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Author Topic: The Post Office is doing great!  (Read 2362 times)
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« Reply #50 on: May 28, 2012, 03:15:56 PM »

Why do blind people get free postage?

Huh



Obama hasn't given them their free laptop, free internet access, and free email yet?

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« Reply #51 on: May 28, 2012, 06:46:56 PM »



Obama hasn't given them their free laptop, free internet access, and free email yet?



Maybe!!! haha
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« Reply #52 on: July 19, 2012, 09:41:34 AM »

Post Office might miss retirees' payment, as first ever default looms
Published July 19, 2012
The Wall Street Journal

While lawmakers continue to fight over how to fix the ailing U.S. Postal Service, the agency's money problems are only growing worse.

The Postal Service repeated on Wednesday that without congressional action, it will default—a first in its long history, a spokesman said—on a legally required annual $5.5 billion payment, due Aug. 1, into a health-benefits fund for future retirees. Action in Congress isn't likely, as the House prepares to leave for its August recess.

The agency said a default on the payment, for 2011, wouldn't directly affect service or its ability to pay employees and suppliers. But "these ongoing liquidity issues unnecessarily undermine confidence in the viability of the Postal Service among our customers," said spokesman David Partenheimer.

The agency says it will default on its 2012 retiree health payment as well—also roughly $5.5 billion, due Sept. 30—if there is no legislative action by then.
Most everyone agrees the Postal Service needs an overhaul. It had a loss of $3.2 billion in the second quarter of this fiscal year; it is to report third-quarter results on Aug. 9. The agency blames factors including declining mail volumes and the unusual 2006 mandate by Congress that it annually set aside billions for future retirees. But while the Senate has passed legislation to overhaul the agency, the House says it doesn't expect to take up its own proposal until after August.

Click for more from The Wall Street Journal.

http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2012/07/19/post-office-might-miss-retirees-payment-as-first-ever-default-looms/?intcmp=trending
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« Reply #53 on: July 30, 2012, 06:02:18 PM »

Post Office Nears Historic Default on $5B Payment
Monday, 30 Jul 2012

The U.S. Postal Service is bracing for a first-ever default on billions in payments due to the Treasury, adding to widening uncertainty about the mail agency's solvency as first-class letters plummet and Congress deadlocks on ways to stem the red ink.

With cash running perilously low, two legally required payments for future postal retirees' health benefits — $5.5 billion due Wednesday, and another $5.6 billion due in September — will be left unpaid, the mail agency said Monday. Postal officials said they also are studying whether they may need to delay other obligations. In the coming months, a $1.5 billion payment is due to the Labor Department for workers compensation, which for now it expects to make, as well as millions in interest payments to the Treasury.

The defaults won't stir any kind of catastrophe in day-to-day mail service. Post offices will stay open, mail trucks will run, employees will get paid, current retirees will get health benefits.

But a growing chorus of analysts, labor unions and business customers are troubled by continuing losses that point to deeper, longer-term financial damage, as the mail agency finds it increasingly preoccupied with staving off immediate bankruptcy while Congress delays on a postal overhaul bill.

Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe has described a "crisis of confidence" amid the mounting red ink that could lead even once-loyal customers to abandon use of the mail.

"I think for my generation it was a great asset — if you had a letter or package and you needed it to get up to the North Pole, you knew it would be delivered," said Jim Husa, 87, of Lawrence, Mich., after stopping to mail letters recently at his local post office. Noting the mail agency's financial woes, he added: "Times have changed, and we old-timers know that. FedEx and UPS and the Internet seem to be making the Postal Service obsolete."

Banks are promoting electronic payments, citing in part the growing uncertainty of postal mail. The federal government will stop mailing paper checks starting next year for millions of people who receive Social Security and other benefits, paying via direct deposit or debit cards instead.

First-class mail volume, which has fallen 25 percent since 2006, is projected to drop another 30 percent by 2016.

Art Sackler, co-coordinator of the Coalition for a 21st Century Postal Service, a group representing the private-sector mailing industry, said the payment defaults couldn't come at a worse time, as many major and mid-sized mailers are preparing their budgets for next year.

"The impact of the postal default may not be seen by the public, but it will be felt by the business community," he said. "Mailers will be increasingly wary about the stability of the Postal Service. The logical and likely move would be to divert more mail out of the system."

The Postal Service, an independent agency of government, does not receive taxpayer money for operations but it is subject to congressional control. It estimates that it is now losing $25 million a day, which includes projected savings it had expected to be accruing by now if Congress this spring had approved its five-year profitability plan. That plan would cut Saturday delivery, reduce low-volume postal facilities and end its obligation to pay more than $5 billion each year for future retiree health payments.

While the Senate passed a bill in April that provides an $11 billion cash infusion to help the mail agency avert a default, it also would delay many of the planned postal cuts for another year or two. The House remains stalled over a measure that allows for the aggressive cuts the Postal Service prefers; that's unlikely to move forward this year, partly due to concerns among rural lawmakers over cutbacks in their communities.

