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Author Topic: US military obtains new video of American soldier held in captivity  (Read 12663 times)
Dos Equis
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« Reply #50 on: July 31, 2014, 09:13:31 AM »

Gee, you seem very sure of yourself for a guy who claims service but won't say what job he did. 

Honestly, BB, the reason I can't give a lot of details is it didn't happen to me so I'm not really sure about the "hows and whys" of it.  I can only say what I saw and maybe wasn't paying super close attention since I spent the last year of my enlistment spending very little time on army shit (other than working my shift at the listening station) because I was spending all of my free time with my German girlfriend from Kaufbeuren who had an apartment in town because she attended Augsburg University.  (I ended up marrying her about a year after I got out).

I'm telling you, though, among the linguist and analyst MOS's in Germany in 86/87 the army seemed pretty much OK with sending people home who really didn't want to be there.  If a soldiers made a big deal out of wanting out they would immediately lose their security clearance so they'd be on casual duty for at least a few months during which they'd catch shit from other soldiers (mostly just the higher-ranked enlisted, though -- most of the other spec4's didn't really GAF).  They'd also might pick up an Article 15 (for disobedience of some kind, I guess) but other than that and some kind of less than honorable discharge, that was about it.  Like I said, there were no combat operations going on so it wasn't like a lot of folks were clamoring to leave.

BTW, I learned this stuff when I tried to talk the one guy into staying but his mind was made up and he pretty much laughed at my concerns as to what effect a crappy discharge could have on his life (he already had a degree and just wanted to go back to school for his masters).   

Now, I'm not sure why the army wasn't making a big deal about folks separating early.  Maybe it was a security clearance thing or maybe they were just trying to shed salaries.  IIRC, the army WAS giving out "early outs" at about that time.

BTW, you don't need to thank me for getting out.  Staying in was never my plan regardless of the pretty decent reenlistment bonus they'd try to dangle in front of you.  Once I maxed out my college money, it was time to leave.


I have no idea if you served.  Only thing I'm sure about is you're a friggin simpleton.  You don't know what the heck you're talking about when it comes to Soldiers just quitting.   Roll Eyes

If you did serve, getting out was great for two reasons.  1.  You would have likely been kicked out anyway.  2.  Simpletons like you get people killed.  Thank you for being a civilian. 
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« Reply #51 on: July 31, 2014, 09:58:11 AM »

I have no idea if you served.  Only thing I'm sure about is you're a friggin simpleton.  You don't know what the heck you're talking about when it comes to Soldiers just quitting.   Roll Eyes

If you did serve, getting out was great for two reasons.  1.  You would have likely been kicked out anyway.  2.  Simpletons like you get people killed.  Thank you for being a civilian. 

Don't know what to tell you as far as the real experience I've related regarding soldiers in my MOS and duty station being allowed to go home relatively easily back in 1987.  If you have specific info that indicates otherwise, let's hear it.  Or post up some links. 

Anyway, enough people on this board probably served at that time so let's see what someone who served but isn't some kind of military fetishist has to say about it, shall we?

FYI, ya wannabe ex-serviceman, I was really good at my job.  I'd have been shitty as an infantryman or whatever but I kicked ass as a Russian voice interceptor where they wisely valued intelligence over blind obedience.

And maybe you'd can tell me how I was gonna get someone killed when my job was to comfortably sit on my ass with headphones on all day at this place in West Germany?:


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USASA_Field_Station_Augsburg 
I didn't work in that building in the middle of that giant antenna, I worked in one of the buildings nearby.  Sadly, only after scanning the wiki page I've linked did I realize that the Gablingen kaserne closed down in 1998.   Cry
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« Reply #52 on: July 31, 2014, 10:09:55 AM »

Don't know what to tell you as far as the real experience I've related regarding soldiers in my MOS and duty station being allowed to go home relatively easily back in 1987.  If you have specific info that indicates otherwise, let's hear it.  Or post up some links. 

Anyway, enough people on this board probably served at that time so let's see what someone who served but isn't some kind of military fetishist has to say about it, shall we?

FYI, ya wannabe ex-serviceman, I was really good at my job.  I'd have been shitty as an infantryman or whatever but I kicked ass as a Russian voice interceptor where they wisely valued intelligence over blind obedience.

And maybe you'd can tell me how I was gonna get someone killed when my job was to comfortably sit on my ass with headphones on all day at this place in West Germany?:


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USASA_Field_Station_Augsburg 
I didn't work in that building in the middle of that giant antenna, I worked in one of the buildings nearby.  Sadly, only after scanning the wiki page I've linked did I realize that the Gablingen kaserne closed down in 1998.   Cry

Who the heck cares what someone else says?  This isn't a contest.  You're trying too hard. 
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« Reply #53 on: July 31, 2014, 10:14:09 AM »

Who the heck cares what someone else says?  This isn't a contest.  You're trying too hard. 

