Getbig Bodybuilding, Figure and Fitness Forums
October 21, 2017, 01:58:56 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
 
   Home   Help Login Register  
Pages: 1 2 3 [4] 5   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: US military obtains new video of American soldier held in captivity  (Read 12623 times)
headhuntersix
Getbig V
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 17264

Our forefathers would be shooting by now


« Reply #75 on: March 25, 2015, 12:43:30 PM »

He had like 500K coming to him if they didn't charge him.....its a nice truck. I don't know how much if any he has already gotten. I just want to know who plays me in the movie
Report to moderator   Logged

L
Dos Equis
Moderator
Getbig V
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 51838

I am. The most interesting man in the world. (Not)


« Reply #76 on: March 25, 2015, 01:06:15 PM »

He had like 500K coming to him if they didn't charge him.....its a nice truck. I don't know how much if any he has already gotten. I just want to know who plays me in the movie

Mark Wahlberg?  Post Pain & Gain movie. 
Report to moderator   Logged
headhuntersix
Getbig V
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 17264

Our forefathers would be shooting by now


« Reply #77 on: March 25, 2015, 01:09:11 PM »

Thats exactly what I said....all he has to do is roll in...short haircut...say fuck 40 or 50 times in like 2 minutes and then leave.
Report to moderator   Logged

L
headhuntersix
Getbig V
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 17264

Our forefathers would be shooting by now


« Reply #78 on: March 25, 2015, 01:10:15 PM »

My phone and email has'nt stopped since 1PM. I have zero to do with Ol Bowe now...fox, cnn...a ton of reporters....
Report to moderator   Logged

L
Dos Equis
Moderator
Getbig V
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 51838

I am. The most interesting man in the world. (Not)


« Reply #79 on: March 25, 2015, 01:33:15 PM »

Fort Leavenworth is calling.   Smiley
Report to moderator   Logged
Dos Equis
Moderator
Getbig V
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 51838

I am. The most interesting man in the world. (Not)


« Reply #80 on: March 25, 2015, 02:18:45 PM »

SUSAN RICE FLASHBACK: BERGDAHL SERVED ‘WITH HONOR AND DISTINCTION’
by IAN HANCHETT25 Mar 2015

National Security Advisor Susan Rice defended the prisoner swap for Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl on the June 1, 2014 brodcast of ABC’s “This Week” by saying Bergdahl “served the United States with honor and distinction.”

Regarding the desertion allegations, she said Bergdahl, “served the United States with honor and distinction. And we’ll have the opportunity eventually to learn what has transpired in the past years.”

Rice also said that “assurances relating to the movement, the activities, the monitoring of those detainees [released in exchange for Bergdahl] give us confidence that they cannot and, in all likelihood, will not pose a significant risk to the United States. And that it is in our national interests that this transfer had been made.”

http://www.breitbart.com/video/2015/03/25/susan-rice-flashback-bergdahl-served-with-honor-and-distinction/
Report to moderator   Logged
Dos Equis
Moderator
Getbig V
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 51838

I am. The most interesting man in the world. (Not)


« Reply #81 on: April 03, 2015, 10:32:55 AM »

Army sets date for Bergdahl Article 32
By Michelle Tan, Staff writer
April 2, 2015

(Photo: Eugene R. Fidell/AP)

The Article 32 hearing for Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl is scheduled for July 8 at Joint Base San Antonio-Fort Sam Houston, Texas, the Army announced Thursday.

Bergdahl, who spent five years as a captive under the Taliban, was charged March 25 with one count of desertion with intent to shirk important or hazardous duty, and one count of misbehavior before the enemy by endangering the safety of a command, unit or place.

The decision to charge Bergdahl was made by Gen. Mark Milley, commanding general of Army Forces Command. It comes after a review of the facts and findings from an extensive Army investigation to determine what, if any, actions should be taken against Bergdahl.

Bergdahl, 28, disappeared from Combat Outpost Mest-Lalak in Paktika province, Afghanistan, on June 30, 2009. He has been accused of leaving his patrol base alone and intentionally before he was captured by Taliban insurgents.

He spent five years as a captive under the Taliban before he was freed in a May 31 prisoner swap that also freed five Taliban leaders from the U.S. military p

Bergdahl is now assigned to a desk job at U.S. Army North at Fort Sam Houston.

The Article 32 will determine if there is enough evidence to merit a court-martial and is often compared to a civilian grand jury inquiry.

Once the Article 32 is completed, the report will be forwarded to Milley, who is the general court-martial convening authority. In that role, Milley has several courses of action, from no further action against Bergdahl to a special or general court-martial.

The desertion charge, which falls under Article 85 of the Uniformed Code of Military Justice, carries a maximum punishment of five years confinement, a dishonorable discharge, reduction to the rank of E-1, forfeiture of all pay and allowances.

The misbehavior before the enemy charge, which falls under Article 99 of the UCMJ, carries a maximum punishment of confinement for life as well as a dishonorable discharge, reduction in rank to E-1, and forfeiture of pay and allowances.

http://www.armytimes.com/story/military/careers/army/2015/04/02/bowe-bergdahl-article-32-scheduled/70846298/
Report to moderator   Logged
Dos Equis
Moderator
Getbig V
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 51838

I am. The most interesting man in the world. (Not)


« Reply #82 on: April 08, 2015, 10:33:50 AM »

Remember when Susan Rice said he “served the United States with honor and distinction"?   

NCIS investigation reportedly shows Bergdahl had 'deliberate plan' to 'offer himself up' to the Taliban
Published April 07, 2015
FoxNews.com

A 2009 NCIS investigation into Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl’s activities while in Afghanistan reveal that there is clear evidence Bergdahl was “going over to the other side with a deliberate plan,” Lt. Col. Anthony Shaffer said on Fox News' "The O'Reilly Factor" Monday night.

Shaffer, a former military intelligence officer and Fox News contributor, said two senior sources told him that the Naval Criminal Investigative Service investigation included a forensic review of his computer, which show Bergdahl’s apparent intent to travel to Uzbekistan.

“He was going to go off to Uzbekistan,” Shaffer told Fox News’ Bill O’Reilly. “He had made contact with local Afghans and wanted to be moved to Uzbekistan and then made contact with the Russians because he wanted to talk to Russian organized crime ...

“Clearly he was not all there relating to what he was doing,” Shaffer told O'Reilly. “I think we’re going to see more and more, as this report is made public that there were a number of disconcerting things within Bergdahl.”

A military source also told Fox News there was strong intelligence after Bergdahl's 2009 disappearance indicating he was handed over to the Taliban about 10 days after he left his base, and that the group wanted him. The source, who is familiar with the investigation and efforts to recover Bergdahl, said there was an effort to pick up Bergdahl -- and potentially block his crossing into Pakistan -- but the intelligence was either bad or old and the effort was not successful.

According to sources, data collection at the time indicated Bergdahl made contact with an Afghan -- who spoke limited English and was part of a local construction project -- in what appeared to be an effort to lay the groundwork for Bergdahl's departure.

“He had Afghan contacts and he was actually trying to offer himself up with the Taliban. Both are very severe,” Shaffer added.

A leaked military assessment of the immediate search also reported communications traffic, or LLVI (low-level voice intercepts such as cellphone or walkie talkie), that "an American soldier with a camera is looking for someone who speaks English." It is not publicly known if that was connected to the Bergdahl situation.

Shaffer said that the NCIS investigation, which included interviews with squad mates as well as Afghans working outside the wire, resulted in Bergdahl being charged with misbehavior toward the enemy.

Officials say Bergdahl, who was charged with desertion in March, walked away from his post in Afghanistan and was captured by the Taliban. He was then released from Taliban control in a prisoner exchange last May for five Taliban commanders.

http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2015/04/07/ncis-report-on-bowe-bergdahl-raises-new-questions/?intcmp=trending
Report to moderator   Logged
Dos Equis
Moderator
Getbig V
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 51838

I am. The most interesting man in the world. (Not)


« Reply #83 on: April 29, 2015, 01:10:54 PM »

Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, 'a case nobody wants to see go to trial'
By David Zucchino
Los Angeles Times (Tribune News Service)
Published: April 28, 2015

While the death penalty is a possible punishment in cases of desertion or misbehavior before the enemy — the charges leveled Tuesday against Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl — that sentence has rarely been imposed.

Whether Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl planned to return to his combat outpost is irrelevant, according to the desertion charge the Army has brought against him.

Every year since America's current overseas wars began 14 years ago, hundreds of Army soldiers have abandoned their units — almost 6,000 since 2001. More than 5,000 have been convicted of desertion or being absent without leave, and most were thrown out of the Army.

Yet few of those soldiers end up with the type of sentence confronting Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, who could receive from five years up to life in prison if convicted of desertion and misbehavior charges.

The Army has routinely allowed soldiers to plead guilty to lesser charges in administrative actions that allow them to avoid prison time in return for their dismissal on other than honorable discharges.

Few, if any, of those desertion cases attracted the national attention focused on the dramatic tale of Bergdahl, who walked away from his remote combat outpost in Afghanistan in 2009 and was captured by insurgents who held him prisoner for five years.

In many cases, soldiers originally charged with desertion have pleaded guilty to lesser charges under plea deals that military lawyers say allow the Army to quickly rid itself of troublesome soldiers. A bad discharge strips soldiers of benefits and makes it difficult to find a good job.

