Getbig Bodybuilding, Figure and Fitness Forums
April 24, 2014, 11:25:05 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
 
   Home   Help Calendar Login Register  
Pages: 1 2 3 [4] 5 6   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: i'm going to be 45 and i still don't have a real career?!  (Read 48799 times)
BayGBM
Getbig V
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 16791



View Profile
« Reply #75 on: February 23, 2010, 09:33:26 PM »

Any updates, Tom? Smiley

Until we hear otherwise, it is safe to assume Tom is still "working only part time as a manager at a recreational center in the midwest hating it (the pay sucks and there is no chance for me to move up and i hate everyone i work with!)"
 
Cry
Report to moderator   Logged
brooklynbruiser
Getbig IV
****
Posts: 1787



View Profile
« Reply #76 on: February 23, 2010, 10:52:07 PM »

Sitting at the right hand of Lucifer, Bay! Smiley
Report to moderator   Logged

Almost always, yes.
BayGBM
Getbig V
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 16791



View Profile
« Reply #77 on: February 24, 2010, 01:18:17 AM »

Sitting at the right hand of Lucifer, Bay! Smiley

Why take the twig when you can own the whole tree?  Cheesy
Report to moderator   Logged
brooklynbruiser
Getbig IV
****
Posts: 1787



View Profile
« Reply #78 on: February 24, 2010, 05:46:04 PM »

I laugh while tears of sorrow flow unabated. Smiley
Report to moderator   Logged

Almost always, yes.
FitnessFrenzy
Getbig V
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 10250


Team Potato Rehaluk


View Profile WWW
« Reply #79 on: February 27, 2010, 03:18:05 PM »

find a decent job you like and stay with it, consistency is the key to success!




Well not if you want to be self employed and start your own business. Then I guess learning something you can use competitively is more important than just being consistent at a pay-slave job for 10 years
Report to moderator   Logged
BayGBM
Getbig V
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 16791



View Profile
« Reply #80 on: February 28, 2010, 01:32:13 PM »

Does

left california in late 2003 so sickened and disgusted by that industry i didn't want anything to do with tv,film,radio or anything media related.

= I was fired?  Cry


* You're fired.jpg (5.16 KB, 180x250 - viewed 493 times.)
Report to moderator   Logged
24KT
Getbig V
*****
Gender: Female
Posts: 23945


Karatbars Account Rep +1 (310) 409-2244


View Profile WWW
« Reply #81 on: February 28, 2010, 09:41:07 PM »

Does

= I was fired?  Cry

Normally I'd agree with that, ...however, having spent many years in the industry,
I can certainly see how one would leave it utterly disgusted by it and many of the people in it.
Report to moderator   Logged

w
BayGBM
Getbig V
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 16791



View Profile
« Reply #82 on: March 01, 2010, 12:05:07 AM »

Normally I'd agree with that, ...however, having spent many years in the industry,
I can certainly see how one would leave it utterly disgusted by it and many of the people in it.

Maybe, but "utter disgust" doesn't usually stem from jobs like "production assistants and office assistants"--unless you were fired.  Sad
Report to moderator   Logged
brooklynbruiser
Getbig IV
****
Posts: 1787



View Profile
« Reply #83 on: March 01, 2010, 08:25:01 PM »

Bay, do they call you Legba or Ol' Scratch? Beelzebub? Smiley
Report to moderator   Logged

Almost always, yes.
BayGBM
Getbig V
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 16791



View Profile
« Reply #84 on: March 01, 2010, 08:51:53 PM »

If only...  Grin


* CEO Pay Youre Fired Pay Out w $.jpg (73.02 KB, 607x472 - viewed 522 times.)
Report to moderator   Logged
ToxicAvenger
Getbig V
*****
Posts: 26529


I thawt I taw a twat!


