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Author Topic: Legalized Marijuana and the Crime Question  (Read 10922 times)
OzmO
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« Reply #350 on: April 23, 2014, 11:33:35 PM »

Definitely sounds like her opinion.  Was just asking about what you have seen.  I don't recall my pot smoking friends ever being "feminized." 

My experience and observations are if you smoke pot every day, 3-4 times a day.....  starting with a "wake and bake" you tend to become passive and lack initiative.   But at the same time I know one guy who literally smokes like that and is very aggressive and proactive at his job all the time. 

Not sure exactly what feminized means but I don't know any girly stoners lol
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« Reply #351 on: April 24, 2014, 06:48:39 AM »

My experience and observations are if you smoke pot every day, 3-4 times a day.....  starting with a "wake and bake" you tend to become passive and lack initiative.   But at the same time I know one guy who literally smokes like that and is very aggressive and proactive at his job all the time. 

Not sure exactly what feminized means but I don't know any girly stoners lol

I smoke maybe 6-8 bowls aday if off, maybe two or so when I work. I find it motivation, however I am not neurotypical. This effect is likely due to blunted dopamine, which would cause apathy etc.. I wake a bake everyday and am a professional. It is the person dude, these same people would be lazy and unmovitaved regardless, they simply are using the drug to escape. If you use it with the intention to improve things, that occurs.

Getting high should not be the goal.
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« Reply #352 on: April 28, 2014, 01:50:02 PM »

Safety concerns about legal marijuana edibles
By Kelly David Burke
Published April 23, 2014
FoxNews.com

Two recent deaths and increased emergency room visits in Colorado have highlighted concerns about the safety of legal marijuana edibles.

Dr. George Sam Wang of Children's Hospital Colorado says part of the problem is that the effects of edible marijuana begin more slowly than smokeable pot, though they tend to last longer.

"One of the dangers that we've been seeing with adult recreational retail use is they'll take the recommended dose, wait, feel no effects and then continue to stack doses. Then before they know it they have a pretty large amount in their system and then they get potentially pretty severe effects," he said.

Investigators say that appears to be what happened to Levy Thamba, a college student from the Republic of Congo who had never tried marijuana before. Friends say he ate the recommended dose of one-sixth of a marijuana-infused cookie on March 11. When he felt no effects he ate the entire cookie: six times the recommended dose. He later became irrational and jumped off a hotel balcony to his death.

In an autopsy report, the Denver medical examiner concluded that Thamba's death was an accident and listed "marijuana intoxication" as a contributing factor.

"The edibles industry is huge," points out Colorado state representative Jonathan Singer. "About 40 percent of the marijuana industry is in edibles."

"Edibles are a huge part of our business," agrees Jamie Perino, owner of Euflora, situated on Denver's 16th Street Mall and a popular tourist destination.

"Because there's no place for visitors to come and enjoy smoking recreational marijuana  - it's illegal to smoke pot in public or in hotels - edibles are probably at least 50, if not on some days 70, percent our sales."

Edibles range from marijuana-infused mints, to candies, baked goods and beverages. Their popularity seems to have taken everyone - lawmakers, health officials and the industry itself, by surprise.

State law requires the products be sold in child-proof packaging and labels show the amount of the psychoactive ingredient THC they contain.

"Child resistant packaging has been proven to work," Dr. Wang says. "But if you take them out of the child resistant packaging...obviously a child isn't going to know the difference between a marijuana containing product and a non-marijuana containing product, and they often don't taste any different."

Wang says that in 2009, 2010 and 2011 combined, Childrens Hospital had 14 children come to their ER for marijuana intoxication. Last year alone, that number rose to eight cases and they have had eight more cases in just the first few months of this year. Six of those required admission to critical care.

Most of the kids are toddlers, and symptoms vary depending on the size of the child and the amount of marijuana in their system. "Symptoms range from sleepiness to where we've had kids actually getting breathing tubes to help them breathe and put on a ventilator."

