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Author Topic: Organized Crime, Mafia, Cartel, Triad, Syndicate, Gang Thread  (Read 2191 times)
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« on: April 08, 2012, 06:31:55 PM »

The FBI Files: "Boss of Bosses" Carlo Gambino
For decades the FBI largely ignored Carlo Gambino but after local cops busted a meeting among the nation's Mafia leaders on November 14, 1957 in upstate Apalachin, NY, the G-men finally decided to take a closer look at the hook-nosed gangster according to Bureau files.

By early 1962 the FBI had understood the importance of Gambino on the nine-member Mafia Commission which governed the 26 crime families throughout the United States, and a May 29, 1962 memo reflects the investigative priority he was given by the New York Field Office:

It is imperative that every effort be made to establish highly confidential coverage of Gambino in view of his position as a "Commission" member and his obvious importance as a top leader in the criminal organization controlled by the "Commission."  Considerable information has been developed recently indicating that Gambino is of key importance at the top level in the organized crime underworld in this country as an arbitrator and consultant.  [Redacted] Because of Gambino's key position on the "Commission" it is of utmost importance that we obtain the desired coverage of his activities, enabling us to stay currently informed on his contacts with some of the most important racket figures in this country.

Gambino was born on August 24, 1902 in Palermo, Sicily, and entered the United States on December 23, 1931 Norfolk, VA "as a stowaway aboard the S.S. Vincenzo Florio." Although Gambino was off the FBI's radar screen until the Apalachin Meeting bust, the mobster had not gone unnoticed by other federal law enforcement agencies during the 1930s and 1940s.

A December 23, 1957 FBI report quotes from the files of the Alcohol Tax Unit within the U.S. Treasury Department including an 11/16/34 memo which claimed:

Since the coming of Prohibition, there has been in the City of New York and vicinity and extending into the State of New Jersey a notorious, daring group of bootleggers known as the GAMBINO outfit.   The principal members of this outfit are:  CARLO GAMBINO; his brother PAUL GAMBINO; and their cousin ANTHONY GAMBINO.

Even after the repeal of Prohibition Gambino allegedly continued in the black market for alcohol, and according to ATU reports cited by the FBI the mobster failed to pay millions in taxes on his product.

Carlo and his brother Paul also were known to the Bureau of Narcotics within the U.S. Treasury Department as far back as the mid-1940s, and a March 13, 1958 FBI report quotes a Narcotics Bureau supervisor who testified before the New York State Joint Legislative Committee on January 9, 1958 that "the GAMBINOS were reported to exercise control of the narcotics smuggling activities between the Mafia element in Palermo and the United States on behalf of SALVATORE LUCIANO."

The FBI's early investigation into Gambino focused on his infiltration of the legitimate economy -- he allegedly had hidden interests in companies involving the garment, paper, food and waste industries among others -- and his front as a "labor consultant" with S.G.S. Associates which helped out real estate developers and owners with their union problems during the 1950s and 1960s.  Included within the Bureau's file is a clipping of an April 17, 1965 article "Business Leaders Used Mafia Firm" by Charles Grutzner from The New York Times which states:

Among the clients and former clients are Wellington Associates, owners of the Chrysler Building and the largest acquirers of real estate in the metropolitan area in recent years; William J. Levitt, most of whose massive building operations have been with non-union labor; Flower and Fifth Avenue Hospitals, Howard Clothes, Bond Clothes, and the Concord Hotel at Lake Kiamesha, N.Y.

The article estimated that S.G.S. Associates earned $500,000 a year in billings although its clients claimed ignorance of the Gambino tie:

Several S.G.S. clients, who confirmed that they had been questioned by F.B.I. agents recently, said they had been unaware that the G. in the firm name stood for Gambino.  They said they had ended their contracts, or were about to do so, after learning of the Mafia connection.

Among the unions in which Carlo Gambino allegedly had influence was the International Longshoremen's Association.

A great deal of the FBI's material on Carlo Gambino concerned his personal life which the G-men acquired from informants, surveillance and bugs.