View Profile
« Reply #85 on: March 02, 2010, 11:22:04 PM »

X ray techs make  decent $ and the training is relatively short...8 months i think
Private Pilots...not commercial but yanno...ones that fly shit from point A to B...makes a decent living
Helicopter pilots make good money...plenty of places that train people...for that..just google em
Believe it or not...Truck Drivers (big rigs) make decent money hauling stuff...
or u could do what i do....
http://www.cisco.com/web/learning/le3/learning_career_certifications_and_learning_paths_home.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cisco_Career_Certifications
just 2 certifications and you r close to the 100k Range.... the CCNA and CCNP ...
...and it can be done in around 4 months...i did it in under 4 months...thats the good news. The bad news is that ya found PT classes hard..i dont think they r hard...actually pretty easy..so you might have to put in more time and more importantly ITS HIGH TIME YOU STOP LOOKING FOR A DREAM CARREER AND PICK SOMETHING  AND STICK WITH IT.Just think...if you start tomorrow..at 50 yrs of age you'll ONLY have 5 yrs of experience (experience = $)...so...GROW the fuck up...i got a wake up call last yr and at 33 & I FEEL BEHIND my 27 yr old friend that also does what i do. IF you pick the cisco path...its not easy..but STICK TO IT and maybe in 2 yrs you can be making close to 80k...get your CCNP...move to a tech heavy area...like VA or DC or Maryland or North Carolina and you'll land a 80k/yr job...that i can promise u
...G'luck
Report to moderator   Logged

carpe` vaginum!
BayGBM
Getbig V
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 16791



View Profile
« Reply #86 on: March 18, 2010, 04:38:28 PM »

For Tom who "hates everyone I work with..."


7 Things Never to Say to Your Boss
by Karen Burns

Everyone has a boss. Even if you "work for yourself," you're still an employee to your client.

A big part of maintaining the boss-employee relationship is to never allow a boss to think you dislike your work, are incapable of doing it, or--worse--consider it beneath you.

These sound like no-brainers, but many statements heard commonly around the workplace violate these basic rules. Looking for an example? Here are seven heard in workplaces all the time. They may seem ordinary, even harmless. But try reading these from your boss's point of view. You'll see right away why it's smart to never allow these seven sentences to pass your lips:

"That's not my job." You know what? A lot of bosses are simple souls who think your job is to do what's asked of you. So even if you're assigned a task that is, indeed, not your job, refrain from saying so. Instead, try to find out why your boss is assigning you this task--there may be a valid reason. If you believe that doing the task is a bad idea (as in, bad for the company) you can try explaining why and suggesting how it could be better done by someone else. This may work, depending on the boss. In any case, remember that doing what's asked of you, even tasks outside your job description, is good karma.

"It's not my problem." When people say something is not their problem it makes them look like they don't care. This does not endear them to anybody, especially the boss. If a problem is brewing and you have nothing constructive to say, it's better to say nothing at all. Even better is to pitch in and try to help. Because, ultimately, a problem in the workplace is everyone's problem. We're all in it together.

"It's not my fault." Yet another four words to be avoided. Human nature is weird. Claiming that something is not our fault often has the result of making people suspect it is. Besides, what's the real issue here? It's that something went wrong and needs to be fixed. That's what people should be thinking about--not who is to blame.

"I can only do one thing at a time." News flash: Complaining you are overworked will not make your boss feel sorry for you or go easier on you. Instead, a boss will think: (1) you resent your job, and/or (2) you aren't up to your job. Everybody, especially nowadays, feels pressured and overworked. If you're trying to be funny, please note that some sarcasm is funny and lightens the mood. Some just ticks people off.

"I am way overqualified for this job." Hey, maybe you are. But the fact is, this is the job you have. You agreed to take it on and, while you may now regret that decision, it's still your job. Complaining that it's beneath you only makes you look bad. Plus, coworkers doing similar jobs may resent and dislike you. And guess what? Bosses will not think, "Oh, this is a superior person whom I need to promote." Nope, they'll think, "What a jerk."

"This job is easy! Anyone could do it!" Maybe what you're trying to convey here is that you're so brilliant your work is easy. Unfortunately, it comes off sounding more like, "This work is stupid." Bosses don't like hearing that any work is stupid. Nor do they really like hearing that a job is easy peasy. It belittles the whole enterprise. If a task is simple, be glad and do it as quickly as you can. Even "stupid" work needs to get done.

"It can't be done." Saying something can't be done is like waving a red flag in a boss's eyes. Even if the thing being suggested truly is impossible, saying it is can make you look ineffectual or incapable. Better to play detective. Why is the boss asking you to do whatever it is? What's the problem that needs to be solved? What's the goal? Search for doable ways of solving that problem or reaching that goal. That's what bosses really want. Most of them do not expect the impossible.