Singer is co-sponsor of a bill that would require pot edibles to be instantly recognizable, even when out of the packaging.

"Whether it's a stamp or a symbol or a shape or a universal color, there should be something that's easily recognizable to both parents and kids so everyone knows what they're putting in their mouth."

Perino and many others in the industry think that is going too far. "I mean it really is a strong industry and has many strong points and to have it over regulated, and have things shut down before it's even started, would be a sad thing to see," he said.

Perino believes parents need to be responsible for keeping these products away from their kids. She also believes much of the concern is overblown due to recent media attention on cases like that of Kristine Kirk, who was shot and killed by her husband Richard on April 14.

At the time of the shooting, Kristine Kirk was on the phone with a 911 operator she had called to report her husband was "totally hallucinating." Police say Richard Kirk had purchased marijuana-infused candy earlier in the day, al he was also taking prescription medication. Kirk faces a first-degree murder charge and the case is still under investigation.

"It's really unfortunate two people have lost their lives," Perino says. "But I think that people have been waiting for something to happen so they can say, 'Oh look how bad marijuana is.' But let's look at the alcohol related deaths since January 1 in Colorado (when recreational marijuana became legal). How does that stack up?"

Perino says she and her employees take very seriously the task of educating customers about the effects of marijuana, especially the edible kind. "We recommend ten milligrams to start, especially if they've never done them before. We tell them to wait at least 45 minutes if not an hour to see how it's going to affect them before they ingest any more."

Singer, one of only two state legislators to publicly endorse legalizing marijuana, says education is critical but more needs to be done. "When you have edibles that are shaped like gummy bears or lollypops or lemon drops we need to make sure there is something clear on there that clearly identifies it as not for child consumption," he said.

He maintains his bill, which passed the Colorado House unanimously and is now in the hands of the Senate, is also good for the industry.

If the bill becomes law, the state's Marijuana Enforcement Division of the Department of Revenue will be tasked with deciding exactly how marijuana edibles will be required to look to make them instantly distinguishable from the products they mimic.

http://www.foxnews.com/health/2014/04/23/safety-concerns-about-legal-marijuana-edibles/
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« Reply #353 on: April 28, 2014, 05:20:42 PM »

Couple faces sentencing for marijuana 'ministry'
By Associated Press
POSTED: 11:01 a.m. HST, Apr 28, 2014
LAST UPDATED: 12:33 p.m. HST, Apr 28, 2014

A Big Island man who openly used his ministry to promote marijuana use was expected to be sentenced Monday in federal court for possessing nearly 300 pot plants as part of a distribution ring.

Roger Christie of Hilo pleaded guilty last year to one count of conspiring to manufacture, distribute and possess marijuana plants.

The charge carries a minimum sentence of five years and a maximum of 40 years in prison. Federal prosecutors are recommending five years in prison followed by four years of supervised release.

His wife, Sherryanne Christie, was also expected to be sentenced Monday following her husband's hearing.

Roger Christie, the founder of the Hawaii Cannabis Ministry, also known as the THC Ministry, and his wife have tried to fight the charges on religious grounds.

The couple pleaded guilty after U.S. District Judge Leslie Kobayashi ruled against allowing a defense based on the Religious Freedom Restoration Act.

Prosecutors say religion was a front for drug trafficking. They say ministry members paid "donations" in exchange for marijuana.

Christie "was always pushing the limits to see how far he could go in his marijuana trafficking activities under the auspices of the ministry," prosecutors said in court documents filed last week. "Christie was clearly in this marijuana trafficking business for financial gain, inasmuch as the ministry's marijuana and associated paraphernalia sales ... were the sole source of income to sustain co-defendant Sherryanne L. Christie ... and himself."

The documents state the couple lived a modest but comfortable lifestyle. Roger Christie also pleaded guilty to two counts of failing to file a tax return. As part of his plea agreement, he will forfeit his apartment and more than $21,000 seized by federal agents.

