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Author Topic: Organic Foods?  (Read 2648 times)
JAM
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« on: November 08, 2011, 08:57:48 AM »

I was curious as a natural bodybuilder / fitness enthusiast or even just someone trying to be generally healthier, do any of you try to avoid chemicals in processed food and eat mostly organics?  I had switched a few years back to organic whole foods and nothing that is really processed.  Made a world of difference for me in how I felt day to day, how often I'd get sick, etc.  But I'm sure we all respond differently...maybe for some people eating taco bell regularly has no ill effects.  LOL   Cool  What say you?
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Montague
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« Reply #1 on: December 23, 2011, 06:22:54 AM »

There are certainly some benefits to eating foods of the "organic" variety, but do some research before you plop down the extra hard-earned cash.
I've been coming across articles and sources that now claim eating organic - while somewhat better in some aspects - is NOT all it's cut out to be by the hipsters.  

It's not something I've followed closely, but if I come across any sources, I'll try to remember to post them here.
It shouldn't be too hard to Google.

IMO, it IS a wise choice to eat foods that are less processed, and you can do a great deal of that with wise selection of regular/non-organic foods found in your basic grocery store.
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JAM
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« Reply #2 on: December 23, 2011, 08:15:27 AM »

I agree that less processed foods are going to be best.  I see "organic" as top of the line in the less processed arena.  For example, an apple wouldn't have pesticides and loads of other similar crap in it.  Or at the very worst case scenario, due to some kind of cross contamination... it should have less of it.  

I think most food companies and studies will try to convince you there is nothing wrong with pesticides, fertilizer, and all the other loads of processing they do.  But they want to continue to sell you cheap crap and get away with it.  For instance, consider meat with "fillers", or muffins with blue dye # xyz versus just using real blueberries.

I grew up on a farm and let me tell you there is a big difference in doing things with a natural/organic approach.  In fact to me the meat even tastes different (better), produce is smaller (apples aren't the size of a softball), milk and eggs taste much better as well (2% taste like whole, eggs are not runny and gross like snot).  

My logic was just a simple idea based on the old saying you are what you eat.  I figured if you give a cow rBGH, fina, antibiotics, and loads of other crap, then you eat the cow... it can't be good.  LOL   Wink


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Montague
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« Reply #3 on: December 23, 2011, 05:19:44 PM »

I agree that less processed foods are going to be best.  I see "organic" as top of the line in the less processed arena.  For example, an apple wouldn't have pesticides and loads of other similar crap in it.  Or at the very worst case scenario, due to some kind of cross contamination... it should have less of it.  

I think most food companies and studies will try to convince you there is nothing wrong with pesticides, fertilizer, and all the other loads of processing they do.  But they want to continue to sell you cheap crap and get away with it.  For instance, consider meat with "fillers", or muffins with blue dye # xyz versus just using real blueberries.

I grew up on a farm and let me tell you there is a big difference in doing things with a natural/organic approach.  In fact to me the meat even tastes different (better), produce is smaller (apples aren't the size of a softball), milk and eggs taste much better as well (2% taste like whole, eggs are not runny and gross like snot).  

My logic was just a simple idea based on the old saying you are what you eat.  I figured if you give a cow rBGH, fina, antibiotics, and loads of other crap, then you eat the cow... it can't be good.  LOL   Wink


No doubt.
Organic is superior for the reasons mentioned above, as well as others.
I just think that the benefits have approached "fad-status" over the years, becoming at least a tad overexaggerated.

Ashley Mullins, R.D., L.D., CNSC, is a registered dietitian at Baylor All Saints Medical Center.
She has gone on record saying: “From a nutrition standpoint, there isn’t enough research to show that organic foods are more nutritious than regular foods. The levels of pesticides currently used haven’t been found to be harmful. Of course, there may be other benefits to buying organic, such as it being more environmentally friendly and, in some cases, fresher.”

Currently, neither the FDA nor the American Academy of Pediatrics claims that organic foods are more nutritious. "To a pediatrician, making sure your baby receives a balanced diet is what is preferable," notes pediatrician Steven Abelowitz, M.D., medical director of Coastal Kids Pediatric Group in Newport Beach and Laguna Niguel, California.


Regardless of the above facts and claims, these fruits and veggies consistently top the list for their pesticide load, and it IS advisable to consume their organic counterparts when possible:

1. Peaches
2. Apples
3. Sweet bell peppers
4. Celery
5. Nectarines
6. Strawberries
7. Cherries
8. Lettuce
9. Imported grapes
10. Pears
11. Spinach
12. Potatoes


sources:
http://www.parenting.com/article/is-organic-food-overrated?page=0,0
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/05/090521200017.htm

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rotaryfan
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« Reply #4 on: January 10, 2012, 03:06:04 PM »

"organic" means different things in different areas of regulation. I know that in Canada an organic produce is only 95% organic, and allows for 5% pesticide or fertilizer use. Also, organic has different meanings for every kind of meat, and different organic regulations for each type. Organic Canadian beef can be sold in most parts of Europe as Organic Beef, but organic beef from Europe cannot pass Canadian regulations for organic status in Canada.  Also, here, after a farm gets organic status, there is no regulating body that goes around and inspects organic farms the way other farms are inspected. so when your in a grocery store and your buying organic food, make sure you know what your state regulations for organic food are, otherwise you could just be wasting extra money on food that has just as many chemicals as other foods.  If i am going to buy organic food, I usually go straight to a local farm where I know the owner, or somewhere that has a good reputation for quality food. Food is way to expensive to waste money on a misrepresented product.
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Montague
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« Reply #5 on: January 10, 2012, 03:45:00 PM »

"organic" means different things in different areas of regulation. I know that in Canada an organic produce is only 95% organic, and allows for 5% pesticide or fertilizer use. Also, organic has different meanings for every kind of meat, and different organic regulations for each type. Organic Canadian beef can be sold in most parts of Europe as Organic Beef, but organic beef from Europe cannot pass Canadian regulations for organic status in Canada.  Also, here, after a farm gets organic status, there is no regulating body that goes around and inspects organic farms the way other farms are inspected. so when your in a grocery store and your buying organic food, make sure you know what your state regulations for organic food are, otherwise you could just be wasting extra money on food that has just as many chemicals as other foods.  If i am going to buy organic food, I usually go straight to a local farm where I know the owner, or somewhere that has a good reputation for quality food. Food is way to expensive to waste money on a misrepresented product.


Good post.
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JAM
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« Reply #6 on: January 11, 2012, 01:12:28 PM »

Wow I didn't know that they allow a 5% for chemicals.  Sort of defeats the idea behind organic doesn't it?  I also get stuff in the summer from a local farm via a crop share.  Once a week I get to go pick up vegetables.  (winter time sucks though)  There is a local farmers market here for meats as well, and it also tastes way better than the grocery store.  Usually cheaper on both counts too.   Smiley
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