"Desertions rarely go to trial. They usually end up with a plea," said Gary Solis, a Georgetown University law professor and a former military lawyer and judge.

Bergdahl's case is likely to end with a plea deal as well, according to military lawyers.

"This is a case nobody wants to see go to trial," Solis said. "Bergdahl just wants to go home. And for the Army, this case is just an embarrassment."

Bergdahl, 29, was released last spring under a contentious prisoner exchange that freed five Taliban detainees at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. He is awaiting an Article 32 preliminary hearing scheduled for July 8 at Joint Base San Antonio-Ft. Sam Houston in Texas.

Bergdahl's case is a rare example of a soldier abandoning a unit while deployed in Afghanistan or Iraq. Army figures compiled at the request of the Los Angeles Times show that of 6,077 cases of alleged desertion or being absent without leave since 2001, just 41 took place in Afghanistan and 150 in Iraq. Most of the other cases involved soldiers who left their units while stationed in the U.S.

There were convictions or guilty pleas in 33 of the 41 cases in Afghanistan and 133 of the 150 Iraq cases.

Cases stemming from offenses at bases elsewhere also have a high rate of conviction or guilty pleas — 5,110 of 5,886 cases.

Of those cases, just nine involved a charge of "misbehavior before the enemy," a rarely invoked offense. The Army lodged that charge against Bergdahl, who is accused by some members of his former unit of exposing soldiers to enemy attacks while they searched fruitlessly for him.

The misbehavior charge covers nine broad categories of misconduct. It applies to a soldier who "runs away"; "shamefully abandons [or] surrenders" a post; exhibits "cowardly conduct"; "casts away his arms or ammunition" or commits other offenses. Bergdahl is accused of leaving his weapon behind when he walked away from his base.

The misbehavior charge carries a maximum penalty of life in prison.

Bergdahl is also accused of "desertion with intent to shirk important or hazardous duty." That charge carries a maximum penalty of five years in prison.

Desertion normally refers to service members who leave their units without permission for more than 30 days. Service members who abandon their units for less than 30 days are typically charged with being AWOL.

Desertion rates in today's war are probably the lowest of any war in U.S. history, said Fred L. Borch III, regimental historian and archivist at the JAG Legal Center and School in Charlottesville, Va.

In World War II, about 50,000 service members deserted from a fighting force of 13 million. Desertion and AWOL were rampant during the Vietnam War, when the conflict was unpopular and draftees resented the military.

Some cases were dealt with through plea bargains or administrative separations, Borch said. But thousands of service members faced court-martial and were imprisoned.

In one notorious case, Pvt. Eddie Slovik was court-martialed and executed in 1945 for deserting before the Battle of the Bulge in 1944. That was the only documented case of execution for desertion in modern U.S. history, Borch said.

The Army said it could not provide statistics on the penalties imposed in the 6,000 desertion cases since 2001, but military lawyers said punishment is more severe for cases in combat zones than on U.S. bases.

Penalties are also significant in cases in which a soldier leaves a U.S.-based unit that has received orders to deploy overseas — a serious offense known as missing a troop movement.

For most other desertion cases that occur away from war zones, soldiers often plead guilty to lesser offenses — usually AWOL — and are reduced in rank and thrown out of the Army with an other than honorable discharge, known as "bad paper."

Even if a plea deal allows a soldier to avoid prison time, the penalty is still significant. A bad discharge carries a stigma that can hamper employment or advancement.

For Bergdahl, who says he was tortured and beaten, his ordeal could mitigate any punishment and possibly the charges against him, military lawyers said. His lawyers could argue that his time as a prisoner is tantamount to time served in military prison, even though Bergdahl's own actions led to his capture.

"The judge might think, well, this guy did do five years with the enemy," Solis said. "He did bring it on himself, but it was no cakewalk."

An other than honorable discharge could prove problematic in Bergdahl's case, said Greg T. Rinckey, a lawyer who has represented service members who left their units.

"This is an individual who will probably need mental healthcare the rest of his life," Rinckey said. "Does the government really want to take away mental healthcare for a soldier who has been held captive and tortured?"

http://www.stripes.com/news/us/army-sgt-bowe-bergdahl-a-case-nobody-wants-to-see-go-to-trial-1.342894
Report to moderator   Logged
Dos Equis
Moderator
Getbig V
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 51838

I am. The most interesting man in the world. (Not)


« Reply #84 on: May 27, 2015, 11:00:00 AM »

Taliban 5 could be free to travel in days, lawmakers raise alarm
Published May 27, 2015·
FoxNews.com

The five Taliban leaders traded a year ago for Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl could be free to travel as early as Monday as the terms of their supervised release are set to expire, raising alarm on Capitol Hill about the possibility they could return to the battlefield.

The five former Guantanamo detainees have been under close monitoring in Qatar and subject to a travel ban since their release last year. The agreement with Qatar is set to expire June 1.

While the Washington Post reported earlier this month that the administration was in talks with Qatari officials about potentially extending security measures for the group, it's unclear if any restrictions will remain in place after the end of the month.

Asked this week if the talks produced any agreement, a State Department official told FoxNews.com, "We don't have any updates."

Congressional lawmakers have grown anxious.

Joe Kasper, spokesman for House Armed Services Committee member Rep. Duncan Hunter R-Calif., said his office has gotten "radio silence" from the administration in asking about the issue.

"They have to be concerned with what happens to the five Taliban because they made every effort to portray the trade as a good deal," Kasper said in an email. "The nightmare scenario for the Administration is if any of these guys show up again within the global battlespace, be it in some kind of leadership position or just as messengers of threats or propaganda."

Members of Congress have repeatedly expressed concern about what will happen after the travel ban expires. They have asked the Obama administration to try to persuade Qatar to extend the monitoring.

"It's impossible for me to see how they don't rejoin the fight in short order," said Rep. Ed Royce, R-Calif., chairman of the House Foreign Affairs Committee.

Sen. Kelly Ayotte, R-N.H., wrote Defense Secretary Ash Carter in March, asking him to take any step necessary to make sure the five do not return to the battlefield in Afghanistan.

"In Congress, we spent a lot of time debating whether the Qataris were going to adequately keep an eye on them in the course of the 12 months," said Rep. Adam Schiff of California, the top Democrat on the House Intelligence committee. "My point all along was that I'm more worried about month No. 13 than the first 12."

Schiff has been privy to the details of the still-secret memorandum of understanding the U.S. reached with Qatar that put the five under a 12-month watch following their release. "The Qataris did pretty good -- I wouldn't say perfect," he said about the year-long monitoring. "But the big question is what comes next."

Fox News reported in March that, according to a government official familiar with the intelligence, at least three of the five have tried to plug back into their old terror networks.

The Post reported earlier this month that amid these concerns, administration officials were putting several options on the table for keeping some restrictions in place. At the time, State Department spokesman Jeff Rathke confirmed the administration was in talks to limit or "mitigate" the risk of former Guantanamo prisoners returning to terrorism. While not mentioning the Taliban Five by name, Rathke did not deny the Post report that these talks were designed to extend the restrictions that expire at the end of the month.

But there was no public indication Tuesday, with just days left on the Qatari deal, on whether the talks led anywhere. Rathke also said Tuesday he had no updates on the issue.

The administration, meanwhile, continues to take heat for last year's trade.

After a lengthy investigation, Bergadhl is being brought up on desertion charges. And on Tuesday, former commander of U.S. forces in Afghanistan Gen. Stanley McChrystal told Fox News that his "initial understanding" of Bergdahl's disappearance was that he had walked off the base intentionally.

Fox News had reported in April that, according to Bergdahl's platoon mates, then-Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Adm. Mike Mullen also knew those details. With McChrystal's comments, this would indicate two of the most-senior military commanders understood the alleged circumstances of Bergdahl's departure, raising more questions about the Taliban-Bergdahl trade itself and the way the deal was initially portrayed to the public.

White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest, asked Tuesday about McChrystal's comments and whether President Obama also was told Bergdahl walked off the base, did not respond directly.

He cited the ongoing military "process" underway, and said: "I'm not going to weigh in on this particular situation until that justice process has run its course."

He reiterated that Obama, as commander-in-chief, has a "special responsibility" to live up to the "principle" that no one in a U.S. military uniform is left behind.

http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2015/05/27/taliban-5-could-be-free-to-travel-in-days-lawmakers-raise-alarm/
Report to moderator   Logged
Dos Equis
Moderator
Getbig V
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 51838

I am. The most interesting man in the world. (Not)


« Reply #85 on: May 29, 2015, 11:27:44 AM »

Bergdahl appeared to lay groundwork for his disappearance in Afghanistan, squad mates say
By  Catherine Herridge
Published May 29, 2015
FoxNews.com

Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl slept on his bed frame, and then the concrete floor, collected contact information, and talked about becoming a mercenary in what his squad mates now describe as behavior that laid the groundwork for his disappearance in Afghanistan nearly six years ago.

"I asked him, 'Why are you sleeping on the frame of your bed?'" former Sgt. Matt Vierkant recalled in a recent interview with Fox News. "I was like well, that's weird. And then I remember coming back -- I don’t know if it was a week later, a couple days, and he had quit doing that and now he was just sleeping on concrete floor, which didn't make sense to me, but now, in hindsight being 20-20, makes me wonder if he was training to live like that."

