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Author Topic: Do you support Tre Smith?  (Read 1878 times)
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« on: August 15, 2007, 09:53:20 AM »

Dog Rescued After Being Locked In Stifling Car For Hours
Tuesday July 31, 2007
CityNews.ca Staff

It's the kind of stupid and senseless action that has no excuse. Toronto Humane Society officials were forced to break in a car window Tuesday afternoon to rescue a dog left sweltering in an oven-like car. Investigators were called to a parking lot in the King and Jameson area around 2pm where they were confronted with the four-legged friend in an obviously dangerous condition. It's believed he'd been sealed in a locked up car with no windows open for several hours. The temperature inside the vehicle had reached in excess of 70C. (175 degees F)

Cruelty investigator Tre Smith was sure the dog was near death and didn't have time to wait for the owners to return. So without hesitating, he broke open the window to reach the limp animal. "I could see through this window and there's a large breed Rottweiler, about 110 pounds, slumped over the back seat with his legs up and a blank stare forward, death stare we call it, foaming from the mouth and he was non-responsive. So I immediately smashed the window and opened the car doors and dragged the dog out and brought it onto the pavement."

Bystanders came by with buckets of cold water and poured them on the dog, hoping to revive him. Andrew McGowan was one of them. "He was laying right here, and we were pouring water on it slowly, making sure it was still stimulated," he remembers.

Veterinarians tended to the dog, which was unresponsive as he was rushed to THS headquarters on River St. and given oxygen and IV on arrival. Officials say it's too soon to know if the animal suffered brain damage and they'll be watching him carefully for at least the next week. But so far, the signs are better than they'd dared to hope. 

But this sad story doesn't end there. When the owner finally emerged after hearing his car alarm go off, Smith managed to handcuff him to the vehicle while police were called. The accused, who will likely be charged with cruelty to animals, also apparently suffered for his alleged actions.

It appears an enraged witness may have attacked him as he was stuck shackled to his car and he was bleeding when officers arrived to take him away. Smith insists he had no choice but to leave the suspect where he was. "The police hadn't got here just yet but they were almost here, and I had to leave because the dog was non-responsive, had stopped breathing and I had to stimulate the dog just to bring him back. So I had to leave for the life of the dog."

Charges against the person who inflicted the beating may be pending.

Humane Society officials say it's a perfect reminder that if it's too hot for you, it's too hot for them. And dogs, cats or any pet should never be left in a car during the summer heat, even for a few minutes. "This happens all the time," Smith complains. "There's ten or fifteen calls a day of people leaving animals in cars. So do us all a favour and your animal and yourself. Leave your animals at home."



Rally Planned To Support Suspended Humane Society Inspector
Tuesday August 14, 2007
CityNews.ca Staff

  <--click me to see video

To animal lovers, activists, and thousands of everyday people who have offered their support, Toronto Humane Society inspector Tre Smith is a hero. 

After all, if it weren't for his brave actions on July 31st, a Rottweiller named Cyrus almost certainly would have perished in the sweltering car his owner locked him in.  But Smith arrived on the scene and didn't hesitate to smash the car's window and pull the dog, which was hovering near death, out of the vehicle where he could begin his valiant attempt to save its life.  But in the confusion that followed, Smith had to make a tough choice.  The dog's owner arrived on the scene, and according to Smith, became confrontational.  Smith knew he had only seconds to spare if he hoped to save Cyrus, and chose to cuff the dog's owner and leave the scene to attend to the animal.  While he was gone, the man became a sitting duck for angry bystanders, and was allegedly assaulted. 

Two weeks later, the Ontario SPCA suspended Smith's agent license pending an internal review.  He can still work at the Humane Society, but can't investigate animal cruelty cases.

Smith was dumfounded by the decision, and so were his supporters, who have organized a rally on Wednesday in honour of their hero. 

In the meantime, Smith is still trying to come to terms with what's transpired.

"To be honest with you, I'm not sure (why I was suspended). I really don't know," he told Ann Rohmer during Animal House Calls on Tuesday.  "I received an e-mail sent out to every O.S.P.C.A. member across the province and alerting them to the fact that a Toronto Humane Society agent has been suspended due to his actions on July 31st, that's pretty much where it ended."

