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Author Topic: Is Alzheimer’s Type 3 Diabetes?  (Read 3322 times)
Straw Man
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« on: June 26, 2013, 11:53:58 AM »

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/09/25/bittman-is-alzheimers-type-3-diabetes/?_r=1
SEPTEMBER 25, 2012, 9:52 PM
Is Alzheimer’s Type 3 Diabetes?

By MARK BITTMAN

Just in case you need another reason to cut back on junk food, it now turns out that Alzheimer’s could well be a form of diet-induced diabetes. That’s the bad news. The good news is that laying off soda, doughnuts, processed meats and fries could allow you to keep your mind intact until your body fails you.

We used to think there were two types of diabetes: the type you’re born with (Type 1) and the type you “get.” That’s called Type 2, and was called “adult onset” until it started ravaging kids. Type 2 is brought about by a combination of factors, including overeating, American-style.

The idea that Alzheimer’s might be Type 3 diabetes has been around since 2005, but the connection between poor diet and Alzheimer’s is becoming more convincing, as summarized in a cover story in New Scientist entitled “Food for Thought: What You Eat May Be Killing Your Brain.” (The graphic — a chocolate brain with a huge piece missing — is creepy. But for the record: chocolate is not the enemy.)

The studies [1] are increasingly persuasive, and unsurprising when you understand the role of insulin in the body. So, a brief lesson.

We all need insulin: in non-diabetics, it’s released to help cells take in the blood sugar (glucose) they need for energy. But the cells can hold only so much; excess sugar is first stored as glycogen, and — when there’s enough of that — as fat. (Blood sugar doesn’t come only from sugar, but from carbohydrates of all kinds; easily digested carbohydrates flood the bloodstream with sugar.) Insulin not only keeps the blood vessels that supply the brain healthy, it also encourages the brain’s neurons to absorb glucose, and allows those neurons to change and become stronger. Low insulin levels in the brain mean reduced brain function.

Type 1 diabetes, in which the immune system destroys insulin-producing cells in the pancreas, accounts for about 10 percent of all cases. Type 2 diabetes is chronic or environmental, and it’s especially prevalent in populations that overconsume hyperprocessed foods, like ours. It’s tragically, increasingly common — about a third of Americans have diabetes or pre-diabetes — and treatable but incurable. It causes your cells to fail to retrieve glucose from the blood, either because your pancreas isn’t producing enough insulin or the body’s cells ignore that insulin. (That’s “insulin resistance”; stand by.)

Put as simply as possible (in case your eyes glaze over as quickly as mine when it comes to high school biology), insulin “calls” your cells, asking them to take glucose from the bloodstream: “Yoo-hoo. Pick this stuff up!”

When the insulin calls altogether too often — as it does when you drink sugar-sweetened beverages and repeatedly eat junk food — the cells are overwhelmed, and say, “Leave me alone.” They become resistant. This makes the insulin even more insistent and, to make matters worse, all those elevated insulin levels are bad for your blood vessels.

Diabetes causes complications too numerous to mention, but they include heart disease, which remains our No. 1 killer. And when the cells in your brain become insulin-resistant, you start to lose memory and become disoriented. You even might lose aspects of your personality.

In short, it appears, you develop Alzheimer’s.

A neuropathologist named Alois Alzheimer noticed, over a century ago, that an odd form of protein was taking the place of normal brain cells. How those beta amyloid plaques (as they’re called) get there has been a mystery. What’s becoming clear, however, is that a lack of insulin — or insulin resistance — not only impairs cognition but seems to be implicated in the formation of those plaques.

Suzanne de la Monte, a neuropathologist at Brown University, has been working on these phenomena in humans and rats. When she blocked the path of insulin to rats’ brains, their neurons deteriorated, they became physically disoriented and their brains showed all the signs of Alzheimer’s. The fact that Alzheimer’s can be associated with low levels of insulin in the brain is the reason why increasing numbers of researchers have taken to calling it Type 3 diabetes, or diabetes of the brain.[2]

Let’s connect the dots: We know that the American diet is a fast track not only to obesity but to Type 2 diabetes and other preventable, non-communicable diseases, which now account for more deaths worldwide than all other causes combined.

We also already know that people with diabetes are at least twice as likely to get Alzheimer’s, and that obesity alone increases the risk of impaired brain function.