Fox News has spoken to five of Bergdahl's former squad mates with first-hand knowledge of events leading up to his capture by the Taliban after he disappeared on June 30, 2009.

While it has been widely reported Bergdahl sent his computer home, the men shed new light on other events that suggest it was not a spur-of-the-moment decision for Bergdahl to walk off base.

Bergdahl asked one of his squad mates for contact information, including a phone number and email, a gesture usually reserved for the end of deployments. He also talked at length about becoming a mercenary and wondered out loud if he could walk to India, some 1000 miles away.

Two of the squad mates said he was a fan of the 2007 movie “The Hitman,” based on a popular video game starring Timothy Olyphant, but they were divided on what to make of it.

"He liked to watch the movie ‘Hit Man.’ I know he liked to watch other war movies and stuff like that. For the most part, he didn't really watch any TV and movies...really to a minimum except for by himself on his laptop," Vierkant said.

Bergdahl was traded on May 31, 2014 for five senior Taliban commanders who were sent to the Gulf nation of Qatar.

Two of the squad mates were asked by the military to sign non-disclosure agreements, or NDAs, after Bergdahl disappeared and they had been interviewed multiple times about the case.

When asked by Fox News, the Army did not dispute that account, but declined to comment, citing Bergdahl's upcoming preliminary hearing on desertion charges scheduled for July 8 at Joint Base San Antonio-Fort Sam Houston, Texas.

"I can't remember, ever, having an enlisted soldier sign a non-disclosure agreement for anything. This is completely unprecedented," said Bob Scales, a retired general and Fox News contributor. "These non-disclosure arguments have got nothing to do with military justice."


The NDAs were presented to the men in a period after an informal Q and A session with then-Chairman of the Joint Chiefs Admiral Mike Mullen, who was on a USO tour in December 2009, and before the end of their deployment in 2010.

At the meeting, three of Bergdahl's squad mates, who spoke on the record to Fox, said Mullen acknowledged that he, too, knew the 29-year-old had intentionally walked off base six months earlier.

"So we asked him and he told us that, he said 'Yeah, we know all the circumstances surrounding him (Bergdahl) walking away, you know we know everything. And we are, we're still looking for him... we're still trying to figure out where he is," said former Army Sgt. Evan Buetow.

This week, in an interview with Fox News, Retired General Stanley McCrystal, the commander of U.S. forces in Afghanistan when Bergdahl disappeared, said he knew, almost in real time, that he had "intentionally" left base.

Given the meeting with Mullen, who reported only to the secretary of defense as well as the president, and confirmation this week from McCrystal, White House spokesman Josh Earnest still would not say Thursday when President Obama learned that Bergdahl intentionally left post and whether it factored into his decision to trade the Taliban Five for his freedom.

In a bizarre moment, Earnest cited an ongoing investigation, though Bergdahl has been charged with desertion.

"Without the benefit of an investigation and, there is a current ongoing investigation into to the circumstances of Sergeant Bergdahl's disappearance, I can't say anything about that investigation. As the spokesperson for the commander-in-chief, I don't want any perception of interference in that independent investigation,” Earnest told “America's Newsroom” host Bill Hemmer.

"Sergeant Bergdahl is entitled to due process. That is what he is being subjected to right now. I don't want to get in the way of that."

“We don’t leave anyone behind, but the thing is, we never left him behind,” Vierkant said. “He left us behind. He chose to walk off and do whatever and get captured. That was his fault. Those were his choices. We did not leave him behind.”

http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2015/05/29/bergdahl-laid-groundwork-for-his-disappearance-in-afghanistan-squad-mates-say/?intcmp=latestnews
Report to moderator   Logged
Dos Equis
Moderator
Getbig V
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 51838

I am. The most interesting man in the world. (Not)


« Reply #86 on: June 15, 2015, 04:20:46 PM »

Former CIA operative: Bergdahl was ‘high’ when captured in Afghanistan
By  Catherine Herridge
Published June 15, 2015
FoxNews.com

EXCLUSIVE: Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl was apparently “high” with a small group of Afghan soldiers when they were picked up by nomads in 2009, according to a former CIA operative who was running a network of informants on the ground.

The information brings some additional detail to the otherwise murky picture of the circumstances of Bergdahl’s disappearance and capture, five years before the Obama administration traded five Guantanamo prisoners for Bergdahl’s freedom. The former CIA operative told Fox News Bergdahl was captured along with others, and sold to the Haqqani terrorist network in Pakistan within four days.

"The call came in and what it said was they had just broken out the message that an American soldier along with two or three Afghan soldiers had been captured or taken by a group of nomads,"Duane 'Dewey' Clarridge told Fox News, speaking for the first time publicly about the incident.

He added that the call said, “they were using the Pashto ‘diwana,’ which in this case meant high on hashish."

At the height of the Afghan war, Clarridge says he set up a network of informants to secure the release of a western journalist. Sometime after midnight, on June 30, 2009, the network came across surprising information about this other case.

Initially, Clarridge -- a 30-year veteran of the CIA who was involved in Iran-Contra -- said he had no idea who the soldier was until his informants reported that Army search teams were scouring the Afghan villages, calling out an unusual name.

"The patrols were moving around aggressively and were shouting ‘Bowe Bowe,’ and the guys down-range wanted to know, what was Bowe?” Clarridge explained. “It was at that point, we were told that the soldier was Bowe Bergdahl."

The unclassified information -- that Bergdahl was apparently high, and held by Afghan nomads, before being sold to the Haqqani terrorist network across the border in Pakistan -- was passed through the proper intelligence channels and pushed forward into Afghanistan.

Asked whether the revelations factored into the White House's decision to swap Bergdahl for the Taliban Five, there was no denial.

"There is an ongoing military justice inquiry into the circumstances of his disappearance, and I don't want to say anything about that ongoing investigation that may in any way interfere,"White House spokesman Josh Earnest said.

Retired Lt. Gen. David Fridovich, a former senior special operations commander who watched events unfold in 2009, told Fox News the information was deemed "credible" and "highly useful."

Within four days of the initial on-the-ground intelligence reporting, Bergdahl had apparently been sold to the Haqqani terrorist network, and was well beyond U.S. government reach in Pakistan.

"[Operatives on the ground] had an opinion that the nomads would try and sell the soldiers probably to the Haqqanis. ... I can't say precisely, but I think it was certainly within four days and maybe less," Clarridge said, though he added the opinion was not shared by the CIA and other U.S. intelligence agencies, and the dangerous village-to-village search continued.The death of six American soldiers at that time is publicly linked to the Bergdahl search.

Bergdahl's military hearing in Texas for alleged desertion was pushed back until September. His lawyer Eugene Fidell declined to answer questions from Fox News for a second time.

http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2015/06/15/former-cia-operative-bergdahl-was-high-when-captured-in-afghanistan/
Report to moderator   Logged
Dos Equis
Moderator
Getbig V
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 51838

I am. The most interesting man in the world. (Not)


« Reply #87 on: September 07, 2015, 10:31:01 AM »

Military selects rarely used charge for Bowe Bergdahl case
By Jonathan Drew, The Associated Press
September 7, 2015

RALEIGH, N.C. — Military prosecutors have reached into a section of military law seldom used since World War II in the politically fraught case against Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, the soldier held prisoner for years by the Taliban after leaving his post in Afghanistan.

Observers wondered for months if Bergdahl would be charged with desertion after the deal brokered by the U.S. to bring him home. He was — but he was also charged with misbehavior before the enemy, a much rarer offense that carries a stiffer potential penalty in this case.

"I've never seen it charged," Walter Huffman, a retired major general who served as the Army's top lawyer, said of the misbehavior charge. "It's not something you find in common everyday practice in the military."

Bergdahl could face a life sentence if convicted of the charge, which accuses him of endangering fellow soldiers when he "left without authority; and wrongfully caused search and recovery operations."

Huffman and others say the misbehavior charge allows authorities to allege that Bergdahl not only left his unit with one less soldier, but that his deliberate action put soldiers who searched for him in harm's way. The Pentagon has said there is no evidence anyone died searching for Bergdahl.

"You're able to say that what he did had a particular impact or put particular people at risk. It is less generic than just quitting," said Lawrence Morris, a retired Army colonel who served as the branch's top prosecutor and top public defender.

The Obama administration has been criticized both for agreeing to release five Taliban operatives from the Guantanamo Bay prison and for heralding Bergdahl's return to the U.S. with an announcement in the White House Rose Garden. The administration stood by the way it secured his release even after the charges were announced.

The military has scheduled an initial court appearance known as an Article 32 hearing for Bergdahl on Sept. 17 at Fort Sam Houston, Texas. The proceeding is similar to a civilian grand jury, and afterward the case could be referred to a court-martial and go to trial.

Misbehavior before the enemy was used hundreds of times during World War II, but scholars say its use appears to have dwindled in conflicts since then. Misbehavior before the enemy cases were tried at least 494 times for soldiers in Europe between 1942 and 1945, according to a Military Law Review article.

Legal databases and media accounts turn up only a few misbehavior cases since 2001 when fighting began in Afghanistan, followed by Iraq less than two years later. By contrast, statistics show the U.S. Army prosecuted about 1,900 desertion cases between 2001 and the end of 2014.

