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« Reply #25 on: October 14, 2010, 11:36:36 AM »

 Smiley


The destroyer USS Chung-Hoon returned to Pearl Harbor from a deployment in the western Pacific. AT2 Phillip Kemple gave his wife, Stephanie, a kiss yesterday after returning.

http://www.staradvertiser.com/news/20101013_Happy_homecoming.html

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« Reply #26 on: October 14, 2010, 05:02:06 PM »

Smiley


The destroyer USS Chung-Hoon returned to Pearl Harbor from a deployment in the western Pacific. AT2 Phillip Kemple gave his wife, Stephanie, a kiss yesterday after returning.

http://www.staradvertiser.com/news/20101013_Happy_homecoming.html



ugh, NO WHITE SHOES AFTER LABOR DAY, hellooooooooo

kidding, what a great story and picture
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« Reply #27 on: October 17, 2010, 09:05:56 AM »

95-year-old NYC man gets medal for WWII rescue
VERENA DOBNIK, Associated Press Writer 

NEW YORK (AP) — The U.S. government is recognizing the World War II architect of a mission to rescue more than 500 U.S. bomber crew members shot down over Nazi-occupied Serbia.

It was the largest air rescue of Americans behind enemy lines in any war.

George Vujnovich (VOOY'-noh-veech) is credited with leading the so-called Halyard Mission in what was then Yugoslavia.

On Sunday, the 95-year-old New York City man is being awarded the Bronze Star in an afternoon ceremony at Manhattan's St. Sava Serbian Orthodox Cathedral.

He's long retired from his job as a salesman of aircraft parts.

Vujnovich says of the honor, "better now than never" — but he regrets most of the men on his wartime mission are no longer alive.

http://hosted2-1.ap.org/HIHON/229cea0feec5482f81543bdaad3ec66c/Article_2010-10-17-US-WWII-Rescue-Medal/id-3aec56cc20a3483dbec801f249565645
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« Reply #28 on: November 16, 2010, 06:37:04 PM »

Medal of Honor goes to first living recipient from Afghanistan war
By the CNN Wire Staff
November 16, 2010

Washington (CNN) -- A 25-year-old Army staff sergeant from Iowa on Tuesday became the first living recipient of the Medal of Honor for a current conflict since three service members from the Vietnam War were honored in 1976.

President Barack Obama awarded the nation's highest medal of valor to Staff Sgt. Salvatore Giunta -- the kind of soldier who leaves you "just absolutely convinced this is what America's all about," Obama said at the White House award ceremony. "It just makes you proud."

Giunta was a specialist serving with the Airborne 503rd Infantry Regiment on his second tour of duty in Afghanistan when his unit was attacked on the night of October 25, 2007. According to Defense Department documents, Giunta and his fellow soldiers were walking back to base along the top of a mountain ridge when the enemy attacked from their front and their left. Taliban fighters barraged the Americans with AK-47s, rocket propelled grenades and Soviet-era large machine guns.
Giunta saw several of his fellow soldiers go down. He ran forward, throwing grenades and returning enemy fire, to help one soldier who had been shot but was still fighting, the documents say. Then he noticed one of the wounded soldiers was missing.

Searching for his wounded friend Sgt. Josh Brennan, Giunta ran over a hill where moments before Taliban fighters had been shooting at him. Now he was alone, out of sight of his fellow soldiers, in an area that the Taliban had controlled just moments before.

Giunta saw two Taliban fighters dragging Brennan away. He ran after them, killing one and wounding the other, who ran off.

Giunta instantly started providing first aid to Brennan, who had been shot at least six times, the documents say. Eventually a medic arrived and a helicopter was called in to take Brennan to a hospital, but he later died of his wounds.

Giunta's action, however, meant that Brennan was not at the mercy of the Taliban, and his parents would be able to give him a proper burial instead of wondering what became of him.

Giunta's quick response to the Taliban attack also helped his unit repulse the enemy fighters before they could cause more casualties, the Defense Department documents note.

Giunta was shot twice, with one round hitting his body armor and the second destroying a weapon slung over his back. He was not seriously hurt.

His actions "embodied the warrior ethos that says I will never leave a comrade," Obama said. "This medal is a testament to his uncommon valor, but also the parents and community that raised him."

According to the White House, the Medal of Honor is awarded to "a member of the Armed Forces who distinguishes themselves conspicuously by gallantry above and beyond the call of duty ... The meritorious conduct must involve great personal bravery or self-sacrifice so conspicuous as to clearly distinguish the individual above his or her comrades and must have involved risk of life."

Upon receiving the Medal of Honor, Giunta said he was appreciative but that the moment was "bittersweet." "I lost two dear friends of mine, Spc. Hugo Mendoza and Sgt. Joshua Brennan. And although this is so positive, I would give this back in a second to have my friends with me right now."

The squadron's medic, Hugo Mendoza of El Paso, Texas, was caught with the rest of the group.

There have been other living Medal of Honor recipients in the years since 1976, but those were retroactive awards. Because of racism during past wars, or because more information about heroics comes to light, the Department of Defense reinvestigates a service member's actions and decides he deserves a Medal of Honor.

http://www.cnn.com/2010/POLITICS/11/16/obama.medal.of.honor/index.html?hpt=C1
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« Reply #29 on: November 17, 2010, 07:16:36 AM »

I know a way the US government could save millions on Orthopedics!







Stop sending our soldiers off to be maimed in senseless wars!