The Postal Service originally sought to close low-revenue post offices in rural areas to save money but after public opposition agreed to keep 13,000 open with shorter operating hours. The Postal Service also is delaying the closing of many mail processing centers, originally set to begin this spring. The estimated annual savings of $2.1 billion won't be realized until the full cuts are completed in late 2014.

The postal uncertainty offers opportunities for banks, which can save up to one-third of the cost of processing checks if payments are made electronically. JPMorgan Chase & Co., Bank of America Corp., Citigroup Inc. and Wells Fargo & Co. have been urging electronic transactions.

"This could be a watershed event to motivate consumers and businesses to stop writing checks," said Rodney Gardner, head of global receivables at Bank of America, who recently reviewed the topic at a conference with insurance companies.

The Postal Service, which releases third-quarter financial results next week, has projected a record $14.1 billion loss for the year. It expects to avoid bankruptcy in October only by defaulting on the two health prepayments, totaling $11.1 billion. It faces a cash crunch again next year.

Fredric Rolando, president of the National Association of Letter Carriers, notes that the onerous health payment for future retirees — something not required of any other government agency or private business — is to blame for much of the post office's red ink. He faults Congress for mandating the payments in 2006, saying they force the post office every year into a "panic mode that absorbs energy and resources" rather than focusing on longer-term innovation.

"The word 'default' sounds ominous, but in reality this is a default on the part of Congress," Rolando said.

In 2007 and 2008, the Postal Service initially had profits of roughly $3 billion but fell into the red after making the health payments. In more recent years, it has suffered annual losses of $2 billion to $5 billion even after factoring out the health payments; by 2016, the mail agency expects to lose $21.3 billion a year, of which $5.8 billion will be caused by that payment.

Peter Nesvold, a financial analyst with Jefferies and Co., says the post office's financial future will depend on how Congress resolves its conflict over the mail agency's core mission. While the Postal Service is a business expected to stay afloat, it also has a legal obligation to provide uniform first-class mail service even to sparsely populated, far-flung areas of the U.S., all for the same price of a 45-cent postage stamp. UPS and FedEx don't deliver to those areas that are less profitable, contracting with the Postal Service to get the job done.

Last year, first-class mail contributed to 49 percent of the Postal Service's total revenue; by 2016, that share will drop to 41 percent. The mail agency has been seeking to pick up the slack by promoting its fast-growing package business as a cheaper alternative to FedEx and UPS, as well as encouraging more use of "standard mail," which are advertising circulars and catalogs often referred to as "junk mail."

Linda Graham, a postmaster in Hope, Alaska, says she understands the Postal Service's financial dilemma. Her rural postal branch may see its hours reduced from eight to four hours a day. "I feel that right now the post office is really grasping to try to make things work. I mean, they're losing money," she said.

Graham acknowledges her postal branch could probably get by if it were open just 6 hours a day, but believes that a bigger cut would be "suicide" for the town because of the role it plays as a community gathering place. "That's a real concern. So I just tell people, write more letters, buy more stamps," she said.

http://www.newsmax.com/US/PostalProblems/2012/07/30/id/447018
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« Reply #54 on: July 30, 2012, 06:07:44 PM »

Post Office Nears Historic Default on $5B Payment
Monday, 30 Jul 2012

The U.S. Postal Service is bracing for a first-ever default on billions in payments due to the Treasury, adding to widening uncertainty about the mail agency's solvency as first-class letters plummet and Congress deadlocks on ways to stem the red ink.

With cash running perilously low, two legally required payments for future postal retirees' health benefits — $5.5 billion due Wednesday, and another $5.6 billion due in September — will be left unpaid, the mail agency said Monday. Postal officials said they also are studying whether they may need to delay other obligations. In the coming months, a $1.5 billion payment is due to the Labor Department for workers compensation, which for now it expects to make, as well as millions in interest payments to the Treasury.

The defaults won't stir any kind of catastrophe in day-to-day mail service. Post offices will stay open, mail trucks will run, employees will get paid, current retirees will get health benefits.

But a growing chorus of analysts, labor unions and business customers are troubled by continuing losses that point to deeper, longer-term financial damage, as the mail agency finds it increasingly preoccupied with staving off immediate bankruptcy while Congress delays on a postal overhaul bill.

Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe has described a "crisis of confidence" amid the mounting red ink that could lead even once-loyal customers to abandon use of the mail.

"I think for my generation it was a great asset — if you had a letter or package and you needed it to get up to the North Pole, you knew it would be delivered," said Jim Husa, 87, of Lawrence, Mich., after stopping to mail letters recently at his local post office. Noting the mail agency's financial woes, he added: "Times have changed, and we old-timers know that. FedEx and UPS and the Internet seem to be making the Postal Service obsolete."

Banks are promoting electronic payments, citing in part the growing uncertainty of postal mail. The federal government will stop mailing paper checks starting next year for millions of people who receive Social Security and other benefits, paying via direct deposit or debit cards instead.

First-class mail volume, which has fallen 25 percent since 2006, is projected to drop another 30 percent by 2016.

Art Sackler, co-coordinator of the Coalition for a 21st Century Postal Service, a group representing the private-sector mailing industry, said the payment defaults couldn't come at a worse time, as many major and mid-sized mailers are preparing their budgets for next year.

