say, 'Can you guarantee me a job?'" he said. "And the answer is, 'Absolutely not.'"

In North Carolina, Central Carolina Community College has long waiting lists for green building and renewable energy classes. The school recently created an associate degree for sustainable fuel production.

"The perception is that there is just a ton of these green jobs already out there," said Andrew McMahan, who coordinates the biofuels program. "The reality is that they are coming, but like any other industry it needs time to mature."

In Michigan, which has the nation's highest unemployment rate at 12 percent, Lansing Community College has seen enrollment in its alternative energy degree program grow from 42 students in 2005 to 252 students in 2008. This fall, the college will begin offering certificates for solar, geothermal, wind turbine and energy efficiency technicians.

Most new students are middle-aged men who recently lost jobs in the auto industry, which makes them eligible for a state program that provides $10,000 to unemployed workers for training.

"They see the field of alternative energy as the industry that's going to pick up where the automotive industry left off," said David Wilson, who coordinates the alternative energy program.

In Silicon Valley, community colleges have teamed up with the solar energy industry to train workers how to install rooftop systems. When the program was launched in 2007, solar power was growing rapidly in California, thanks in part to a $3 billion state rebate program.

But the financial crisis has frozen the market for new systems. Many solar-installation firms are laying off workers, not hiring them.

Matthew Welch, who teaches the Solar 102 class at San Jose City College, recently lost his job as a solar installer. Now he is starting his own solar company and may try to hire some of his students.

"The cost is going to be coming down," Welch said. "You're going to be seeing solar everywhere in the future."

___

Associated Press Writer Christine Armario in Tampa, Fla., contributed to this report.

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« Reply #2 on: April 19, 2009, 06:49:20 PM »

sad thing is that is can be relatively easy to fake green credentials and being green
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