What’s new is the thought that while diabetes doesn’t “cause” Alzheimer’s, they have the same root: an over consumption of those “foods” that mess with insulin’s many roles. (Genetics have an effect on susceptibility, as they appear to with all environmental diseases.) “Sugar is clearly implicated,” says Dr. de la Monte, “but there could be other factors as well, including nitrates in food.”

If the rate of Alzheimer’s rises in lockstep with Type 2 diabetes, which has nearly tripled in the United States in the last 40 years, we will shortly see a devastatingly high percentage of our population with not only failing bodies but brains. Even for the lucky ones this is terrible news, because 5.4 million Americans (nearly 2 percent, for those keeping score at home) have the disease, the care for which — along with other dementias — will cost around $200 billion this year.

Gee. That’s more than the $150 billion we’ve been saying we spend annually on obesity-related illnesses. So the financial cost of the obesity pandemic just more than doubled. More than 115 million new cases of Alzheimer’s are projected around the world in the next 40 years, and the cost is expected to rise to more than a trillion of today’s dollars. (Why bother to count? $350 billion is bad enough.)

The link between diet and dementia negates our notion of Alzheimer’s as a condition that befalls us by chance. Adopting a sane diet, a diet contrary to the standard American diet (which I like to refer to as SAD), would appear to give you a far better shot at avoiding diabetes in all of its forms, along with its dreaded complications. There are, as usual, arguments to be made for enlisting government help in that struggle, but for now, put down that soda!

1. NIH: Relative Intake of Macronutrients Impacts Risk of Mild Cognitive Impairment or Dementia and The Whitehall II Cohort Study; Rhode Island Hospital: A Link Between Brain Insulin Resistance and Neuronal Stress in Worsening Alzheimer’s Disease
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22915175
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22810099

2. Here is a fantastic and detailed summary by Dr. de la Monte: Alzheimer’s: Diabetes of the Brain?
http://www.doctoroz.com/videos/alzheimers-diabetes-brain
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Roger Bacon
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« Reply #1 on: June 26, 2013, 02:50:08 PM »

Just in case you need another reason to cut back on junk food, it now turns out that Alzheimer’s could well be a form of diet-induced diabetes. That’s the bad news. The good news is that laying off soda, doughnuts, processed meats and fries could allow you to keep your mind intact until your body fails you.

True Adonis, get in here
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« Reply #2 on: June 26, 2013, 07:15:28 PM »

Excellent post/article, Straw!
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Straw Man
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« Reply #3 on: June 26, 2013, 09:18:05 PM »

thanks

here is some pure honesty from Gary Taubes

I agree with the ending assesment



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rwcgzOcGW3A
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Montague
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« Reply #4 on: July 08, 2013, 03:41:09 PM »

thanks

here is some pure honesty from Gary Taubes

I agree with the ending assesment



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rwcgzOcGW3A


In the current societal climate, I agree, too.
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Straw Man
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« Reply #5 on: July 18, 2013, 10:03:38 PM »

http://www.dietdoctor.com/its-the-insulin-stupid
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« Reply #6 on: July 20, 2013, 12:03:58 PM »

Total quackery!
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Straw Man
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« Reply #7 on: July 21, 2013, 07:13:10 PM »

Total quackery!


common claim by people who haven't bothered to look at the science

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Straw Man
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« Reply #8 on: July 29, 2013, 10:48:36 AM »

Is Sugar Toxic?

http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=7403942n&tag=contentBody;storyMediaBox
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« Reply #9 on: July 31, 2013, 04:58:26 PM »

common claim by people who haven't bothered to look at the science


We get that here once in a while.

Andre got all riled up the one night when I called him on one of his posts: "supps don't work.....food."
He said I was a bully because I demanded clarification and proof of his claims; neither of which he could provide.
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Straw Man
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« Reply #10 on: August 01, 2013, 10:40:02 AM »


We get that here once in a while.

Andre got all riled up the one night when I called him on one of his posts: "supps don't work.....food."
He said I was a bully because I demanded clarification and proof of his claims; neither of which he could provide.

funny, someone on the politics board accused me of being Andre

I enjoy a good debate but I really don't care to debate about nutrition.
People can look at the facts and decide for themselves.  There is so much bullshit and emotion around food that most people are going to do whatever they want regardless of facts so why even bother debating. 
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« Reply #11 on: August 01, 2013, 03:49:37 PM »

funny, someone on the politics board accused me of being Andre

I enjoy a good debate but I really don't care to debate about nutrition.
People can look at the facts and decide for themselves.  There is so much bullshit and emotion around food that most people are going to do whatever they want regardless of facts so why even bother debating. 


