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Author Topic: thermous insulation for uture houses  (Read 514 times)
magikusar
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« on: December 22, 2012, 02:12:47 PM »

can it be used?
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Roger Bacon
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« Reply #1 on: December 22, 2012, 02:14:30 PM »

can it be used?


As far as I know,a thermos just uses an air gap as insulation.

I think dense packed cellulose is getting big.

I read an article about this guy who built a 2500 sqft home, and used insulation in such a way that he heated his home with one wood stove  using one cord of wood a season.

I guess it all comes down to R-Values
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« Reply #2 on: December 22, 2012, 02:20:56 PM »

wood stove or electric aside

would the thermous method keep in more heat?

I saw reflective insulation too
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« Reply #3 on: December 22, 2012, 03:08:43 PM »

can it be used?


yes -its the principle used in double and triple glazing (thougha cavity wider than 10mm is counterproductive for heat insulation. For most wall construction rockwool &/or glassgfiber batts or polystyrene (aeroboard) boards are used.
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« Reply #4 on: December 23, 2012, 09:40:47 AM »

wood stove or electric aside

would the thermous method keep in more heat?

I saw reflective insulation too

That is called a "radiant barrier" and is mostly effective as to prevent solar radiation from heating attics...you have to have at least an inch void between the radiant barrier and the space you are seeking to protect.  Difficult to achieve in walls...In attics it takes one of two forms:
1) A paint that has a metallic content that reflects infrared and you apply it to the underneath of roofing decks...this is the easiest to do but is not nearly as effective as the second method.
2) An aluminum foil radiant barrier usually stapled shiny side down between the roofing joists…The reason it is stapled shiny side down is that if dust were to collect on the shiny side, it’s effectiveness would diminish…It doesn’t matter to the reflective qualities of the foil to infrared if the shiny side is down, it still reflects it back into space.


Oh…you get specially manufactured foil from roofing supply house for this…don’t try to use household aluminum foil.

One more thing…it’s not effective in preventing the transfer of heat from two spaces that have low temperature delta (temperature differential between the two spaces)…so if the surface separating the two spaces doesn’t receive sunshine…radiant barriers are not effective enough to use.
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« Reply #5 on: December 23, 2012, 10:36:54 AM »

As far as I know,a thermos just uses an air gap as insulation.


No...it's a vacuum...
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Roger Bacon
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« Reply #6 on: December 23, 2012, 06:52:26 PM »

No...it's a vacuum...

Oh yeah, I remember seeing that on How It's Made.
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