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Author Topic: Constant pain above left hip  (Read 44273 times)
Butterbean
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« on: February 08, 2008, 01:23:07 PM »

My friend has had a constant pain above her left hip (just above the hip in the front) for about a week now.  She said that it's always there and is worse while walking.  She also said it's worse when she feels like she needs to urinate and also while urinating.

Apparently there was no external trauma that caused this.

Any ideas would be appreciated Smiley
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« Reply #1 on: February 08, 2008, 01:47:59 PM »

My friend has had a constant pain above her left hip (just above the hip in the front) for about a week now.  She said that it's always there and is worse while walking.  She also said it's worse when she feels like she needs to urinate and also while urinating.

Apparently there was no external trauma that caused this.

Any ideas would be appreciated Smiley

Kidney infection?
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Butterbean
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« Reply #2 on: February 08, 2008, 01:58:50 PM »

Kidney infection?
I will do some searching on that.  Thanks Princess Smiley
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« Reply #3 on: February 08, 2008, 03:18:32 PM »

My friend has had a constant pain above her left hip (just above the hip in the front) for about a week now.

Just my 2 cents, but I believe if it's the kidney, that pain would be in the back.
Reason I say that is I was recently in the hospital for four days with what the doctors deemed a “severe” UTI.

The infection radiated all the way up into my ureter, and was bad enough to cause a significant blockage, trapping most of my water in the kidney and preventing it from draining into my bladder.

The kidney pain I experienced was located in the back, right under my latissimus.
I also experienced some minor cramping in my abdomen, but they told me any pain in the front was most likely unrelated to anything with the kidney – I probably just pulled something from compensating for the pain in the back.

Either way, this is nothing to d*ck around with. Without wasting another moment, I would highly recommend your friend go see a doctor.

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Butterbean
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« Reply #4 on: February 11, 2008, 11:24:05 AM »

Thanks Montague, she said she would call the doc today.
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« Reply #5 on: February 11, 2008, 11:37:39 AM »

Sure.
Please let us know what this turns out to be.
I’m no hypochondriac, but I do like to elevate my education on different illnesses and their symptoms.

I wish your friend the best of luck.

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Butterbean
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« Reply #6 on: February 11, 2008, 12:38:06 PM »

Thanks Montague.  I just checked my email and she finally read some stuff I had found and sent to her on diff. things including ovarian/etc cysts.




She really is going to call the doc now:

"This page is disgusting.  Words like thick watery fluid, gel like puss.  Cysts that produce hair like teeth causing pain.  I'm calling my doctor, gotta go."


 Grin




 
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« Reply #7 on: February 11, 2008, 01:35:22 PM »

Kidney infection?


more like bladder infection no?
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Butterbean
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« Reply #8 on: February 12, 2008, 02:21:50 PM »

Her gyno saw her today and she is to make an appt. w/a urologist.

He thinks she has a kidney stone Sad
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« Reply #9 on: February 12, 2008, 03:54:59 PM »

I’m not arguing with a doctor’s prognosis – I’m just surprised.
Every person I’ve known to have kidney issues (including me) always reports the pain/discomfort in the back; not the front as your friend indicated.

Nonetheless, stones – from what I understand – are a commonly treated condition.
Remedies are not often intrusive.

Keep us posted.

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Butterbean
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« Reply #10 on: February 12, 2008, 09:25:49 PM »

She's got an appt w/the urologist in the morn....I'll update!
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« Reply #11 on: February 15, 2008, 05:14:51 PM »

She had a cat scan and was supposed to be called today (fri) w/the results.

No one had called her by about 3:20 so she called them.  Surprise!  The office had closed for the weekend Roll Eyes  On the bright side, maybe there wasn't anything serious to report.
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« Reply #12 on: February 16, 2008, 02:42:19 PM »

On the bright side, maybe there wasn't anything serious to report.

It'd be a hell of a thing if there is.

I go for my follow up with the urologist in about 3 months.
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« Reply #13 on: February 16, 2008, 04:12:50 PM »

She had a cat scan and was supposed to be called today (fri) w/the results.