Last words: When in doubt, remember that silence really is golden.

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/7-Things-Never-to-Say-to-Your-usnews-226352592.html/print;_ylt=AglyCF2IeK2bjwnM6UPWvnMEbq9_;_ylu=X3oDMTBwNjZiaWw5BHBvcwMxBHNlYwN0b29scwRzbGsDcHJpbnQ-?x=0
Report to moderator   Logged
BayGBM
Getbig V
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 16791



View Profile
« Reply #87 on: March 21, 2010, 09:49:30 AM »

$1 million isn't enough anymore
A majority of experts now say $1 million is not nearly enough for a truly secure retirement.
by Joe Mont

Conventional wisdom says you need to save $1 million for retirement.

That target may be easy to remember, but it falls short of the true cost of what's required for post-career comfort. Longer life spans, the threat of inflation and the uncertain future of Social Security benefits make this long-touted savings advice inadequate for most, advisers say.

Scottrade recently polled 226 registered investment advisers on the topic and found that 71% don't believe $1 million is enough for the average American family. Most said families need to save double, or more than triple, the amount.

"Younger generations, especially, need to set their retirement goals higher than other generations and start saving as early as possible," says Craig Hogan, Scottrade's director of customer-relationship management and reporting.

The survey solicited opinions about the current investment habits of Americans. Questions were broken down by generations to determine advisers' opinions on average investment goals in today's dollars for various groups.

Generation Y (ages 18 to 26) needs to save at least $2 million, according to 77% of advisers. Forty percent put the figure at $3 million.

Nearly half of advisers (46%) said Generation X (ages 27 to 42) should at least double the $1 million goal. Twenty-two percent suggested more than $3 million.

For Boomers (ages 43 to 64), 35% recommended $2 million to $3 million. Thirty percent suggested $1.5 million to $2 million.

According to Scottrade's analysis, seniors are the only generation that may come close to needing only $1 million. Forty-four percent of advisers said $500,000 to $1.5 million is sufficient for average families in that age bracket.

Bill Smith, president of Ohio-based Great Lakes Retirement Group, is among the advisers who took part in the survey. As he sees it, too many people rely on online retirement calculators. Much of that guidance uses a target based on making do with 70% to 80% of pre-retirement income.

"I've never been a big fan of planning to earn less in retirement than you are making now," he says. "I'd like to see an individual continue making the same amount of retirement as when he was working. Who wants to set themselves up in retirement to make less?"

While most people will spend less when they retire, inflation or the onset of a long-term illness could wipe out savings without proper protection or planning.

That said, there's no secret to meeting a retirement goal: maximize your contribution rate, have a greater tolerance for risk when you're younger and downshift to bonds as you grow older. Successful preparation, however, begins with setting a realistic goal and understanding your true financial picture.

Debt needs to be carefully considered as well as leaving money for the kids.

"There are two extremes," Smith says. "There are individuals who say, 'We don't care if we have anything left the day we die -- we are OK with that last check bouncing when we are gone.' Then there are the individuals who don't do anything in retirement because all of their decisions are made around, 'I've got to leave it for the kids.' "
Report to moderator   Logged
Devon97
Getbig IV
****
Posts: 3487


Keith lives on...


View Profile
« Reply #88 on: April 12, 2010, 09:58:44 AM »

$1 million isn't enough anymore
A majority of experts now say $1 million is not nearly enough for a truly secure retirement.
by Joe Mont

Conventional wisdom says you need to save $1 million for retirement.

That target may be easy to remember, but it falls short of the true cost of what's required for post-career comfort. Longer life spans, the threat of inflation and the uncertain future of Social Security benefits make this long-touted savings advice inadequate for most, advisers say.

Scottrade recently polled 226 registered investment advisers on the topic and found that 71% don't believe $1 million is enough for the average American family. Most said families need to save double, or more than triple, the amount.

"Younger generations, especially, need to set their retirement goals higher than other generations and start saving as early as possible," says Craig Hogan, Scottrade's director of customer-relationship management and reporting.

The survey solicited opinions about the current investment habits of Americans. Questions were broken down by generations to determine advisers' opinions on average investment goals in today's dollars for various groups.