"I'm absolutely in the dark," he adds.  "From what I understand they've hired an independent person, a retired O.P.P. constable, to look into the events on that day."

And while his future may be uncertain, Smith is sure of one thing --- he has no regrets about his past.  In the end, Cyrus was saved, and to Smith, that's all that matters.

"When we brought him into the clinic we were surprised he was going to last the night and fortunately he did and he's thrived and got a lot better, (but) he'll never be the same dog he was before this incident.

"They haven't actually given him a final diagnosis but they're definitely seeing mild brain damage, his attention span isn't the same. He doesn't always respond to his name. I've been told by the vets that he is suffering from mild brain damage."

According to Smith, timing was everything, and if he'd been delayed dealing with the owner, the dog would have died.

"I don't think he could have survived any longer. He was seconds if not milliseconds away from crossing over. He had already released himself which is a tell tale sign that the organs are shutting down."

"I've been to hundreds of dog and car calls and you always prepare yourself (but) that was one of the most horrible things I've seen to date, seeing this beautiful Rottweiler slumped over the backseat gasping for his last bit of air. There's a lot going on. Emotions run deep when that happens but you have to keep them under control and remember that you're there to save and an animal's life."


Tre Smith Rally:
Wednesday
Starts at Toronto Humane Society
11 River St. @ 11:30am
Procession drives slowly up Highway 404 to Newmarket OSPCA Headquarters
16586 Woodbine Avenue
Newmarket.

************************************

Right now Tre is under suspension with pay, pending the outcome of an investigation. The controversy surrounds his putting the life of a human in danger. As a peace officer, with powers of arrest, when you place someone under arrest, you are required to deliver that person to safe custody. Tre left him handcuffed to his vehicle, in the hot sun for hours, while angry bystanders used him as a punching bag. Being handcuffed to his vehicle, he was left vulnerable and unable to defend himself. When police did eventually arrive, the dog's owner was bleeding from his assault.
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« Reply #1 on: August 15, 2007, 10:00:46 AM »

hehe..good..the should have stuck the owner in an unventilated car for an hour and watched him shit his pants.
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« Reply #2 on: August 15, 2007, 10:07:23 AM »

hehe..good..the should have stuck the owner in an unventilated car for an hour and watched him shit his pants.


Why?
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« Reply #3 on: August 15, 2007, 10:10:22 AM »

hehe..good..the should have stuck the owner in an unventilated car for an hour and watched him shit his pants.


That was my gut level reaction as well. Infact, when I first heard the story 2 weeks ago, I thought that was what he did, ...but in retrospect, I know that would be improper. The question at issue is... does the safety and well being of an animal, supercede the safety and well being of a human being? Have we taken animal rights to such an extent that we disregard the safety of humans?

I personally don't think it was necessary to cuff the owner to the car and leavehim there. They knew who he was. They could have picked him up later. The question is: was it proper to leave a man handcuffed and vulnerable like that?

I think he was wrong? He was definately a hero for saving Cyrus' life, ...but he should not have left the dog's owner handcuffed. I hope he gets a reprimand and will be able to return to active duty as an animal cruelty investigator.
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« Reply #4 on: August 15, 2007, 10:22:48 AM »

That was my gut level reaction as well. Infact, when I first heard the story 2 weeks ago, I thought that was what he did, ...but in retrospect, I know that would be improper. The question at issue is... does the safety and well being of an animal, supercede the safety and well being of a human being? Have we taken animal rights to such an extent that we disregard the safety of humans?

I personally don't think it was necessary to cuff the owner to the car and leavehim there. They knew who he was. They could have picked him up later. The question is: was it proper to leave a man handcuffed and vulnerable like that?

I think he was wrong? He was definately a hero for saving Cyrus' life, ...but he should not have left the dog's owner handcuffed. I hope he gets a reprimand and will be able to return to active duty as an animal cruelty investigator.

No the better question is where the hell were the police officers?  They shoudl have been called at the same time as the animal control officer---especially AFTER he broke the window.  Thats who i'd place the blame on, not the animal control officer. 