A federal grand jury indicted the Christies and 12 others on marijuana trafficking counts after a 2010 raid of the ministry. Christie has been in federal detention since, while his wife has been free on bail.

http://www.staradvertiser.com/news/breaking/20140428_Couple_faces_sentencing_for_marijuana_ministry.html?id=257050861
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« Reply #354 on: April 30, 2014, 03:44:06 AM »

Safety concerns about legal marijuana edibles
By Kelly David Burke
Published April 23, 2014
FoxNews.com

Two recent deaths and increased emergency room visits in Colorado have highlighted concerns about the safety of legal marijuana edibles.

Dr. George Sam Wang of Children's Hospital Colorado says part of the problem is that the effects of edible marijuana begin more slowly than smokeable pot, though they tend to last longer.

"One of the dangers that we've been seeing with adult recreational retail use is they'll take the recommended dose, wait, feel no effects and then continue to stack doses. Then before they know it they have a pretty large amount in their system and then they get potentially pretty severe effects," he said.

Investigators say that appears to be what happened to Levy Thamba, a college student from the Republic of Congo who had never tried marijuana before. Friends say he ate the recommended dose of one-sixth of a marijuana-infused cookie on March 11. When he felt no effects he ate the entire cookie: six times the recommended dose. He later became irrational and jumped off a hotel balcony to his death.

In an autopsy report, the Denver medical examiner concluded that Thamba's death was an accident and listed "marijuana intoxication" as a contributing factor.

"The edibles industry is huge," points out Colorado state representative Jonathan Singer. "About 40 percent of the marijuana industry is in edibles."

"Edibles are a huge part of our business," agrees Jamie Perino, owner of Euflora, situated on Denver's 16th Street Mall and a popular tourist destination.

"Because there's no place for visitors to come and enjoy smoking recreational marijuana  - it's illegal to smoke pot in public or in hotels - edibles are probably at least 50, if not on some days 70, percent our sales."

Edibles range from marijuana-infused mints, to candies, baked goods and beverages. Their popularity seems to have taken everyone - lawmakers, health officials and the industry itself, by surprise.

State law requires the products be sold in child-proof packaging and labels show the amount of the psychoactive ingredient THC they contain.

"Child resistant packaging has been proven to work," Dr. Wang says. "But if you take them out of the child resistant packaging...obviously a child isn't going to know the difference between a marijuana containing product and a non-marijuana containing product, and they often don't taste any different."

Wang says that in 2009, 2010 and 2011 combined, Childrens Hospital had 14 children come to their ER for marijuana intoxication. Last year alone, that number rose to eight cases and they have had eight more cases in just the first few months of this year. Six of those required admission to critical care.

Most of the kids are toddlers, and symptoms vary depending on the size of the child and the amount of marijuana in their system. "Symptoms range from sleepiness to where we've had kids actually getting breathing tubes to help them breathe and put on a ventilator."

Singer is co-sponsor of a bill that would require pot edibles to be instantly recognizable, even when out of the packaging.

"Whether it's a stamp or a symbol or a shape or a universal color, there should be something that's easily recognizable to both parents and kids so everyone knows what they're putting in their mouth."

Perino and many others in the industry think that is going too far. "I mean it really is a strong industry and has many strong points and to have it over regulated, and have things shut down before it's even started, would be a sad thing to see," he said.

Perino believes parents need to be responsible for keeping these products away from their kids. She also believes much of the concern is overblown due to recent media attention on cases like that of Kristine Kirk, who was shot and killed by her husband Richard on April 14.

At the time of the shooting, Kristine Kirk was on the phone with a 911 operator she had called to report her husband was "totally hallucinating." Police say Richard Kirk had purchased marijuana-infused candy earlier in the day, al he was also taking prescription medication. Kirk faces a first-degree murder charge and the case is still under investigation.

