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Author Topic: Is a low-sodium diet killing you?  (Read 1028 times)
WOOO
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« on: November 01, 2012, 03:44:19 AM »

Again, this is a meta-analysis (if you don't know what that means please google it) so the conclusions need to be thought about in that context (not a controlled, double blind trial):

http://heart.bmj.com/content/early/2012/08/21/heartjnl-2012-302337.abstract

Low sodium versus normal sodium diets in systolic heart failure: systematic review and meta-analysis

Abstract
Context A low sodium diet has been proposed to reduce the risk of heart failure (HF) hospitalisations and is currently advocated in consensus guidelines, yet some evidence suggests adverse neurohumoral activation for sodium restriction in the HF setting.

Objectives
To evaluate the effects of a restricted sodium diet in patients with systolic HF.

Data sources
A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised trials OVID MEDLINE, PubMed, Excerpta Medica (Embase), the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, Scopus, Web of Science and Google Scholar were searched up to April 2012.

Study selection
Two independent reviewers selected studies for inclusion on the basis of a randomised controlled trial design that included adults with systolic HF receiving a restricted salt diet or control diet and reporting mortality (all-cause, sudden death or HF-related) and HF-related hospitalisations.

Data extraction and analysis
Descriptive and quantitative information was extracted from included studies. A random-effects model was used to compute pooled risk ratios (RR) for mortality and morbidity outcomes.

Results
Six randomised trials comparing low sodium diets (1.8 g/day) with normal sodium diets (2.8 g/d) in 2747 patients with systolic HF were identified. Compared with a normal sodium diet, a low sodium diet significantly increased all cause mortality (RR 1.95, 95% CI 1.66 to 2.29), sudden death (RR 1.72, 95% CI 1.21 to 2.44), death due to HF (RR 2.23, 95% CI 1.77 to 2.81) and HF readmissions (RR 2.10, 95% CI 1.67 to 2.64).

Conclusion
Compared with a normal sodium diet, a low sodium diet significantly increases morbidity and mortality in systolic HF.
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Montague
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« Reply #1 on: November 01, 2012, 05:06:45 AM »

This observation is semi-related, but I've always been under the presumption that iodine is the real problem with excessive common/table salt consumption.
Fortunately, there are more, better alternatives available to us now.
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chris-a
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« Reply #2 on: November 01, 2012, 07:07:42 AM »

sea salt, perfect sodium/potassium balance, minerals etc, a gram a day = good health
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Montague
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« Reply #3 on: November 01, 2012, 08:52:29 AM »

sea salt, perfect sodium/potassium balance, minerals etc, a gram a day = good health


I love sea salt and use it exclusively now. I also swear it's got a better and stronger taste than processed iodized table salt.
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Princess L
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« Reply #4 on: November 01, 2012, 11:22:54 AM »


I love sea salt and use it exclusively now. I also swear it's got a better and stronger taste than processed iodized table salt.

Mostly due to irregular and larger grains (Kosher too).  You taste more, using less.
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« Reply #5 on: November 01, 2012, 11:43:16 AM »

Mostly due to irregular and larger grains (Kosher too).  You taste more, using less.


I didn't realize much of its stronger taste was due to granule size.
So, if used in cooking, there is no allowance that needs to be made if it simply dissolves in a broth, for instance?
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« Reply #6 on: November 01, 2012, 01:29:53 PM »

Personally I use 'fleur de sel' aka primo sea salt. Taste is amazing. Hopefully it's not blessed by anyone though. Blessing food is fucking odd.
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Princess L
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« Reply #7 on: November 01, 2012, 05:48:54 PM »


I didn't realize much of its stronger taste was due to granule size.
So, if used in cooking, there is no allowance that needs to be made if it simply dissolves in a broth, for instance?

I'm not sure I understand your question  Huh  I season while cooking, infusing flavor I guess, using Kosher (easy to pinch) or sea salt, "finishing" with same if necessary.  I don't use table salt unless a (baking) recipe specifically calls for it (disolvability).  

Maybe this explains it better (from Food Network).


For the cook's purposes, the main difference between salts is in their texture. Table salt's fine granules dissolve quickly, making it the preferred salt of bakers. Sea salt and kosher salt possess larger, irregular grains that add a delightful crunch and hit of briny flavor when sprinkled on food at the last minute. Generally, savvy cooks prefer kosher salt when cooking, since its coarse texture is easier to take a pinch of when seasoning savory dishes.

Chemically there is little difference between kitchen salts. All are at least 97 1/2 percent sodium chloride. But there are significant differences in the provenance and processing of these salts.

Table salt is mined from underground salt deposits, and includes a small portion of calcium silicate, an anti-caking agent added to prevent clumping. It possesses very fine crystals and a sharp taste. Because of its fine grain a single teaspoon of table salt contains more salt than a tablespoon of kosher or sea salt.

Sea salt is harvested from evaporated seawater and receives little or no processing, leaving intact the minerals from the water it came from. These minerals flavor and color the salt slightly. However, because these salts are usually expensive, it is worth keeping in mind that they lose their unique flavor when cooked or dissolved.

Kosher salt takes its name from its use in the koshering process. It contains no preservatives and can be derived from either seawater or underground sources. Aside from being a great salt to keep within arm's reach when you are cooking, it is particularly useful in preserving, because its large crystals draw moisture out of meats and other foods more effectively than other salts.
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« Reply #8 on: November 01, 2012, 05:59:42 PM »

Sorry. Looking at it now, I see that I wasn't very clear.
I was asking if it is necessary to use less sea salt when cooking to achieve the same taste as regular salt - the context being soup, broth, or anything in which the salt dissolves, as opposed to being sprinkled over just before serving or eating.

And thank you for the article. I found it helpful and informative!
 Cool
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« Reply #9 on: November 01, 2012, 06:14:06 PM »

Koshering means 'removing the blood from'

It's a primitive term that is often misapplied to non animal goods

Eat food.

Fck religion
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Princess L
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« Reply #10 on: November 01, 2012, 07:04:27 PM »

Koshering means 'removing the blood from'

It's a primitive term that is often misapplied to non animal goods

Eat food.

Fck religion

Well, since Kosher refers to how the animal is slaughtered or prepared or something like that  Undecided , koshering salt would be the kind (the right shape and size) of salt that would draw out the blood from the meat.  Kosher has nothing to do with a Rabbi blessing the food.

I'm sure Ron could speak to this
  Huh
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« Reply #11 on: November 01, 2012, 07:08:37 PM »

Sea salt comes from salt beds. Not from animals. Hope this helps.
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Princess L
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« Reply #12 on: November 01, 2012, 07:38:01 PM »

Sea salt comes from salt beds. Not from animals. Hope this helps.

Have you been drinking again?
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« Reply #13 on: November 01, 2012, 09:17:36 PM »

Informative article.  And I only ever use sea salt....love the stuff. 
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« Reply #14 on: November 02, 2012, 04:50:28 AM »

Have you been drinking again?

I was fricken loaded last night.  Grin
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