By outward appearances the mob boss did not live extravagantly.  He owned a modest home in Brooklyn, and perhaps his only indulgence was a waterfront property in Massapequa which he purchased from Ettore Zappi -- a trusted capo who ran Gambino's extensive porn empire and lived next door -- for use on the weekends during the summer.   At the Long Island home he kept a 1964 20-foot Glasspas and a 1958 55-foot Wheeler cabin crusier at the dock, and "it is also reported that GAMBINO uses a converted Coast Guard cutter" but "this information could not be verified."  Although Gambino lived relatively modestly he was a very rich man.  He stashed jewels and cash in safety deposit boxes at multiple banks throughout New York City, and was said to have the capacity to raise $10 million on a moment's notice.

In 1932 Carlo Gambino married Catherine Castellano -- an apparent first cousin and the sister of Gambino's successor Paul Castellano -- and the FBI built a family tree of the mob boss after Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy during a November 4, 1963 visit to the New York field office "expressed an interest in the intermarriage within the blood family of CARLO GAMBINO" and the supposed "resulting imbeciles and morons that have come from such close intermarriage."  The family tree is compiled in an FBI November 13, 1963 report, and the Bureau notes "that hoodlums in referring to the Gambino family ('Cosa Nostra' family) sometimes call them 'degenerates' and it is believed that this terminology may have come about through this close intermarriage within various members of the family."   (The FBI files on Thomas "Tommy Ryan" Eboli indicate that the Genovese acting boss never could stand Gambino, and an informant told the FBI in the early 1960s that Eboli characterized the Gambino crime family as "full of degenerates" after learning one of its soldiers was whacked for having an affair with his mother-in-law.)

The FBI planted a bug in the long-married couple's hotel room during their March 1962 vacation to Miami, FL where they stayed at the Golden Gate, and Carlo complained about his days at the track and Catherine complained about the Jews.  Apparently Mrs. Gambino had an anti-Semitic streak:  "She also stated that there were too many Jews there and she says she feels these Jews drink too much.  She stated that she feels she is better than they are."  As the wife of a bootlegger Mrs. Gambino apparently missed the irony in complaining about "these Jews" who "drink too much" but, of course, self-delusion is the first refuge of a mob wife.

The marriage sounded thoroughly loveless with endless bickering based on the FBI eavesdropping of the Gambino hotel room.  Carlo on one occasion called Catherine a "shrew" with "a sharp tongue," and on another occasion cursed at her and "then told his wife that she talked too much and if she did not shut up, he would cut her tongue off."

In its nearly 20-year investigation into Carlo Gambino the FBI was only able to build a single case against the mob boss, and on March 23, 1970 arrested the so-called "boss of bosses" for his alleged role in conspiring to rob $6 million from an armored truck.  Of course, the case never was prosecuted.  Manhattan federal judge Marvin Frankel took sympathy upon the aging gangster,  and indefinitely stayed the case.

Carlo Gambino had been conveniently saved from justice by his bad heart on numerous occasions.  The mob boss had been a target for deportation by the INS since the 1957 Apalachin Meeting, and his ticker always flared up right before he was due to appear before immigration hearings or court proceedings on the matter.  On May 13, 1969 an FBI agent approached Gambino at a lower Manhattan eatery on Walker Street in the city's then textile manufacturing district as the mob boss was having breakfast -- a grapefruit, English Muffin and coffee -- and while counting out the 30 pills he had to take daily for his degenerate heart repeatedly said "I'm a sick, sick, very sick man."

The old coot finally died at the age of 74 on October 15, 1976 at his Long Island home.  An October 19, 1976 memo from the New York Field Office to the FBI Director provided the final details on the passing of Carlo Gambino from this world into the next one:

CARLO GAMBINO died of heart disease 10/15/76 at 34 Club Drive, Massapequa, LI, NY (not verified by death certificate).  GAMBINO waked at Cusimano and Russo Funeral Home, 10/16-17/76.  Funeral services held 10 AM 10/18/76 at Our Lady of Grace Church, Ave. W and E. 4th St., Brooklyn, NY.  Burial services followed at the Cloisters, St. John's Cemetery, Queens, NY.

It's ironic that Gambino received a funeral mass given that he probably would have rolled dice for Christ's clothing if present at the Crucifixion.