"The impact of the postal default may not be seen by the public, but it will be felt by the business community," he said. "Mailers will be increasingly wary about the stability of the Postal Service. The logical and likely move would be to divert more mail out of the system."

The Postal Service, an independent agency of government, does not receive taxpayer money for operations but it is subject to congressional control. It estimates that it is now losing $25 million a day, which includes projected savings it had expected to be accruing by now if Congress this spring had approved its five-year profitability plan. That plan would cut Saturday delivery, reduce low-volume postal facilities and end its obligation to pay more than $5 billion each year for future retiree health payments.

While the Senate passed a bill in April that provides an $11 billion cash infusion to help the mail agency avert a default, it also would delay many of the planned postal cuts for another year or two. The House remains stalled over a measure that allows for the aggressive cuts the Postal Service prefers; that's unlikely to move forward this year, partly due to concerns among rural lawmakers over cutbacks in their communities.

The Postal Service originally sought to close low-revenue post offices in rural areas to save money but after public opposition agreed to keep 13,000 open with shorter operating hours. The Postal Service also is delaying the closing of many mail processing centers, originally set to begin this spring. The estimated annual savings of $2.1 billion won't be realized until the full cuts are completed in late 2014.

The postal uncertainty offers opportunities for banks, which can save up to one-third of the cost of processing checks if payments are made electronically. JPMorgan Chase & Co., Bank of America Corp., Citigroup Inc. and Wells Fargo & Co. have been urging electronic transactions.

"This could be a watershed event to motivate consumers and businesses to stop writing checks," said Rodney Gardner, head of global receivables at Bank of America, who recently reviewed the topic at a conference with insurance companies.

The Postal Service, which releases third-quarter financial results next week, has projected a record $14.1 billion loss for the year. It expects to avoid bankruptcy in October only by defaulting on the two health prepayments, totaling $11.1 billion. It faces a cash crunch again next year.

Fredric Rolando, president of the National Association of Letter Carriers, notes that the onerous health payment for future retirees — something not required of any other government agency or private business — is to blame for much of the post office's red ink. He faults Congress for mandating the payments in 2006, saying they force the post office every year into a "panic mode that absorbs energy and resources" rather than focusing on longer-term innovation.

"The word 'default' sounds ominous, but in reality this is a default on the part of Congress," Rolando said.
In 2007 and 2008, the Postal Service initially had profits of roughly $3 billion but fell into the red after making the health payments.
In more recent years, it has suffered annual losses of $2 billion to $5 billion even after factoring out the health payments; by 2016, the mail agency expects to lose $21.3 billion a year, of which $5.8 billion will be caused by that payment.

Peter Nesvold, a financial analyst with Jefferies and Co., says the post office's financial future will depend on how Congress resolves its conflict over the mail agency's core mission. While the Postal Service is a business expected to stay afloat, it also has a legal obligation to provide uniform first-class mail service even to sparsely populated, far-flung areas of the U.S., all for the same price of a 45-cent postage stamp. UPS and FedEx don't deliver to those areas that are less profitable, contracting with the Postal Service to get the job done.

Last year, first-class mail contributed to 49 percent of the Postal Service's total revenue; by 2016, that share will drop to 41 percent. The mail agency has been seeking to pick up the slack by promoting its fast-growing package business as a cheaper alternative to FedEx and UPS, as well as encouraging more use of "standard mail," which are advertising circulars and catalogs often referred to as "junk mail."

Linda Graham, a postmaster in Hope, Alaska, says she understands the Postal Service's financial dilemma. Her rural postal branch may see its hours reduced from eight to four hours a day. "I feel that right now the post office is really grasping to try to make things work. I mean, they're losing money," she said.

Graham acknowledges her postal branch could probably get by if it were open just 6 hours a day, but believes that a bigger cut would be "suicide" for the town because of the role it plays as a community gathering place. "That's a real concern. So I just tell people, write more letters, buy more stamps," she said.

http://www.newsmax.com/US/PostalProblems/2012/07/30/id/447018

phony crisis manufactured by congress

simple fix is to reverse the unnecessary 2006 legislation

no other government agency or even private company is required to prefund insurance costs 75 years into the future
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« Reply #55 on: August 03, 2012, 12:21:20 PM »

Postal Service future in question after first-ever default, lawmakers stuck on a deal
Published August 03, 2012
FoxNews.com

Add the Postal Service to the list of problems Congress is so far unable to fix.

America's mail service endured its first-ever default overnight, failing to submit a required $5.5 billion payment for future retirees' health benefits by Thursday.

The unprecedented lapse prompted new questions about the fate of the Postal Service as its financial situation spirals ever out of control, and Capitol Hill lawmakers have started a new round of fingerpointing after deadlocking over how to break the slide.

"Congress must act quickly in order to prevent the loss of thousands of jobs in the Postal Service and the American mailing industry," Rep. Steve Cohen, D-Tenn., said in a letter to House Speaker John Boehner.

The agency is expected to miss another $5.6 billion payment in September. For now, the missed mega-payments are not expected to affect day-to-day operations. An agency statement this week said the default would have "no material effect" on the Postal Service, affirming it would continue to deliver mail and pay employees as usual.