The second question is where did they go to treat the dog?  The newsreport makes it sound as if they were right there, yet the guy got beat up.  if he observed the assault, then he's at fault.  If he left the scene, then he was at fault---he could have taken the owner cuffed with him.  If he was standing right there and the crowd was that unruly, where the hell were the cops?
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« Reply #5 on: August 15, 2007, 10:53:58 AM »

That was my gut level reaction as well. Infact, when I first heard the story 2 weeks ago, I thought that was what he did, ...but in retrospect, I know that would be improper. The question at issue is... does the safety and well being of an animal, supercede the safety and well being of a human being? Have we taken animal rights to such an extent that we disregard the safety of humans?

I personally don't think it was necessary to cuff the owner to the car and leavehim there. They knew who he was. They could have picked him up later. The question is: was it proper to leave a man handcuffed and vulnerable like that?

I think he was wrong? He was definately a hero for saving Cyrus' life, ...but he should not have left the dog's owner handcuffed. I hope he gets a reprimand and will be able to return to active duty as an animal cruelty investigator.



nice arm chair quarterbacking jaguar...he's an animal control officer and is employed to look after the animal not this dumbass who left his dog in an unventilated car..as the ACO said..the police didn't get there and he had to go...he should have uncuffed the guy and left with the dog but he didn't...so the guy got roughed up..maybe next time he'll realize that being a careless asshole doesn't get you anywhere in life.
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« Reply #6 on: August 15, 2007, 11:01:11 AM »

The question at issue is... does the safety and well being of an animal, supercede the safety and well being of a human being? Have we taken animal rights to such an extent that we disregard the safety of humans?


the dog was dying jag..did you read that part? he's an animal control officer--that's his job...I guess you expect him to sit there and watch the animal die...

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« Reply #7 on: August 15, 2007, 11:02:36 AM »

Why?



people learn only by example mr. gebra...that's why.

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« Reply #8 on: August 15, 2007, 11:03:56 AM »

The way I read the story was he handcuffed the guy and was working on the unresponsive dog.  He couldn't work on the dog and watch the guy. 

 The assaulter should be held responsible. 


 
   
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« Reply #9 on: August 15, 2007, 11:05:32 AM »

I personally don't think it was necessary to cuff the owner to the car and leavehim there. They knew who he was. They could have picked him up later. The question is: was it proper to leave a man handcuffed and vulnerable like that?

I don't think his intention was to leave him vulnerable.  Unless he encouraged the person to go up and beat on him.  
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« Reply #10 on: August 15, 2007, 11:06:38 AM »



people learn only by example mr. gebra...that's why.



i got that part. it was the wanting tre smith to  "watch him shit his pants" part that i didn't.
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« Reply #11 on: August 15, 2007, 11:07:51 AM »

Tre left him handcuffed to his vehicle, in the hot sun for hours, while angry bystanders used him as a punching bag. Being handcuffed to his vehicle, he was left vulnerable and unable to defend himself. When police did eventually arrive, the dog's owner was bleeding from his assault.


It took the police HOURS to respond?    Ok, I am reversing here, if he was left handcuffed, alone, for hours, then that was not right.  He could of taken him with him if he had too, or yes, let him go to be picked up later. 
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« Reply #12 on: August 15, 2007, 11:08:17 AM »

i got that part. it was the wanting tre smith to  "watch him shit his pants" part that i didn't.

 quit it  Angry
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« Reply #13 on: August 15, 2007, 11:11:09 AM »

i got that part. it was the wanting tre smith to  "watch him shit his pants" part that i didn't.


mob rule gets overblown sometimes...
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« Reply #14 on: August 15, 2007, 12:56:30 PM »

Tre left him handcuffed to his vehicle, in the hot sun for hours, while angry bystanders used him as a punching bag. Being handcuffed to his vehicle, he was left vulnerable and unable to defend himself. When police did eventually arrive, the dog's owner was bleeding from his assault.


It took the police HOURS to respond?    Ok, I am reversing here, if he was left handcuffed, alone, for hours, then that was not right.  He could of taken him with him if he had too, or yes, let him go to be picked up later. 

Thats why I asked my question---where the hell were the cops? 
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« Reply #15 on: August 15, 2007, 12:59:41 PM »

quit it  Angry

I was just asking rockyfortune a question  Huh
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« Reply #16 on: August 15, 2007, 01:19:45 PM »

I was just asking rockyfortune a question  Huh

 I'm TEAL!!!! !     Princess L is purple -  PICK ANOTHER COLOR!~~~  Angry
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« Reply #17 on: August 15, 2007, 02:00:22 PM »

I'm TEAL!!!! !   

