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Author Topic: Weight used  (Read 2992 times)
oldtimer1
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« on: April 15, 2012, 09:41:07 AM »

Anyone reach the point where they truly don't care about the weight used?  It seems all through my training life if I was in a gym and not my basement I wouldn't be caught dead using a light weight. Now in my 50's I feel I don't care if someone sees me using a moderate weight. If I'm burning the muscle with a lot of sets I can't use a ton of weight compared to when I use to use a Yates type routine.  

Now I feel like I'm working the muscle and  going to the gym to do 400lbs deadlifts for reps is over for now or maybe ever. Doing sets with 225lbs to 300lbs is really burning out the legs and back. Using a moderate weight for flys really is burning and pumping the chest.  I only care now if I'm working hard.
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WOOO
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« Reply #1 on: April 15, 2012, 09:45:16 AM »

I've been preaching about this for about a year now... it coincides with the time when i put my home gym in... I go to the actual gym for group cardio classes (I really enjoy box-fit and the other aerobics-combat classes)... I also started running...

I trained back, traps and biceps today... for biceps all i did was 6 sets of dumbbells curls with 30lbs in each hand... the highest number of reps I got was 32 per arm (slow reps) all the way down to 9 for the last set... loved it
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chaos
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« Reply #2 on: April 15, 2012, 10:46:04 AM »

Depends on what my intentions are for that day, but I never concern myself with what other people think about how much I'm lifting, I always lift how I feel. Sometimes I intentionally lift less weight, more reps and slower reps, focusing on each muscle group but most of the time I still lift heavy, low reps.
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Montague
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« Reply #3 on: April 15, 2012, 11:50:08 AM »

I only care now if I'm working hard.


Weight is not the only variable contributing to intensity. The effort you put into a workout is largely up to you; NOT just the total poundages used.

I've been using substantially lighter weight for my entire upper body for the last several months. Performing more reps with less weight has proven quite hard for me compared with the low rep training I'd been doing for so long. I suspect part of the reason it's so tough is that I'd been neglecting my slow-twitch fibers for so long. Another reason I believe my type I fibers were neglected is that, doing higher rep work, I'm seeing new growth.

One final benefit to my current protocol is that I'm able to train very hard, but my joints and tendons feel fantastic compared with the aches & pains I used to get doing things the other way.

Regardless of training style, form, inter-set rests, weight, etc., the trainer chooses how much intensity he/she invests in a workout.
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jpm101
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« Reply #4 on: April 15, 2012, 12:24:24 PM »

 Reminds me of the percentage of tonnage used in an exercise and the way some Olympic, and other lifters, readjust their workout based on that.

Taking the bench as an example:

Say a lifter uses 300b for 3x5's,  that's lifting 300lb 15 times in a exercise. Total weight would equal 4,500lbs.

If the same lifter used a seemly much lighter,, and easier, weight of 200lb and does 3x10's, lifting that 200lbs 30 times in a exercise. Total weight would equal 6.000lbs.

With the much lighter 200, the lifter would be putting a much more demanding workload on the chest/delts & tricep muscles themselves, than if using the 300lbs. And with less stress on the joints/tendons/ligaments and less potential of serous injury. (a time factor is involved with the original concept of this program also ..with regards to the TUT protocol, stopwatch, etc....keeping it simple now)  Training with a lighter weight does not always mean that you are not getting an exceptional and progress muscle building workout. Watching a few top BB'er and Pro's train (over the years), I can attest that some of the  moderate weights they use can be very surprising ....nothing like some of their video's show.

The OldTimer1 & WOOO arrived at the  idea that will come to most lifters as they grow older and hopefully wiser....sooner rather than later. Good Luck


SideBar:  GVT (10X10) is a system I follow from time to time. Just think if anyone were to use 200lbs on the bench, they would have a workload of 20,000 after the final set.

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oldtimer1
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« Reply #5 on: April 15, 2012, 01:41:49 PM »

This thread reminds me of when I was in a gym in the early 80's and a guy was talking about how he saw Chris Dickerson train. He was telling everyone how light he trained.  Years later I learned about Dickerson's training and found out he trained half the body on one day and the other half the day after. He generally did 6 sets of around 10 reps and he trained really fast with about three exercises per body part. Only Superman could use heavy weight training that fast with that many sets.
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wes
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« Reply #6 on: April 16, 2012, 04:20:03 AM »

It`s taken me many years to get my head wrapped around training lighter..........my ego and the magazines that brainwashed me as a kid always get in the way.

