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Author Topic: Meteorite crashes in Russia  (Read 4752 times)
mass243
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« Reply #75 on: February 16, 2013, 01:59:37 PM »


Now they said nothing has been found from the lake so far.

"“The ministry’s divers have completed examining the lake’s area but discovered no traces of the meteorite,” Irina Rossius said."


<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WaQIPBqoQ-Q" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WaQIPBqoQ-Q</a>

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« Reply #76 on: February 17, 2013, 08:18:14 AM »

Haha  Grin





 Grin Grin Grin
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« Reply #77 on: February 17, 2013, 08:19:39 AM »

Grin Grin Grin

  Cheesy
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littledumbells
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« Reply #78 on: February 17, 2013, 08:40:59 AM »

Russians are cool as ice!

if that hit in the states there would be panic on the streets, people running to supermarkets to gather supplies , weapons out just in case more Meteors hit





  And there would be the folk standing around waiting, and complaining, about FEMA not doing enough for them instead of doing shit to help themselves
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« Reply #79 on: February 26, 2013, 10:25:41 AM »

Quite possibly the best reaction to the Russian meteor

http://www.ilyke.net/quite-possibly-the-best-reaction-to-the-russian-meteor/22214/u23p37/?utm_source=u23&utm_medium=p2337&utm_campaign=aff
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« Reply #80 on: February 26, 2013, 10:32:20 AM »

  Cheesy


 Grin
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« Reply #81 on: February 26, 2013, 03:35:29 PM »

?
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« Reply #82 on: February 26, 2013, 03:44:13 PM »


 Grin
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« Reply #83 on: February 26, 2013, 03:50:55 PM »

 LOL



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« Reply #84 on: March 04, 2013, 10:47:17 AM »

METEORITE STRIKE AFTERMATH
 
After the massive strike of the meteorite last month, Russian officials, volunteers and scientists from all over the world had gathered at the crash site. The purpose for such a massive search was to gather the fragments of the meteorite while also obtaining data and closure to the residents of Chelyabinsk.

Over 100 pieces have been discovered after nearly combing and excavating 50 km (31 miles) of the area including Lake Chebarkul & Ural Mountains. Along with recent videos, photographs and infrasound readings, they have been able to determine and evaluate more information on the meteorite itself.

Here are the following updates:
 
- Russian experts at Ural Federal University have determined the meteorite to be a common space rock called Chondrite. The meteorite had traces of pyroxene, olivine, troilite, kamacite & taenite.
 
- The meteorite had spent approximately 4.5 billion years in space before it hit the Earth's surface.
 
- Colombian astronomers have been able to map out the trajectory of the meteorite thanks to the mapping of the fragments and videos taken by the locals.
 
- NASA physicist, Peter Brown, had calculated the meteorite to be:
 +17.0 meters wide
 +Weighed 10,000 metric tons
 +Came at the Earth in a velocity of 64,373.8 km/h (40,000 mph)
 +Broke apart 19.3 to 24.1 km (12 to 15 miles) from the Earth
 +The energy of the explosion was 470 kilotons of TNT
 
- The largest piece discovered weighed at 9.8 kgs (22lbs).
 
This is the biggest recorded meteorite since the 1908 Tunguska Event.
 
~ era
 
The photo is an artist's rendition of the unnamed meteor entering into the Earth’s atmosphere.

Photo source: ShutterStock
 
Sources:
 - http://1.usa.gov/160MajZ
 - http://on.doi.gov/YMaKjb
 - http://bit.ly/X9UjO7
 - http://huff.to/VX74fD
 - http://bit.ly/12bgHMF


* meteor.jpg (29.49 KB, 810x486 - viewed 268 times.)
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« Reply #85 on: March 04, 2013, 01:24:18 PM »

 
^^









Bonus: Putin in team Finland  Cool
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« Reply #86 on: November 12, 2013, 04:20:59 AM »

http://xfinity.comcast.net/articles/news-general/20131106/US-SCI--Asteroid.Hit/

Russian fireball shows meteor risk may be bigger

WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists studying the terrifying meteor that exploded without warning over a Russian city last winter say the threat of space rocks smashing into Earth is bigger than they thought.

Meteors about the size of the one that streaked through the sky at 42,000 mph and burst over Chelyabinsk in February — and ones even larger and more dangerous — are probably four, five or even seven times more likely to hit the planet than scientists believed before the fireball, according to three studies published Wednesday in the journals Nature and Science.

That means about 20 million space rocks the size of the Chelyabinsk one may be zipping around the solar system, instead of 3 million, NASA scientist Paul Chodas said at a news conference.

Until Chelyabinsk, NASA had looked only for space rocks about 100 feet wide and bigger, figuring there was little danger below that.

This meteor was only 62 feet across but burst with the force of 40 Hiroshima-type atom bombs, scientists say. Its shock wave shattered thousands of windows, and its flash temporarily blinded 70 people and caused dozens of skin-peeling sunburns just after dawn in icy Russia. More than 1,600 people in all were injured.

Up until then, scientists had figured a meteor causing an airburst like that was a once-in-150-years event, based on how many space rocks have been identified in orbit. But one of the studies now says it is likely to happen once every 30 years or so, based on how often these things are actually hitting.