Generation Y (ages 18 to 26) needs to save at least $2 million, according to 77% of advisers. Forty percent put the figure at $3 million.

Nearly half of advisers (46%) said Generation X (ages 27 to 42) should at least double the $1 million goal. Twenty-two percent suggested more than $3 million.

For Boomers (ages 43 to 64), 35% recommended $2 million to $3 million. Thirty percent suggested $1.5 million to $2 million.

According to Scottrade's analysis, seniors are the only generation that may come close to needing only $1 million. Forty-four percent of advisers said $500,000 to $1.5 million is sufficient for average families in that age bracket.

Bill Smith, president of Ohio-based Great Lakes Retirement Group, is among the advisers who took part in the survey. As he sees it, too many people rely on online retirement calculators. Much of that guidance uses a target based on making do with 70% to 80% of pre-retirement income.

"I've never been a big fan of planning to earn less in retirement than you are making now," he says. "I'd like to see an individual continue making the same amount of retirement as when he was working. Who wants to set themselves up in retirement to make less?"

While most people will spend less when they retire, inflation or the onset of a long-term illness could wipe out savings without proper protection or planning.

That said, there's no secret to meeting a retirement goal: maximize your contribution rate, have a greater tolerance for risk when you're younger and downshift to bonds as you grow older. Successful preparation, however, begins with setting a realistic goal and understanding your true financial picture.

Debt needs to be carefully considered as well as leaving money for the kids.

"There are two extremes," Smith says. "There are individuals who say, 'We don't care if we have anything left the day we die -- we are OK with that last check bouncing when we are gone.' Then there are the individuals who don't do anything in retirement because all of their decisions are made around, 'I've got to leave it for the kids.' "

BAY ,
Don't tell that to these peoplehttp://www.getbig.com/boards/index.php?topic=327143.50
They think with a couple mill they can live like Trump , carefree and high on the hog  Cheesy
Report to moderator   Logged
Devon97
Getbig IV
****
Posts: 3487


Keith lives on...


View Profile
« Reply #89 on: April 12, 2010, 10:10:51 AM »

Tom,

Any updates?

My friend, I would seriously persue geetting your teaching certificate and be a HS/middle school teacher.

You could also do personal training in the summer or a/f school.

Start working toward a pension plan and saving with a steady paycheck.
Report to moderator   Logged
BayGBM
Getbig V
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 16791



View Profile
« Reply #90 on: April 13, 2010, 10:52:05 AM »

BAY ,
Don't tell that to these peoplehttp://www.getbig.com/boards/index.php?topic=327143.50
They think with a couple mill they can live like Trump , carefree and high on the hog  Cheesy

Too true.   Embarrassed
Report to moderator   Logged
loco
Getbig V
*****
Posts: 8710

Getbig!


View Profile
« Reply #91 on: April 15, 2010, 08:57:17 AM »

$1 million is more then enough if you move to a part of the country where the cost of living is low, and you commit to a comfortable yet simple life style.  Getting a job after retirement wouldn't hurt either.  It's good for one's mental and physical health.
Report to moderator   Logged
Devon97
Getbig IV
****
Posts: 3487


Keith lives on...


View Profile
« Reply #92 on: April 20, 2010, 07:57:49 AM »

$1 million is more then enough if you move to a part of the country where the cost of living is low, and you commit to a comfortable yet simple life style.  Getting a job after retirement wouldn't hurt either.  It's good for one's mental and physical health.

Should I expect an invoice from you for that bit of financial planning advice? Cheesy

Report to moderator   Logged
loco
Getbig V
*****
Posts: 8710

Getbig!


View Profile
« Reply #93 on: April 20, 2010, 08:17:03 AM »

Should I expect an invoice from you for that bit of financial planning advice? Cheesy

No.  It's free advice.    Smiley
Report to moderator   Logged
BayGBM
Getbig V
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 16791



View Profile
« Reply #94 on: May 05, 2010, 12:28:41 PM »

The Worst Words to Say at Work
by Linnda Durre

Some words and phrases are often used to buy time, avoid giving answers, and escape commitment. If you use these words and phrases yourself, take a scalpel and cut them out of your thinking, speaking, and writing.