The misbehavior charge is included in Article 99 of the military justice code, which is best known for its use to prosecute cases of cowardice. However, Article 99 encompasses nine different offenses including several not necessarily motivated by cowardice, such as causing a false alarm or endangering one's unit — the charge Bergdahl faces.

The complexity of Article 99 may be one reason it's not frequently used, said Morris, who published a book on the military justice system.

"It is of course more complicated than the desertion charge, not as well understood, a higher burden on the government to prove," he said.

Huffman, now a law professor at Texas Tech University, said another reason may be that different parts of military law already deal with similar misconduct, including disobeying orders and avoiding duty.

Recent prosecutions under the misbehavior charge include a Marine lance corporal who pleaded guilty after refusing to provide security for a convoy leaving base in Iraq in 2004. A soldier in Iraq was charged with cowardice in 2003 under Article 99 after he saw a mangled body and sought counseling, but the charges were later dropped.

The specification that Bergdahl faces appears in the 1971 case of an Army captain accused of endangering a base in Vietnam by disobeying an order to establish an ambush position. The captain was found guilty of other charges including dereliction of duty.

Another case cited in a 1955 military law journal says an Army corporal was convicted under Article 99 of endangering his unit in Korea by getting drunk on duty. The article says he "became so drunk that it took the tank company commander thirty minutes to arouse him."

For Bergdahl, the Article 99 offense allows the prosecutors to seek a stiffer penalty than the desertion charge, which in this case carries a maximum sentence of five years in prison.

Bergdahl's attorney, Eugene Fidell, has argued his client is being charged twice for the same action, saying in a previous television interview that "it's unfortunate that someone got creative in drafting the charge sheet and figured out two ways to charge the same thing."

The scholars say that's a valid issue for Fidell to bring up in court, but it may not sway military authorities.

"The question is: Is it a piling on?" said Jeffrey K. Walker, a St. John's University law professor, retiredAir Force officer and former military lawyer. "It does almost look like you're trying to get two bites at the same apple."

Associated Press news researchers Jennifer Farrar and Barbara Sambriski contributed to this report.

http://www.militarytimes.com/story/military/2015/09/07/military-selects-rarely-used-charge-for-bowe-bergdahl-case/71837020/
Report to moderator   Logged
Dos Equis
Moderator
Getbig V
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 51838

I am. The most interesting man in the world. (Not)


« Reply #88 on: September 14, 2015, 04:34:59 PM »

Navy SEAL shares dramatic attempt to save Bowe Bergdahl
By Theodore Schleifer, CNN
Sat September 12, 2015

When the two helicopters touched down during a rescue attempt shortly after Bergdahl vanished, the team immediately came under heavy fire. With a dog named Remco -- who ended up being shot -- they advanced. But Hatch was eventually shot right above his knee, and the helicopters had to be called back in to extract the wounded SEAL.

"I took a lot of that on myself. I felt like maybe if I had done things just a little differently -- not gotten hurt -- you know, the mission wouldn't have failed," Hatch said. "There's no way to know that. At the time, it was a failure to me and I was the cause of it."

Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus eventually awarded Hatch a Purple Heart and the Bronze Star.

Since then, Hatch has created a 501(c)(3) organization dedicated to helping working dogs get medical care and proper protection.

http://www.cnn.com/2015/09/11/politics/navy-seal-bowe-bergdahl-anderson-cooper/index.html
Report to moderator   Logged
Dos Equis
Moderator
Getbig V
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 51838

I am. The most interesting man in the world. (Not)


« Reply #89 on: September 17, 2015, 09:32:46 AM »

The Latest on Bergdahl: Bergdahl's Platoon Leader Testifies
By JUAN A. LOZANO, ASSOCIATED PRESS SAN ANTONIO
Sep 17, 2015

The latest on the Article 32 hearing for Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl to determine if he should face a court-martial on charges of desertion and and misbehavior before the enemy. All times are local.

———

11:10 a.m.

The head of Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl's platoon in Afghanistan says he thought his soldiers were joking when they told him that the Idaho native had gone missing from their post.

Capt. John Billings testified at Bergdahl's Article 32 hearing Thursday that he felt "utter disbelief" that one of his soldiers had gone missing.

Billings told military prosecutor Maj. Margaret Kurz that the search for Bergdahl was grueling at times and lasted from June 30, 2009 — the day he went missing — until the end of that August.

The hearing at Fort Sam Houston in San Antonio, where Bergdahl is based, will determine if he will face a military trial on charges of desertion and misbehavior before the enemy.

Bergdahl was exchanged after five years in captivity for five Taliban commanders.

———

9:20 a.m.

A hearing has begun to determine if Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl should face a military trial for leaving his post in Afghanistan in June 2009.

The Article 32 hearing at Fort Sam Houston in San Antonio, where Bergdahl is based, will determine if the Idaho native will face a court-martial on charges of desertion and misbehavior before the enemy.

Bergdahl's lead attorney, Eugene Fidell, has said he plans to call witnesses during the hearing, which could last several days. He declined to say if Bergdahl would be among them, but he has said details would emerge about the circumstances surrounding Bergdahl's disappearance from his post.

The Taliban held Bergdahl captive for five years until exchanging him for five Taliban commanders being held at the U.S. detention center in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

http://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory/latest-bergdahl-hearing-bergdahl-hearing-begins-33829555
Report to moderator   Logged
Dos Equis
Moderator
Getbig V
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 51838

I am. The most interesting man in the world. (Not)


« Reply #90 on: September 18, 2015, 10:25:17 AM »

Officers stress dangers involved in search for Bowe Bergdahl
By Juan A. Lozano, The Associated Press
September 17, 2015

SAN ANTONIO — The commanders of Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl's platoon, company and battalion testified Thursday that his disappearance from his post in Afghanistan six years ago put a strain on their forces and put his fellow soldiers in danger.

Attorneys for Bergdahl, who is charged with desertion and misbehavior before the enemy, will get to present their own evidence and call witnesses on Friday on the second day of the hearing to determine if Bergdahl should face a court-martial. His lead attorney, Eugene Fidell, said after Thursday's proceedings that he would call four witnesses, though he declined to say if Bergdahl would be one of them.

Military prosecutors focused on trying to substantiate the misbehavior charge, which carries a possible life sentence and which would require them to prove that Bergdahl's actions put other soldiers in harm's way.

Capt. John Billings, who led Bergdahl's platoon, described the 45-day search for the Idaho native as grueling, saying soldiers got little food or sleep and endured temperatures in the high-90s.

"Physically, mentally I was defeated," Billings said, adding that he felt like he had "failed" his men.

His company commander, Maj. Silvino Silvino, said some of the thousands of soldiers who took part in the search were angry about it because they felt Bergdahl had deserted.

"I would tell them we are doing what we are doing because he is our brother," Silvino testified.

Finally, Bergdahl's battalion commander, Col. Clinton Baker, said that although no soldiers died as part of the search, there was a spike in improvised explosive device attacks because soldiers were going to places they ordinarily wouldn't have gone. He also said he had to put counter-insurgency efforts on hold due to the search and that it hurt partnerships with the Afghan government and Afghan forces.

Bergdahl spent five years as a Taliban captive until he was exchanged last year for five Taliban commanders who were being held at the U.S. detention center at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. The prisoner swap was sharply criticized by many Republicans and some Democrats, who said it was politically motivated and counter to the U.S. policy against negotiating with terrorists.

Bergdahl spent much of Thursday's hearing taking notes and conferring with his attorneys. Wearing his blue and black dress uniform, he answered "Yes sir, I do," when asked whether he understood the charges by the officer presiding over the hearing.

Before disappearing, Bergdahl had expressed opposition to the war in general and misgivings about his own role in it. Military prosecutor Maj. Margaret Kurz said Thursday that Bergdahl had actually been planning for weeks to abandon the post and had emailed friends and family about his plans beforehand.

"Under the cover of darkness, he snuck off the post," Kurz told the courtroom.

Legal experts said they expected Bergdahl's lawyers to argue that he suffered enough during his years in captivity. After the hearing wrapped up for the day, Fidell repeated his call for the military to make public Bergdahl's interview with military investigators after the prisoner exchange, saying it would help counteract the negative publicity Bergdahl has faced. He declined to discuss his strategy or to say whether Bergdahl's mental health history would play a role.

Under questioning by one of Bergdahl's attorneys Thursday, both Billings and Silvino said Bergdahl had been a model soldier until he disappeared. Both also said they weren't aware of Bergdahl's mental health history, including his psychological discharge from the U.S. Coast Guard and that an Army psychiatric board had concluded that Bergdahl possessed "severe mental defect."

If Bergdahl is eventually convicted of the misbehavior charge, he could face up to life in a military prison. He could also be dishonorably discharged, reduced in rank and made to forfeit all pay.

The Article 32 hearing will result in a report that will be forwarded to Gen. Robert Abrams, the commanding general of U.S. Army Forces Command. Abrams will decide whether the case should be referred to a court-martial or is resolved in another manner.

http://www.militarytimes.com/story/military/2015/09/17/platoon-leader-describes-shock-at-bergdahls-disappearance/32560185/
Report to moderator   Logged
Dos Equis
Moderator
Getbig V
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 51838

I am. The most interesting man in the world. (Not)


« Reply #91 on: October 06, 2015, 09:59:23 AM »

Experts: Mitigating factors could affect Bergdahl case
By Nancy Montgomery
Stars and Stripes
Published: October 4, 2015

Five years of torment at the hands of what one witness called “psychopathic sadists” make it likely that Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl would serve little if any jail time, military lawyers said, even if he were court-martialed and found guilty of desertion and misconduct.