LOL.

You are a nut, BB -- but you're probably OK in real life.

What do you call that philosophy that consists of thinking that you are the only real person in the universe and everyone else is a figment of your imagination?  That.  You have that.
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« Reply #54 on: July 31, 2014, 10:35:32 AM »

LOL.

You are a nut, BB -- but you're probably OK in real life.

What do you call that philosophy that consists of thinking that you are the only real person in the universe and everyone else is a figment of your imagination?  That.  You have that.

Why thank you very much Simpleton Simon.  Your comments are most appreciated.   Smiley
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« Reply #55 on: November 03, 2014, 11:37:40 AM »

Defense Dept: Yeah, Those Gitmo Detainees We Released Aren’t Going Home to Sing Kumbayah
BY MICHAEL HAUSAM (3 DAYS AGO) | HEADLINES, NATION, WORLD
IJRSHAREEMAIL

Fox News reported Thursday that U.S. officials have confirmed that up to 30 former Guantanamo detainees are likely in Syria, fighting on behalf of the Islamic State.

The numbers are not certain and they represent a small number of those released — numbering 620 detainees so far — but the news is nonetheless very troubling. Furthermore, they also point out that they estimate that about 180 have returned to the battlefield.

U.S. Ambassador to Iraq James Jeffrey, commenting on the difficulties with releasing prisoners and the complications related to the President’s inability to keep his promise to close the prison, said this:

The majority have remained there, but there was always, if you will, a certain seepage. These people are ideologically and essentially religiously committed to their evil cause, and it is very hard to sort out who are going to stay at home and who are going to return to the battlefield.
Many have criticized the President’s eagerness to release captives from the controversial prison and his promise to eventually shut it down. Senator John McCain discussed the issue with Fox News’ Greta Van Susteren:

“The eagerness with which this administration wants to get these people out of Guantanamo has clearly overridden good sense and a real concern for the lives of American men and women who are serving.”
Currently, there are 149 terrorists still being detained in Guantanamo Bay, with 80 currently eligible for transfer or release. There were no details available about the specific individuals or the timing of their release.

Which begs a simple question: If there is any chance of a released detainee rejoining the fight against America and harming soldiers or citizens, should they be released at all?

http://www.ijreview.com/2014/10/195122-shocking-intelligence-defense-department-admission-released-gitmo-detainees-joining-isis/
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« Reply #56 on: November 03, 2014, 02:51:46 PM »

That's why obama released them in the first place. 
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« Reply #57 on: November 26, 2014, 02:08:30 PM »

What a mess.

Military reviewing Bergdahl report including recommendations on whether punishment applies
By Justin Fishel
Published November 26, 2014
FoxNews.com

Nearly five months after the release of Taliban prisoner Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, the military has yet to release a report on Bergdahl leaving his Afghanistan post in 2009 that also makes recommendations on whether he should be punished.

The Pentagon says it is not holding up the decision, though the review by Army Gen. Kenneth Dahl was finished in early October.

Rear Adm. John Kirby, the Pentagon press secretary, recently acknowledged the report has been completed and said it is under review.

“As you know, in this building that can sometimes take a while, especially for major investigations like this," he said.

Desertion in the military is technically punishable by death. But given the circumstances of Bergdahl's case, such a sentence is essentially out of the realm of possibility.

Bergdahl, the only American prisoner in the war in Afghanistan, could face a lesser administrative punishment including forfeiture of back pay or even jail time. But Army officials are acutely aware of the potential political backlash that could follow severely punishing a prisoner of war.

Meanwhile, Bergdahl is still serving as a sergeant at Fort Sam Houston in Texas. He has a desk job with the Army after being held captive for roughly five years, much of that time spent in a metal box.

Bergdahl’s May 2014 release, which was secured by exchanging five high-value Taliban detainees from the U.S. prison in Guantanamo Bay, has sparked widespread controversy.

Soon after President Obama announced the exchange, many of Bergdahl’s former unit members spoke out, calling him a deserter, saying he put fellow soldiers’ lives at risk.

At least some Republican lawmakers think it was a bad deal.

Sen. John McCain referred to the prisoners as “the Taliban dream team.”

"These are the worst of the worst, the hardest of the hardest,” the Arizona Republican told Fox News. “I can't tell you how dangerous these people are."

Now, California GOP Rep. Duncan Hunter, a former Marine, wants to know whether the swap included a ransom and if the United States was swindled.

"It has been brought to my attention that a payment was made to an Afghan intermediary who ‘disappeared’ with the money and failed to facilitate Bergdahl's release in return," Hunter wrote Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel in a Nov. 4 letter.

The alleged payment, Hunter says, was made in February through the Joint Special Operations Command and might have exceeded $1 million.