True







 Tongue
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« Reply #30 on: December 06, 2010, 09:03:59 PM »

Battleship California veteran recalls raising flag during Dec. 7 attack
He had decoded a message warning of a sneak attack, but his superiors believed it would be sabotage, not an air raid
By AUDREY McAVOY
Associated Press

POSTED: 07:28 p.m. HST, Dec 05, 2010

The morning of Dec. 7, 1941, Yeoman 2nd Class Durrell Conner was wrapping Christmas presents aboard the USS California when he heard a commotion. Peering through a porthole of the battleship, the 23-year-old saw an airplane approaching low.

"He dropped something, and as he banked away I saw the red emblem of the Japanese on his wings so I knew we were under attack," Conner said. "He dropped the torpedo that struck the ship right below where I was standing."

The battleship shook like an earthquake, and the cryptographer rushed to his battle station where he coded and decoded messages for the California's commander. Since no messages were coming in, he joined a chain passing ammunition to Marines and sailors firing guns on the deck.

Another Japanese plane dropped a 500-pound bomb on the California, sinking the ship. The vessel lost nearly 100 of its 1,800 officers and crew.

On Tuesday, Conner plans to return to Pearl Harbor along with about 120 other survivors for a ceremony in remembrance of those who died in the Japanese attack 69 years ago. About 580 family and friends are due to join them, as are several hundred members of the public.

The Navy and the National Park Service are jointly hosting the event at a grassy site across the harbor from the sunken hull of the USS Arizona, where 1,177 lives were lost. In all, some 2,400 sailors, Marines and soldiers were killed in the attack.

Conner, 92, attended the annual remembrance for the first time last year with his daughter.

He so enjoyed the displays of patriotism and tributes — including the sailors who lined the deck of the USS Lake Erie guided missile cruiser as it rendered honors to the Arizona — that he's coming back with his wife, four daughters and their husbands, and several grandchildren.

"The patriotic feeling that everybody had — it was just wonderful," Conner said. "I decided from then on, if I physically would be able, I would be there every year."

He reckons he'll keep coming back for a while.

"I play golf three times a week. I hope to be around for another five or 10 years," Conner said in a telephone interview from his home in Sun City, Calif.

This year, Conner will represent the California by laying a wreath for his fallen shipmates during the ceremony.

"It's really quite an honor," he said.

Conner, who made a career in the Navy after the war, said he probably wasn't as surprised by the Sunday morning assault as some of his fellow sailors because he had recently decoded a message from Washington telling his ship to be on the alert for a sneak attack.

His commanders, though, didn't envision they'd be fighting airplanes. They expected Japanese in Hawaii to somehow sabotage them — something that never happened.

"Everyday I was wondering, 'Well is it going to be today?' — kind of laughing because I thought they were being overcautious," Conner said.

He recalled simply getting to work when the attack began.

"I just took it in stride, tried to do what was asked of me," said Conner.

At about 10 a.m., Conner noticed the Stars and Stripes wasn't flying above the California because the assault began just as Marines usually raised the colors at 8 a.m. He saw the Marines had dropped the flag on the deck as they rushed to return fire.

So Conner and a seaman raised the flag, giving troops a morale boost as they struggled to fight back and save the wounded while battleships burned and sank.

"It should be up, and I knew it would raise morale," he said. "There was a motor launch going by right at the stern, and I knew some of the people, and they yelled my name and they said 'Hey!' and cheered. It was quite a thrill."

Conner is looking forward to seeing the new $56 million Pearl Harbor visitor center the National Park Service just finished building to replace an older structure that had to be scrapped because it was sinking.

It has twice the exhibition space of the old facility, offering the 1.6 million people who visit the USS Arizona Memorial each year a deeper understanding of the attack that pushed the U.S. into World War II.

Conner hopes the new center will help the public remember the lessons of Dec. 7, particularly the need to be prepared.

"For anything that might happen. There are a lot of people that don't like us and would like to see us destroyed. We have to keep alert all the time," he said.

http://www.staradvertiser.com/news/breaking/111363929.html
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« Reply #31 on: December 07, 2010, 04:46:24 PM »

Pearl Harbor survivor James Donis salutes the color guard during the 69th anniversary ceremony marking the attack on Pearl Harbor, Tuesday, Dec. 7, 2010, in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. (AP Photo/Marco Garcia)



With the USS Arizona memorial in the background, Pearl Harbor survivor Richard Laubert, of Phoenix, Ore., attends the 69th anniversary ceremony marking the attack on Pearl Harbor, Tuesday, Dec. 7, 2010, in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. (AP Photo/Marco Garcia)




With the USS Arizona memorial in the background, a Marine stands at attention, Tuesday, Dec. 7, 2010, in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Tuesday marks the 69th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor. (AP Photo/Marco Garcia)
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« Reply #32 on: December 31, 2010, 08:29:00 PM »

Boy Scout Saves Residents From House Fire
Published December 31, 2010 | FoxNews.com


A Boy Scout, Keith Rausch, 16 is hailed as a hero after he alerted three residents inside a home that their house was on fire.

A Boy Scout is hailed as a hero after he alerted three residents inside an Orange County, Fla. home that their house was on fire, saving them from injury.

Keith Rausch, 16, just happened to be passing by the house in his girlfriend's neighborhood, when he saw something terribly wrong. "I told her to stop the car." He said he saw that flames were coming from the side of the home. "They were growing 4 to 5 feet."

He quickly ran to the door and told the people inside there was a fire. "They thought I was playing a joke, but got the kids out just in case and walked to the side and said, 'Oh my God the house is on fire!'"