These days,I train more for feel but I still incorporate a few heavy sets as I feel that both heavier weight and moderate weight should be used for more complete development.

More on this conundrum after I hit the gym to blast legs.
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jakesonyou
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« Reply #7 on: April 16, 2012, 03:12:22 PM »

you seem to be concerned that old guys shouldn't or can't lift as heavy.  my answer is do what works for you.

I am not as old as you but I can still see myself lifting heavy and injury free in the years to come.  listen to your body and watch for results.

I don't concern myself with others in the gym.  headphones on and it's game time.  the gym is fun for me.  I am not there to chit chat or sit on the bench playing with my phone.
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oldtimer1
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« Reply #8 on: April 16, 2012, 03:27:11 PM »

Every runner in their 30's will say when I'm in my 50's and 60's I will be just as good or better. Same with bodybuilders. Maybe if you are juicing heavy.  It's quite a reality check for most guys into their 50's. Almost all my football friends from High school and college look like crap. Almost all of my bodybuilding buddies from 30 years ago suffered the same fate.  It is really rare to see a guy in their 50's who isn't risking health with drugs that look in shape. To those that don't agree I say look at your dad.

I still train hard. Today was a cardio day and I ran 5 hard miles on the board walk. There were many runners out there and I'll tell you this day no one ran past me. I still hit the iron hard too. I would be a fool to think I could run or lift like I did when I was 23 years old.
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jakesonyou
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« Reply #9 on: April 16, 2012, 09:13:35 PM »

they look like crap because sports was their thing and now they have nothing to do.

Bodybuilding has been my passion since a kid.  I have no reason to drop it.  I go to the gym to look and feel better, but ultimately because I enjoy it.  It's no chore.  It is very fun.

I stay lean year all around and that won't change.  When I am in my 50s I plan to still have abs and good definition.

Some people just let themselves go.

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WOOO
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« Reply #10 on: April 17, 2012, 03:48:10 AM »

jakes...

i'm still convinced that you're a gimmick

i doubt you've ever lifted anything...

i take everything you say with a  Roll Eyes Roll Eyes Roll Eyes
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oldtimer1
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« Reply #11 on: April 17, 2012, 05:45:42 AM »

they look like crap because sports was their thing and now they have nothing to do.

Bodybuilding has been my passion since a kid.  I have no reason to drop it.  I go to the gym to look and feel better, but ultimately because I enjoy it.  It's no chore.  It is very fun.

I stay lean year all around and that won't change.  When I am in my 50s I plan to still have abs and good definition.

Some people just let themselves go.





Everyone has the same plan. Do you think any hard training athlete think they will be out of shape when they get older? Good luck to you and I hope you remember what you wrote now when you are 55.


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WOOO
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« Reply #12 on: April 17, 2012, 06:27:26 AM »


Everyone has the same plan. Do you think any hard training athlete think they will be out of shape when they get older? Good luck to you and I hope you remember what you wrote now when you are 55.




 Grin
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Montague
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« Reply #13 on: April 17, 2012, 08:21:58 AM »

When I am in my 50s I plan to still have abs and good definition.


Famous last words...
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jpm101
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« Reply #14 on: April 17, 2012, 08:48:17 AM »

The cold realities of training, physical condition and abilities  present themselves around 35 years of age. Time is a relentless bitch.

Good Luck
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Montague
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« Reply #15 on: April 17, 2012, 08:56:24 AM »

The cold realities of training, physical condition and abilities  present themselves around 35 years of age. Time is a relentless bitch.

Good Luck


JPM:
You're a serious lifter with plenty of years in the game.
Would you be willing to outline any injuries you've sustained, along with causes and treatment?

If that's too personal, could you perhaps share conditions other trainers (north of 35) have experienced?
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chaos
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« Reply #16 on: April 17, 2012, 09:47:51 AM »

The cold realities of training, physical condition and abilities  present themselves around 35 years of age. Time is a relentless bitch.

Good Luck
ok why do people on this board seem to hold the belief that once you hit your 30's you can't be as strong or in as good of shape as in your 20's? I'm pushin 40 the next couple of years here and I'm as strong as ever, even stronger I would say. And i know a couple guys in their 40's that are still lifting heavier pounage.

Are there injuries or other physical factors you guys suffer from.
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« Reply #17 on: April 17, 2012, 12:28:33 PM »


Famous last words...
nope not at all.  as long as this forum is up for years to come then I will be here to say I have those abs at 50.