By readjusting how often these rocks strike and how damaging even small ones can be, "those two things together can increase the risk by an order of magnitude," said Mark Boslough, a Sandia National Lab physicist, co-author of one of the studies.

Lindley Johnson, manager of NASA's Near Earth Object program, which scans the heavens for dangerous objects, said the space agency is reassessing what size rocks to look for and how often they are likely to hit.

In addition, NASA this fall reactivated a dormant orbiting telescope called WISE specifically to hunt for asteroids, Johnson said. And the agency is expanding ground-based sky searches.

At the same time, NASA and the Federal Emergency Management Agency are looking into the need for evacuations in the case of an asteroid headed for Earth and how to keep the public informed without scaring people.

Those issues came up after the two agencies quietly held a disaster drill last spring in Washington that was meant to simulate what would happen if a space rock slightly bigger than the Chelyabinsk one threatened the East Coast.

During the drill, when it looked as if the meteor would hit just outside the nation's capital, experts predicted 78,000 people could die. But when the mock meteor ended up in the ocean, the fake damage featured a 49-foot tsunami and shortages of supplies along the East Coast, according to an after-action report obtained by The Associated Press.

The exercise and the studies show there's a risk from smaller space rocks that strike before they are detected — not just from the giant, long-seen-in-advance ones like in the movie "Armageddon," said Bill Ailor, a space debris expert at the Aerospace Corporation who helped coordinate the drill.

"The biggest hazard from asteroids right now is the city-busting airbursts, not the civilization-busting impacts from 1-kilometer-diameter objects that has so far been the target of most astronomical surveys," Purdue University astronomer Jay Melosh, who wasn't part of the studies, wrote in an email.

"Old-fashioned civil defense, not Bruce Willis and his atom bombs, might be the best insurance against hazards of this kind."

Chodas said the Chelyabinsk rock surprised astronomers because it was coming from the direction of the sun and was not detectable. Telescopes can see some space rocks as small as 3 feet wide, but some are simply too dark to spot, he said.

Scientists said a 1908 giant blast over Siberia, a 1963 airborne explosion off the coast of South Africa, and others were of the type that is supposed to happen less than once a century, or in the case of Siberia, once every 8,000 years, yet they all occurred in a 105-year timespan.

Because more than two-thirds of Earth is covered with water and other vast expanses are uninhabited deserts and ice, other past fireballs could have gone unnoticed.

Just this week, NASA got a wake-up call on those bigger space rocks that astronomers thought they had a handle on, discovering two 12-mile-wide asteroids and a 1.2-mile-wide one that had escaped their notice until this month. However, NASA said the three objects won't hit Earth.

Asteroids are space rocks that circle the sun as leftovers of failed attempts to form planets billions of years ago. When asteroids enter Earth's atmosphere, they become meteors. (When they hit the ground, they are called meteorites.)

The studies said the Chelyabinsk meteor probably split off from a much bigger space rock.

What happened in the Russian city of 1 million people is altering how astronomers look at a space rocks. With first-of-its-kind video, photos, satellite imagery and the broken-up rock, scientists have been able to piece together the best picture yet of what happens when an asteroid careens into Earth's atmosphere. It's not pretty.

"I certainly never expected to see something of this scale or this magnitude," said University of Western Ontario physicist Peter Brown, lead author of one study. "It's certainly scary."

Scientists said the unusually shallow entry of the space rock spread out its powerful explosion, limiting its worst damage but making a wider area feel the effects. When it burst it released 500 kilotons of energy, scientists calculated.

"We were lucky. This could have easily gone the other way. It was really dangerous," said NASA meteor astronomer Peter Jenniskens, co-author of one of the papers. "This was clearly extraordinary. Just stunning."

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« Reply #87 on: November 12, 2013, 04:38:32 AM »

http://xfinity.comcast.net/articles/news-general/20131106/US-SCI--Asteroid.Hit/

Russian fireball shows meteor risk may be bigger

WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists studying the terrifying meteor that exploded without warning over a Russian city last winter say the threat of space rocks smashing into Earth is bigger than they thought.

This meteor was only 62 feet across but burst with the force of 40 Hiroshima-type atom bombs, scientists say.

"We were lucky. This could have easily gone the other way. It was really dangerous," said NASA meteor astronomer Peter Jenniskens, co-author of one of the papers. "This was clearly extraordinary. Just stunning."



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« Reply #88 on: May 07, 2014, 07:10:36 PM »

http://www.iflscience.com/space/meteor-explodes-over-canada

Meteor Explodes Over Canada


Yesterday on Sunday, May 4th, a meteor exploded over southern Ontario in Canada. The sighting occurred just before 4:20 pm local time and produced a flash of light that witnesses say rivaled the brightness of the sun. The explosion caused a loud crashing sound, leading many citizens to wonder if their house had sustained any damage.

The meteor was about half a meter long, causing it to explode with the force of 20-30 tons of dynamite, astronomy professor Peter Brown told CBC News. Although the Earth gets pelted with up to 78,000 tons of space debris each year, most of them occur over water or uninhabited areas.

Check out some of these dash cam videos that caught the brief, yet incredibly bright meteor explosion:

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hiKyNbx4RXg" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hiKyNbx4RXg</a>
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