“Number one, you can't pay ransoms,” Hunter told Fox News. “Number two, if there is an exceptional case when you can get an American back, then there ought to be some oversight and there has to be some congressional purview over this -- and there hasn't been. I mean the (Defense Department) can't break the law and have no repercussions whatsoever.”

The Pentagon told Hunter on Friday that no money was exchanged and that paying ransom is indeed against the law.

“There was no ransom paid,” Kirby told reporters. “Nor was there an attempt to do so that failed.”

Hunter’s office still alleges that FBI operatives and members of the Army’s elite Delta Force orchestrated a botched cash exchange and says the congressman will request a formal investigation of the matter by the Defense Department’s inspector general.

The deal purportedly involved Delta members giving the money to an informant who disappeared instead of giving Bergdahl to FBI agents at a predetermined spot inside Afghanistan, on the border with North Waziristan.

Concerns about the circumstances of the prisoner swap have increased in the wake of the Islamic State executing five Americans in the past four months.

The president has ordered a review of how American hostages are handled by the U.S. government.

Families of the beheaded Americans have issued complaints about how their sons’ cases were handled. However, the White House says it has no plans to allowing ransom to be paid for hostages.

http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2014/11/26/public-awaits-military-completed-bergdahl-report-that-includes-recommendations/
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« Reply #58 on: December 19, 2014, 10:10:35 AM »

Good job Mr. President.

Military Analysts: Bergdahl Report to Show He Deserted
Thursday, 18 Dec 2014
By Greg Richter

The U.S. Army's report on Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl will show he deserted, but not that he is a traitor, two military analysts familiar with the case told Fox News Channel's "The O'Reilly Factor."

The report was completed in October, but has yet to be released to the public. Bergdahl walked away from his base in Afghanistan and was captured and held by the Taliban for five years.

He was released earlier this year in a controversial trade for five Taliban leaders being held at the U.S. military detention facility at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

Lt. Col. Tony Shaffer, who said he played a role in one of three methods the United States considered in bringing Bergdahl back, told Fox's Bill O'Reilly on Thursday he has heard the final report mirrors the initial Naval Criminal Investigative Service report from 2009, just after Bergdahl was taken captive.

Col. David Hunt says he has heard the same thing, adding that the report likely will be released on Jan. 16. That would be about a week and a half after the new Republican Congress is sworn in, and would be on a Friday, when stories are less likely to get wide media coverage.

Conservatives have charged that the report's release was delayed to avoid hurting Democrats in the November primaries. President Barack Obama initially held a Rose Garden ceremony with Bergdahl's parents, but the good points quickly soured when some platoon mates said Bergdahl had deserted his post.

Hunt said the real issue will be whether Bergdahl will be found to be a traitor. He told O'Reilly that he has been told Bergdahl will not be charged as a traitor and will be given a less-than-honorable discharge.

He also will not be required to refund the $300,000 in back pay he received during his captivity.

Shaffer and Hunt both said they oppose that decision. Shaffer said Bergdahl did as much damage as Pvt. Bradley Manning, who leaked military secrets online.

http://www.Newsmax.com/Newsfront/Bowe-Bergdahl-report-Bill-OReilly-deserted/2014/12/18/id/613936/#ixzz3MMfCCMeN
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« Reply #59 on: December 22, 2014, 04:47:31 PM »

Good.  But I have a feeling this will go away quietly.  Letter of reprimand.  Maybe an administrative separation.  I doubt they court martial him, even though they should. 

Army: Bergdahl could face court-martial
By Andrew Tilghman, Staff writer December 22, 2014


Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl
(Photo: Eugene R. Fidell/AP)

The Army's decision Monday to forward the investigation of Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl for possible court-martial means the former prisoner of war will remain on active duty and in legal limbo for months to come.

The Army has not determined whether Bergdahl, who spent five years as a captive under the Taliban, is eligible for the lump-sum back pay that is traditionally provided to prisoners of war who return home. In Bergdahl's case, he could be eligible for more than $200,000.

For now Bergdahl, 28, remains assigned to a desk job at an Army headquarters unit in San Antonio. The Army declined to release any details of the six-month investigation into the the circumstances surrounding his disappearance.

Then-Spc. Bergdahl was accused of leaving his patrol base alone and intentionally before he was captured by Taliban insurgents in 2009. Legal experts say the allegations suggest charges of desertion could apply.

At the crux of the case is a question of intent: When Bergdahl left his base that night, was he going temporarily AWOL, or was he a intending to desert his unit permanently? A determination that he was a deserter would result in a far more severe punishment.

A prior investigation of Bergdahl's disappearance — conducted in 2009 long before his return — found that some members of his unit believed Bergdahl left his patrol base alone at night at least once before and returned safely.