Orange County Fire Communications received a 911 call about the fire around 2:35 Thursday afternoon. A resident of the home reported that she had just received a delivery of propane gas. The first fire crews arrived and saw that the gas-fed flames had quickly spread to the roof and attic of the 4,700 square foot home.

Fire crews fought the fire aggressively, bringing it under control in less than one hour. Over 35 firefighters were deployed to extinguish the flames.

Click here for more on this story from MyFoxOrlando.

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2010/12/31/boy-scout-saves-residents-house/?test=latestnews
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« Reply #33 on: January 11, 2011, 08:52:28 PM »

Quote

Col. William Marsh "Bill" Bower

February 13, 1917 - January 10, 2011
Posted: 01/11/2011 01:00:00 AM MST

Col. William Marsh "Bill" Bower, 93, the last surviving pilot from the famous "Doolittle's Tokyo Raiders" who bombed Japan in 1942, died Monday, January 10, 2011 at his home in south Boulder, surrounded by friends and family.

Hailed as a hero for his role in the United States' first air attack on Japan following the bombing of Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941, Bill always said that the true heroes are the men who stick by and raise their families.

Bill was born February 13, 1917 in Ravenna, Ohio, the son of Harold  Friend Bower and Kathryn Marsh Bower. He attended Chestnut Street School and Highland Avenue School and graduated from Ravenna High School in 1934.

He attended Hiram College and Kent State University

from 1934 to 1936.

He married Lorraine Amman Bower in the lobby of the Lady Lafayette Hotel, Walterboro, S.C. on August 18, 1942. They raised four children: Bill, Jim, Mary and Mindy. Lorraine died in 2004.

Bill served with the Ohio National Guard 107th Cavalry from 1934 to 1938 and graduated from the Army Air Force Flying School in 1940. He received a commission as a 2nd lieutenant, USAF on October 4, 1940, with a rating of Army Aviator. He joined the 37th Bombardment Squadron at Lowry Field in Denver, Colo. in October 1940 and joined the 17th Bombardment Group in June 1941 at McChord Field in Washington.

Following the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Bill volunteered and was chosen for the mission planned and led by Lt. James "Jimmy" Doolittle to bomb military targets on the home islands of Japan, an effort to demonstrate that the Japanese Empire was not invulnerable to attack.

On April 18, 1942, 16 B25B Mitchell medium bombers took off from the decks of the U.S.S. Hornet in the western Pacific Ocean. Because landing planes of that size on the Hornet was impossible, the pilots continued toward China after bombing their targets. All but one aircraft, which landed in the Soviet Union, crashed in China or were ditched at sea. Of the 80 crew members, 11 were either captured or killed; the rest returned to the United States.

After his return, Bill assumed command of the 428th Bombardment Squadron and joined Allied invasion forces in Africa. He remained there and in Italy until September 1945. He was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for his role in the raids.

After the war, Bill worked as a planner and accident investigator for the U.S. Air Force and served in the Arctic as commander of a USAF transport organization. He also served as commander at Dobbins Air Force Base, Marietta, Georgia.

In 1966, he retired and moved with his family to Boulder, where  he built and lived in the same house on Dennison Lane.

Bill was deeply involved in his community, and was recognized by the BDC in the "Monday Morning Rose." He volunteered with Second Harvest Community Food Shares and Meals on Wheels. He organized state and local chapters of Trout Unlimited and founded the Central Optimist Club, of which he was the chapter president. He was a Flight Captain with the Order of Daedalians and organized the local chapter of the Air Force Association. Bill was a member of the board of directors of Crime Stoppers, 1982-83 and the board of Retired Seniors Volunteer Program. He also served on city of Boulder committees overseeing aviation noise and operations and Boulder Creek Flood Control. Finally, he worked for ten years on Colorado Congressman Tom Wirth's screening committee for applicants to the nation's service academies.

He continues to be remembered fondly by his neighbors, past and present. One described Bill as a "surrogate grandfather, handyman, and caretaker" to adults and children alike. He did everything from shoveling his neighbors' sidewalks (without being asked) to building model rockets for kids. "Mr. Bower" or "the Colonel" always had a Jolly Rancher candy for neighborhood children who stopped by.
Bill was a consummate outdoorsman. He enjoyed fishing on the Rio Grande - including, on occasion, with Doolittle and his fellow raiders - bird hunting and guiding hunters in the Colorado mountains. An accomplished equestrian as a young man, he introduced his daughters to riding when they were young; both continue to work with horses today.

He also greatly enjoyed the annual Raider reunions, held every year since 1947 except 1955 and 1966. Five Raider crew members, including two co-pilots, survive him, but Bill was the last living pilot. He was asked to play "Taps" at Doolittle's memorial service in 1993.

In 2008, he was recognized or his distinguished service to his country at the Boulder Memorial Day race.
He is survived by Bill and Janet Bower, Jim and Susan Bower, Mary and Buck Brannaman, and Mindy Bower and Kevin Hall; his grandchildren Tyler and Amy Bower, Lauren and Kristin Swenson, Daniel Bower, Andrew Bower and Reata Brannaman; great-granddaughter Ashley Bower; and an amazing group of caregivers.

Services will be held at St. Martin de Pourres, 3300 Table Mesa Dr, Boulder, at 11AM on Thursday, January 13th.