Testimony about Bergdahl’s horrific treatment by the Taliban-associated Haqqani network — as well as other evidence largely undisputed by prosecutors at his Article 32 probable-cause hearing on whether he should face court-martial —  revealed significant mitigating factors, experts said. That evidence, if left unchallenged, would probably spare him confinement were he convicted, the lawyers said, and could replace court-martial with another disposition.

“It’s hard for me to imagine either a judge or a military panel sentencing him to any additional confinement with the facts of this case,” said Victor Hansen, a former Army lawyer who’s now an associate law professor at the New England School of Law. “From a fairness point, what more do we want to punish him for?”

Lt. Col. Mark Visger, who presided over Bergdahl’s two-day hearing in San Antonio last month, is expected to provide his recommendations Monday to Gen. Robert Abrams, commander of the U.S. Forces Command. Abrams inherited convening authority in the case after Gen. Mark Milley, who in March charged Bergdahl, was promoted to Army chief of staff.

But the recommendation is just that; Abrams could disregard it. It’s also possible that prosecutors, who did not dispute evidence nor introduce aggravating evidence, might do so if Abrams sends the case to court-martial.

Testimony at the preliminary hearing painted a sympathetic picture of Bergdahl, one at odds with public speculation on the case, including his motives for slipping away from his observation post in eastern Afghanistan in June 2009, his state of mind, his actions while in captivity and whether U.S. soldiers were killed searching for him.

The unusual charges against Bergdahl — desertion with the intent to shirk or avoid hazardous or important service, and misbehavior before the enemy that endangered troops who had to search for him — carry a maximum potential of life in prison along with dishonorable discharge. Maximum sentences under the Uniform Code of Military Justice are rarely levied, however, even in cases without the extensive mitigating circumstances of the Berdahl case.

According to undisputed testimony, just weeks into his 2009 deployment to Afghanistan, then-Pfc. Bowe Bergdahl hatched a quixotic plan to alert the highest levels of command to what he considered serious leadership issues in his unit that were endangering troops. He would disappear from his outpost, creating a crisis reaching all the way to the Pentagon, run to the forward-operating base 19 miles away, and demand that a general officer hear him out.

Maj. Gen. Kenneth Dahl, who did the “15-6” command investigation that led to the charges,  described Bergdahl  as an “unrealistic idealist” who often misperceived situations, including inflated views of his own abilities and the flaws of others and felt honor-bound to bring his concerns about his command to light.

“He felt that it was his responsibility to intervene,” Dahl testified, no matter the repercussions to himself or his chances of success.

Dahl testified that his investigation found no evidence that troops were killed during the search for Bergdahl and said it would be “inappropriate” to send him to jail.

Bergdahl was captured by the Taliban within hours after leaving post. For the next five years, he was beaten with hoses and chains, tied spread-eagled to a bed until his muscles atrophied, starved, humiliated and kept in a cage, according to testimony by Terrence Russell, an official with the Joint Personnel Recovery Agency, a survival specialist who debriefed Bergdahl.  Russell, no stranger to harsh treatment,   teared up recalling Bergdahl’s treatment. He said that Bergdahl had tried valiantly to escape, to resist and to stay alive to bring back intelligence.

Bergdahl, 29, sustained permanent disabilities in captivity, according to testimony of medical personnel.

“If we say Bergdahl is to blame for what happened to him — then what?” said Zachary Spilman, a former active-duty U.S. Marine lawyer who served in Afghanistan in 2010 and is now a reservist in private practice and the lead writer of a military criminal justice blog. “Do we as a society just cast this kid out? Any objective observer would say whatever Bergdahl did wrong, he has suffered enough.”

Army prosecutor Maj. Margaret Kurz agreed, saying at the hearing: “Indeed, he has suffered greatly.” But if someone robbed a bank, crashed the getaway vehicle and ended up an amputee, she said, he would be prosecuted for bank robbery.

“He’s not allowed to say, ‘I shouldn’t be punished,’ ” Kurz said.

Bergdahl was discharged from initial training in the Coast Guard for depression and failure to adapt, and had required a waiver to enlist in the Army in 2008, when the service had lowered its standards, according to his defense lawyer, Eugene Fidell.

He was a stellar soldier, one of Bergdahl’s sergeants testified, but with such obvious emotional difficulties that the sergeant had asked the company first sergeant to intercede. The first sergeants’ creed vows that he or she will  “dedicate my time and energy to (soldiers’) needs; their health, morale, discipline and welfare.”

But the first sergeant ignored the lower-ranking sergeant, saying that his opinions were worthless, according to testimony.

Any failures by Bergdahl’s chain of command would likely be mitigating evidence, experts said, that would reduce Bergdahl’s culpability.

“I wouldn’t want to be the prosecutor,” Spilman said. “I wouldn’t want to have to prove this case.”

A retired senior military official agreed that the facts of the case present an uphill battle for prosecutors at court-martial.

“Bergdahl’s going to say his higher duty is to file a complaint,” said the official, who declined to be identified to discuss an ongoing, sensitive case. “You can argue that that’s not his business. But in the court of public opinion, which the Army’s concerned about, that’s not going to play well.”

Yet  the charges against Bergdahl appear to be correct under the law, the official said.

“If you believe this is what he did and why he did it, the charges fit the facts. Just saying, ‘He’s a screwball,’ is not good enough,” the official said. “The foreseeable consequences of his actions was putting his unit in danger. There has to be some kind of accountability.”

Once the Army had the facts from Bergdahl’s voluntary interview with Dahl, it had little choice but to charge Bergdahl, in part for the optics, the official said.

“It’s a commander exercising the prerogative to put a label on behavior and communicate to the entire force that this is abhorrent,” the official said. “Messaging is important.”

That argument was not universally accepted.

“What message do you send to the other troops? ‘Don’t be delusional?’ ” Hansen said.

“And the capture is a message in itself. The Taliban did that for us. Message received.”

Taking the case to court-­martial, Hansen said, expending the time and resources, “would be really stupid.”

Several military lawyers suggested that a reasonable outcome would be for Bergdahl’s defense to request a so-called Chapter 10 discharge — an other-than-­honorable discharge in lieu of court-martial — and for the Army to grant it. That would spare Bergdahl any possibility of confinement, criminal record or dishonorable discharge denying him a medical disability and other benefits.

But a Chapter 10 discharge would jeopardize VA benefits for Bergdahl, experts said. Fidell maintains that Bergdahl should be medically retired with an honorable discharge. His client could reasonably be held responsible for, at most, being absent without leave for one day.

The minute he was taken captive, Fidell said, Bergdahl became a kidnapping victim.

http://www.stripes.com/news/us/experts-mitigating-factors-could-affect-bergdahl-case-1.371729
Report to moderator   Logged
Dos Equis
Moderator
Getbig V
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 51838

I am. The most interesting man in the world. (Not)


« Reply #92 on: October 08, 2015, 01:00:33 PM »

Bowe Bergdahl’s trial is here… and here’s why Obama hopes you won’t notice
Written by Allen West on October 7, 2015



Finally, we’ve gotten to the Bowe Bergdahl trial and are finding out some very interesting things. In case you’ve forgotten, Bergdahl is the Army soldier who left his assigned duty station on a combat outpost in Afghanistan. He left his weapon, night vision devices and body armor — and deserted his post. Those are the facts, simple and true.

Now, it seems Bergdahl’s defense could be based upon what are being termed “mitigating” factors.

As reported in Military.com:

Five years of torment at the hands of what one witness called “psychopathic sadists” make it likely that Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl would serve little if any jail time, military lawyers said, even if he were court-martialed and found guilty of desertion and misconduct.

Testimony about Bergdahl’s horrific treatment by the Taliban-associated Haqqani network — as well as other evidence largely undisputed by prosecutors at his Article 32 probable-cause hearing on whether he should face court-martial — revealed significant mitigating factors, experts said. That evidence, if left unchallenged, would probably spare him confinement were he convicted, the lawyers said, and could replace court-martial with another disposition.

“It’s hard for me to imagine either a judge or a military panel sentencing him to any additional confinement with the facts of this case,” said Victor Hansen, a former Army lawyer who’s now an associate law professor at the New England School of Law. “From a fairness point, what more do we want to punish him for?”

Lt. Col. Mark Visger, who presided over Bergdahl’s two-day hearing in San Antonio last month, is expected to provide his recommendations Monday to Gen. Robert Abrams, commander of the U.S. Forces Command. Abrams inherited convening authority in the case after Gen. Mark Milley, who in March charged Bergdahl, was promoted to Army chief of staff.

But the recommendation is just that; Abrams could disregard it. It’s also possible that prosecutors, who did not dispute evidence nor introduce aggravating evidence, might do so if Abrams sends the case to court-martial.

I have two words for this assertion about “mitigating factors” — bovine excrement! What kind of insidious crap is this? Let’s be very honest, there’s only one mitigating factor: Bowe Bergdahl wouldn’t have been in the hands of the Haqqani Network if he’d kept his arse on his combat outpost. Have we lost all sense of individual responsibility in our society and the military?