"It's really unfortunate two people have lost their lives," Perino says. "But I think that people have been waiting for something to happen so they can say, 'Oh look how bad marijuana is.' But let's look at the alcohol related deaths since January 1 in Colorado (when recreational marijuana became legal). How does that stack up?"

Perino says she and her employees take very seriously the task of educating customers about the effects of marijuana, especially the edible kind. "We recommend ten milligrams to start, especially if they've never done them before. We tell them to wait at least 45 minutes if not an hour to see how it's going to affect them before they ingest any more."

Singer, one of only two state legislators to publicly endorse legalizing marijuana, says education is critical but more needs to be done. "When you have edibles that are shaped like gummy bears or lollypops or lemon drops we need to make sure there is something clear on there that clearly identifies it as not for child consumption," he said.

He maintains his bill, which passed the Colorado House unanimously and is now in the hands of the Senate, is also good for the industry.

If the bill becomes law, the state's Marijuana Enforcement Division of the Department of Revenue will be tasked with deciding exactly how marijuana edibles will be required to look to make them instantly distinguishable from the products they mimic.

http://www.foxnews.com/health/2014/04/23/safety-concerns-about-legal-marijuana-edibles/

Yes people can consume to much, people should know what they are putting into their bodies, this is evolution at work.
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« Reply #355 on: April 30, 2014, 04:38:55 AM »

Yes people can consume to much, people should know what they are putting into their bodies, this is evolution at work.

Yes, but don't you think it's our responsibility to put safeguards in place to make it very difficult for people to harm themselves and/or others? 
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« Reply #356 on: April 30, 2014, 07:38:49 AM »

I smoke maybe 6-8 bowls aday if off, maybe two or so when I work. I find it motivation, however I am not neurotypical. This effect is likely due to blunted dopamine, which would cause apathy etc.. I wake a bake everyday and am a professional. It is the person dude, these same people would be lazy and unmovitaved regardless, they simply are using the drug to escape. If you use it with the intention to improve things, that occurs.

Getting high should not be the goal.

Yeah, and after a while you don't get as high.  I couldn't function smoking that much a day.  My friend is just like you though.  He can smoke fat joint straight to his head and conduct a seminar.
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« Reply #357 on: April 30, 2014, 08:40:44 AM »

Yes, but don't you think it's our responsibility to put safeguards in place to make it very difficult for people to harm themselves and/or others? 

Of course, proper labelling is a must. But the point about the onset is lack of drug knowledge, edibles alter the compounds in MJ, making them stronger, due to the first pass (liver) metabolism. Also, the onset is really long like 1.5 hours, again common knowledge. Could proper labelling help those that show no self control?
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« Reply #358 on: April 30, 2014, 08:45:34 AM »

Yeah, and after a while you don't get as high.  I couldn't function smoking that much a day.  My friend is just like you though.  He can smoke fat joint straight to his head and conduct a seminar.

Yes, I have a tolerance, I feel mildly relaxed but my awareness becomes much more expansive. It kinda becomes like coffee, I bowl up in the AM, drink coffee and work then repeat without the caffeine to my hearts content. I find people with quick wit, or perhaps quick processing enjoying it the most as it tends to dampen sensory input.

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« Reply #359 on: April 30, 2014, 11:22:49 AM »

Former Supreme Court Justice Claims Marijuana Should Be Legalized
Posted: 04/29/2014 11:27 am EDT Updated: 04/29/2014

Last week, during an interview with NPR's Weekend Edition Saturday, former Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens said that he believes our beloved federal government should legalize marijuana.

The former high court host said he feels that it should be legalized due to the changing mindset that's taking place on a national basis.

"Yes," Stevens said in response to show host Scott Simon's question as to whether possessing marijuana should be legal under federal law. "I really think that that's another instance of public opinion [that's] changed. And recognize that the distinction between marijuana and alcoholic beverages is really not much of a distinction. Alcohol, the prohibition against selling and dispensing alcoholic beverages has I think been generally, there's a general consensus that it was not worth the cost. And I think really in time that will be the general consensus with respect to this particular drug."