And he is teal as well...
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« Reply #18 on: August 16, 2007, 09:14:26 AM »

The question at issue is... does the safety and well being of an animal, supercede the safety and well being of a human being? Have we taken animal rights to such an extent that we disregard the safety of humans?


the dog was dying jag..did you read that part? he's an animal control officer--that's his job...I guess you expect him to sit there and watch the animal die...


Not at all, ...but understand this guy was not Bin Laden, and he wasn't profiled on America's Most Wanted.
I understand he is an animal rescue officer, ...however, the question remains did he prioritize an animals wellbeing over a humans?

I could be a bloody cement worker tasked with the job of laying cement in sidewalks, but if someone falls into the cement mixer, am I suppose to keep the mixer going so I can get the sidewalk built, ...or should I turn it off?
Worse still, should I be the one placing him into the cement mixer to begin with?

No one is saying he should have let the dog die, ...simply that he should not have left the man handcuffed and vulnerable. Retribution and the desire to exact vengeance on behalf of the animal ellicits one reaction, however professionalism demands another. He should have uncuffed the guy and had him picked up later. And that is what is at issue here.

Think about it for a minute Rocky. Let us assume, that while in Harlem or Watts, you were arrested under suspicion that you were the Klansman who had been burning crosses in the neighbourhood. How would you feel if the cop who placed you under arrest couldn't immediately transport you to the station for booking & processing? Would you prefer he uncuff you, with the certain knowledge they were going to pick up your butt later, ...or would you prefer to be left handcuffed & vulnerable in a Harlem back alley, unable to defend yourself while angry residents not fond of the KKK used you as a punching bag?

With the power to place someone in custody, comes the responsibility for the safekeeping of that person.
He should have delivered him up to the safe custody of the police, ...or released him from his bonds.

One of the issues this controversy is bringing to the fore is whether animal rescue workers need more backup and support when attending calls. Were they required to be dispatched in pairs similar to police, one could have effected the arrest while the other whisked the animal to medical care. Unfortunately, an animal rescue call is not a huge priority for the police department who dispatches officers based on the severity of the call. And later calls of a more urgent nature will take priority over an animal rescue call.
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« Reply #19 on: August 16, 2007, 09:33:25 AM »

Not at all, ...but understand this guy was not Bin Laden, and he wasn't profiled on America's Most Wanted.
I understand he is an animal rescue officer, ...however, the question remains did he prioritize an animals wellbeing over a humans?

I could be a bloody cement worker tasked with the job of laying cement in sidewalks, but if someone falls into the cement mixer, am I suppose to keep the mixer going so I can get the sidewalk built, ...or should I turn it off? Worse still, should I be the one placing him into the cement mixer to begin with?

No one is saying he should have let the dog die, ...simply that he should not have left the man handcuffed and vulnerable. Retribution and the desire to exact vengeance on behalf of the animal ellicits one reaction, however professionalism demands another. He should have uncuffed the guy and had him picked up later. And that is what is at issue here.
Think about it for a minute Rocky. Let us assume, that while in Harlem or Watts, you were arrested under suspicion that you were the Klansman who had been burning crosses in the neighbourhood. How would you feel if the cop who placed you under arrest couldn't immediately transport you to the station for booking & processing? Would you prefer he uncuff you, with the certain knowledge they were going to pick up your butt later, ...or would you prefer to be left handcuffed & vulnerable in a Harlem back alley, unable to defend yourself while angry residents not fond of the KKK used you as a punching bag?

With the power to place someone in custody, comes the responsibility for the safekeeping of that person.
He should have delivered him up to the safe custody of the police, ...or released him from his bonds.

One of the issues this controversy is bringing to the fore is whether animal rescue workers need more backup and support when attending calls. Were they required to be dispatched in pairs similar to police, one could have effected the arrest while the other whisked the animal to medical care. Unfortunately, an animal rescue call is not a huge priority for the police department who dispatches officers based on the severity of the call. And later calls of a more urgent nature will take priority over an animal rescue call.