Donations may be made in lieu of flowers to the Family Hospice Foundation, 1790  30th St, #308, Boulder, CO, or the Doolittle Tokyo Raiders' Scholarship Fund, c/o Richard Cole, 48 Blaschke Rd, Comfort, TX, 78013.

http://www.dailycamera.com/obits/ci_17057961?source=most_emailed
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« Reply #34 on: January 11, 2011, 09:23:48 PM »

Good picture of old Ben Franklin.

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« Reply #35 on: January 24, 2011, 07:16:33 PM »

Hawaii Medal of Honor recipient Barney Hajiro dies
By Gregg K. Kakesako
POSTED: 10:45 a.m. HST, Jan 24, 2011


AP
President Clinton presents the Congressional Medal of Honor to Barney Hajiro, of Waipahu, Hawaii, during a ceremony in the Pavilion, South Lawn, at the White House, Wednesday, June 21. 2000.. Pvt. Hajiro of the 442nd Regimental Combat Team, wiped out two machine gun nests and killed two snipers before being wounded by a third machine gun in France's Vosges Mountains, on Oct. 29, 1944. Twenty-Two Asian-American veterans of World War II, most of whom fought in a courageous unit whose motto was " Go for broke!"are receiving the nations top honor for bravery on the the battlefield 55 years after the end of the war. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)
More Photos
 

The nation's oldest living recipient of the Medal of Honor, Barney Hajiro, died Friday at Maunalani Hospital in Honolulu.

He was 94.

Hajiro had been awarded three Distinguished Service Crosses by the Army while serving with a rifle company in the 442 Regimental Combat Team during World War II in Europe.

One of those awards was upgraded to the Medal of Honor 46 years after the war ended at the urging of Sen. Daniel Akaka who authored congressional legislation requiring the Army to determine whether 22 Asian and Pacific Island Americans who received the Distinguished Service Cross had not been properly recognized because of the war's anti-Japanese sentiment. Twenty, including Sen. Daniel Inouye, were members of the famed segregated Japanese American 100th Battalion and 442nd Regimental Combat Team.

During one of the 442nd's fiercest campaigns in dense forests of France's Vosges Mountains to free the towns of Bruyeres and Biffontaine, Hajiro on Oct. 29, 1944, led a charge  on "Suicide Hill" drawing fire and single-handedly destroying two machine gun nests and killing two enemy snipers before being wounded by a third machine gun.

The effort by the nisei soldiers of the 442nd Regimental Combat Team's I and K companies to rescue Texas 36th Division's "Lost Battalion" is considered to be one of the key battles in U.S. Army history.

In a 2000 Star-Bulletin story, Hajiro discussed the battle before President Clinton hung the sky-blue ribbon that dangles a gold star around his neck at a special White House ceremony.

 "There was shooting coming from all sides. I got hit in my arm ... my BAR was hit ... and then my helmet was blown off my head."

During the battle, an enemy bullet had penetrated Hajiro's left wrist and severed a nerve. Another bullet had entered his shoulder. His left cheek also was scarred by an enemy bullet.

Several days earlier Hajiro, while acting as a sentry near Bruyeres, helped allied troops by attacking a house 200 yards away by exposing himself to enemy fire and directing fire at an enemy strong point. He assisted the unit on his right by firing his automatic rifle, killing or wounding two enemy snipers.

On Oct. 22, he and fellow soldier took up an outpost security position about 50 yards to the right front of their platoon, concealed themselves, and ambushed an 18-man, heavily armed enemy patrol, killing two, wounding one, and taking the rest as prisoners.

Edward Yamasaki, president of the 442nd Regimental Combat Team's I Company chapter, in his book --  "And Then There Were Eight" -- noted that I Company started the battle with 140 riflemen. "Then there only eight soldiers standing at the end."

Hajiro was the eldest of nine children and left the 8th grade at Puunene on Maui to work in the sugar-cane fields for 10 cents an hour, 10 hours a day. Because he had to leave school to help support his family, Hajiro, an aspiring track star, was never able to pursue his dream to compete in high school and college.

He is survived by a son, Glenn; wife, Esther, and one grandson.

Funeral services, which are being handled by Hosoi Mortuary, are pending.

http://www.staradvertiser.com/news/breaking/114503739.html
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« Reply #36 on: February 12, 2011, 08:11:15 AM »

Police officer wins medal for saving a man from a fire
By Star-Advertiser staff
POSTED: 08:16 p.m. HST, Feb 11, 2011

A police officer credited with saving an elderly man in a burning apartment building last year was awarded Wednesday with the Honolulu Police Department's Bronze Medal of Valor.

Patrol officer John Rabago, 35, ran to the second-story unit of the Piikoi Street walk-up in the middle of the fire, amid burning embers, to alert the man.

The Nov. 11 fire was only three to five feet from his apartment when Rabago alerted him.

"Apparently, he was about ready to take a shower and didn't know the building was on fire," said Rabago, who is approaching his 10th year as an HPD officer. "Fortunately I yelled loud enough several times."

The bronze medal is HPD's third highest award.

Five other officers were recognized with Certificates of Merit for helping evacuate residents that day: Sgt. Jason Kimura and officers Thomas Dumaoal, James Quinones, Kyle Suemori and Reginald Ramones.

Officer Richard Townsend, 39, a solo bike officer, received a Certificate of Merit for performing CPR on a woman who crashed on H-1 freeway late last year.

Darl Hunt, 64, said she was driving home from the airport, when she had a heart attack that made her crash her vehicle. She had no pulse when Townsend arrived and began CPR.

"I just did what we were trained to do," said Townsend, an eight-year HPD veteran.