Appointed by President Gerald Ford, Stevens deems himself as a conservative, but he was also considered part of the court's liberal wing.

The former Supreme Court ruler has been stirring up a little controversy as of late with a new book that was recently published, Six Amendments, in which he recommends six changes to the U.S. Constitution. A few of his ideas include abolishing the death penalty, enforcing limits on how much money corporate entities can "donate" to elections, and executing stricter gun control laws.

I'm looking forward to a time when the powers that be can be honest and forthright regarding their position on important issues such as reforming our current drug policy without having to retire first. (And then I awakened from my pipe dream.)

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/the-/former-supreme-court-marijuana-legalization_b_5229995.html
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« Reply #360 on: April 30, 2014, 01:37:58 PM »

Of course, proper labelling is a must. But the point about the onset is lack of drug knowledge, edibles alter the compounds in MJ, making them stronger, due to the first pass (liver) metabolism. Also, the onset is really long like 1.5 hours, again common knowledge. Could proper labelling help those that show no self control?

I can't stand "individual responsibility" neocons like you.  I bet you sided with the banks during the housing crisis too..."it's the buyer's fault for accepting a loan they couldn't pay."   Roll Eyes
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« Reply #361 on: April 30, 2014, 02:02:43 PM »

I can't stand "individual responsibility" neocons like you.  I bet you sided with the banks during the housing crisis too..."it's the buyer's fault for accepting a loan they couldn't pay."   Roll Eyes

NOT taking any blame away from the banks in this mess....

But why wouldn't it be the buyers fault for taking on a loan that they can't afford?

At some point personal responsibility must play into what happens to people.  I agree that at some level laws should be created to protect people from themselves but how much should we continue to dumb things down for people?

Are you the type of person who thinks that people should be able to do what ever with out consequences?  Do you believe a person should be able to accept a loan and its ok they don't pay it?

 
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« Reply #362 on: April 30, 2014, 02:08:08 PM »

I can't stand "individual responsibility" neocons like you.  I bet you sided with the banks during the housing crisis too..."it's the buyer's fault for accepting a loan they couldn't pay."   Roll Eyes

Nice analogy, fail.

If a grown human wants to consume a drug for recreational purposes he should know what he is ingesting. In no way is drugging yourself the same as a complex decision like a mortgage.

But if I was to critique your point regardless of how silly it is, some of he blame falls on the person who accepted the loan, blame isn't a monopoly.

Thanks for stopping by.
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« Reply #363 on: May 03, 2014, 08:32:33 AM »

One negative side effect which I have experienced to some degree is the cyclical vomiting syndrome or cannabis hyperemesis (puking due to cannabis). It appears to happen only to chronic users, it happens to me almost like a hangover, whenever I go ham with some buddies. basically it appears that cannabis over time reduces blood flow to the stomach, which can cause vomiting, gastroparesis etc. the treatment oddly enough is hot showers. It has been described in the literature.

Clin Med Res. 2014 Mar 25. [Epub ahead of print]

Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome: A Case Report and Review of Pathophysiology.

Iacopetti CL1, Packer CD.


Author information




Abstract


Cannabis is the most widely used illicit drug in the United States, with lifetime prevalence of use estimated at 42% to 46%.1 The antiemetic properties of cannabis are well-known by the medical community and by the general public; however, less well-recognized is the paradoxical potential for certain chronic users to develop hyperemesis. We describe in this case a patient with prior extensive work-up for nausea and vomiting and previous diagnosis of cyclic vomiting syndrome who presented with characteristic features of cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome. We review the current literature for this condition and highlight potential mechanisms for its pathogenesis


It appears to be related to misuse not medicinal usage. If someone was using this for a chronic disorder like epilepsy, this would be a concern for sure. while it's dose related, it's not fun.
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« Reply #364 on: May 14, 2014, 02:34:48 PM »

I bet the dog was happy.   Smiley

Miami police find marijuana grow house hidden under doghouse
Published May 14, 2014
FoxNews.com

Lazara Lopez and Julio Valdes were charged with drug possession and trafficking, according to CBS Miami.
A marijuana grow house under a doghouse may land someone in the big house.