Bergdahl’s supposed detention for five years was of his own choosing. He made a conscious choice to violate the Uniform Code of Military Justice by deserting in a combat zone. Folks, that’s punishable by death, which of course won’t happen. But to come up with this weak-as-pond-water mess that he’s already suffered is unconscionable.

Let’s consider something, why is it that Bergdahl was held for those five years? This enemy we face does not “hold on” to American combat troops. They’re ritually disemboweled and savagely beheaded. What were the “mitigating factors” that meant Bowe Bergdahl got special treatment? He certainly didn’t look like he was in bad health.

You want to know another “mitigating factor”? Consider the six U.S. soldiers who lost their lives searching for a deserter, Bowe Bergdahl, what about their suffering — they’re dead. They lost their lives because some deserter decided to abandon them. Guess what, they didn’t abandon him and they lost their lives in pursuing that noble goal.

Ladies and Gents, this episode stinks with undue command influence. It’s rather interesting that the person who did the investigation on Bergdahl is now the Chief of Staff, U.S. Army. If anyone believes President Obama wants a long, drawn-out court case with a life imprisonment verdict for someone he traded for five senior Taliban leaders, you’re misguided. Obama wants Bergdahl’s case to go away, with minimal consequence.

Here’s the angle that’ll be pursued on Bergdahl’s behalf — he’s a victim. And we know the liberal progressive left loves a victim. This excerpt from the Military.com article explains it all:

The unusual charges against Bergdahl — desertion with the intent to shirk or avoid hazardous or important service, and misbehavior before the enemy that endangered troops who had to search for him — carry a maximum potential of life in prison along with dishonorable discharge. Maximum sentences under the Uniform Code of Military Justice are rarely levied, however, even in cases without the extensive mitigating circumstances of the Bergdahl case.

According to undisputed testimony, just weeks into his 2009 deployment to Afghanistan, then-Pfc. Bowe Bergdahl hatched a quixotic plan to alert the highest levels of command to what he considered serious leadership issues in his unit that were endangering troops. He would disappear from his outpost, creating a crisis reaching all the way to the Pentagon, run to the forward-operating base 19 miles away, and demand that a general officer hear him out.

Maj. Gen. Kenneth Dahl, who did the “15-6” command investigation that led to the charges, described Bergdahl as an “unrealistic idealist” who often misperceived situations, including inflated views of his own abilities and the flaws of others and felt honor-bound to bring his concerns about his command to light.

“He felt that it was his responsibility to intervene,” Dahl testified, no matter the repercussions to himself or his chances of success.

Dahl testified that his investigation found no evidence that troops were killed during the search for Bergdahl and said it would be “inappropriate” to send him to jail.

Bergdahl was captured by the Taliban within hours after leaving post. For the next five years, he was beaten with hoses and chains, tied spread-eagled to a bed until his muscles atrophied, starved, humiliated and kept in a cage, according to testimony by Terrence Russell, an official with the Joint Personnel Recovery Agency, a survival specialist who debriefed Bergdahl. Russell, no stranger to harsh treatment, teared up recalling Bergdahl’s treatment. He said that Bergdahl had tried valiantly to escape, to resist and to stay alive to bring back intelligence.

I have just one question for all these “experts,” investigating officers and purveyors of “mitigating factors:” — how many U.S. combat troops deserted their duty posts in Iraq and Afghanistan? How many in Bergdahl’s unit felt conditions were so bad they walked off their duty post?

It’s amazing to me all of these concessions are being made for a deserter — the only relevant factor. If Bowe Bergdahl hadn’t deserted, he wouldn’t have been taken by the enemy. Plain and simple. He was not “captured,” as he was not fighting. And if his injuries were so bad, why was he so able to go off Ft. Sam Houston into the local community?

The liberal progressive mindset was on full display by Susan Rice who declared Bergdahl served with honor and distinction. Funny, the U.S. Army wants to kick SFC Charles Martland out of the service — a Green Beret soldier with a Bronze Star for Valor award — for beating the crap out of an Afghan police chief guilty of raping a twelve-year-old boy and beating his mother.

But Bowe Bergdahl, a deserter, is a victim for whom we should consider the “mitigating factors” this coward brought upon himself?

This, Ladies and Gents, is Barack Obama’s military. Cowards are heroes, and heroes are demonized. Doggone FUBAR!

http://www.allenbwest.com/2015/10/bowe-bergdahls-trial-is-here-and-heres-why-obama-hopes-you-wont-notice/
Report to moderator   Logged
Dos Equis
Moderator
Getbig V
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 51838

I am. The most interesting man in the world. (Not)


« Reply #93 on: October 12, 2015, 10:49:02 AM »

Army officer recommends no jail time for Bowe Bergdahl, attorney says
Published October 10, 2015
Associated Press

An Army officer is recommending that Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl face a lower-level court martial and be spared the possibility of jail time for leaving his post in Afghanistan, his lawyer said Saturday.

Bergdahl was captured by the Taliban after leaving his post on June 30, 2009, and held until last year, when he was exchanged for five Taliban commanders. His commanding officers in Afghanistan say a 45-day search for Bergdahl put soldiers in danger.

Military prosecutors charged Bergdahl in March with desertion and misbehavior before the enemy, a charge that could carry a maximum penalty of life imprisonment.

But defense attorney Eugene Fidell said Lt. Col. Mark Visger has recommended that Sgt. Bergdahl's case be referred to a special court martial, which is a misdemeanor-level forum. It limits the maximum punishment to reduction in rank, a bad-conduct discharge and a term of up to a year in prison.

Fidell also said that Visger recommended that there be no prison time or punitive discharge against Bergdahl. In light of Visger's recommendations, the defense is asking that the case be disposed of non-judicially, rather than by any court martial.

Visger presided over last month's Article 32 hearing in Texas that reviewed evidence against Bergdahl. Visger submitted a report with his recommendation on Monday, but the Army hadn't said what Visger recommended.

Gen. Robert Abrams, the commanding general of U.S. Army Forces Command, will ultimately decide whether the case should be referred to a court-martial. No timeline has been given for a decision from Abrams.

"These are highly discretionary matters and, needless to say, I hope General Abrams does the right thing, but it's his call," Fidell said by phone Saturday.

The Obama administration's prisoner swap was sharply criticized by many Republicans and some Democrats, who said it was politically motivated and counter to the U.S. policy against negotiating with terrorists.

Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump said Thursday that Bergdahl should have been executed for leaving his post in Afghanistan and called him a "no-good traitor," which he also said in August.

Paul Boyce, a spokesman for the U.S. Army's Force Command, released a statement Saturday that didn't confirm Visger's decision.

"As legal action is ongoing, we continue to maintain careful respect for the military-judicial process, the rights of the accused, and ensuring the case's fairness and impartiality," Boyce said.

Philip Cave, a retired Navy judge advocate now in private practice in Virginia, said commanders often follow the officer's recommendation.

"The real issue here is the politics. That's the elephant in the room. How much is Abrams going to be affected by the politics?" Cave said. "I think the answer is, fairly little at this point."

Fidell released a memorandum addressed to Visger. It said the defense team is "grateful for the balanced, judicious, and humane approach you have taken to this complex case, and for the evenhanded way you conducted the public hearing."

It added that Visger's report should be made public "so the American people can be fully informed of your findings."

"The pity is, there's no reason for not having transparency," Fidell said Saturday, adding that Bergdahl's defense team planned to file a written appeal next week seeking to have the full report released. "It's a self-inflicted wound for the Army."

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2015/10/10/military-officer-recommends-bowe-bergdahl-shouldnt-face-jail-time-punitive/?intcmp=hpbt3
Report to moderator   Logged
Dos Equis
Moderator
Getbig V
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 51838

I am. The most interesting man in the world. (Not)


« Reply #94 on: December 11, 2015, 10:51:22 AM »

The Army is apparently gearing up for a big battle.  I hope they put this traitor in prison. 

Bergdahl says he left Afghanistan base to expose 'leadership failure'
Published December 11, 2015
Associated Press

BOISE, Idaho –  Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl says he walked off his base in Afghanistan to cause a crisis that would catch the attention of military brass.

He wanted to warn them about what he believed were serious problems with leadership in his unit. And he wanted to prove himself as a real-life action hero, like someone out of a movie.

Bergdahl hasn't spoken publicly about his decision or his subsequent five-year imprisonment by the Taliban and the prisoner swap that secured his return to the United States. But over the past several months he spoke extensively with screenwriter Mark Boal, who shared about 25 hours of the recorded interviews with Sarah Koenig for her popular podcast, "Serial."

"As a private first-class, nobody is going to listen to me," Bergdahl says in the first episode of the podcast, released Thursday. "No one is going to take me serious that an investigation needs to be put underway."

Bergdahl, of Hailey, Idaho, was charged in March with desertion and misbehavior before the enemy. He faces up to life in prison, though an Army officer has recommended that Bergdahl's case be moved to a special misdemeanor-level military court.

His attorney Eugene Fidell says politicians and would-be politicians have been using Bergdahl as a talking point to push their own agendas for months, a situation he described as creating "gale-force political winds."

The more the public can hear Bergdahl's own words, the better, Fidell told The Associated Press.