Download Carlo Gambino FBI Files Part 1

Download Carlo Gambino FBI Files Part 2

Download Carlo Gambino FBI Files Part 3

Download Carlo Gambino FBI Files Part 4

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Download Carlo Gambino FBI Files Part 6

Download Carlo Gambino FBI Files Part 7

Download Carlo Gambino FBI Files Part 8

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Download Carlo Gambino FBI Files Part 10

Download Carlo Gambino FBI Files Part 11

Download Carlo Gambino FBI Files Part 12

Download Carlo Gambino FBI Files Part 13

Download Carlo Gambino FBI Files Part 14

04:18 PM in Bootlegging, Carlo Gambino, Cosa Nostra, Deportation, Drug Trafficking, Ettore Zappi, FBI, Gambino, Gambling, Genovese, Illegal Immigation, Illegal Reentry, International Longshoremen's Association, Loan Sharking, Lucky Luciano, Mob History, Pornography, Prohibition, Sicilian Mafia, Tax Evasion, Thomas Eboli, Union Corruption, Waste Carting | Permalink
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« Reply #1 on: April 08, 2012, 06:39:34 PM »

[edit]Prohibition era


Al Capone's violent rise to power in Chicago and the media attention it brought made him a lasting figure of the prohibition era and organized crime in general.
On January 17, 1920, Prohibition began in the United States with the Eighteenth Amendment making it illegal to sell, manufacture or transport alcohol. Despite alcohol production and consumption being made illegal, there was still a high demand for it from the public. The profits that could be made from selling and distributing alcohol were worth the risk of punishment from the government, which had a difficult time enforcing prohibition. There were over 900,000 cases of liquor shipped to the borders of American cities.[7] Criminal gangs and politicians saw the opportunity to make fortunes and began shipping larger quantities of alcohol to American cities. The majority of the alcohol was imported from Canada,[8][9] the Caribbean, and the American Midwest where stills manufactured illegal alcohol.
In the early 1920s fascist Benito Mussolini took control of Italy and waves of Italian immigrants fled to the United States. The Sicilian Mafiosi also fled Sicily as Mussolini cracked down on Mafia activities in Italy.[10] The Italian immigrants resided in tenement buildings. As a way to escape the poor life style some Italian immigrants chose to join the American Mafia.
The Mafia took advantage of prohibition and began selling illegal alcohol. The profits from bootlegging far exceeded the traditional crimes of protection, extortion, gambling and prostitution. Prohibition allowed Mafia families to make fortunes.[11][12][13] As prohibition continued victorious factions would go on to dominate organized crime in their respective cities, setting up the family structure of each city. Since Mafia gangs hijacked each other's alcohol shipments, forcing rivals to pay them for "protection" to leave their operations alone, armed guards almost invariably accompanied the caravans that delivered the liquor.[14][15]
In the early 1920s Italian Mafia families began waging wars for absolute control over lucrative bootlegging rackets. As the violence erupted, Italians fought Irish and Jewish ethnic gangs for control of bootlegging in their respected territories. In New York City Frankie Yale waged war with the Irish American White Hand Gang. In Chicago Al Capone and his family massacred the North Side Gang, another Irish American outfit.[12][16] In New York City, by the end of the 1920s two factions of organized crime had emerged to fight for control of the criminal underworld: one led by Joe Masseria and the other by Salvatore Maranzano.[1] This caused the Castellammarese War, which led to Masseria's murder in 1931. Maranzano then divided New York City into five families.[1] Maranzano, the first leader of the American Mafia, established the code of conduct for the organization, set up the "family" divisions and structure, and established procedures for resolving disputes.[1] In an unprecedented move, Maranzano set himself up as Boss of All Bosses and requiring all families to pay tribute to him. This new role was received negatively by his men, and Maranzano was himself murdered within six months on the orders of Charles "Lucky" Luciano. Luciano was a former Masseria underling who had switched sides to Maranzano and orchestrated the killing of Masseria.
After prohibition ended in 1933, organized crime groups were confronted with an impasse and could no longer maintain the high profits they had acquired through the 1920s. The smarter of the organized crime groups acted prudently and expanded into other ventures such as unions, construction, sanitation and drug trafficking. On the other hand, those Mafia families that neglected the need to change eventually lost power and influence and ultimately vanished.[17]
[edit]The Commission
Further information: The Commission (mafia)