But the default again raises questions about whether taxpayers will eventually need to step in to save an agency that historically has gotten by without taxpayer support, even though it is subject to congressional oversight.

That oversight has complicated the agency's efforts to overhaul itself. As it loses roughly $25 million a day, the agency has rolled out a plan to cut Saturday delivery, reduce low-volume postal facilities and end its obligation to pay the future retiree health payments.

The House and Senate each have taken a different approach to that plan.

While the Senate passed a bill in April that provides an $11 billion cash infusion to help the mail agency avert a default, it also would delay many of the planned postal cuts for another year or two. The House remains stalled over a measure that allows for the aggressive cuts the Postal Service prefers, in large part due to concerns among rural lawmakers over cutbacks in their communities.

The Postal Service originally sought to close low-revenue post offices in rural areas to save money, but after public opposition it agreed to keep 13,000 open with shorter operating hours. The Postal Service also is delaying the closing of many mail processing centers, originally set to begin this spring. The estimated annual savings of $2.1 billion won't be realized until the full cuts are completed in late 2014.

Senate Democrats have urged the House to act quickly so that the two chambers can iron out the differences between their two bills. The House, though, is not expected to act until September or later.

Asked about the possibility of action on the Postal Service next month, Boehner said, "there will be a lot of conversations over the next five or six weeks" on what the House can fit into its "limited" schedule.

"The postal legislation, there's a lot of conversation about it, but, you know, these missed payments are not going to affect the ability of the post office to do its job," Boehner said.

House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi claimed that Republicans have "shown no interest in offering meaningful solutions."

Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe has described a "crisis of confidence" amid the mounting red ink that could lead even once-loyal customers to abandon use of the mail.

Banks are promoting electronic payments, citing in part the growing uncertainty of postal mail. The federal government will stop mailing paper checks starting next year for millions of people who receive Social Security and other benefits, paying via direct deposit or debit cards instead.

First-class mail volume, which has fallen 25 percent since 2006, is projected to drop another 30 percent by 2016.

http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2012/08/03/economy-adds-163000-jobs-in-july-unemployment-rate-rises-to-83-percent/
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« Reply #56 on: October 02, 2012, 12:45:00 PM »

Postal Service defaults on $5.6B retiree pre-payment

October 1. 2012 - Because of congressional inaction, the U.S. Postal Service today defaulted on a $5.6 billion pre-payment for future retiree health benefits, the second such default in two months.

The Postal Service missed a $5.5 billion payment in August, bringing the missed pre-payments to $11.1 billion for the fiscal year that ended Sunday. Overall, the postal service expected a $15 billion deficit for last year, and a projected shortfall of $238 billion over the next 10 years.

Congress mandated the early funding in 2006. No other government agency or private business is required to make such over-payments.

Despite the defaults, "customers can be confident in the continued regular operations," Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe said in a statement.

"We will continue to deliver the mail and pay our employees and suppliers. Postal Service retirees and employees will also continue to receive their health benefits," Donahone said, noting that current retirees' health care is paid from the agency's general operating budget.

"Comprehensive reform of the laws governing the Postal Service is urgently needed in order for the Postal Service to fully implement its five-year business plan and return to long-term financial stability," Donahoe said.

Facing declining mail volume, the Postal Service has proposed several sweeping measures to reduce losses, including ending Saturday delivery, closing mail handling centers, reducing staffing, cutting local post office hours and starting new shipping services to compete with UPS and Fedex.

The Senate has passed legislation to restructure the Postal Service that would allow it to tap into its retiree overpayments, allow some proposed changes, but not eliminate Saturday delivery. (Read a summary.) The House has declined to act on similar bills. Congress recessed last month until after the November election.

A spokeswoman for House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, R-Va., would not comment last week on whether the lame-duck session would take up postal-restructuring, says the Federal Times, published by Gannett, USDA TODAY's parent.

In reporting today's default, Government Executive writes, "Congress has punted on the question of a solution until after the election. Expect Congress to fight Postal Service efforts to put ending Saturday delivery on the table as well as closing many rural post offices." The four postal unions are also challenging proposals to shutter processing centers or reduce post office hours, and to end no-layoff guarantees in future contracts.

Before the August default, one of the unions, the National Association of Letter Carriers, noted in a press release that the Postal Service "already has $45 billion set aside for future retiree health benefits – more than any other organization in America – and yet Congress wants to drain still more from the USPS."

http://www.usatoday.com/story/ondeadline/2012/10/01/postal-service-default-retiree-health-benefits/1606815/
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« Reply #57 on: November 15, 2012, 05:52:55 PM »

U.S. Postal Service on a ‘Tightrope’ Lost $15.9 Billion
By Angela Greiling Keane - Nov 15, 2012

The U.S. Postal Service said its net loss last year widened to $15.9 billion, more than the $15 billion it had projected, as mail volume continued to drop, falling 5 percent.

Without action by Congress, the service will run out of cash on Oct. 15, 2013, after it makes a required workers compensation payment to the U.S. Labor Department and before revenue typically jumps with holiday-season mailing, Chief Financial Officer Joe Corbett said today.