No one had called her by about 3:20 so she called them.  Surprise!  The office had closed for the weekend Roll Eyes  On the bright side, maybe there wasn't anything serious to report.

With no history of bloody or cloudy urine, i wouldn't jump to infection right away, but if it hurts to walk, it could be strain of hip flexor. (possibly psoas or TFL.)

I don't see the logic of a CT scan though.  the things some MD's do just boggle my mind.....  *sigh*
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« Reply #14 on: February 18, 2008, 01:18:37 PM »

It'd be a hell of a thing if there is.

I go for my follow up with the urologist in about 3 months.

Hope you'll be fine!


With no history of bloody or cloudy urine, i wouldn't jump to infection right away, but if it hurts to walk, it could be strain of hip flexor. (possibly psoas or TFL.)

I don't see the logic of a CT scan though.  the things some MD's do just boggle my mind.....  *sigh*
Thanks for the input eho, she just called and apparently has ovarian cysts.
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« Reply #15 on: February 18, 2008, 01:49:34 PM »

Thanks for the input eho, she just called and apparently has ovarian cysts.

Dang.
What's the procedure(s) to remove/treat those?
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« Reply #16 on: February 19, 2008, 08:46:42 AM »

Dang.
What's the procedure(s) to remove/treat those?

My wife has ovarian cysts..  According to her GYN, they're quite common..  often they prescribe hormone therapy in the form of birth control pills to help shrink them.  Depending on how BIG they are, it will dictate the course of action. 

my wife had the BP, and also had laproscopic surgery  (guided by fibre optics) to remove the cysts, but they came back.  doesn't leave very big scars.
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« Reply #17 on: February 19, 2008, 08:57:12 AM »

Thanks guys.  My friend's doc is out of town this week and should meet w/him next week I think to decide what they are going to do.  She's been told treatment decisions are usually based on age/childbearing intentions etc.  She's done having children.

How are cysts treated?
Watchful waiting. The patient waits and gets re-examined in one to three months to see if the cyst has changed in size. This is a common treatment option for women who are in their childbearing years, have no symptoms, and have a fluid-filled cyst. It also might be an option for postmenopausal women.

Surgery. If the cyst doesn’t go away after several menstrual periods, has gotten larger, looks unusual on the ultrasound, causes pain, or you’re postmenopausal, the doctor may want to remove it. There are two main surgical procedures:

Laparoscopy—if the cyst is small and looks benign on the ultrasound, your doctor may perform a laparoscopy. This procedure is done under general anesthesia. A very small incision is made above or below the navel, and a small instrument that acts like a telescope is inserted into the abdomen. If the cyst is small and looks benign, it can be removed.
Laparotomy—if the cyst is large and looks suspicious, the doctor may perform a procedure called a laparotomy. This procedure involves making bigger incisions in the stomach to remove the cyst. While you are under general anesthesia, the doctor is able to have the cyst tested to find out if the tissue is cancerous. If it is cancerous, the doctor may need to remove the ovary and other tissues that may be affected, like the uterus or lymph nodes.
Birth control pills. If you frequently develop cysts, your doctor may prescribe birth control pills to prevent you from ovulating. This will lower the chances of forming new cysts.

Can ovarian cysts be prevented?
Ovarian cysts cannot be prevented. Fortunately, the vast majority of cysts don’t cause any symptoms, are not related to cancer, and go away on their own. Talk to your doctor or nurse if you notice any changes in your period, pain in the pelvic area, or any of the major symptoms listed above. A pelvic exam, possibly with an ultrasound, can help determine if a cyst is causing the problem. If a woman is not seeking pregnancy and develops functional cysts, frequently, future cysts may be prevented by taking oral contraceptives, Depo-Provera, or Norplant.

When are women most likely to have ovarian cysts?
Functional ovarian cysts usually occur during the childbearing years. Most often, cysts in women of this age group are not cancerous. Women who are past menopause (ages 50-70) with ovarian cysts have a higher risk of ovarian cancer. At any age, if you think you have a cyst, it’s important to tell your doctor
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