FBI chart of American Mafia Bosses across the country in 1963.
Instead of ruling as Boss of All Bosses, Luciano set up the Commission,[1] where the bosses of the most powerful families would have equal say and vote on important matters and solve disputes between families. This group ruled over the National Crime Syndicate and brought in an era of peace and prosperity for the American Mafia.[18] By mid-century, there were 26 official Commission-sanctioned Mafia crime families, each based in a different city (except for the Five Families which were all based in New York).[19] Each family operated independently from each other and generally had exclusive territory they controlled.[1] As opposed to the older generation of "Mustache Petes" such as Maranzano and Masseria, who usually only worked with fellow Italians, the "Young Turks" lead by Luciano were more open to working with other groups, most notably the Jewish-American criminal syndicates to achieve greater profits. The Mafia thrived by following a strict set of rules that called for an organized hierarchical structure and a code of silence that forbade its members from cooperating with the police (Omertà). Failure to follow any of these rules is punishable by death.
The rise of power that the Mafia acquired during Prohibition would continue long after alcohol was made legal again. Criminal empires which had expanded on bootleg money would find other avenues to continue making large sums of money. When alcohol ceased to be prohibited in 1933, the Mafia diversified its money-making criminal actives to include (both old and new): illegal gambling operations, loan sharking, extortion, protection rackets, drug trafficking, fencing, and labor racketeering through control of labor unions. In the mid-20th century, the Mafia was reputed to have infiltrated many labor unions in the United States, most notably the Teamsters and International Longshoremen's Association.[1] This allowed crime families to make inroads into very profitable legitimate businesses such as construction, demolition, waste management, trucking, and in the waterfront and garment industry.[20] In addition they could raid the unions' welfare, health and pension funds, extort businesses with threats of a workers' strike and participate in bid rigging. In New York City, most construction projects could not be performed without the Five Families' approval. In the port and loading dock industries, the Mafia bribed union members to tip them off to valuable items being brought in. Mobsters would then steal these products, pay off security, then fence the stolen merchandise.
Meyer Lanksy made inroads into the casino industry in Cuba during the 1930s while the Mafia was already involved in exporting Cuban sugar and rum.[21] When his friend Fulgencio Batista became president of Cuba in 1952, several Mafia bosses were able to make legitimate investments in legalized casinos. One estimate of the number of casinos mobsters owned was no less than 19.[21] However, when Batista was overthrown following the Cuban Revolution, his successor Fidel Castro banned American investment in the country, putting an end to the Mafia's presence in Cuba.[21] Las Vegas was seen as an "open city" where any family can work. Once Nevada legalized gambling, mobsters were quick to take advantage and the casino industry became very popular in Las Vegas. Since the 1940s, Mafia families from New York, Cleveland, Kansas City, Milwaukee and Chicago had interests in Las Vegas casinos. They got loans from the Teamsters' pension fund, a union they effectively controlled, and used legitimate front men to build casinos.[22] When money came in to the counting room, hired men skimmed millions of dollars in cash before it was recorded, then delivered it to their respective bosses.[22] This money went unrecorded, but the amount is estimated to be in the hundreds of millions of dollars.
Operating in the shadows, the Mafia faced little opposition from law enforcement. Local law enforcement agencies did not have the resources or knowledge to effectively combat organized crime committed by a secret society they were unaware existed.[20] Many people within police forces and courts were simply bribed, while witness intimidation was also common.[20] In 1951, a U.S. Senate committee called the Kefauver Hearings determined that a "sinister criminal organization" known as the Mafia operated in the nation.[1] Many suspected mobsters were subpoenaed for questioning, but few testified and none gave any meaningful information. In 1957, New York State Police uncovered a meeting and arrested major figures from around the country in Apalachin, New York. The event (dubbed the "Apalachin Meeting") forced the FBI to recognize organized crime as a serious problem in the United States and changed the way law enforcement investigated it.[1] In 1963, Joe Valachi became the first Mafia member to turn state's evidence, and provided deatailed information of the its inner workings and secrets. More importantly, he revealed Mafia's existence to the law, which enabled the Federal Bureau of Investigations to begin an aggressive assault on the Mafia's National Crime Syndicate.[23] Following Valachi's testimony, the Mafia could no longer operate completely in the shadows. The FBI put a lot more effort and resources into organized crime actives nation-wide and created the Organized Crime Strike Force in various cities. However, while all this created more pressure on the Mafia, it did little to curb their criminal activities. Success was made in the beginning of the 1980s, when the FBI was able to rid Las Vegas casinos of Mafia control and made a determined effort to loosen the Mafia's stronghold on labor unions.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Mafia