In a short statement issued Monday, the Army said the general courts-martial convening authority in the case, Gen. Mark Milley, commanding general of Army Forces Command, will determine "appropriate action," which could range from no further action to a full-blown court-martial.

The case presents a challenge for the Army's leadership, which has to decide whether to punish a soldier who spent five years as a prisoner of war or essentially overlook the allegations of misconduct that surrounded his disappearance.


Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, right, stands with a Taliban fighter in eastern Afghanistan while waiting to be freed from captivity.(Photo: AP)

After five years in captivity, Bergdahl's Taliban captors released him May 31 in a prisoner swap that also freed five Taliban leaders from the U.S. military prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. He returned to good health after a short stay at military hospitals in Germany and San Antonio.

Since Bergdahl technically remained on active-duty for his entire captivity, he could be eligible for about $200,000 in back pay. For most of his captivity, Bergdahl's pay was placed into an Army account, where it remains today pending a final resolution of the matter.

If the Army concludes he was a prisoner of war, he would be eligible for far more in additional pay and benefits.

Those questions remain unresolved, Army spokeswoman Lt. Col. Alayne Conway said Monday. "The determination on pay and allowances will be made at the Department of the Army level at the appropriate time," she told Military Times.

If Bergdahl is court-martialed, he could ultimately face a punitive discharge, denying him most or all veterans benefits.

http://www.armytimes.com/story/military/pentagon/2014/12/22/army-sgt-bowe-bergdahl-could-face-court-martial/20771723/
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« Reply #60 on: January 27, 2015, 09:07:18 AM »

Good news.

Bergdahl to be charged with desertion, ex-military intel officer says
Published January 27, 2015
FoxNews.com

The Army has decided to charge Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, who was released by Taliban-aligned militants last year in exchange for five Guantanamo prisoners, with desertion, according to a former military intelligence officer.

Retired Lt. Col. Tony Shaffer, who now works at the London Center for Policy Research, told Fox News' "The O'Reilly Factor" Monday night that he's learned of the military's decision from two sources.

"The Army has come to its conclusion, and Bowe Bergdahl ... will be charged with desertion," he said.

Asked for comment on the claim, Army officials denied that any decision had been made. Spokesman Paul Boyce told Fox News on Tuesday that there is "no change" and that it is an "ongoing review at this time."

Eugene Fidell, Bergdahl's lawyer, did not comment when reached by Fox News.

But Shaffer said Bergdahl's attorney has been given a "charge sheet" outlining the section of the military justice code Bergdahl allegedly violated.

"As a corporate entity, the Army has decided that they want to pursue Bergdahl for this violation," Shaffer said.

Shaffer said there's a "huge battle" going on inside the Obama administration, as some try to "suppress" this development. "This is shaping up to be a titanic struggle behind the scenes," he said.

Shaffer said the Army "wants to do the right thing" but the White House "wants this to go away."

He said: "The White House, because of the political narrative, President Obama cozying up to the parents and because of he, President Obama, releasing the five Taliban ... The narrative is what the White House does not want to have come out."

Bergdahl was held for five years before his release was secured in 2014.

But while the president joined with Bergdahl's parents in the Rose Garden at the time in celebrating his return home, the prisoner swap swiftly became a matter of severe controversy. Fellow soldiers accused Bergdahl of deserting his post on a base in Afghanistan in 2009. And the trade itself, of his freedom for five Guantanamo prisoners, drew criticism in Congress from lawmakers who said it sent a troubling signal.

On Monday,  former diplomat Richard Grenell claimed the administration has "sent the message" that the U.S. will negotiate on such matters. He cited an alleged offer, made around the same time as Bergdahl's release, by the Qatari government to trade two Americans held in Qatar for an Al Qaeda agent held in a U.S. federal prison. The Obama administration denies there was any deal. Those prisoners were ultimately released over the past two months.

http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2015/01/27/bergdahl-to-be-charged-with-desertion-ex-military-intel-officer-says/
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« Reply #61 on: January 27, 2015, 09:08:43 AM »

Army Officer: Bergdahl Charged With Desertion, WH Wants It Kept Quiet
Monday, 26 Jan 2015
By Greg Richter

Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl has been charged with desertion, but the White House is trying to keep the story under wraps, a retired Army officer said Monday on Fox News Channel's "The O'Reilly Factor."

An Army report on Bergdhal was finished in October, but has yet to be released. White House Deputy National Security Adviser Ben Rhodes is trying to keep the information from becoming public because it would embarrass President Barack Obama, said Lt. Col. Tony Schaffer.
 
Bergdahl walked away from his camp in Afghanistan in June 2009 and was captured by the Taliban. He was held for five years until he was traded for five Taliban leaders being held by the United States at Guantanamo Bay last summer.