"Some of the information that is going to come out is inevitably not going to be what we would have preferred in a perfect universe, but net-net, we'll take it and allow people in our democratic society to form their own opinions," Fidell said.

Bergdahl's interview is another coup for makers of "Serial," which established podcasts as a viable outlet when the first season was downloaded more than 100 million times. Makers wouldn't say how long the new season would last; the first one was 12 separate episodes.

In the episode, Bergdahl says he wanted to expose the "leadership failure" he experienced in Afghanistan. The episode does not elaborate on what that failure was, but he says he believed at the time his disappearance and his plan to reappear at another location would give him access to top officials. After leaving the base after midnight, he worries about the reception he'll get once he reappears, and decides to try to get information on who was planting bombs in the area. That information will help smooth things over with angry military officials, he figures.

Sarah Koenig, the host and executive producer of "Serial," describes Bergdahl as a "radical, idiosyncratic" man in the episode. She says Bergdahl shipped his personal items home, bought local attire and pulled out $300 in U.S. dollars and Afghanis ahead of leaving the base.

Bergdahl acknowledges his motives weren't entirely idealistic.

"I was trying to prove to myself, I was trying to prove to the world, to anybody who used to know me ... I was capable of being what I appeared to be," Bergdahl says. "Doing what I did was me saying I am like Jason Bourne. I had this fantastic idea that I was going to prove to the world I was the real thing."

He says after the sun came up, a group of men on motorcycles captured him as he walked through nearby flatland desert.

He also discusses the psychological torment of being held captive for years.

"It's like how do I explain to a person that just standing in an empty dark room hurts?" Bergdahl recounts. "It's like well, a person asked me, 'Why does it hurt? Does your body hurt?' Yes, your body hurts but it's more than that. It's mental, like, almost confused. ... I would wake up not even remembering what I was."

He adds: "It's like you're standing there, screaming in your mind."

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2015/12/11/bergdahl-says-left-afghanistan-base-to-expose-leadership-failure/?intcmp=hplnws
Report to moderator   Logged
Dos Equis
Moderator
Getbig V
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 51838

I am. The most interesting man in the world. (Not)


« Reply #95 on: December 14, 2015, 06:00:00 PM »

Good.

Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl will face court-martial for desertion, misbehavior charges
By Michelle Tan, Staff writer
December 14, 2015

Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl has been recommended for trial by general court-martial, the Army announced Monday.

Bergdahl is charged with desertion and misbehavior before the enemy and could face life in prison.

The case was referred to court-martial by Gen. Robert Abrams, commanding general of Forces Command and the court-martial convening authority in the case.

A date for his arraignment hearing has not been announced. The hearing is expected to take place at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, where FORSCOM has its headquarters.

"The convening authority did not follow the advice of the preliminary hearing officer who heard the witnesses," Bergdahl's lawyer, Eugene Fidell, said in a statement.

Bergdahl's defense team "had hoped the case would not go in this direction. We will continue to defend Sgt. Bergdahl as the case proceeds."

The Army's announcement comes days after "Serial," one of the nation's most popular podcasts, launched its series on Bergdahl. The first episode of the series features snippets of conversations between the soldier and filmmaker Mark Boal, who worked as a writer and producer on "Zero Dark Thirty" and "The Hurt Locker."

It's the first time the public will hear directly from Bergdahl, at length, about his ordeal.

Bergdahl spent five years as a captive under the Taliban and was released last year in a controversial prisoner swap.

He was captured after disappearing from Combat Outpost Mest-Lalak in Paktika province, Afghanistan, on June 30, 2009. He has been accused of leaving his patrol base alone and intentionally before he was captured by Taliban insurgents. He was freed in a May 31, 2014, prisoner swap that also freed five Taliban leaders from the U.S. military prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

Bergdahl was charged March 25 with one count of desertion with intent to shirk important or hazardous duty, and one count of misbehavior before the enemy by endangering the safety of a command, unit or place.

The Article 32 investigation into his case, to determine if there is enough evidence to merit a court-martial, took place in September at Joint Base San Antonio-Fort Sam Houston, Texas. Bergdahl is currently assigned to Army North on Fort Sam Houston. He is accompanied off-post by at least two NCOs for his protection, Fidell has said.

In his report, the investigating officer for the Article 32 recommended Bergdahl avoid jail time, Fidell previously told the media. Lt. Col. Mark Visger's report to Abrams also recommended the case be decided at a special court-martial.

Soldiers facing special courts-martial can receive no more than a year in jail and no worse than a bad-conduct discharge; punishments regarding hard labor and pay forfeiture have similar restrictions.

Visger also recommended Bergdahl not face a punitive discharge for his alleged actions, Fidell said at the time.

In addition to Visger, Maj. Gen. Kenneth Dahl, who was charged with investigating Bergdahl's 2009 capture, testified during the Article 32 that the soldier should not be imprisoned for his actions.

On Monday, as the Army announced Abrams' decision regarding the case, Fidell again called on Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump to "cease his prejudicial months-long campaign of defamation against our client. We also ask that the House and Senate Armed Services Committees avoid any further statements or actions that prejudice our client's right to a fair trial."

In August, Trump called Bergdahl "a dirty, rotten traitor" during a town hall meeting in New Hampshire. At the time, Fidell fired back, calling the candidate's remarks "contemptible and un-American" and "a call for mob justice."

Fidell in September railed against what he called "open season" on his client as he pushed for the public release of parts of the Army's investigation into the soldier's disappearance.

"It is an understatement to observe that Sgt. Bergdahl's case has been and continues to be the subject of intense and highly politicized media interest," Fidell wrote in a document submitted to the Army Professional Conduct Council.

The desertion charge, which falls under Article 85 of the Uniformed Code of Military Justice, carries a maximum punishment of five years confinement, a dishonorable discharge, reduction to the rank of E-1, forfeiture of all pay and allowances.

The misbehavior before the enemy charge, which falls under Article 99 of the UCMJ, carries a maximum punishment of confinement for life as well as a dishonorable discharge, reduction in rank to E-1, and forfeiture of pay and allowances.

http://www.armytimes.com/story/military/2015/12/14/sgt-bowe-bergdahl-face-court-martial-desertion-charge/77300686/
Report to moderator   Logged
Dos Equis
Moderator
Getbig V
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 51838

I am. The most interesting man in the world. (Not)


« Reply #96 on: December 17, 2015, 05:41:09 PM »

Army sets arraignment date for Bergdahl
By Eugene Scott, CNN
Thu December 17, 2015 | Video Source: WRAL

Bergdahl will face a military court on charges of desertion and endangering fellow soldiers

Washington (CNN)Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, the soldier who allegedly deserted his unit in Afghanistan and was held captive by the Taliban for nearly five years, will be arraigned for his court martial next week, the Army said Thursday.

The Army set a date of December 22. Bergdahl will face a military court on charges of desertion and endangering fellow soldiers in a hearing at Fort Bragg in North Carolina.

Bergdahl disappeared from his base in Afghanistan in June 2009 and was held in captivity by the Taliban until the U.S. released five Taliban detainees in a controversial exchange for Bergdahl in May 2014.

Gen. Robert Abrams, the commander of U.S. Army Forces Command, ordered the court-martial on Monday, breaking with the U.S. military officer overseeing Bergdahl's preliminary hearing who recommended that Bergdahl be referred to a special court-martial and face no jail time.

Abrams on Monday ordered Bergdahl's case to a general court-martial, which means Bergdahl could face life imprisonment if convicted of "misbehavior before the enemy by endangering the safety of a command, unit or place."

Lt. Col. Mark Visger, the Army investigator who led the preliminary hearing into the charges Bergdahl faces, recommended against Bergdahl facing any jail time in October.

And Maj. Gen. Kenneth Dahl, who led the investigation into Bergdahl's actions in Afghanistan, testified in September that jail time would be "inappropriate" and said he did not find "any evidence to corroborate the reporting that Bergdahl was ... sympathetic to the Taliban."

http://www.cnn.com/2015/12/17/politics/bowe-bergdahl-arraignment-hearing/index.html
Report to moderator   Logged
Dos Equis
Moderator
Getbig V
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 51838

I am. The most interesting man in the world. (Not)


« Reply #97 on: December 22, 2015, 03:43:01 PM »

Bowe Bergdahl enters no plea during hearing
By Eliott C. McLaughlin, Nick Valencia and Devon M. Sayers, CNN
Tue December 22, 2015

Fort Bragg, North Carolina (CNN)—Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl was arraigned Tuesday on charges of desertion and misbehavior before the enemy during a hearing preceding his court-martial at Fort Bragg, North Carolina.

Sporting a shaved head and a blue military dress uniform, Bergdahl did not enter a plea and did not indicate a preference for a jury or bench trial. He showed little expression and looked straight ahead during the hearing.

Col. Christopher Frederikson, the judge in the case, explained that if Bergdahl opted against a bench trial, he would face a panel of at least five officers, all ranked higher than the sergeant. If the jury found Bergdahl guilty and elected to sentence him to more than 10 years in prison, it would require a three-fourths vote via secret ballot, the judge said.

The majority of Berghdahl's public comments consisted of "Sir, yes, sir," in response to Frederikson's questions. He also whispered occasionally to Lt. Col. Franklin D. Rosenblatt, one of his attorneys. In one of the few decisions to come out of Tuesday's hearing, Bergdahl told Frederikson he was pleased with his military and civilian counsel.