Yes, but when people come on here and simply claim the science is bullshit without offering any support, I'm going to call them on it. We try to reserve this board for serious and constructive discussion. There are enough other boards here for spewing shit.
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Straw Man
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« Reply #12 on: August 01, 2013, 09:33:03 PM »


Yes, but when people come on here and simply claim the science is bullshit without offering any support, I'm going to call them on it. We try to reserve this board for serious and constructive discussion. There are enough other boards here for spewing shit.

that's fair

I'm not a mod on this board

for whatever reason I don't really care to argue with anyone about diet though I love arguing about politics.   I think it's because politics is a public domain and process where diet, exercise and health are a personal thing (meaning what you do only effects yourself)
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« Reply #13 on: August 02, 2013, 12:34:34 AM »

There are a lot more variables to Insulin Resistance and Diabetes than are even generalized about in that article.


If you really want to know about Diabetes, you will find that are many, many types of Diabetes out there. Yes, they all include: Sugar (I don't care what form) and Insulin.


The topic is much more involved and even a book written by medical professionals cannot prove this theory.


Has anyone considered the general age group of those with Alzheimers? They didn't even eat like people do today. They were also much more active.


I'm calling B.S. on the whole article.


Too many other things to consider that haven't even been researched yet. If they had, we would already be working on a cure.
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Straw Man
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« Reply #14 on: August 02, 2013, 08:13:11 AM »

There are a lot more variables to Insulin Resistance and Diabetes than are even generalized about in that article.


If you really want to know about Diabetes, you will find that are many, many types of Diabetes out there. Yes, they all include: Sugar (I don't care what form) and Insulin.


The topic is much more involved and even a book written by medical professionals cannot prove this theory.


Has anyone considered the general age group of those with Alzheimers? They didn't even eat like people do today. They were also much more active.


I'm calling B.S. on the whole article.


Too many other things to consider that haven't even been researched yet. If they had, we would already be working on a cure.

feel free to post something/anything to support your position
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Straw Man
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« Reply #15 on: August 02, 2013, 08:23:57 AM »

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/08/120813173205.htm

Consuming Flavanol-Rich Cocoa May Enhance Brain Function

Aug. 13, 2012 — Eating cocoa flavanols daily may improve mild cognitive impairment, according to new research in the American Heart Association's journal Hypertension.

Each year, more than six percent of people aged 70 years or older develop mild cognitive impairment, a condition involving memory loss that can progress to dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

Flavanols can be found in tea, grapes, red wine, apples and cocoa products and have been associated with a decreased risk of dementia. They may act on the brain structure and function directly by protecting neurons from injury, improving metabolism and their interaction with the molecular structure responsible for memory researchers said. Indirectly, flavanols may help by improving brain blood flow.

In this study, 90 elderly participants with mild cognitive impairment were randomized to drink daily either 990 milligrams (high), 520 mg (intermediate) or 45 mg (low) of a dairy-based cocoa flavanol drink for eight weeks. The diet was restricted to eliminate other sources of flavanols from foods and beverages other than the dairy-based cocoa drink. Cognitive function was examined by neuro-psychological tests of executive function, working memory, short-term memory, long-term episodic memory, processing speed and global cognition.

Researchers found:

Scores significantly improved in the ability to relate visual stimuli to motor responses, working memory, task-switching and verbal memory for those drinking the high and intermediate flavanol drinks.[/li][/list]

Participants drinking daily higher levels of flavanol drinks had significantly higher overall cognitive scores than those participants drinking lower-levels.
Insulin resistance, blood pressure and oxidative stress also decreased in those drinking high and intermediate levels of flavanols daily. Changes in insulin resistance explained about 40 percent of the composite scores for improvements in cognitive functioning.

"This study provides encouraging evidence that consuming cocoa flavanols, as a part of a calorie-controlled and nutritionally-balanced diet, could improve cognitive function," said Giovambattista Desideri, M.D., study lead author and director of Geriatric Division, Department of Life, Health and Environmental Sciences, University of L'Aquila in Italy.

"The positive effect on cognitive function may be mainly mediated by an improvement in insulin sensitivity. It is yet unclear whether these benefits in cognition are a direct consequence of cocoa flavanols or a secondary effect of general improvements in cardiovascular function."

The study population was generally in good health without known cardiovascular disease. Thus, it would not be completely representative of all mild cognitive impairment patients. In addition, only some clinical features of mild cognitive impairment were explored in the study.