Some of Bergdahl's platoon-mates publicly criticized the trade, saying Bergdahl had abandoned his unit and placed the lives of his comrades in danger when they searched fruitlessly for him.

Shaffer told Fox News he has confirmed that the investigation concluded that Bergdahl's key violation was desertion, and that he will face a military court martial.

"This has been done. The decision has been made," Schaffer said. "Let me be very clear. As a corporate entity, the Army has decided that they want to pursue Bergdahl for this violation."

But, Schaffer said, the White House is attempting to keep the information from being made public because it would embarrass Obama, who brought Bergdahl's parents to the White House for a Rose Garden announcement of the release.

"This is shaping up to be titanic struggle behind the scenes," Shaffer said. The Army here wants to do the right thing."

http://www.Newsmax.com/Newsfront/Bowe-Bergdahl-desertion-deserter-Army/2015/01/26/id/620866/#ixzz3Q2SIbARj
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« Reply #62 on: January 27, 2015, 09:13:45 AM »

We were all nuts for calling this asshat a deserter, weren't we...................... ...
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« Reply #63 on: January 27, 2015, 09:19:39 AM »

We were all nuts for calling this asshat a deserter, weren't we...................... ...

And the President looked like quite the hero and diplomat on this too.   Embarrassed

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« Reply #64 on: January 27, 2015, 09:42:55 AM »

We were all nuts for calling this asshat a deserter, weren't we...................... ...

Yup - another instance we were dead right on.  F Obama!
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« Reply #65 on: January 27, 2015, 10:22:05 AM »

Army: Bergdahl reports are untrue, no decision made
By Michelle Tan and Andrew Tilghman, Staff Writers
January 27, 2015


(Photo: Uncredited)

The Army says there is no truth to media reports claiming a decision has been made to charge Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl with desertion.

The Army continues to review the case against Bergdahl, said Paul Boyce, a spokesman for Forces Command, on Tuesday morning.

In a report Monday citing two anonymous military sources, retired Lt. Col. Tony Schaffer told Fox News' "The O'Reilly Factor" that the Army plans to charge Bergdahl with desertion. Schaffer also told the outlet his sources confirmed to him that Bergdahl's lawyer has been given a charge sheet.

No charge sheets were available Tuesday, and Boyce said he is unaware of any charge sheets being issued against Bergdahl, adding that the Fox News story "seems to be speculative in nature." Bergdahl's attorney Eugene Fidell declined to comment. NBC News, citing an anonymous senior defense official, is also reporting a desertion charge is coming, possibly within the week.

Gen. Mark Milley, commanding general of Forces Command, "is reviewing now the Army's facts and findings to determine, impartially, any appropriate next steps and possible actions," Boyce said.

Milley is "actively reviewing the case," he said. "No decision's been made."

There is no timeline for when Milley must make a decision.

Milley received the Army's investigation Dec. 22, Boyce said.

Bergdahl, 28, disappeared from Combat Outpost Mest-Lalak in Paktika province, Afghanistan, on June 30, 2009.

He spent five years as a captive under the Taliban before he was freed in a May 31 prisoner swap that also freed five Taliban leaders from the U.S. military prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

He is now assigned to a desk job at U.S. Army North at Joint Base San Antonio-Fort Sam Houston, Texas, while he awaits the outcome of the Army's review.

The Army has declined to release any details of the six-month investigation into the circumstances surrounding his disappearance.

Then-Spc. Bergdahl was accused of leaving his patrol base alone and intentionally before he was captured by Taliban insurgents in 2009.

A prior investigation of Bergdahl's disappearance — conducted in 2009 long before his return — found that some members of his unit believed Bergdahl left his patrol base alone at night at least once before and returned safely.

As the general court-martial convening authority, Milley has several courses of action, from no further action against Bergdahl to court-martial.

The case presents a challenge for the Army's leadership, which has to decide whether to punish a soldier who spent five years as a prisoner of war or essentially overlook the allegations of misconduct that surrounded his disappearance.

http://www.armytimes.com/story/military/crime/2015/01/27/bergdahl-army-update-false-reports/22396367/
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« Reply #66 on: January 27, 2015, 04:28:25 PM »

Bergdahl decision expected in days
By Barbara Starr, CNN Pentagon Correspondent
January 27, 2015

Washington (CNN)The Army is expected to decide in the coming days how to proceed with disciplinary action against Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, the soldier who left his post in Afghanistan, and was captured and held by the Taliban for years before being exchanged last year for five detainees from Guantanamo Bay, but Pentagon officials are insisting no decision has been made as of Tuesday.

The decision could come "very soon, imminently," one senior defense official told CNN. The Pentagon issued a statement denying reports that it has determined to charge Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl with desertion over his disappearance from his post in Afghanistan.

NBC News reported Tuesday that Bergdahl will be charged with desertion, following an interview that aired Monday night on Fox News, where a former military officer said he's been told by sources that Bergdahl's lawyer has been provided a list of the charges.