Why are you assuming that he did it for retribution and not to hold him accountable to the law when the police arrived?   I don't think that he could reasonably assume that mob rule would take over and they would beat the guy..it's unfortunate that it happened but his action of handcuffing the guy should not be considered some sort of retribution.  It happens everyday when police officers are called to the scene of accidents, crimes..criminals are cuffed and victims are tended to...you don't let someone who is breaking the law to walk away. 
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« Reply #20 on: August 16, 2007, 09:45:03 AM »



Why are you assuming that he did it for retribution and not to hold him accountable to the law when the police arrived?   I don't think that he could reasonably assume that mob rule would take over and they would beat the guy..it's unfortunate that it happened but his action of handcuffing the guy should not be considered some sort of retribution.  It happens everyday when police officers are called to the scene of accidents, crimes..criminals are cuffed and victims are tended to...you don't let someone who is breaking the law to walk away. 

 But, they don't leave the person handcuffed and leave the scene.  If I read it correctly and it is accurate, he left with the dog and left the guy handcuffed there alone.  I don't think he did that for retribution, I believe he did think the police would be there very shortly after he left, but he shouldn't of left him handcuffed.  They had his license plate number, he could of been picked up later. 

  He made a bad call, not a purposely malicious one, but a bad call nonetheless.
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« Reply #21 on: August 16, 2007, 09:47:44 AM »


 But, they don't leave the person handcuffed and leave the scene.  If I read it correctly and it is accurate, he left with the dog and left the guy handcuffed there alone.  I don't think he did that for retribution, I believe he did think the police would be there very shortly after he left, but he shouldn't of left him handcuffed.  They had his license plate number, he could of been picked up later. 

  He made a bad call, not a purposely malicious one, but a bad call nonetheless.




there'd be a lot less crime going on if they did.  I can't feel bad for a person like this and what happened to him..would i be part of the mob? no, but do i feel bad for a law breaker (any law breaker) who gets his/her hand caught in the cookie and gets slapped for it? nope...it's time people start being held accountable for their actions.  this guy was...i'm sure he'll think twice about ever doing something like that again. 
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« Reply #22 on: August 16, 2007, 09:58:18 AM »

there'd be a lot less crime going on if they did.   Tongue

 Probably!!   Grin     


   I am interested to see the final outcome of this.  Will the AC guy be fired?  Have a lawsuit filed against him? Will one be filed against the city?
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« Reply #23 on: August 16, 2007, 10:01:34 AM »



Why are you assuming that he did it for retribution and not to hold him accountable to the law when the police arrived?   I don't think that he could reasonably assume that mob rule would take over and they would beat the guy..it's unfortunate that it happened but his action of handcuffing the guy should not be considered some sort of retribution.  It happens everyday when police officers are called to the scene of accidents, crimes..criminals are cuffed and victims are tended to...you don't let someone who is breaking the law to walk away. 

I didn't say he did it for retribution, ...but the overwhelming majority of those who applaud his actions do so for that very reason. That speaks volumes about their mindsets, ...as well as yours. As an arresting officer, his job is not also to be judge and jury, convicter and sentencer. His conviction is up to a judge and/or jury, and only upon conviction is he to be sentenced, ...again by a judge and/or jury, ...not an arresting officer.

Yes police handcuff people everyday, but they don't leave them alone and handcuffed, vulnerable to attack by passersby. The next time you come upon a cop affecting an arrest, ...try to assault his suspect and see how far you get?

Since when do we not allow someone breaking the law to walk away? It's not like they hadn't identified him.
They knew exactly who he was upon arriving at the scene.
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« Reply #24 on: August 16, 2007, 10:13:33 AM »

Anyone that abuses/negelects an animal...wouldn't be classified in my opinion as a "stellar individual".

I support this guy....

he had his hands full & didn't want the owner to dry away or to get away from taking responsibility.

So...innocent bystanders came by & 'tuned' him up alittle.  So what?  The jerk off probably gets shit like this happening to him all the time if locking a dog in a car shows anything of his behaviour.

This is the way I look at it.....

if he didn't lock this dog up in the car on a hot summer day & leave him there for dead....& if someone didn't report it & had to break into his car.....SHIT LIKE GETTING CUFFED TO YOUR CAR SO BYSTANDERS TAKING POP SHOTS AT YOU WOULDN"T OF HAPPENED.

 Roll Eyes
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