About 50 people, an even split of journalists and military personnel, attended the 11-minute proceeding, and then Bergdahl exited the courtroom with two military escorts and Rosenblatt. Bergdahl said hello to one reporter, but for the most part, did not make eye contact with the press corps.

The next hearing is set for January 12 at Fort Bragg. Frederikson said Col. Jeffery Nance, another judge, "has been detailed for all future judicial hearings in this case," according to a news release.

Generals disagree on jail time

Bergdahl stands charged with one count of desertion with intent to shirk important or hazardous duty, aka Article 85, and one count of misbehavior before the enemy by endangering the safety of a command, unit or place, aka Article 99. A conviction could command life in prison.

Bergdahl disappeared from Combat Outpost Mest-Malak in Afghanistan's Paktika province near the Pakistan border in June 2009 and was later captured by the Taliban. President Barack Obama secured his release in a prisoner swap announced May 31, 2014. In the deal, Bergdahl was exchanged for five Guantanamo Bay detainees. He returned to the United States two weeks later.

His attorney Eugene Fidell, who did not attend Tuesday's hearing, has said his client endured torture during his captivity, including months chained to a bed and years chained on all fours or locked in a cage.

Army Maj. Gen. Kenneth Dahl, who led the Bergdahl investigation, testified this year that imprisoning Bergdahl would be "inappropriate" because Dahl's lengthy interview with the 29-year-old sergeant yielded no evidence that he was "sympathetic to the Taliban."

Dahl contended that Bergdahl left his post to call attention to what he felt was poor leadership within his unit, an assertion Bergdahl has made in interviews with filmmaker Mark Boal. The interviews with Boal have provided the storyline for the second season of the popular podcast "Serial."

"I had this fantastic idea that I was going to prove to the world that I was the real thing," Bergdahl told the "Zero Dark Thirty" producer during 25 hours of interviews. "You know, that I could be what it is that all those guys out there that go to the movies and watch those movies -- they all want to be that -- but I wanted to prove I was that."

He hoped his disappearance would spur investigations into the "leadership failures" at his outpost, he said.

Deserter or Jason Bourne?

Bergdahl, who is presently on administrative Army duty in San Antonio, said that once he left the outpost he realized he could face serious punishment and decided to emulate the fictional action hero, Jason Bourne, and collect intelligence on the Taliban so he could return to the U.S. military with something to show for his absence.

Instead, he said, Taliban fighters on motorcycles, armed with AK-47s, found him walking along a desert road and took him captive.

The leader of Bergdahl's platoon, Sgt. Evan Buetow, told CNN this year that he felt Bergdahl's actions were "completely dishonorable" and he doesn't believe Bergdahl was trying to expose problems in his platoon.

Troops were injured and killed looking for Bergdahl, Buetow said, and others in his platoon were in constant fear that Bergdahl would give up information -- either voluntarily or via torture -- that would endanger them.

"You could go to sleep and never wake up because some guy just sneaks up because he knows your shortcomings in your security, or he knows your shortcomings here or there, and you don't wake up the next morning because they come and they attack you," Buetow said.

On December 14, Gen. Robert Abrams, commander of the U.S. Army Forces Command, broke from the recommendation of Dahl, his fellow general -- as well as the testimony of Lt. Col. Mark Visger, an Army investigator -- that Bergdahl should face no jail time. Instead, Abrams ordered that Bergdahl face a general court-martial that could end with the sergeant spending his life behind bars.

http://www.cnn.com/2015/12/22/us/bowe-bergdahl-court-martial-arraignment/index.html
Report to moderator   Logged
Dos Equis
Moderator
Getbig V
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 51838

I am. The most interesting man in the world. (Not)


« Reply #98 on: January 15, 2016, 04:46:42 PM »

They must be on crack.

Does Bowe Bergdahl deserve a POW Medal and Purple Heart? His lawyers think so.
By Dan Lamothe
January 12, 2016    

FORT BRAGG, N.C. — Army officials grappled Tuesday with how to handle an estimated 300,000 pages of classified information in the desertion case of Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, as well as whether the soldier should be allowed to wear a Prisoner of War Medal, Purple Heart and two other decorations that could be associated with his five years of confinement in Pakistan.

The issues came up at a pretrial hearing at this Army base, where Bergdahl is expected to face court-martial beginning Aug. 8. He is charged with desertion and misbehavior before the enemy for deliberately walking off his infantry platoon’s outpost in eastern Afghanistan in June 2009. He was captured within hours by the Taliban, and held under brutal conditions by the Haqqani network, a group affiliated with the Taliban, until a controversial swap was approved by the White House in May 2014 in which Bergdahl was released in exchange for five Taliban officials.

Bergdahl, 29, has so far deferred his option to enter a plea in the case and pick whether his case will be decided by a judge or jury. His lawyers have maintained that he should be charged with a lesser charge, absence without leave, which carries a penalty of up to 30 days of confinement. He currently faces up to life in prison if convicted.

The main purpose of the hearing Tuesday was to hammer out details of a protective order governing the handling of classified material and other issues in the case. One is expected to be signed in the coming days by Col. Jeffrey Nance, the judge overseeing proceedings. One of Bergdahl’s defense lawyers, Lt. Col. Franklin Rosenblatt, argued repeatedly that the defense team needs more access to classified information, while prosecutors said that strict safeguards need to be put in place to prevent the unauthorized spillage of classified details into the public.

[Disillusioned and self-deluded, Bowe Bergdahl disappeared into brutal captivity]

Rosenblatt said that he and the rest of Bergdahl’s defense team have not been given access to thousands of pages of relevant classified information, making it difficult for them to prepare for court-martial. The defense team also wants to be able to directly request classified information from Defense Department agencies, but has been unable to do so to date, he added.

“The guy who has the most need to know this information in DOD has the least access to it,” Rosenblatt argued on behalf of his client.

But a prosecutor, Capt. Michael Petrusic, said that a senior official with the ability to classify and declassify sensitive information should be consulted for approval before information is released to the defense through discovery, and before the defense interviews witnesses who may have access to classified information. He also noted that there are more than 25,000 classified documents, each with an average length of 13 pages, associated with the case, underscoring the complexity of the proceeding.

 Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, right, arrives for a pretrial hearing at Fort Bragg, N.C., with his defense counsel Lt. Col. Franklin D. Rosenblatt on Tuesday. Bergdahl, who was held by allies of the Taliban for five years after he walked off a base in Afghanistan, faces charges of desertion and misbehavior before the enemy. (AP Photo/Ted Richardson)

Bergdahl has said that he walked away from his base to cause enough of a commotion to get an audience to air gripes he had about his unit’s leaders. His disappearance sparked a months-long manhunt that endangered troops and drastically altered the way the war was waged as they resources were devoted to finding the soldier, Army officials say.

Nance said he will decide in coming days how information in the case will be handled. Nance said four individuals, who were not named, may have already disclosed classified information about the case in public. He did not describe the information.

“The bottom line,” he said, “Is everybody who wants access to classified information has to have the appropriate security clearance.”

The protective order also is expected to set out guidelines for public affairs, logistics and security for the court-martial. Nance said he needs the prosecution to submit a detailed plan for each issue. Unless security professionals suggest otherwise, he said, he doesn’t see a reason why armed military police will be needed in the courtroom, relying instead on a variety of other security measures in place.

[In podcast, Bowe Bergdahl says he compared himself to action hero Jason Bourne]

Rosenblatt asked Nance to consider intervening on Bergdahl’s behalf to find out why he has not been allowed by the Army to wear the POW Medal, the Purple Heart, the Afghanistan Campaign Medal and the NATO Medal. The service not doing so, Rosenblatt said, is prejudicial to Bergdahl’s case because he is required to walk in public while wearing a uniform that shows he is not authorized for awards directly associated with his case.

Nance asked Rosenblatt if the defense team has brought the issue up with the Army. It was raised with Bergdahl’s commanders, Rosenblatt said, but the issue has not been resolved. Army officials did not immediately respond to questions about it on Tuesday.

The POW Medal is rare, and authorized only for U.S. service members who are granted “creditable U.S. military service” and held captive while involved in a conflict with an opposing force, according to the most recent version of the law approved in 2013. It would serve as official acknowledgment that Bergdahl was held against his will.

The Purple Heart is awarded to any service member who is wounded or killed while serving in the Armed Forces by enemy forces. Bergdahl will require a lifetime of care for physical injuries suffered while in confinement at the hands of the Haqqani network, medical professionals who examined him testified during a pretrial hearing in September.

The Afghanistan Campaign Medal is authorized for any service member who has served in that country for 30 days consecutively or 60 days non-consecutively. Bergdahl was in Afghanistan about five weeks before walking away from his base, investigators have said.

The NATO Medal goes to soldiers to serve in a variety of international commands, including the International Security Assistance Force that oversaw operations across Afghanistan for much of the war there.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/checkpoint/wp/2016/01/12/does-bowe-bergdahl-deserve-a-pow-medal-and-purple-heart-his-lawyers-think-so/
Report to moderator   Logged
absfabs
Getbig III
***
Posts: 636


« Reply #99 on: January 15, 2016, 06:32:27 PM »

remove his citizenship
Report to moderator   Logged
Pages: 1 2 3 [4] 5   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Theme created by Egad Community. Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!