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« Reply #2 on: April 08, 2012, 06:44:34 PM »

http://www.ganglandnews.com


Great site. 
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« Reply #3 on: April 08, 2012, 06:56:44 PM »

Death of Vinny Gorgeous pal Robert Van Zandt Jr. was not suicide: widow
Capo | September 15, 2011    | 0 Comments
A buddy of ex-Bonanno family boss Vincent (Vinny Gorgeous) Basciano was found floating in his family pool with a bullet to the brain – and his wife says it wasn’t self-inflicted.

Ex-con Robert Van Zandt Jr., 44, was Basciano’s partner and “moneyman” in a Bronx construction company. His body was discovered by his wife on Sept. 6 at his Scarsdale home.

“I strongly believe it was not suicide,” widow Kimmarie Van Zandt said Wednesday.

“I loved my husband 110% with all my heart, and there’s no way he would have done this to himself without reaching out to me one last time to say goodbye,” she said. There was no suicide note, she added. Asked if her husband had enemies, she responded, “No comment.”

Detective Lt. Patrick McCormack of the Yonkers Police Department said the death remains an “open investigation.”

“It’s possibly a suicide, but we’re not ruling out anything,” said McCormack, whose department is heading the probe.

Several experienced homicide investigators queried by the Daily News said they had never heard of someone committing suicide with a handgun in a swimming pool.

Kimmarie Van Zandt said she has “no idea” about the origin of the gun recovered from the inground pool.

Basciano’s recent trial for the murder of mob associate Randolph Pizzolo was peppered with references to Robert Van Zandt.

There was testimony that Robert Van Zandt had complained to the gangster that Pizzolo was ripping him off on a construction job.

Basciano was convicted of ordering Pizzolo’s murder, in part because he botched the work on the job.

Robert Van Zandt served time for mail fraud and reached out to the Bonannos for help when he had a beef in prison.

“He owed some people money for gambling in jail … He told me he was around Vinny so I straightened it out for him,” testified Generoso Barbieri, a former Bonanno soldier in Basciano’s crew.

Robert Van Zandt, married and the father of two children, had filed for bankruptcy in 2005, claiming he was $3 million in debt.

Source: nydailynews.com

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I once had closing w Basciano's kid.   A real pofs who stiffed everyone.
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« Reply #4 on: April 08, 2012, 07:01:02 PM »

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rudaj_Organization


I have had a lot of dealings w Albanians.    Tey are the worst of the worst.   
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« Reply #5 on: April 08, 2012, 07:10:04 PM »

http://nymag.com/nymetro/news/crimelaw/features/10870


5 families are a farce.    RICO has largely ended the mafia.
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« Reply #6 on: April 08, 2012, 07:21:50 PM »

http://mafiatoday.com/general-breaking-news/modern-mobsters-still-follow-dad-into-the-mafia



one of my clients, not saying who, is cited in this article.     Total BS.   They have nothing to do w the mob but the FBI and media tried to put it out there like that for ratings. 


he dude is 67 years old and the jack boot thugs showed up at his house w a swat team. 
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« Reply #7 on: April 08, 2012, 07:25:26 PM »

http://mafiatoday.com/organised-crime-today


Cool site.   Tons of info. 
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« Reply #8 on: April 18, 2012, 08:47:04 AM »

Mexican Mafia Declares War On Black Gangs
Friends of Ours ^ | 04/18/12 | Friends of Ours




Apparently gang rivalries in Southern California are breaking down along racial lines, and the Mexican Mafia has ordered Hispanic street gangs to "'focus on getting the blacks out' of their territories, according to an Escondido police gang specialist" as reported by Eva Knott for the San Diego Reader.

Racial unrest in the underworld has been boiling over for the last few years in the Golden State.