The service, whose fiscal year ends Sept. 30, lost $5.1 billion a year earlier. It announced the 2012 net loss at a meeting at its Washington headquarters.

“We are walking a financial tightrope,” Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe said at the meeting. “Will we ever stop delivering the mail? It will never happen. We are simply too important to the economy and the flow of commerce.”

The Postal Service uses about $250 million a day to operate and will have less than four days of cash on hand by the end of the fiscal year, Corbett said.

The service is asking Congress to enact legislation before it adjourns this year that would allow the Postal Service to spread future retirees’ health-benefit payments over more years, stop Saturday mail delivery, and more easily close post offices and processing plants.

Over Edge
“The Postal Service is facing a fiscal cliff of its own and any unanticipated drop in mail volumes could send the agency over the edge,” said Art Sackler, co-coordinator of the Coalition for a 21st Century Postal Service, whose members include Bank of America Corp. and EBay Inc. (EBAY) “If Congress fails to act, there could be postal slowdowns or shutdowns that would have catastrophic consequences for the 8 million private sector workers whose jobs depend on the mail.”

Without legislative change, the service expects its losses to continue in 2013, with a forecast loss of $7.6 billion for the year that started Oct. 1, Corbett said.

“There is no margin of error,” given the low level of cash, he said.

The service is trying to cut costs by giving retirement- eligible workers a financial incentive to retire. Those employees have a Dec. 3 deadline to accept the offer, with $200 million budgeted for the incentive costs in fiscal 2013.

Health Benefits
Next year’s loss forecast includes a $5.6 billion payment due to the U.S. Treasury for future retiree health benefits, Corbett told reporters after the meeting. The 2012 loss includes the $5.6 billion payment to the fund that the service defaulted on Sept. 30, and the previous year’s $5.5 billion obligation that was due Aug. 1 and also not paid. Because that year’s payment was deferred, the 2011 loss doesn’t include any pre- funding amount.

Mail volume for the year fell to 159.9 billion pieces, led by an 8 percent decrease in single-piece first-class items, the most profitable kind of mail that includes letters, cards and bill payments.

Operating revenue fell less than 1 percent to $65.2 billion for the year as the service cut work hours while delivering less mail.

The service’s outlook worsened this week, when the U.S. Office of Personnel Management said the service’s projected surplus in a government-worker retirement account has fallen to $2.6 billion, less than one-quarter of the previous year’s estimate, due to lower interest rates. It found another retirement account now has a $17.8 billion shortfall instead of a previously estimated surplus. The service has proposed tapping the surpluses to help cover its losses.

“Relying on a temporary, projected surplus to keep USPS solvent is a risk no matter which set of assumptions OPM is directed to use,” said Ali Ahmad, a spokesman for House Government and Reform Committee Chairman Darrel Issa, a California Republican who is a sponsor of a postal overhaul measure pending in the House. “It is no substitute for the actual cost-cutting USPS needs to do to find real savings.”

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-11-15/u-s-postal-service-on-tightrope-loses-15-9-billion.html
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« Reply #58 on: January 28, 2013, 08:25:42 PM »

Postmaster General: Post Office Losing $25 Million Every Day
Monday, 28 Jan 2013

The price of a first-class stamp rose a penny on Sunday, to 46 cents, but the U.S. Postal Service is still operating at a deficit.

“We are currently losing $25 million per day,” Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe said this month, according to NBC News. Last fiscal year, the agency lost nearly $16 billion — and it no longer has a line of credit with the U.S. Treasury Department.

The Postal Service could run out of money “between six months and a year at most,” if Congress does not act, Richard Geddes, associate professor of policy analysis and management at Cornell University, told NBC.

The Postal Service said keeping letters moving is its top priority, even if it means defaulting on its retirement benefit funds again.

“Although our liquidity situation remains a serious concern, the Postal Service is continuing to prioritize payments to ensure employees and suppliers are paid on time, preventing any interruption in our operations,” spokesman David Partenheimer, told NBC.

Still, Michael Crew, director of the Center for Research in Regulated Industries, and professor of regulatory economics at Rutgers University, told NBC: “There could be a period when mail is not being delivered.”

The Postal Service delivers mail six days a week to everyone in the nation who has been sent mail, and maintains as many as 32,000 post offices.

The post office wants to eliminate Saturday delivery, which Partenheimer said would save $2.7 billion a year, but it needs congressional approval to do so.

Congress has not granted that authority.

“Essentially, Congress has got to rethink the legislation that establishes the post office,” Campbell told NBC.

http://www.newsmax.com/US/post-office-losing-25/2013/01/28/id/487783
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« Reply #59 on: January 28, 2013, 08:54:33 PM »

.50 cent stamp on the way
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« Reply #60 on: January 28, 2013, 10:59:50 PM »

I like the post office, but it is in financial ruin.  The Constitutionally mandated Post Office needs to be run more efficiently or spending needs to be cut elsewhere to ensure that it is solvent. 
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« Reply #61 on: January 28, 2013, 11:02:10 PM »

I like the post office, but it is in financial ruin.  The Constitutionally mandated Post Office needs to be run more efficiently or spending needs to be cut elsewhere to ensure that it is solvent. 