Saying he wants to put a "fork" in reports about the fate of Bergdahl, Pentagon Press Secretary Rear Admiral John Kirby said Tuesday that "no decision has been made" with respect to case.

Kirby said there is no timeline to make that decisions and Gen. Mark Milley is not under any pressure to make a decision. "There is a process here," Kirby said adding that Gen. Milley is still "in a deliberative process," Kirby added that Bergdahl "has not been charged with any crime."

Maj. Gen. Ronald F. Lewis, The Chief of Public Affairs United States Army also said Tuesday, "The reporting from Fox News and NBC on Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl is patently false," referencing reports those outlets had saying that Bergdahl will be charged with desertion.

"What they are reporting is untrue -- there has been no update to what we provided in Dec. Investigation is still with [General Mark] Milley who will determine appropriate action -- which ranges from no further action to convening a court martial. We cannot discuss or disclose the findings of the investigation while disciplinary decisions are pending before commanders," the Army also said in a statement provided to CNN.

Eugene Fidell, a member of Bergdahl's legal team declined to comment to CNN.

Several military sources tell CNN that as of Tuesday morning, Milley who is reviewing the case has not signed or forwarded a charge sheet. Milley has a full range of legal options he could decide upon ranging from no action, to charging Bergdhal with an offense such as desertion that could lead to a courts martial military officials say.

Among the higher ranking officials, there is a good deal of discussion that Bergdahl could be facing a charge of desertion.

"Our culture demands accountability, you can't just say it didn't happen," one official told CNN. The official, who has some knowledge of the case, said "there is no malice in the Pentagon towards Bergdahl," echoing a sentiment of others that regardless of the charge Bergdahl is unlikely to face jail time, given the years he already spent in Taliban captivity.

One option would be for Bergdahl's legal team to agree to a plea deal in which he forfeits his back pay, and agrees to a less than honorable discharge officials tell CNN.

http://www.cnn.com/2015/01/27/politics/bergdahl-what-we-know/index.html
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« Reply #67 on: January 29, 2015, 08:56:52 AM »

I'm not convinced he is going to be prosecuted.  I have no doubt the investigation found he deserted, but there must be some serious pressure being exerted by the White House to make this go away.  We shall see. 

Tony Shaffer to Newsmax: Believe it — Bergdahl Will Be Charged
Wednesday, 28 Jan 2015
By Bill Hoffmann

Retired U.S. Army Lt. Col. Tony Shaffer, who made the disputed claim that terror-swap soldier Bowe Bergdahl will be charged with desertion, told Newsmax TVon Wednesday he is standing by declaration.

"The report done by the investigating officer … concludes there were violations of what we call the punitive articles of the Uniform Code of Military Justice," Shaffer told "The Steve Malzberg Show."

"That there was evidence that Bowe Bergdahl did indeed essentially leave his duty post during time of war … otherwise known as desertion."

Bergdahl was freed from captivity last year in a Taliban prisoner swap, but questions were soon raised as to whether he had deserted his base in Afghanistan in 2009.

This week, Shaffer as well as NBC News sources reported that Bergdahl will indeed be charged with desertion. Defense officials deny that. Bergdahl's attorney Eugene Fidell, declined to comment.
That's because the official announcement isn't ready yet, according to Shaffer.

"Those charges were actually put together on what we call a statement of charges and given to [Bergdahl's] lawyers, essentially, pending the formal mobilization of a charge," he said.

"The commanding general who now has this, Gen. Milley, has the option as the responsible officer to do anything from basically say, I'm not going to do anything, I'm going to let Bergdahl continue to serve in the military, to taking administrative action.

"[That] basically would be a reduction of a rank to private and kicking him out of the service with an honorable or dishonorable discharge all the way up to and including an Article 15 or court martial, which would be the most severe."

Shaffer repeated his assertion that a desertion is imminent.

"Based on what I've been told is in the report, it would be very difficult for anybody who's rational to come away with any other conclusion other than that Sgt. Bergdahl did violate the Uniform Code of Military Justice by deserting his post during a time of war," he said.

http://www.Newsmax.com/Newsmax-Tv/Tony-Shaffer-Bowe-Bergdahl-charges-coming/2015/01/28/id/621341/#ixzz3QE5vvIKZ
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« Reply #68 on: January 29, 2015, 06:41:33 PM »

Graham: Detainees in Bergdahl swap contacted Haqqani
By Deb Riechmann, The Associated Press
January 29, 2015

WASHINGTON — Sen. Lindsey Graham says the Taliban detainees released from Guantanamo Bay in exchange for Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl have been in touch with members of the al-Qaida-linked Haqqani network, yet all five still are being monitored in Qatar.