Last year the feds indicted 51 suspected members of Azusa 13 -- a Latino street gang affiliated with the Mexican Mafia -- for their alleged roles in a terror campaign against blacks in Azusa, CA as then reported by Frank Stoltze for KPCC: "The indictment alleges that nearly 20 years ago, the Azusa 13 adopted a racist principle to harass and use violence in an effort to drive African-Americans out of the city of Azusa."


(Excerpt) Read more at bitterqueen.typepad.com ...


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------




Cool - thugs killing thugs!   
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« Reply #9 on: January 17, 2013, 10:57:28 AM »

The FBI Hauls Away The Trash

 New York News | NYC Breaking News

Early this morning the FBI made its appointed rounds throughout New York and New Jersey to pick up the trash.
 
The feds have variously charged 32 individuals including suspected mobsters from the Gambino, Lucchese and Genovese crime families for their alleged roles in the waste carting, loan sharking and other rackets pursuant to three indictments as reported by Larry Mcshane and Robert Gearty for the Daily News.
 
A press release from the Department of Justice states:
 
The main Indictment charges 12 defendants under the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act ("RICO") for conspiring to participate in a racketeering enterprise that asserted illegal and extortionate control over commercial waste-hauling companies, and 17 other defendants with individual acts of extortion, loansharking, and other crimes associated with those activities.
 
The lead defendant in the main indictment is reputed Genovese associate Carmine "Papa Smurf" Franco who allegedly used front companies to continue operating "in waste management despite two prior convictions that led to his ban from the business in New Jersey -- and the loss of his license in New York City."
 
Franco and other defendants allegedly employed a so-called "property rights" scheme by which carting routes were determined by extortion payments and enforced through violent threats resulting in quashed competition and higher rates.

Another defendant is reputed Gambino associate Scott Fappiano who last year was given no prison time by Judge Kiyo Matsumoto on an extortion conviction, and apparently quickly returned to the mob life as reported by Mitchel Maddux for the New York Post:  "he will be charged in Manhattan federal court later today for allegedly extorting 'protection' payments from a trash hauler, an indictment says."
 
Of course, it wouldn't be an organized crime case without a police corruption allegation.  Defendant Mario Velez, a recently-retired trooper from the New York State Police, is charged with extortion, and he "is believed to have committed the acts while he was still a state trooper" as reported by ABC News.  A "source close to the investigation" alleges the 44-year-old Velez "retired in October, under pressure, as the investigation by FBI agents, Westchester County and New York City police was underway" as reported by Shawn Cohen and Jonathan Bandler for The Journal News.
 
The main indictment alleges four defendants -- Anthony Pucciarello, Peter LeConte, Dominick "Pepe" Pietranico and Joseph Sarcinella -- are made members of the Genovese family, and a fifth defendant -- Anthony Bazzini -- is a made member of the Gambino family.
 
The second indictment charges three defendants -- reputed Lucchese associate Charles Giustra, Vincent Dimino and Joseph Antico -- with trafficking contraband cigarettes, and further charges Giustra with trafficking cocaine, and the third indictment charges Kenneth Lopez on a weapons charge.
 
Download Indictment:  United States v. Carmine Franco, et al.
 
Download Indictment:  United States v. Charles Giustra, et al.
 
Download Indictment:  United States v. Kenneth Lopez
 
The mob long has had a role in the trash industry, and in 2006 the feds brought a similar "property rights" case against James Galante in Connecticut which included the use of Genovese muscle provided by one-time acting boss Matthew "Matty the Horse" Ianniello.



________________________ _

Mostly a bullshit indictment
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« Reply #10 on: April 06, 2013, 06:08:16 PM »

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EjUACV9s44A" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EjUACV9s44A</a>
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« Reply #11 on: April 06, 2013, 06:37:18 PM »

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JpMG-vA_4a8" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JpMG-vA_4a8</a>
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« Reply #12 on: May 05, 2013, 06:35:50 AM »

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JKda5wqspOA" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JKda5wqspOA</a>


Enjoy 
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« Reply #13 on: May 05, 2013, 06:44:37 AM »

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VQFrnnueZ2c" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VQFrnnueZ2c</a>
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« Reply #14 on: May 05, 2013, 06:49:59 AM »

This is great!!!

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VQFrnnueZ2c" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VQFrnnueZ2c</a>
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