"Try"
"Try" is a weasel word. "Well, I'll try," some people say. It's a cop-out. They're just giving you lip service, when they probably have no real intention of doing what you ask. Remember what Yoda says to Luke Skywalker in "Star Wars": "Do or do not--there is no try." Take Yoda's advice. Give it your all when you do something. And if it doesn't work, start over.  Put passion into your work, and give it your best effort, so you can know that you did all you could to make it happen. So if the outcome you were expecting didn't come to fruition, it's not because you didn't do everything you could to make it happen. It just wasn't the right time for it or it wasn't meant to be.

"Whatever"
This word is a trusted favorite of people who want to dismiss you, diminish what you say, or get rid of you quickly. "Whatever," they will say as an all-purpose response to your earnest request. It's an insult and a verbal slap in the face. It's a way to respond to a person without actually responding. When you say "whatever" after another person has said his or her piece, you have essentially put up a wall between the two of you and halted any progress in communicating. It's a word to avoid.

"Maybe" and "I don't know"
People will sometimes avoid making a decision--and hide behind words and phrases like "maybe" and "I don't know." There's a difference between legitimately not knowing something and using words like these as excuses. Sometimes during a confrontation, people will claim not to know something or offer the noncommittal response "maybe," just to avoid being put on the spot. If that seems to be the case, ask, "When do you think you will know?" or "How can you find out?" Don't let the person off the hook so easily.

"I'll get back to you"
When people need to buy time or avoid revealing a project's status, they will say, "I'll get back to you," and they usually never do. If people say they will get back to you, always clarify. Ask them when they will get back to you, and make sure they specify the day and time. If they don't, then pin them down to a day and time and hold them to it. If they won't give you a day or time, tell them you'll call in a day or week and follow up. Make sure you call and get the information you need.

"If"
Projects depend on everyone doing his or her part. People who use "if" are usually playing the blame game and betting against themselves. They like to set conditions, rather than assuming a successful outcome. People who rely on conditional responses are fortifying themselves against potential failure. They will say, "If Bob finishes his part, then I can do my part." They're laying the groundwork for a "no fault" excuse and for not finishing their work.

There are always alternatives, other routes, and ways to get the job done. Excuse makers usually have the energy of a slug and the spine of a jellyfish. You don't want them on your team when you're trying to climb Mt. Everest.

"Yes, but . . ."
This is another excuse. You might give your team members suggestions or solutions, and they come back to you with "Yes, but . . ." as a response. They don't really want answers, help, or solutions. You need to call the "Yes, but . . ." people out on their avoidance tactic by saying something like "You know, Jackie, every time I offer you a suggestion you say, 'Yes, but . . . ,' which makes me think you don't really want to solve this problem. That's not going to work. If you want to play the victim, go right ahead, but I'm not going to allow you to keep this up." After a response like that, you can be assured that the next words you hear will not be "Yes, but . . ."!

"I guess . . ."
This is usually said in a weak, soft-spoken, shoulder-shrugging manner. It's another attempt to shirk responsibility--a phrase that is muttered only when people half agree with you but want to leave enough leeway to say, "Well, I didn't really know. . . . I was only guessing." If you use this phrase, cut it out of your vocabulary.

"We'll see . . ."
How many times did we hear our parents say this? We knew they were buying time, avoiding a fight or confrontation, or really saying no. It's better to be decisive and honest by saying, "I need more information. Please present your case or send me the data--both pro and con--so I can make an informed decision." That way, the interested parties will contribute to an in-depth, well-researched "verdict."
Report to moderator   Logged
BayGBM
Getbig V
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 16791



View Profile
« Reply #95 on: May 16, 2010, 10:46:57 PM »

It's the choices one makes in the early years that usually determine one's fate. Options narrow. The path can become one-way.  Embarrassed
Report to moderator   Logged
HTexan
Getbig V
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 13200


NEVER trust a soapy stud lover!!!


View Profile
« Reply #96 on: May 16, 2010, 11:49:04 PM »

Night school.
Report to moderator   Logged

Allegedly.
loco
Getbig V
*****
Posts: 8710

Getbig!