"Given the global rise in cognitive disorders, which have a true impact on an individual's quality of life, the role of cocoa flavanols in preventing or slowing the progression of mild cognitive impairment to dementia warrants further research," Desideri said. "Larger studies are needed to validate the findings, figure out how long the positive effects will last and determine the levels of cocoa flavanols required for benefit."

Co-authors are Catherine Kwik-Uribe, Ph.D.; Davide Grassi, M.D., Ph.D.; Stefano Necozione, M.D.; Lorenzo Ghiadoni, M.D.; Daniela Mastroiacovo, M.D.; Angelo Raffaele, M.D.; Livia Ferri, M.D.; Raffaella Bocale, M.D.; Maria Carmela Lechiara, M.D.; Carmine Marini, M.D. and Claudio Ferri, M.D. Author disclosures are on the manuscript.

Mars Inc. funded the study and provided the standardized cocoa drinks.
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« Reply #16 on: August 03, 2013, 12:19:54 AM »

feel free to post something/anything to support your position


Sure, do you want to read a whole book? I really don't like to copy and paste. I like to use original thought-processing and empirical data. Ever worked with diabetics?


 Although research has revealed a great deal about Alzheimer’s, the precise changes in the brain that trigger the development of Alzheimer’s, and the order in which they occur, largely remain unknown. I can settle with that for this moment based on the continuous work being done on my grandfather.

But hey, no pissing match. Just my own logical thoughts. Don't hold your breath b/c I will put some time and effort into this if you truly give a rats ass. Cool?
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« Reply #17 on: August 03, 2013, 08:23:37 AM »


Sure, do you want to read a whole book? I really don't like to copy and paste. I like to use original thought-processing and empirical data. Ever worked with diabetics?


 Although research has revealed a great deal about Alzheimer’s, the precise changes in the brain that trigger the development of Alzheimer’s, and the order in which they occur, largely remain unknown. I can settle with that for this moment based on the continuous work being done on my grandfather.

But hey, no pissing match. Just my own logical thoughts. Don't hold your breath b/c I will put some time and effort into this if you truly give a rats ass. Cool?

I don't work with diabetics or Alzheimers patients or anything like that.
I never said this was definitive proof of anything (did you notice the thread title is a question and not a statement ?).   I will happily take a look at anything you would like to suggest.  I'm just interested in learning more about the topic (connection btw insulin and many different diseases)
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Straw Man
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« Reply #18 on: August 06, 2013, 11:05:25 AM »


Sure, do you want to read a whole book? I really don't like to copy and paste. I like to use original thought-processing and empirical data. Ever worked with diabetics?


 Although research has revealed a great deal about Alzheimer’s, the precise changes in the brain that trigger the development of Alzheimer’s, and the order in which they occur, largely remain unknown. I can settle with that for this moment based on the continuous work being done on my grandfather.

But hey, no pissing match. Just my own logical thoughts. Don't hold your breath b/c I will put some time and effort into this if you truly give a rats ass. Cool?

ok, not holding my breath but until you get around to posting some info here is some additional info

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xRp0sJuqkBk" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xRp0sJuqkBk</a>

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VGTxyoeWLDQ" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VGTxyoeWLDQ</a>
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Straw Man
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« Reply #19 on: August 11, 2013, 11:00:41 PM »

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vxI1NPk1Nlg" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vxI1NPk1Nlg</a>
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Karl Kox
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« Reply #20 on: August 20, 2013, 07:24:47 AM »

My Alzheimer's experience.

Many people don't know this but before my father died he was dignosed with Alzheimer's. It was caught early so the medications slowed the process way down. The only thing that really got effected was his memory from about ten years back. His long term/short term memory was fine. One thing we did notice was his grumpiness. Despite him being a mean tough guy in the ring, out of the ring he was a big kid. About a year before he did my mom was reading an article on Alzheimer's and found out some research had been done and that coconut oil could help restore some of the side effects of the disease. The lady who did the research started giving it to her husband, at that point he couldn't even draw a simple clock. Several weeks later he could. So after reading that my mom started having my dad take coconut oil pills. After about 2 weeks his whole attitude changed. He went from grumpy, back to his old loving teddy bear self and his memory (which wasn't really bad) did improve.

Just thought I'd share that. I'm going to try and find that article.
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Karl Kox
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« Reply #21 on: August 20, 2013, 07:29:40 AM »

heres the story

http://www.tampabay.com/news/aging/doctor-says-an-oil-lessened-alzheimers-effects-on-her-husband/879333
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« Reply #22 on: August 20, 2013, 05:54:34 PM »



Good article!
Thanks for sharing!!
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« Reply #23 on: October 25, 2013, 09:00:56 AM »

My Alzheimer's experience.