Would it not be possible to contract this out to a company like FedEx?   Huh
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« Reply #62 on: January 29, 2013, 05:35:03 AM »

Would it not be possible to contract this out to a company like FedEx?   Huh

Not for the price that we currently pay for mail. Ask FedEx to deliver a letter from California to Arizona in 2 days for $0.45 and it will give you the finger.

The problem isn't that the post office is horribly inefficient – although I'm sure there are efficiency gains to be had. The problem is that the post office looks like a company, sounds like a company and even smells like a company but it's not a company. It is basically run by Congress and management can't actually manage or make decisions.

They have to make massive payments to prefund pensions and health insurance. They must charge a flat rate regardless of whether you're sending mail from California to Nevada or California to New York. They must visit every mailbox in the country six days a week, even if they don't have mail to deliver. And so on...

The Post Office can thrive, even in the era of e-mail. Hell, just Amazon's shipping volume could be enough to get them out of the hole if they were allowed to offer shipping services that made sense. In other words if they were allowed to operate more freely instead of having to jump whenever a politician in Congress feels gassy.
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« Reply #63 on: January 29, 2013, 07:09:25 AM »

HEHEHEHHE!!

The federal government can't even run the post office efficiently. It has driven Social Security to bankruptcy. Medicaid is on its way.

But, somehow, a lot of people believe that they should be in charge of healthcare and immigration.

HEHEHEHEH!! This nation deserves every bit of economic agony for being so stupid in re-electing the same idiot in chief.
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« Reply #64 on: January 29, 2013, 07:15:11 AM »

HEHEHEHHE!!

The federal government can't even run the post office efficiently. It has driven Social Security to bankruptcy. Medicaid is on its way.

But, somehow, a lot of people believe that they should be in charge of healthcare and immigration.

HEHEHEHEH!! This nation deserves every bit of economic agony for being so stupid in re-electing the same idiot in chief.

And just out of curiosity, who should be in charge of immigration troll?

As for deserving every bit of agony for reelecting Obama, it's funny that you think things would be any different if Romney was elected instead. It shows just how naïve and blindly partisan you are.
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« Reply #65 on: January 29, 2013, 07:40:13 AM »

Would it not be possible to contract this out to a company like FedEx?   Huh
FedEx is a racket and overly priced.  The Post Office is as Constitutional as the Right To Bear Arms is and should be preserved.
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« Reply #66 on: January 29, 2013, 07:43:31 AM »

Article I, Section 8, Clause 7 of the United States Constitution, known as the Postal Clause or the Postal Power, empowers Congress "To establish Post Offices and post Roads".

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« Reply #67 on: January 29, 2013, 08:22:14 AM »

Article I, Section 8, Clause 7 of the United States Constitution, known as the Postal Clause or the Postal Power, empowers Congress "To establish Post Offices and post Roads".



To establish. Not to be completely clueless on how to run it.

While your at it. Give us the Article, Section and Clause where government has the power to enforce health care.
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« Reply #68 on: January 29, 2013, 08:30:33 AM »

To establish. Not to be completely clueless on how to run it.

While your at it. Give us the Article, Section and Clause where government has the power to enforce health care.
I agree, they need to cut spending elsewhere in order to keep the Post Office solvent.  I don`t support Obamacare and do not like it one bit.  There is nowhere in the Constitution that supports Obamacare unless its considered a tax, but even that is arguable and in my opinion wrong. 

The Post Office, however,  is in the Constitution.
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« Reply #69 on: February 06, 2013, 11:37:41 AM »

Postal Service To Cut Saturday Mail Delivery To Save $2 Billion Per Year
By PAULINE JELINEK 02/06/13   

WASHINGTON — The financially struggling U.S. Postal Service said Wednesday it will stop delivering mail on Saturdays but continue to disburse packages six days a week, an apparent end-run around an unaccommodating Congress.

The service expects the Saturday mail cutback to begin the week of Aug. 5 and to save about $2 billion annually, said Postmaster General and CEO Patrick R. Donahoe.

"Our financial condition is urgent," Donahoe told a press conference.

The move accentuates one of the agency's strong points – package delivery has increased by 14 percent since 2010, officials say, while the delivery of letters and other mail has declined with the increasing use of email and other Internet services.

Under the new plan, mail would be delivered to homes and businesses only from Monday through Friday, but would still be delivered to post office boxes on Saturdays. Post offices now open on Saturdays would remain open on Saturdays.

Over the past several years, the Postal Service has advocated shifting to a five-day delivery schedule for mail and packages – and it repeatedly but unsuccessfully appealed to Congress to approve the move. Though an independent agency, the service gets no tax dollars for its day-to-day operations but is subject to congressional control.

Congress has included a ban on five-day delivery in its appropriations bill. But because the federal government is now operating under a temporary spending measure, rather than an appropriations bill, Donahoe says it's the agency's interpretation that it can make the change itself.

"This is not like a `gotcha' or anything like that," he said. The agency is essentially asking Congress not to reimpose the ban when the spending measure expires on March 27 and he said he would work with Congress on the issue.