"He gave me my life back," said Hunt, now 60. "It's so critical, the few minutes you where the brain doesn't get any oxygen. If this man wasn't there when he was, I wouldn't be here."

Hunt's son, Jeffrey, was a police officer on Maui. He died of a heart attack in 2007.

Other officers and civilians recognized by Police Chief Louis Kealoha last week:

>> Sgt. Duane Samson, employee of the quarter, for coordinating a major cleanup at Kaupo Beach, as well as anti-bullying, drug and alcohol prevention, and Read Aloud America programs in schools.

>> The East Honolulu Crime Reduction Unit, unit of the quarter, for its recovery of more than 600 pounds of fireworks Dec. 30-31. They are Sgt. Stuart Yano, and officers Nicholas Akaka, Thomas Chang, Stephen Forman, Keoni Hong, Robert Loomis, Michael Mahi and Nathan Suzuki.

>> James Wong, Civilian Certificate of Merit, for physically restraining a man attempting to jump off an H-1 pedestrian overpass.

>> Officer Ashley Stibbard, Certificate of Merit, for spotting a fire, alerting residents and using a garden hose to fight the flames.

>> Officer Pedro Rodriguez, Certificate of Merit, for performing CPR on a woman who collapsed and was unconscious on a city bus.

>> Kenneth Taipin Jr., a Department of Defense police officer, Civilian Certificate of Merit, for helping arrest a suspect for theft and assault.

>> Irving Wong, Civilian Certificate of Merit, for helping solve several bank robberies.

>> Officer Lovinna Kaniho, Certificate of Merit, for performing CPR on a woman who had choked on food and was unconscious.

>> Apelu Ekeroma and Alberto Martinez, Civilian Certificates of Merit, for stopping a man from jumping from a high-rise apartment.

>> Clayton Nakasone, a U.S. Postal Service letter carrier, and Kikue Takagi, Letters of Appreciation, for finding and helping an elderly woman who was severely injured and unable to call for help.

http://www.staradvertiser.com/news/breaking/116038529.html
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« Reply #37 on: February 12, 2011, 08:12:45 AM »

Hawaii Medal of Honor recipient Barney Hajiro dies
By Gregg K. Kakesako
POSTED: 10:45 a.m. HST, Jan 24, 2011


AP
President Clinton presents the Congressional Medal of Honor to Barney Hajiro, of Waipahu, Hawaii, during a ceremony in the Pavilion, South Lawn, at the White House, Wednesday, June 21. 2000.. Pvt. Hajiro of the 442nd Regimental Combat Team, wiped out two machine gun nests and killed two snipers before being wounded by a third machine gun in France's Vosges Mountains, on Oct. 29, 1944. Twenty-Two Asian-American veterans of World War II, most of whom fought in a courageous unit whose motto was " Go for broke!"are receiving the nations top honor for bravery on the the battlefield 55 years after the end of the war. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)
More Photos
 

The nation's oldest living recipient of the Medal of Honor, Barney Hajiro, died Friday at Maunalani Hospital in Honolulu.

He was 94.

Hajiro had been awarded three Distinguished Service Crosses by the Army while serving with a rifle company in the 442 Regimental Combat Team during World War II in Europe.

One of those awards was upgraded to the Medal of Honor 46 years after the war ended at the urging of Sen. Daniel Akaka who authored congressional legislation requiring the Army to determine whether 22 Asian and Pacific Island Americans who received the Distinguished Service Cross had not been properly recognized because of the war's anti-Japanese sentiment. Twenty, including Sen. Daniel Inouye, were members of the famed segregated Japanese American 100th Battalion and 442nd Regimental Combat Team.

During one of the 442nd's fiercest campaigns in dense forests of France's Vosges Mountains to free the towns of Bruyeres and Biffontaine, Hajiro on Oct. 29, 1944, led a charge  on "Suicide Hill" drawing fire and single-handedly destroying two machine gun nests and killing two enemy snipers before being wounded by a third machine gun.

The effort by the nisei soldiers of the 442nd Regimental Combat Team's I and K companies to rescue Texas 36th Division's "Lost Battalion" is considered to be one of the key battles in U.S. Army history.

In a 2000 Star-Bulletin story, Hajiro discussed the battle before President Clinton hung the sky-blue ribbon that dangles a gold star around his neck at a special White House ceremony.

 "There was shooting coming from all sides. I got hit in my arm ... my BAR was hit ... and then my helmet was blown off my head."

During the battle, an enemy bullet had penetrated Hajiro's left wrist and severed a nerve. Another bullet had entered his shoulder. His left cheek also was scarred by an enemy bullet.

Several days earlier Hajiro, while acting as a sentry near Bruyeres, helped allied troops by attacking a house 200 yards away by exposing himself to enemy fire and directing fire at an enemy strong point. He assisted the unit on his right by firing his automatic rifle, killing or wounding two enemy snipers.

On Oct. 22, he and fellow soldier took up an outpost security position about 50 yards to the right front of their platoon, concealed themselves, and ambushed an 18-man, heavily armed enemy patrol, killing two, wounding one, and taking the rest as prisoners.

Edward Yamasaki, president of the 442nd Regimental Combat Team's I Company chapter, in his book --  "And Then There Were Eight" -- noted that I Company started the battle with 140 riflemen. "Then there only eight soldiers standing at the end."

Hajiro was the eldest of nine children and left the 8th grade at Puunene on Maui to work in the sugar-cane fields for 10 cents an hour, 10 hours a day. Because he had to leave school to help support his family, Hajiro, an aspiring track star, was never able to pursue his dream to compete in high school and college.