Many people don't know this but before my father died he was dignosed with Alzheimer's. It was caught early so the medications slowed the process way down. The only thing that really got effected was his memory from about ten years back. His long term/short term memory was fine. One thing we did notice was his grumpiness. Despite him being a mean tough guy in the ring, out of the ring he was a big kid. About a year before he did my mom was reading an article on Alzheimer's and found out some research had been done and that coconut oil could help restore some of the side effects of the disease. The lady who did the research started giving it to her husband, at that point he couldn't even draw a simple clock. Several weeks later he could. So after reading that my mom started having my dad take coconut oil pills. After about 2 weeks his whole attitude changed. He went from grumpy, back to his old loving teddy bear self and his memory (which wasn't really bad) did improve.

Just thought I'd share that. I'm going to try and find that article.


Humanofort can be  very beneficial also, here a nice testimonial:

My name is Jim Chelossi and this is about  my father:

February 6, 2008

It has been 24 days since my Dad started taking Humanofort. After one week I could see some small changes in Dad’s daily activities. Before he started Humanofort he would sleep late in the morning anywhere from 10-12 Noon sometimes. He would then eat, watch TV, eat lunch, take a nap, get up and watch TV until dinner and then go to bed after dinner (around 6-7pm). He would not say much in the day, maybe a word or two if you asked him something. After 1 week he started talking more and doing small things such as finding his way to the bathroom or putting his seat belt on with no help. Now, after 3 weeks, they are small changes but any change for the better is great. He has been getting up earlier every day now and the last couple of days he has asked to walk on the treadmill and lift with the barbells. It had been 6 months since he has wanted to workout before Humanofort. I would ask him daily and he would say, “Tomorrow I will start.” He is laughing at things again, not always but I have not seen him laugh this much in a long time (6 months to one year). The children and my wife Tammy have also seen the changes in Dad. His last shower he was able to understand when you told him to wash his legs. He would just wash his head over and over again even after telling him to wash his legs. He needs help all the time but it has been a lot easer the last couple of weeks. I will be keeping a diary of my Dad’s progress throughout our journey with this wonderful Humanofort.

February 8, 2008

Today has started out very good as Dad worked out first thing this morning. Every day when he gets up he leaves his glasses in the room and cannot seem to figure out how to get them out of the room or find them. For the first time that I can remember I ask him to go get his glasses and he went into the room and found them without any help. Usually he will go in the room or wonder around for awhile then just sit down and I will get them for him.

February 9, 2008

Dad wanted to work out. He got up early (8am) and there were times he would not get up until 11 or 12am eat then go back to bed. In the gym he walked 10 minutes on the tread mill. One month ago I was getting worried about Dad. He would sit in one place so long that his legs were getting very weak and he would stumble almost every time he would walk. (I knew getting him on the treadmill would help with that.) He did very well with his shower today. He washed his body parts when instructed and he was able to wash more than his head. I always stay in the bathroom when he is in the shower and it is nice when he can help by washing his own body.
He was in a good mood all day and at dinner he went to his own seat without sitting in someone else’s chair first. He went into the dinning room without any problems. We were having sushi and he was able to mix his own wasabi and soy sauce together after I showed him how with my own. He was able to do this fairly quickly and I was very impressed as he had not been able to perform this action in a long time, even with instruction. I know these are little things but any improvement is great.

February 10, 2008

Dad walked 17 minutes on treadmill and lifted light weights for a few sets today. He came out of his room with his glasses on and that may not sound like much but this is great for him. While watching TV today, he was laughing and he even picked up his plate from the table and brought it to the sink without being asked. It was a good day today.

February 11, 2008

Dad went to the gym this morning and was working out for about 10 minutes. He has been in a good mood and even tried to hide from me when I came in to scare me (Dad use to be quite the jokester) then he started laughing when I saw him. I put on a movie that he didn’t know the name of but he remembered the ending of the movie. These are big steps for Dad.