Graham, a South Carolina Republican who recently visited Qatar, said he was concerned one of the detainees had left, but was assured during his visit that all five senior Taliban officials remain in the tiny nation on the Arabian Peninsula.

Qatar gained public praise from President Obama for brokering the controversial deal that freed ArmySgt. Bowe Bergdahl from Taliban captivity in May 2014 in exchange for the release of the five Taliban detainees.

The Pentagon says it is confident in Qatar's ability to mitigate any threat posed by the former detainees.

http://www.militarytimes.com/story/military/capitol-hill/2015/01/29/graham-detainees-in-bergdahl-swap-contacted-haqqani/22553365/
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« Reply #69 on: February 23, 2015, 12:58:53 PM »

Kayla Mueller's parents: Why we feel ISIS wanted to release our daughter
Eun Kyung Kim

Kayla Mueller's parents, Carl and Marsha, say that despite fearing for their daughter's safety in captivity at the hands of ISIS, they were holding out hope for a reunion because of frequent contact with her captors.

"We always had that little bit of hope that we would always get her home," Marsha Mueller told TODAY's Savannah Guthrie in an exclusive interview.


"I really feel that we had a chance to get Kayla out," her father Carl explained. "We were in communications with them, unlike other families. But how do you raise $6.2 million? You know, it pretty much made it impossible."

Mueller, 26, was confirmed dead on Feb. 10, four days after ISIS claimed she had been killed in an airstrike in Syria.

The Muellers said communication with their daughter's captors fell apart once the White House agreed last year to trade American soldier Bowe Bergdahl, held for five years in Taliban captivity, in exchange for five Taliban detainees being kept in Guantanamo Bay.

“That made the whole situation worse,” said Kayla’s brother, Eric Mueller. “Because that's when the demands got greater. They got larger. They realized that they had something. They realized that, ‘Well, if they're gonna let five people go for one person, why won't they do this? Or why won't they do that?’”


Carl Mueller said the move raised his hopes a similar swap would be made for his daughter.

“I actually asked the president that question when we were in the White House," he said. "Yeah, that was pretty hard to take.”

He also expressed frustration with a U.S. government policy that forbids paying ransoms for the lives of American citizens, noting other Western countries have paid millions to secure the release of their nationals.

“We understand the policy about not paying ransom, but on the other hand, any parents out there would understand that you would want anything and everything done to bring your child home,” Carl Mueller said. “And we tried, and we asked. But they put policy in front of American citizens’ lives. And it didn’t get it changed.”

The Muellers also addressed concern over whether her daughter was too young to truly grasp the danger she put herself in while traveling abroad.

“Well, yeah, it was overenthusiastic youth and, of course, being naďve. But who wasn't, you know?” Carl Mueller said. “How many mistakes have we all made in life that were naďve and didn't get caught at? Kayla was just in a place that was more dangerous than most. And she couldn't help herself. She had to go in there and had to help.”

In her 26 short years, Kayla traveled to the bleakest parts of the world to help the needy.

“The only time we ever saw her was when she was home to earn enough money to buy another plane ticket to go back and work with people,” her brother said.

On Monday, the family unveiled a foundation, Kayla’s Hands, devoted to the causes that its namesake felt passionate about.

“She had to be busy with her hands doing something to help people. And as long as she was, she was just joyful,” her mother said.

"She just didn't have enough power as one little person. Maybe we can get the world behind her, or at least behind Kayla's Hands."

http://www.today.com/news/kayla-muellers-parents-why-we-feel-isis-wanted-release-our-2D80507618
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« Reply #70 on: February 23, 2015, 01:03:49 PM »

Tea party, Koch broths, fox news, palin, akin, cheney

Kayla Mueller's parents: Why we feel ISIS wanted to release our daughter
Eun Kyung Kim

Kayla Mueller's parents, Carl and Marsha, say that despite fearing for their daughter's safety in captivity at the hands of ISIS, they were holding out hope for a reunion because of frequent contact with her captors.

"We always had that little bit of hope that we would always get her home," Marsha Mueller told TODAY's Savannah Guthrie in an exclusive interview.


"I really feel that we had a chance to get Kayla out," her father Carl explained. "We were in communications with them, unlike other families. But how do you raise $6.2 million? You know, it pretty much made it impossible."

Mueller, 26, was confirmed dead on Feb. 10, four days after ISIS claimed she had been killed in an airstrike in Syria.

The Muellers said communication with their daughter's captors fell apart once the White House agreed last year to trade American soldier Bowe Bergdahl, held for five years in Taliban captivity, in exchange for five Taliban detainees being kept in Guantanamo Bay.

“That made the whole situation worse,” said Kayla’s brother, Eric Mueller. “Because that's when the demands got greater. They got larger. They realized that they had something. They realized that, ‘Well, if they're gonna let five people go for one person, why won't they do this? Or why won't they do that?’”