He is survived by a son, Glenn; wife, Esther, and one grandson.

Funeral services, which are being handled by Hosoi Mortuary, are pending.

http://www.staradvertiser.com/news/breaking/114503739.html


State flags to be at half-staff for Medal of Honor recipient
By Star-Advertiser Staff
POSTED: 04:16 p.m. HST, Feb 11, 2011

Hawaii state flags will be flown at half-staff at all state offices and the Hawaii National Guard from sunrise Saturday to sunset Monday, in honor of Hawaii Medal of Honor recipient Barney Hajiro.

Hajiro, who died on Jan. 21, was a member of the  442nd Regimental Combat Team, a Japanese-American U.S. Army unit that fought in Europe during World War II.

An interment ceremony for Hajiro will beheld Monday at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific at Punchbowl.

He was among the 22 Asian American veterans who received the Medal of Honor for heroism in 2000, after a Pentagon review.

“Barney Hajiro epitomized the dedication, courage and perseverance exhibited during World War II by all Americans of Japanese ancestry...was well regarded by his community, the people of Hawaii and our nation,” Gov. Neil Abercrombie said.

http://www.staradvertiser.com/news/breaking/116008159.html
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« Reply #38 on: February 12, 2011, 08:30:59 AM »

Franklin

You think this guy was a great american? For starters Rooservelt was a jew whose real name is Rosenfeldt. He was responsible for the confiscation of gold from the populace, for devaluing american currency, for turning america over to the bankers, he was a freemason and heavily into the occult. Was suspected of being a homosexual for his relationship with Henry Wallace who was the secretary of agriculture and once involved with Rosenfeldt was promoted up to vice president. Both men were heavy followers of another guy name Nicholas Roarick (sic) who believed in Shambala (some supposed paradise on earth that he spent his life looking for and never found). Nicholas had an extreme influential control over Rosenfeldt so much so that the administration at the time looked upon him as Rosenfledt's "SWAMI" and even questioned Rosenfeldt's relationship with him. Rosenfeldt is also responsible for the Illuminati all seeing eye being put on the dollar as well as much of the freemson/illuminati influence in america

HE WAS NOT A GREAT AMERICAN....
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« Reply #39 on: February 12, 2011, 09:04:58 AM »

You think this guy was a great american? For starters Rooservelt was a jew whose real name is Rosenfeldt. He was responsible for the confiscation of gold from the populace, for devaluing american currency, for turning america over to the bankers, he was a freemason and heavily into the occult. Was suspected of being a homosexual for his relationship with Henry Wallace who was the secretary of agriculture and once involved with Rosenfeldt was promoted up to vice president. Both men were heavy followers of another guy name Nicholas Roarick (sic) who believed in Shambala (some supposed paradise on earth that he spent his life looking for and never found). Nicholas had an extreme influential control over Rosenfeldt so much so that the administration at the time looked upon him as Rosenfledt's "SWAMI" and even questioned Rosenfeldt's relationship with him. Rosenfeldt is also responsible for the Illuminati all seeing eye being put on the dollar as well as much of the freemson/illuminati influence in america

HE WAS NOT A GREAT AMERICAN....

SAMSON this thread wasn't entitled "Great Apes". Therefore your participation in this thread is unnecessary and ill advised. We will notify you if and when someone creates a thread that is in need of expert opinion on baboons or other jungle animals that are known to throw their own feces.
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« Reply #40 on: February 12, 2011, 10:01:03 AM »

SAMSON this thread wasn't entitled "Great Apes". Therefore your participation in this thread is unnecessary and ill advised. We will notify you if and when someone creates a thread that is in need of expert opinion on baboons or other jungle animals that are known to throw their own feces.

Hahahah...YAAAAAAAAWN!!!!

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« Reply #41 on: February 15, 2011, 05:50:00 PM »

Bill Russell??  No Boston Celtics on the list.   Angry

George H.W. Bush, Buffett Among Medal of Freedom Recipients Honored by Obama
Published February 15, 2011 | Associated Press
   
WASHINGTON -- President Obama recognized a former U.S. president, a basketball legend and a civil rights hero Tuesday among the 15 recipients of the Medal of Freedom. They included German Chancellor Angela Merkel.

During a ceremony at the White House, Obama said the recipients represent, "the best of who we are and who we aspire to be."

The Medal of Freedom is the nation's highest civilian honor, and is presented to people who have made important contributions to U.S. national security, world peace, culture or other significant public or private endeavors.

Among the recipients honored Tuesday were former President George H.W. Bush, former basketball star Bill Russell, businessman Warren Buffett and civil rights activist Rep. John Lewis, a Democrat.

Obama praised Bush, who was president in the late 1980s and early 1990s, for his more than 70 years of service to his country, saying his life is a testament to the belief that public service is a noble calling.

"His humility and his decency reflects the very best of the American spirit," Obama said.