The agency clearly thinks it has a majority of the American public on its side regarding the change.

Postal Service market research and other research indicated that nearly 7 in 10 Americans support the switch to five-day delivery as a way for the Postal Service to reduce costs, the agency said.

"The Postal Service is advancing an important new approach to delivery that reflects the strong growth of our package business and responds to the financial realities resulting from America's changing mailing habits," Donahoe said. "We developed this approach by working with our customers to understand their delivery needs and by identifying creative ways to generate significant cost savings."

But the president of the National Association of Letter Carriers, Fredric Rolando, said the end of Saturday mail delivery is "a disastrous idea that would have a profoundly negative effect on the Postal Service and on millions of customers," particularly businesses, rural communities, the elderly, the disabled and others who depend on Saturday delivery for commerce and communication.

He said the maneuver by Donahoe to make the change "flouts the will of Congress, as expressed annually over the past 30 years in legislation that mandates six-day delivery."

House Oversight and Government Reform Committee Chairman Darrell Issa, R-Calif., and Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Ranking Member Tom Coburn M.D., R-Okla., said in a joint statement that they had sent a letter to leaders of the House and Senate in support of the elimination of Saturday mail.

They called it "common-sense reform"

Others agreed the Postal Service had little choice.

"If the Congress of the United States refuses to take action to save the U.S. Postal Service, then the Postal Service will have to take action on its own," said corporate communications expert James S. O'Rourke, professor of management at the University of Notre Dame.

He said other action will be needed as well, such as shuttering smaller rural post offices and restructuring employee health care and pension costs.

"It's unclear whether the USPS has the legislative authority to take such actions on its own, but the alternative is the status quo until it is completely cash starved," O'Rourke said in a statement.

The Postal Service made the announcement Wednesday, more than six months before the switch, to give residential and business customers time to plan and adjust, officials said.

Donahoe said the change would mean a combination of employee reassignment and attrition and is expected to achieve cost savings of approximately $2 billion annually when fully implemented.

The agency in November reported an annual loss of a record $15.9 billion for the last budget year and forecast more red ink in 2013, capping a tumultuous year in which it was forced to default on billions in retiree health benefit prepayments to avert bankruptcy.

The financial losses for the fiscal year ending Sept. 30 were more than triple the $5.1 billion loss in the previous year. Having reached its borrowing limit, the mail agency is operating with little cash on hand.

The agency's biggest problem – and the majority of the red ink in 2012 – was not due to reduced mail flow but rather to mounting mandatory costs for future retiree health benefits, which made up $11.1 billion of the losses. Without that and other related labor expenses, the mail agency sustained an operating loss of $2.4 billion, lower than the previous year.

The health payments are a requirement imposed by Congress in 2006 that the post office set aside $55 billion in an account to cover future medical costs for retirees. The idea was to put $5.5 billion a year into the account for 10 years. That's $5.5 billion the post office doesn't have.

No other government agency is required to make such a payment for future medical benefits. Postal authorities wanted Congress to address the issue last year, but lawmakers finished their session without getting it done. So officials are moving ahead to accelerate their own plan for cost-cutting.

The Postal Service is in the midst of a major restructuring throughout its retail, delivery and mail processing operations. Since 2006, it has cut annual costs by about $15 billion, reduced the size of its career workforce by 193,000 or by 28 percent, and has consolidated more than 200 mail processing locations, officials say.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/02/06/postal-service-saturday-mail_n_2629373.html
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« Reply #70 on: February 06, 2013, 11:40:30 AM »

This is a horrible idea and most likely, unconstitutional as Congress did not vote on this- Post Office is in the Constitution.
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« Reply #71 on: February 06, 2013, 12:18:43 PM »

With all of the technology and convenience at our disposal, why, in 2013, do we still have a dude going from house to house dropping off handfuls of paper in people's boxes?

The Post Office can still exist by simply sending out all mail in electronic form to someone's registered email account. 
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« Reply #72 on: February 06, 2013, 12:52:47 PM »

With all of the technology and convenience at our disposal, why, in 2013, do we still have a dude going from house to house dropping off handfuls of paper in people's boxes?

The Post Office can still exist by simply sending out all mail in electronic form to someone's registered email account. 
Packages are by far cheaper sent by USPS than any other service.
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« Reply #73 on: February 06, 2013, 02:31:01 PM »

Postal Service Saturday Delivery Cuts Set Up Fight With Unions, Democrats


Posted: 02/06/2013 1:32 pm EST  |  Updated: 02/06/2013 2:19 pm EST



WASHINGTON -- The announcement Wednesday by the U.S. Postal Service that it would end Saturday delivery of first-class letters has infuriated postal employee unions and set up a struggle with members of Congress, many of whom believe the agency doesn't have the authority to implement service cuts on its own.

The agency apparently expected as much. In defending the move at a press conference at Postal Service headquarters, Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe posed the question to himself that he knew was on many observers' minds.

"Is it legal?" Donahoe asked. "Yes, it is, in our opinion."