View Profile
« Reply #97 on: May 17, 2010, 03:45:50 AM »

It's the choices one makes in the early years that usually determine one's fate. Options narrow. The path can become one-way.  Embarrassed

Agreed!  That's true for one's health too.  For bad habits and ill treatment of your body when you are young, your body will punish you later when you are not so young.  Likewise, for good habits and good treatment of your body when you are young, your body will reward you later when you are not so young.

Of course the above is the norm, and there are always a few exceptions to the norm.
Report to moderator   Logged
BayGBM
Getbig V
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 16791



View Profile
« Reply #98 on: July 15, 2010, 11:15:48 AM »

What NOT to do: 7 ways to ruin your resume
By Hillary Chura

In the time it takes you to read this paragraph, the average recruiter will have plowed through six resumes. (We know; we timed one.) Want to increase the chances of your resume making it to the next round? Then don’t do any of these seven things, which recruiters say — more than anything — make them want to push the “shred” button.

1. Apply for a job for which you are not remotely qualified
Many candidates believe the job hunt is a numbers game — drop enough resumes, and you’re bound to land something. But shotguns are for hunting pheasant, not finding jobs. The reality is that recruiters hate wasting time on resumes from unqualified candidates. Morgan Miller, an executive recruiter at StaffMark, recalls the security guard who applied to be a financial risk manager (maybe Lehman should have hired him), while Scott Ragusa at Winter, Wyman talks of the aerial photographer who sought out a position as a tax specialist.

“Sorting through unqualified resumes is frustrating, unproductive and puts an extra burden on staff,” says Katherine Swift, Senior Account Director at KCSA Strategic Communications in Natick, Mass. “It also makes it much more challenging to find the right candidate.” So the next time you’re thinking of blasting out resumes to all 60 of the job listings on Monster.com that have the word “finance” in them , save your time (and that of the recruiters) and only apply for ones for which you’re qualified.

2. Include a lofty mission statement
More than ever, today’s savage job market is about the company, not the candidate. As such, mission or objective statements — particularly ones with an applicant’s hopes, dreams, and health insurance aspirations — will dispatch otherwise fine resumes to the circular file. Employers don’t care about how they can solve your problems — certainly not before they’ve met you and possibly not even after they’ve hired you. Instead, write an “objectives” statement that explains specifically how your skills and experience will help the company you’re applying to, not the other way around. And be very clear about what kind of job you’re seeking.

3. Use one generic resume for every job listing
To stand out amongst the sea of resumes that recruiters receive, yours must speak to each and every specific position, even recycling some of the language from the job description itself. Make it obvious that you will start solving problems even before you’ve recorded your outgoing voicemail message. Your CV or query letter should include a just touch of industry lingo — sufficient to prove you know your stuff but not so much that you sound like a robot. And it should speak to individual company issues and industry challenges, with specifics on how you have personally improved customer loyalty, efficiency, and profitability at past jobs, says workplace and performance consultant Jay Forte. Plus, each morsel should be on point.

“Think hard about how to best leverage each piece of information to your job search advantage,” says Wendy Enelow, a career consultant and trainer in Virginia. “Nothing in your resume should be arbitrary, from what you include in your job descriptions and achievement statements, to whether your education or experience comes first [recent grads may want to put education first] to how you format your contact information.”

4. Make recruiters or hiring managers guess how exactly you can help their client
Sourcing experts want to know — immediately — what someone can offer, and they won’t spend time noodling someone’s credentials. “Animal, vegetable or mineral? Doctor, lawyer or Indian chief?That’s what I’m wondering every time I open a resume. If it takes me more than a split second to figure this out, I feel frustrated,” says Mary O’Gorman, a veteran recruiter based in Brooklyn.

5. Don’t explain how past experience translates to a new position
Though candidates should avoid jobs where they have no experience, they absolutely should pursue new areas and positions if they can position their experience effectively. A high school English teacher applying for new jobs, for example, can cite expertise in human resource management, people skills, record keeping, writing, and training, says Anthony Pensabene, a professional writer who works with executives.

“Titles are just semantics; candidates need to relate their ‘actual’ skills and experiences to the job they’re applying for in their resume,” Pensabene says. An applicant who cannot be bothered to identify the parallels between the two likely won’t be bothered with interviews, either.