Carl Mueller said the move raised his hopes a similar swap would be made for his daughter.

“I actually asked the president that question when we were in the White House," he said. "Yeah, that was pretty hard to take.”

He also expressed frustration with a U.S. government policy that forbids paying ransoms for the lives of American citizens, noting other Western countries have paid millions to secure the release of their nationals.

“We understand the policy about not paying ransom, but on the other hand, any parents out there would understand that you would want anything and everything done to bring your child home,” Carl Mueller said. “And we tried, and we asked. But they put policy in front of American citizens’ lives. And it didn’t get it changed.”

The Muellers also addressed concern over whether her daughter was too young to truly grasp the danger she put herself in while traveling abroad.

“Well, yeah, it was overenthusiastic youth and, of course, being naďve. But who wasn't, you know?” Carl Mueller said. “How many mistakes have we all made in life that were naďve and didn't get caught at? Kayla was just in a place that was more dangerous than most. And she couldn't help herself. She had to go in there and had to help.”

In her 26 short years, Kayla traveled to the bleakest parts of the world to help the needy.

“The only time we ever saw her was when she was home to earn enough money to buy another plane ticket to go back and work with people,” her brother said.

On Monday, the family unveiled a foundation, Kayla’s Hands, devoted to the causes that its namesake felt passionate about.

“She had to be busy with her hands doing something to help people. And as long as she was, she was just joyful,” her mother said.

"She just didn't have enough power as one little person. Maybe we can get the world behind her, or at least behind Kayla's Hands."

http://www.today.com/news/kayla-muellers-parents-why-we-feel-isis-wanted-release-our-2D80507618
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« Reply #71 on: February 23, 2015, 03:29:11 PM »



“We understand the policy about not paying ransom, but on the other hand, any parents out there would understand that you would want anything and everything done to bring your child home,” Carl Mueller said. “And we tried, and we asked. But they put policy in front of American citizens’ lives. And it didn’t get it changed.”

The Muellers also addressed concern over whether her daughter was too young to truly grasp the danger she put herself in while traveling abroad.

“Well, yeah, it was overenthusiastic youth and, of course, being naďve. But who wasn't, you know?” Carl Mueller said. “How many mistakes have we all made in life that were naďve and didn't get caught at? Kayla was just in a place that was more dangerous than most. And she couldn't help herself. She had to go in there and had to help.”





Pretty sure most young people don't do really stupid shit like this and expect taxpayers to shell out millions of dollars to bail them out.

Unless, of course, they're bankers, automobile manufacturers, running solar energy companies...then million dollar bailouts are cool apparently.

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« Reply #72 on: March 25, 2015, 11:21:29 AM »

Outstanding.

Reports: Bowe Bergdahl to be charged with desertion
By Michelle Tan, Staff writer
March 25, 2015


Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl will be charged with desertion, the Associated Press reports.

The Army will make a formal announcement this afternoon.

The statement from Army Forces Command will include the Army's next planned steps regarding Bergdahl, who spent five years as a captive under the Taliban before he was freed in a May 31 prisoner swap.

Gen. Mark Milley, commanding general of Forces Command, was tasked with reviewing the facts and findings from an extensive Army investigation to determine what, if any, actions should be taken against Bergdahl.

The soldier, 28, disappeared from Combat Outpost Mest-Lalak in Paktika province, Afghanistan, on June 30, 2009. He has been accused of leaving his patrol base alone and intentionally before he was captured by Taliban insurgents.

He spent five years as a captive under the Taliban before he was freed in a May 31 prisoner swap that also freed five Taliban leaders from the U.S. military prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

Bergdahl is now assigned to a desk job at U.S. Army North at Joint Base San Antonio-Fort Sam Houston, Texas, while he awaits the outcome of the Army's review.

The Army has declined to release any details of the six-month investigation into the circumstances surrounding his disappearance. The service in January refuted news reports that officials were preparing to charge Bergdahl with desertion.

As the general court-martial convening authority, Milley has several courses of action, from no further action against Bergdahl to court-martial.

The case presents a challenge for the Army's leadership, which has to decide whether to punish a soldier who spent five years as a prisoner of war or essentially overlook the allegations of misconduct that surrounded his disappearance.

http://www.armytimes.com/story/military/2015/03/25/bowe-bergdahl-army-decision-next-steps/70436058/
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« Reply #73 on: March 25, 2015, 12:38:56 PM »

Well I guess he shouldn't have bought the Ford Raptor he's been tooling around here in.....
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« Reply #74 on: March 25, 2015, 12:40:16 PM »

Well I guess he shouldn't have bought the Ford Raptor he's been tooling around here in.....

Wurd.  You should only buy a "deployment vehicle" if you actually have deployment money.   Smiley
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