Getbig Bodybuilding, Figure and Fitness Forums
October 30, 2014, 10:51:47 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
 
   Home   Help Login Register  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: The second angel poured out his bowl on the sea, and it turned into blood  (Read 611 times)
Bad Boy Dazza
Getbig IV
****
Posts: 3381



« on: November 27, 2012, 05:35:25 AM »

the end is nigh






Report to moderator   Logged
Onetimehard
Competitors II
Getbig V
******
Gender: Male
Posts: 13964


Jasher


« Reply #1 on: November 27, 2012, 05:44:45 AM »

what is the cause of that?
Report to moderator   Logged
Kwon_2
Getbig V
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 23729


I'M DRINK EARL GAY TEA


« Reply #2 on: November 27, 2012, 05:45:13 AM »

Who was the second angel? Lucius Ferdinand? Gabs?
Report to moderator   Logged
Bad Boy Dazza
Getbig IV
****
Posts: 3381



« Reply #3 on: November 27, 2012, 05:49:14 AM »

what is the cause of that?

The flags are back up at Bondi Beach but thick red algal blooms are continuing to appear at beaches across Sydney's east.

A bloom was first spotted at Bondi at 6.30am (AEDT) on Tuesday, with subsequent outbreaks popping up at Clovelly Beach and Gordons Bay later in the day.

On the NSW central coast, blooms were spotted off Wamberal, Copacabana, Terrigal, Avoca and North Avoca beaches at around 9.30am but dispersed shortly after, a Gosford City Council spokesperson said.

No beaches were closed on the central coast.

While Gordons Bay and Clovelly, which resembled tomato juice on Tuesday afternoon, remain closed, Bondi Beach has reopened.

"With the red algae leaving and mostly harmless, Bondi is putting the flags back up again. Enjoy!" Beachwatch wrote on Twitter.

The bloom has been identified as Noctiluca scintillans, is caused by an upwelling of colder nutrient-rich water.

Also called "red tide" or "fire in the sea", the algae is non-toxic but contains high ammonia levels that can cause minor skin irritation if you swim in it, a NSW Office of Water spokesman told AAP.

He said the blooms were a common natural phenomena and more likely to occur in spring and autumn when there were higher water temperatures and more movement in ocean currents.

"(It) can also often be seen after rainfall events in the vicinity of river mouths."

At night, the algae can appear phosphorescent.

Waverley head lifeguard Bruce Hopkins said the bloom had "quite a fishy smell to it", had a "reddy-purple" tinge and sits on the surface like oil sheen.

"It can irritate some people's skin but generally not much more than that," he told AAP.

Red algae was uncommon but not unheard of at Bondi, Mr Hopkins added.

People are advised to avoid swimming in discoloured water.
It is not known when the Clovelly or Gordons Bay will reopen.
Report to moderator   Logged
WOOO
Getbig V
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 15971


Mr. Unpopular


« Reply #4 on: November 27, 2012, 06:07:48 AM »

red tide has been happening for kiloyears...
Report to moderator   Logged
Stark
Getbig V
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 22925



« Reply #5 on: November 27, 2012, 09:05:23 AM »

what is the cause of that?
]

can you say algae?
Report to moderator   Logged
nefario
Getbig III
***
Posts: 319


« Reply #6 on: November 27, 2012, 09:38:06 AM »

Damn, that is seriously red!  I've seen a lot of red tide in So Cal in the summertime over the years (and the cool-as-shit green phosphorescence at night) but nothing approaching these images.
Report to moderator   Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Theme created by Egad Community. Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!