As I said above...  The gym to me is enjoyable, this is no chore.  The only time I have ever missed going to the gym was when I went on vacation.  Other than that, I never missed a single day.  No sick days, no injures, nothing.

Those fat people in there 50s who use to look good?  1 word - lazy.

also you don't need drugs to look good in your 50s.  You might not have the testosterone as you did in your 20s but that is ok.  It will be harder to gain muscle and maintain what you once had, but that doesn't mean you will shrivel up and become a blob. Only if you let yourself go - no training, diet no check, etc this will happen.
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ritch
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« Reply #18 on: April 17, 2012, 12:55:55 PM »

LOL at the age of 35 being a bad time. I'm 35 and just hitting my peak.
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mik1111
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« Reply #19 on: April 17, 2012, 01:09:56 PM »

once you get big you don't care about the weights.

if you have grown with small weights: great genetics, no shame at all.
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WOOO
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« Reply #20 on: April 17, 2012, 07:02:01 PM »

ok why do people on this board seem to hold the belief that once you hit your 30's you can't be as strong or in as good of shape as in your 20's? I'm pushin 40 the next couple of years here and I'm as strong as ever, even stronger I would say. And i know a couple guys in their 40's that are still lifting heavier pounage.

Are there injuries or other physical factors you guys suffer from.

i started training as a powerlifter at age 14... played 9 years of football up to the college level... I dislocated my left shoulder playing ball and separated the right one 2 years later...

currently I experience intermittent elbow and shoulder pain that i would describe as moderate... my lower body is undamaged...

i know a lot of lifters who only hit the weights seriously later in life... maybe that's why their bodies hold out longer... i'm 33 and i am in pretty good condition but i mind my Ps & Qs with my upper body these days and i do not want my joint issues to worsen with age
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jpm101
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« Reply #21 on: April 18, 2012, 08:55:20 AM »

Ritch:  There comes a time when  the human body reaches a point of diminishing returns, that  the efforts put into serious training does not always give the same results as when younger. The late 20's to early 30's is usually when this occurs in most men. At the mean average of 35, the bodies recovery system,  and the potential for injury , will need more serious attention when working out.  We all must make training adjustments and be honest in recognizing our limitations.  No dis'ing you here, but if your just hitting your peak at 35, your a bit over 10 years too late.

I'm not saying than anyone can not improve and increase their strength when reaching 35, most trainee's can and do when logic is applied to their workout protocol (fewer training days a week/allow more time for recovery/shorter and to the point workouts/etc). Many are breaking their personal past best, but that graph line is dropping a little each year. And again, the point of diminishing returns should become quite clear. Though the spirit may be willing, the genetic & chemical factor of each of us, has a strong influence as we all age.

Mik1111: Agree..don't bother trying to impress with super duper lifting...muscle size should explain all.

Montague: Not a serious lifter for quite a while.. Only major injury was while playing football (D1-AA). Senior year, major lower back surgery. Spent a time in rehab. I consider that Romanian Dl's had helped my lower back very well when returning to regular workouts. Lucky having no serious or long term injury from lifting, at any time.

Far as potential injury goes; If wanting to avoid serious injury (and steady strength/muscle building progress) try not going to failure during training.  That has been impressed on my mind from talking to many veteran lifters and BB'ers, since my teens. If you find problems (nagging injuries, etc) with doing benches, DL's or squats, than don't do them. Unless your a PL'er, because BB'ers get too caught up with lifting heavy on these movements, when they don't have to. For BB'ers, no need to waste energy in the gym by trying to impress people who don't really care any way. Train for yourself and not others.  Good Luck.

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rambo_john
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« Reply #22 on: April 18, 2012, 04:31:02 PM »

Hey mik1111,

Would you care to elaborate a little?

Do you think one need to get to a certain strength level before he can volume train?

once you get big you don't care about the weights.

if you have grown with small weights: great genetics, no shame at all.

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wes
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« Reply #23 on: April 19, 2012, 01:01:54 PM »

35-40 are peak strength years as long as you`ve been training steadily for a long time.


After 40 or so in most people,you start to go a bit downhill and miss a few steps,but don`t ever stop training.......it`ll always be better than stopping!!
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oldtimer1
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« Reply #24 on: April 19, 2012, 02:26:00 PM »

I think the best I ever looked was when I was 23.  The second best was for many years in my 40's. I really think I spent the majority of my 40's looking good.  Now in my 50's my body is going down hill.  I'm working on it though.
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