The Postal Service occupies a strange, quasi-governmental territory, where it operates much like a business but must nevertheless answer to congressional oversight. The legality of cutting delivery hinges on a continuing resolution issued for years by Congress, tying 6-day delivery to an annual reimbursement from the federal government for services already rendered.

Donahoe argued that the specific language of the continuing resolution does not prohibit the switch. Employee unions, for one, vehemently disagree, and are considering lawsuits that could prevent the agency from proceeding.

The National Association of Letter Carriers (NALC) union called for Donahoe's resignation on Wednesday. Fred Rolando, the union's president, said the move "flouts the will of Congress, as expressed annually over the past 30 years in legislation that mandates six-day delivery," and the union said it was "exploring all legal and political options to block Donahoe’s gambit."

There are two possible paths for the Postal Service to cut back to five-day delivery: Either its unilateral move announced Wednesday holds up legally, or Congress paves the way for the switch by stripping out the 6-day delivery language when the current continuing resolution expires at the end of March.




Donahoe, who said the move would save $2 billion per year, appeared to hedge between these two possibilities.

"We think we're on good footing with this ... Our interpretation is that the language does not bind us to six-day," he said. But he added that, given the looming expiration of the current resolution, "there's plenty of time -- we can get it resolved by then. [Congress] can take out any language that prevents us from doing this."

In other words, the Postal Service is sending a strong signal to Congress about what it wants -- and it expects lawmakers to comply.

The Senate produced a bill last year that would have maintained Saturday delivery for at least two more years, then allowed the agency to explore ending it if it seemed financially necessary. In a statement Wednesday, Sen. Tom Carper (D-Del.), chairman of the committee overseeing the Postal Service, said he was "disappointed" by the move, though he qualified that disappointment.

"For nearly three decades, it has been the clear intent of Congress that the Postal Service provide most communities with six days of mail delivery," Carper said. "That said, I have long argued that Congress should reduce the number of service mandates it places on the Postal Service."

The announcement appears to have split some lawmakers along party lines in the House. Rep. Darrell Issa, whose Oversight committee presides over the agency, voiced his support for Donahoe's move on Wednesday, saying in a letter to House leadership that the move to five-day delivery was "common sense." He also urged lawmakers to pave the way for the move with its next continuing resolution.

"Democrats on the Hill are furious," said a Democratic lobbyist. "They feel blindsided."

A House oversight committee staffer clarified to HuffPost that, even if the language at issue isn't stripped out of the next resolution, Issa believes the Postal Service has the authority to make the switch unilaterally.

But Rep. Elijah Cummings (D-Md.), ranking Democrat on the Oversight committee, rebuked Donahoe for the move in a brief statement Wednesday.

"The issue of service delivery frequency should be addressed in that legislation rather than through arbitrary action by the Postal Service," he said.

Legality aside, Donahoe's announcement raises the question of whether moving to five-day delivery of first-class mail is the wise path for long-term survival. (Package delivery, which has been growing for the agency in recent years, will continue on Saturdays under Donahoe's proposal.)

Unions and a host of businesses that rely on the Postal Service have argued that the breadth of the agency's service is its strongest asset. Cutting back on delivery, they say, would diminish the agency's value and inevitably lead to a "death spiral." It would also disproportionately hurt elderly and rural Americans who rely more on the mail.

The announcement is "yet another death knell for the quality service provided by the U.S. Postal Service," said Jeanette Dwyer, president of the National Rural Letter Carriers’ Association. "To erode this service will undermine the Postal Service’s core mission and is completely unacceptable."

The agency has struggled with mounting losses in recent years, and defaulted on payments to the U.S. Treasury in 2012 for the first time in its history. But, for the most part, the agency's alarming red ink is not due to operational losses, but to financial requirements placed on it by lawmakers. In 2006, Congress passed legislation forcing the agency to pay $5.5 billion per year to fund health care for retirees years in advance.

Of the agency's $15.9 billion in losses last year, $11.1 billion of it stemmed from Congress's pre-funding mandates.

Donahoe said he plans to make his argument for the switch to Congress.

"Everyone knows it's the right thing to do," Donahoe said. "Part of my job is to make a very clear and concise argument in front of Congress that we're doing the right thing."






LMFAO @ these libs
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« Reply #74 on: February 13, 2013, 02:51:50 PM »

Postal Service Debt May Hit $45 Billion
Wednesday, 13 Feb 2013

The U.S. Postal Service, which lost $1.3 billion in its first quarter, said its debt could reach $45 billion by around 2017 if Congress doesn’t pass legislation allowing it to change its business model.

The post office, at a Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee hearing today, will ask for permission to run its own health plan for employees and retirees. Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe, in testimony prepared for the hearing, said the service could save as much as $7 billion a year through 2016 by taking its health coverage out of the U.S. government plan.

Donahoe last week said the service plans to end Saturday mail delivery in August even though an appropriations law first enacted in 1981 requires it to deliver mail six days a week.

The service has reached the $15 billion limit on what it’s allowed to borrow from the U.S. Treasury and defaulted last year on two payments due to the Treasury for future retiree health benefit costs.

http://www.newsmax.com/Newsfront/post-office-debt-45/2013/02/13/id/490218
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