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Author Topic: Olympic weightlifters, training several times per week, and capacity for volume  (Read 4772 times)
Beach Muscles
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« Reply #25 on: December 14, 2012, 07:46:31 PM »

Realized too, that these are OLYMPIC WEIGHTLIFTERS. THEIR GENETICS ARE FAR BEYOND THE AVERAGE LIFTER OR BODYBUILDER. They are fast twitch freaks whose muscles respond and adapt FAR MORE EFFICIENTLY THAN 90% OF THE POPULATION.
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keanu
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« Reply #26 on: December 28, 2012, 09:02:40 PM »

Olympic weightlifters may train several times a day, but these workouts are very short, maybe 30 minutes, and consist of only a few sets with long rest in between. The idea is not to stain too much at any one session, and to keep the Olympic weightlifting coaches employed. What is your goal, bigger muscles? To construct a program you need to break down how a muscle grows.

From my experience training thousands of people:

1) do not training to failure (which you do not). Training to the limit will cease muscular gains. You want to go at about 80-85 percent when the form starts going and the cheating starts, the set is stopped.

2) Your sets have to last a least 30 seconds to trigger decent hypertrophy.

3) More work in less time is what you should be doing with the volume training. You won't accomplish this doing straight sets, one exercise at a time.

4) Proper breathing. A workout should be like an athletic event.  Holding your breath is the worst thing you can do. Hello stress hormones, goodbye muscle.

5) Upping the volume usually comes with less intensity. If you slip out of the 80-85 percent zone you will get little out of it muscle wise.  
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WOOO
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« Reply #27 on: December 29, 2012, 04:25:40 AM »

I would suggest that it's not that simple...


"
Olympic weightlifters may train several times a day, but these workouts are very short, maybe 30 minutes, and consist of only a few sets with long rest in between. The idea is not to stain too much at any one session, and to keep the Olympic weightlifting coaches employed. What is your goal, bigger muscles? To construct a program you need to break down how a muscle grows.

From my experience training thousands of people:

1) do not training to failure (which you do not). Training to the limit will cease muscular gains. You want to go at about 80-85 percent when the form starts going and the cheating starts, the set is stopped.
     This is not true in my experience... do you have scientific backing for this claim? Failure, when used correctly, can be a valuable tool.

2) Your sets have to last a least 30 seconds to trigger decent hypertrophy.
     Ok... but this can be achieved using stop-start sets, short rest periods, drop sets and (my personal favorite) supersets

3) More work in less time is what you should be doing with the volume training. You won't accomplish this doing straight sets, one exercise at a time.
     Straight sets work well for many people... personally I love a ton of volume and supersetting opposing muscle groups... but that's not for everyone.

4) Proper breathing. A workout should be like an athletic event.  Holding your breath is the worst thing you can do. Hello stress hormones, goodbye muscle.
     Holding, controlling and using one's breath is a valuable tool... staying relaxed (not getting angry at the iron) is far more important that worrying about when you are breathing in/out. Weight lifting in a serene/meditative state can help a person push through pain barriers far better than rage (I always laugh when I see people smacking each other before sets). Learning yogic breathing can help though (controlled, through the nose) as well as learning how to focus the breath within different parts of the abdomen and back ("pushing against your belt") when powerlifting.

5) Upping the volume usually comes with less intensity. If you slip out of the 80-85 percent zone you will get little out of it muscle wise.
     Doesn't make much sense to me... muscle adaptation occurs from both intense and minimal effort training... watch the progression of an old person who starts a tai chi program. After 2-3 years of weekly sessions you can usually see a marked difference in their muscle mass (without any lifting).

"


Just my $0.02
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anabolichalo
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« Reply #28 on: January 24, 2013, 11:46:03 AM »

didnt read the thread but just wanted to say olympic lifters that make it to the top are genetically gifted and juiced to the gils


they typically dont have a job
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#1 Klaus fan
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« Reply #29 on: February 03, 2013, 03:41:17 PM »

Weightlifters, like powerlifters and strongman, get their volume from assistance training. They always strive for bigger volume.
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