Merkel was not present for the ceremony. Obama said he would present her the award when she visits the U.S. No date was available.

http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2011/02/15/george-hw-bush-buffett-medal-freedom-recipients-honored-obama/
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« Reply #42 on: February 19, 2011, 08:12:53 AM »

Lieutenant Colonel Allen West (US Army, Retired) was born and raised in Atlanta Georgia and is third of four generations of military servicemen in his family. His parents instilled in him a very basic principle, love of God and Country. In 2004, when it was time to retire from more than twenty years of service in the US Army, he brought his wife and two young daughters to Broward County, Florida, where he taught high school for one year. He then returned to Afghanistan as an advisor to the Afghan army, an assignment he finished in November 2007. Allen West received his Bachelors degree from University of Tennessee and Masters degree from Kansas State University, both in political science. He also holds a Master of Military Arts and Sciences from the US Army Command and General Staff Officer College in political theory and military operations. "Education is the great equalizer," he says. "With a good education, any child in America can live his dream." Allen West knows that for our children to live their dreams, they need to be safe. He has served in several combat zones: in Operation Desert Storm, in Operation Iraqi Freedom, where he was battalion commander for the Army's 4th Infantry Division, and in Afghanistan, where he trained Afghan officers to take on the responsibility of securing their own country. In his Army career, Col. West has been honored many times, including a Bronze Star, three Meritorious Service Medals, three Army Commendation Medals (one with Valor), and a Valorous Unit Award. He received his valor award as a Captain in Desert Shield/Storm, was the US Army ROTC Instructor of the Year in 1993, and was a Distinguished Honor Graduate III Corps Assault School. He proudly wears the Army Master parachutist badge, Air Assault badge, Navy/Marine Corps parachutist insignia, Italian parachutist wings, and German proficiency badge (Bronze award). Allen is an avid distance runner, a PADI Master certified SCUBA diver, motorcyclist, and attends Community Christian Church in Tamarac Florida. Excellence is a West family tradition. His wife, Angela, holds an MBA and PhD. and works as a financial planner. His oldest daughter, Aubrey, attends Archbishop McCarthy HS and his youngest daughter, Austen, attends Parkway Christian School.

http://www.allenwestforcongress.com/about
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« Reply #43 on: February 19, 2011, 11:10:33 AM »

 Does America have any writer or something? Those are all soldiers!
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« Reply #44 on: February 19, 2011, 05:33:13 PM »

Does America have any writer or something? Those are all soldiers!

Wrong.
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« Reply #45 on: February 28, 2011, 07:24:09 PM »

Last American World War I Veteran Dies
Al Pessin | Pentagon  February 28, 2011


Photo: VOA - A. Pessin
Portrait of Frank Buckles, taken February 28, 2011, at the Pentagon, where anonymous workers placed white roses and a handwritten note in his memory. Buckles, the last known American veteran of World War I, died Sunday at age 110. He attended the portrait's unveiling three years ago. The handwritten note reads, 'Thank you for your service to our country. May you and your generation rest in peace.'

The last known American veteran of World War I died Sunday at his home in West Virginia.  Former U.S. Army Corporal Frank Buckles was 110 years old. VOA Pentagon Correspondent Al Pessin had the chance to speak to Mr. Buckles several years ago and filed this remembrance.

"I did not lie [LAUGHTER].  Nobody calls me a liar! [LAUGHTER]”

Mr. Buckles had us laughing that day in March of 2008, when he came to the Pentagon for the unveiling of a set of new portraits of himself and other World War I veterans. He admitted he exaggerated his age, twice, in order to join the Army in 1917, when he was just 15 years old. But with a wink he said that did not make him a liar.

“I had added some years onto my age and was 18. He [the recruiter] said, ‘Sorry, but you have to be 21.’ So I came back later and I had aged. I was 21. [LAUGHTER]”

And he was still lying about his age, just a little bit.

“I do not feel that I am any older than you are [LAUGHTER],” said Buckles.

In fact, he was more than twice as old as any of the Pentagon reporters who interviewed him that day.

On Monday, anonymous Pentagon workers put white roses and a handwritten note on his portrait. The note reads, "Thank you for your service to our country. May you and your generation rest in peace."

Three years ago, Buckles captivated the crowd from his wheelchair in the Pentagon auditorium, as speakers, including U.S. Defense Secretary Robert Gates, offered their praise and thanks.

“We cherish the memory of those who have passed away," said Gates. "We cherish the chance to say thank you in person to Corporal Frank Buckles. We will always be grateful for what they did for their country 90 years ago, and feel glad, too, for the longevity that they enjoyed on this earth.”

Buckles also was welcomed at the White House that week, by then-president George W. Bush.

“It has been my high honor to welcome Mr. Buckles, and his daughter, Susannah, here to the Oval Office," said Bush. "Mr. Buckles has a vivid recollection of historic times. And one way for me to honor the service of those who wear the uniform in the past and those who wear it today is to herald you, sir, and to thank you very much for your patriotism and your love for America.”

Buckles wanted to serve when World War I broke out, and his lie to the recruiter made it possible. Shortly afterward, at age 16, he deployed to Europe as an ambulance driver. He saw the horror of war close up, ferrying the wounded from the trenches to primitive field hospitals. Later, he drove German prisoners back to Germany.

Buckles left the army in 1920 and years later he went to work for a shipping company in the Philippines. When World War II broke out, he and other Americans there were put in prison camps by the occupying Japanese forces. Although he was not a soldier at that time, he spent more than three years in the notorious Los Baňos prison. The cup he ate out of for all that time is in the background of his 2008 portrait, which now hangs with eight others along one of the Pentagon’s many corridors.

In a statement issued Monday, President Barack Obama and his wife Michelle praised Buckles, saying he continued to serve America until his death, as the Honorary Chairman of the World War I Memorial Foundation. The Obamas said they join the Buckles family “in celebrating a remarkable life that reminds us of the true meaning of patriotism and our obligations to each other as Americans.” 