6. Don’t include a cover letter with your resume
A cover letter should always accompany a resume — even if it’s going to your best friend. And that doesn’t mean a lazy “I’m _____ and I’m looking for a job in New York; please see my attached resume.” Says Lindsay Olson, a partner at Manhattan’s Paradigm Staffing: “I’d like to know why you are contacting me (a particular position, referral, etc.), a short background about yourself, and a career highlight or two. It’s important to attempt to set yourself apart from the competition.”

7. Be careless with details
Reckless job hunters rarely make for conscientious workers. As such, even promising resumes must abide by age-old dictums: typo-free, proper organization, and no embellishment. Susan Whitcomb, author of Resume Magic: Trade Secrets of a Professional Resume Writer, says that almost 80 percent of HR managers she surveyed said they would dismiss otherwise qualified candidates who break these rules. She tells the story of one would-be employer who, when looking for an assistant, decided not to hire anyone because every resume she received contained typos.

“With a 6-to-1 ratio of jobseekers-to-jobs in the current marketplace, you can’t afford to make mistakes with your resume,” Whitcomb says.
Report to moderator   Logged
BayGBM
Getbig V
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 16791



View Profile
« Reply #99 on: July 18, 2010, 07:59:28 AM »

Did anyone else see this? This kid has been unemployed for two years after graduating from Colgate (majored in political science and minored in history).  Parents and grandparents paid for everything and still pay all his bills including rent, cell phone, etc.  Meanwhile he turned down a job offer as an associate claims adjuster, at $40k.  His brother has a job making $75k and that's what he's holding out for... Good luck with that.  Roll Eyes


American Dream Is Elusive for New Generation

GRAFTON, Mass. — After breakfast, his parents left for their jobs, and Scott Nicholson, alone in the house in this comfortable suburb west of Boston, went to his laptop in the living room. He had placed it on a small table that his mother had used for a vase of flowers until her unemployed son found himself reluctantly stuck at home.

The daily routine seldom varied. Mr. Nicholson, 24, a graduate of Colgate University, winner of a dean’s award for academic excellence, spent his mornings searching corporate Web sites for suitable job openings. When he found one, he mailed off a résumé and cover letter — four or five a week, week after week.

Over the last five months, only one job materialized. After several interviews, the Hanover Insurance Group in nearby Worcester offered to hire him as an associate claims adjuster, at $40,000 a year. But even before the formal offer, Mr. Nicholson had decided not to take the job.

Rather than waste early years in dead-end work, he reasoned, he would hold out for a corporate position that would draw on his college training and put him, as he sees it, on the bottom rungs of a career ladder.

“The conversation I’m going to have with my parents now that I’ve turned down this job is more of a concern to me than turning down the job,” he said.

He was braced for the conversation with his father in particular. While Scott Nicholson viewed the Hanover job as likely to stunt his career, David Nicholson, 57, accustomed to better times and easier mobility, viewed it as an opportunity. Once in the door, the father has insisted to his son, opportunities will present themselves — as they did in the father’s rise over 35 years to general manager of a manufacturing company . . .


 . . . Scott Nicholson almost sidestepped the recession. His plan was to become a Marine Corps second lieutenant. He had spent the summer after his freshman year in “platoon leader” training. Last fall he passed the physical for officer training, and was told to report on Jan. 16.

If all had gone well, he would have emerged in 10 weeks as a second lieutenant, committed to a four-year enlistment. “I could have made a career out of the Marines,” Scott said, “and if I had come out in four years, I would have been incredibly prepared for the workplace.”

It was not to be. In early January, a Marine Corps doctor noticed that he had suffered from childhood asthma. He was washed out. “They finally told me I could reapply if I wanted to,” Scott said. “But the sheen was gone.”

So he struggles to get a foothold in the civilian work force. His brother in Boston lost his roommate, and early last month Scott moved into the empty bedroom, with his parents paying Scott’s share of the $2,000-a-month rent until the lease expires on Aug. 31.

And if Scott does not have a job by then? “I’ll do something temporary; I won’t go back home,” Scott said. “I’ll be a bartender or get work through a temp agency. I hope I don’t find myself in that position.”


Full article here
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/07/business/economy/07generation.html?_r=1&pagewanted=all
Report to moderator   Logged
Pages: 1 2 3 [4] 5 6   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Theme created by Egad Community. Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.16 | SMF © 2011, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!