2-18-08
Dad is up to 15 min on treadmill. Today I was in the gym he came out he did not have his glasses on I told him to see if he could get his glasses. He came back without them I told him again this went on 2 more times when he came back with his glasses he went in to his room and found them. There was times that he can’t find his room with out help for him to go into the house find his room and his glasses was a big deal
2-25 -08
Dad has allot more energy he want to work out or do something witch is much better then before he would sit in front of the TV all day if I let him or take long naps he hasn’t taken a nap in quite a long time .Treadmill is at 25 min at 2.5 mph he love it then lifts weights for 10 15 min..He still gets confuse don’t get me wrong but now you ask him something and you can see he is thinking about it before he would just say I cant remember or I don’t know .He doesnot always come up with the answer but I know he is trying. For so long there was only dad going backwards never staying the same and for him to be doing any better is a wonderful thing it make it allot easer to take care of him.

3-5-08

Dads doing well he even cut his pancake with his fork I always cut up all his food just wanted to see if he could do it no problem. He is happy and likes that he is working out.25 min on treadmill is what he does now.

3-8-08

Dad asked about my friend he said how is your friend doing I asked if he knew his name he thought about it and said Scotty he never seams to get a name right I did ask him later and he did not get it right but before he would have never got it . later I pointed to my daughter and ask him her name he said Carlee that is great
You can see that dad has been working out his arms look strong.

3-15-08
Dad is doing well he is more fun then he has been in a long time laughing and playing with the kids. Working out every day and though he forgets things one time he remembers it the next he is doing much better all the way around. If he does not know the answer at least he is thinking about the answer .Picking up his plates after a meal .He also has mush more energy not taking very many naps and getting up earlier am very happy with his progress. It makes it allot easer to take care of and he enjoys life more.

4-1-08
Dad has his ups and downs and does get confused but all in all I am very happy with the way he is doing he has been staying about the same but I will take it. Before it was always backwards slowly watching him get worse and worse .He works out and is fun to be around for the most part. He never use to smile now he laughs out load .I know that there are many people out there that are taking care of others with Alzheimer’s.

4-14-08

The last two weeks dad has been doing great. Sleeping well at night and getting up early working out and in a great mood. Playing with my children and laughing allot. He keeps saying he want a girlfriend before I don’t think he could have a relationship as he would not get out of in front of the TV or he would be sleeping and not talking much .Now his energy level is up and he is fun to be around and could handle a conversation with others.

4-20-08

We have a new dog dad loves him he even remembered his name when I asked him .I had dad take the dog for a walk today on the property on a leash with me watching he did great just another thing he would have never done before he started on Humanofort.

4-30 -08

The last three days have been dads best so far he has been allot of fun .I turned on the music in the weight room and out of the blue he started dancing. He has been watching movies and really understanding them .The Humanofort is great and has help my dad and mad it easer to take care of him.

5-16-08
Today was a great day we had some guest at the house. Most dad did not know .He came out and sat at the table and was talking to a couple having a good time .Then he was talking to another guest chatting it up. This is something that is great. Back in January if we would have people over he would not even come out of the house and wouldn’t have come out and join the group and talk with them.
Later on after most had gone dad and my son went to the basketball court and my son and dad were shooting the ball. I had to get it on video it was great .I think he even mad a couple. And he tried dribbling the ball

5-22-08
Today I made lunch for dad I went out of the room and when I cam into the kitchen dad had mad a peanut butter and jelly sandwich. I ask him what was up he said I was still hungry. He has not made anything in over 2 years. I will say there was a mess but he did it one his own. His workouts have been good he tells me that he is ripped; Tomorrow he goes to the dr for his regular checkup I am sure the dr is going to be surprised on how well he is doing and how good he looks.


4-28-09


It has been awhile since I have made any additions to Dad’s diary .I would like to bring it up to date.
Dad is still working out and laughing and trying to be part of the family talk, especially at dinner.  He enjoys watching television.
He gets on the treadmill for about 20 minutes now. He also likes to show off his shadow boxing.
The other day he told me he would like to have a girlfriend.
Alzheimer’s is a terrible disease and before Humanofort Dad was only going backwards.
There was a time I was running out of Humanofort so I cut back his dose in half and within a week I could see that he was not doing as well. I have him back on his regular dose now and he seems to be getting back to where he was.
I am not saying that Dad is 100%, the same he was a year ago.  Alzheimer’s is taking its
Toll on him but he is still so pleasant to be around. He does need a little more help now but without the Humanofort he would be in bed or in front of the TV like he was before he started Humanofort.
Just that small amount of time he was without the full dose of Humanofort proved to me how much it has helped my dad.


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Getbig V
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« Reply #24 on: October 25, 2013, 05:52:25 PM »

i was ragging on this for a while last year... the science continues to support a possible hormonal link to alzheimers...
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