Florida police acted Monday night on an anonymous tip that led them to a home in west Miami-Dade where they said they found a doghouse covering a crawl space that led them to about 64 plants and 50 pounds of marijuana, CBS Miami reported.

The space was described as too small for an adult to stand. The electrical work was so poor, police wondered how the house didn't explode prior to the discovery.

Police also found evidence of a cockfighting ring in the back of the house with both live and dead roosters, the report said.

Julio Valdes and Lazara Lopez were arrested and reportedly face charges ranging from drug possession and trafficking within 1,000 feet of a school. Bail was reportedly set at $43, 000 and they need to prove they can come up with the funding from legal sources.

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2014/05/14/miami-cops-find-marijuana-grow-house-hidden-under-dog-house/?intcmp=latestnews
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« Reply #365 on: May 20, 2014, 01:06:23 PM »

Quote

Teen Faces Life In Prison Over Hash Brownies
The Huffington Post  | by  David Moye

Jacob Lavoro, 19, is facing a potential life sentence for making and selling pot brownies.
A teenager who allegedly made and sold hash brownies could serve life in prison because of the ingredients he used.

Officials in Round Rock, Texas, have charged Jacob Lavoro, 19, with a first-degree felony because he chose to use hash oil rather than marijuana.

That allows the state to use the entire weight of the brownies -- sugar, cocoa, butter and other ingredients -- to determine the weight of the drugs, KHON-TV reports.

The brownies confiscated by Round Rock officials weighed about 1.5 pounds. Lavoro could be sentenced between five years and life in prison.

The punishment is too harsh, according to Jamie Spencer, the legal counsel for the Texas division of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws.

"That's higher than the punishment range for sexual assault, higher than the punishment range for aggravated assault with a deadly weapon. It's kind of crazy," Spencer told KUTV.com.

Lavoro's lawyer, Jack Holmes, is also outraged by the charges.


"I’ve been doing this 22 years as a lawyer and I’ve got 10 years as a police officer and I’ve never seen anything like this before,” he said, according to KFOR-TV. “They’ve weighed baked goods in this case. It ought to be a misdemeanor.”

KEYE-TV reached out to the district attorney, hoping to find out how the case might be prosecuted. So far, there's been no response.

Lavoro's father, Joe Lavoro, says if his son is determined to have done something illegal, he should be punished, but doesn't agree with the proposed penalty.

"Five years to life? I'm sorry, I'm a law abiding citizen. I'm a conservative. I love my country. I'm a Vietnam veteran, but I'll be damned ... this is wrong, this is damn wrong!" he told KEYE-TV. "If [Jacob] did something wrong he should be punished, but to the extent that makes sense. This is illogical. I'm really upset, and I'm frightened, I'm frightened for my son."
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« Reply #366 on: May 20, 2014, 05:16:48 PM »



Teen Faces Life In Prison Over Hash Brownies
The Huffington Post  | by  David Moye

Jacob Lavoro, 19, is facing a potential life sentence for making and selling pot brownies.
A teenager who allegedly made and sold hash brownies could serve life in prison because of the ingredients he used.

Officials in Round Rock, Texas, have charged Jacob Lavoro, 19, with a first-degree felony because he chose to use hash oil rather than marijuana.

That allows the state to use the entire weight of the brownies -- sugar, cocoa, butter and other ingredients -- to determine the weight of the drugs, KHON-TV reports.

The brownies confiscated by Round Rock officials weighed about 1.5 pounds. Lavoro could be sentenced between five years and life in prison.

The punishment is too harsh, according to Jamie Spencer, the legal counsel for the Texas division of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws.