In one sense, Frank Buckles was not much different from millions of other World War One veterans. With his enthusiasm to serve and his longevity, however, it certainly was possible to say about him what he said about that Pentagon ceremony three years ago.

“Really, it was remarkable. I enjoyed every minute of it here.”

http://www.voanews.com/english/news/Last-American-World-War-I-Veteran-Dies-117100373.html
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« Reply #46 on: March 10, 2011, 12:31:58 PM »

www.yogiberra.com

________________________ ________________




Lawrence Peter "Yogi" Berra was born on May 12, 1925 in St. Louis, Mo. and grew up on Elizabeth Street in a neighborhood called "The Hill".

Yogi got his "nickname" from Bobby Hofman, a childhood friend. While watching a movie about an Indian snake charmer, Bobby noted that Yogi had a striking resemblance to the hindu man, saying "That yogi walks like Lawdie ( Larry) Berra," and the name stuck. Joe Garagiola tells a funny story about Yogi giving Carmen an anniversary card signed 'Yogi Berra.' She asked him if he thought he had to sign his last name so she wouldn't think it came from some other Yogi."

In 1942 Yogi was playing minor League ball and was approached by the then Cardinals General Manager, Branch Rickey. Rickey had just signed Garagiola for $500, but Rickey offered Yogi $250 and Yogi turned him down. It was reported that Rickey said of Yogi, "He'll never make anything more than a Triple A ballplayer at best." Yankees scout Leo Browne disagreed and convinced the Yankees that Yogi was worth the $500, so the Yankees signed him.

Yogi was assigned to the Norfolk Tars of the Class B Piedmont League. During a double header, Yogi had perhaps his most productive game ever. He is credited with driving in 23 runs that day.

When Yogi turned 18 he joined the Navy. He is pictured here with his father and brother John in St. Louis in 1944.



World War II was in full swing and Yogi played his part. He participated in the D-Day invasion at Omaha Beach, served in North Africa and Italy, and then was finally stationed back in the States. The Photo on the right is of Yogi and two GI's taken somewhere in Italy 1945.



After the war, Yogi returned to baseball and played with the New London, CT club. It was there that Mel Ott, the Giants Manager saw him play and attempted to offer the Yankees $50,000 for Yogi's contract. Yankee GM Larry MacPhail had no idea who Yogi was, but figured that if Mel Ott wanted him that badly, he had to be worth keeping. In 1946 Yogi was apprenticed to the Newark Bears of the International League before beginning his career with the Yankees in late 1946. He joined the team as a platoon catcher with Aaron Robinson, Charlie Silvera and Gus Niarhos.

Yogi was known as a wild swinger, perhaps equal to Hall of Famer Joe Medwick, and he was very difficult to get out. Paul Richards said of Yogi." He is the toughest man in baseball in the last three innings." In spite of his 'wild' swing, Yogi didn't strike out often. In 1950, he fanned only 12 times in 597 at bats.

Yogi was also a talker behind the plate. He used to talk to the opposing batters in order to distract them. Hank Aaron tells the story about the 1958 World Series, with Yogi behind the plate. Yogi kept telling Aaron to 'hit with the label up on the bat'. Finally Aaron turned and said "Yogi, I came up here to hit, not to read."

Yogi went on to become a Fifteen-time All Star, winning the AL MVP three times, in 1951, 54 and 55. He played in 14 World Series and holds numerous World Series records including most games by a catcher (63), hits (71), and times on a winning team (10), first in at bats, first in doubles, second in RBI's, third in home runs and BOB's. Yogi also hit the first pinch hit home run in World Series history in 1947.

 One of Yogi's most memorable moments came in 1959 at "Yogi Berra Day" at Yankee Stadium. Here Yogi is pictured with the gifts given to him by his team and friends, displayed right on the field. Just a great shot!

 The photo on the left is the famous shot of Yogi and Joe DiMaggio taken that day.

Yogi was named the Yankees Manager in 1964 and went on to win the AL pennant, but was fired after losing to the Cardinals in a seven-game series. Yogi then signed with the NY Mets as a player-coach in a public relations coup that can only happen in New York. Yogi was reunited with his long time friend and mentor Casey Stengel, the current Mets manager. Following Gil Hodges's death in 1971, Yogi was named as the Mets manager in 1972. In 1973, Yogi brought the "You Gotta Believe" Mets from last place in the final month of the season to win the National League pennant.

Yogi was dismissed from the Mets in 1975 and returned to the Yankees as a coach the following year. In 1984, George Steinbrenner hired Yogi to manage the Yankees; they finished third that year. After 22 games of the 1985 season Yogi was replaced as manager. In 1986 Yogi signed on as a coach with the Houston Astros, and remained with them until his retirement in 1992. Yogi is one of only a few managers to have won pennants in both the American and National Leagues.

Yogi was elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1972.

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« Reply #47 on: March 10, 2011, 12:37:39 PM »

True Hero 

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vpT8vkQ1rVw" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vpT8vkQ1rVw</a>
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« Reply #48 on: March 10, 2011, 12:49:16 PM »

Politicians tend to think soldiers are disposable.
[/quote[url]

I would like to see George W. Bush send his daughters to Afghanistan and help nation build.  Or how about Eric Cantor the neo con enlist in the Army and do some door kicking in Mosul.  They would think twice about so carelessly going to war. 
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« Reply #49 on: March 10, 2011, 12:50:14 PM »

Beach Bum has my nomination, but only if he renounces christianity and accepts the teachings of Mohammad and the Qu'ran as the one true faith.
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