"That's higher than the punishment range for sexual assault, higher than the punishment range for aggravated assault with a deadly weapon. It's kind of crazy," Spencer told KUTV.com.

Lavoro's lawyer, Jack Holmes, is also outraged by the charges.


"I’ve been doing this 22 years as a lawyer and I’ve got 10 years as a police officer and I’ve never seen anything like this before,” he said, according to KFOR-TV. “They’ve weighed baked goods in this case. It ought to be a misdemeanor.”

KEYE-TV reached out to the district attorney, hoping to find out how the case might be prosecuted. So far, there's been no response.

Lavoro's father, Joe Lavoro, says if his son is determined to have done something illegal, he should be punished, but doesn't agree with the proposed penalty.

"Five years to life? I'm sorry, I'm a law abiding citizen. I'm a conservative. I love my country. I'm a Vietnam veteran, but I'll be damned ... this is wrong, this is damn wrong!" he told KEYE-TV. "If [Jacob] did something wrong he should be punished, but to the extent that makes sense. This is illogical. I'm really upset, and I'm frightened, I'm frightened for my son."

Texas.  Don't go there.
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« Reply #367 on: May 20, 2014, 05:27:54 PM »

Texas.  Don't go there.
Or mess with it. 
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« Reply #368 on: June 02, 2014, 01:19:28 PM »

Why You Should Be Alarmed About Marijuana Legalization, According to a Former Obama Drug Adviser
Rob Bluey
May 30, 2014
 
 
Marijuana legalization poses a significant health risk to America’s youth—and many parents have no clue about the consequences, says a former Obama administration drug policy adviser.

“Today’s marijuana is not the marijuana of the ‘60s, ‘70s or ‘80s. It’s five to 15 times stronger,” Kevin Sabet said in an exclusive interview with The Foundry. “I think a lot of Baby Boomers’ experience with pot—a couple of times in the dorm room—they don’t correspond to what kids are experiencing today.”
Sabet, a former senior adviser at the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy, wrote the book “Reefer Sanity: Seven Great Myths About Marijuana” to shed light on the marijuana legalization movement.

He pointed to Colorado, which has operated with de-facto legalization for five years, as a case study. By 2011, Denver had more medical marijuana shops than Starbucks or McDonalds.

The state has more kids using marijuana, he said, resulting in more kids in treatment and higher rate of car crashes. There have even been two deaths tied to marijuana use, including one involving domestic violence.

“Legalization in practice is a lot scarier than legalization in theory,” Sabet said. “It means a pot shop in your backyard, mass advertising and commercialization and greater health harms.”

In the book, Sabet takes on the myth that marijuana isn’t addictive. He said one in six kids who try marijuana will become addicted—the same as alcohol. That’s because young people are vulnerable than adults.

“There are more kids in treatment for marijuana today than all other drugs, including alcohol, combined,” Sabet said.
 
He worries that as other states and the District of Columbia consider legalization, more people will be hurt by the drug.

http://blog.heritage.org/2014/05/30/alarmed-marijuana-legalization-according-former-obama-drug-adviser/

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=060pHP7v3i0" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=060pHP7v3i0</a>
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« Reply #369 on: June 03, 2014, 08:31:43 AM »

Why You Should Be Alarmed About Marijuana Legalization, According to a Former Obama Drug Adviser
Rob Bluey
May 30, 2014
 
 
Marijuana legalization poses a significant health risk to America’s youth—and many parents have no clue about the consequences, says a former Obama administration drug policy adviser.

“Today’s marijuana is not the marijuana of the ‘60s, ‘70s or ‘80s. It’s five to 15 times stronger,” Kevin Sabet said in an exclusive interview with The Foundry. “I think a lot of Baby Boomers’ experience with pot—a couple of times in the dorm room—they don’t correspond to what kids are experiencing today.”
Sabet, a former senior adviser at the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy, wrote the book “Reefer Sanity: Seven Great Myths About Marijuana” to shed light on the marijuana legalization movement.

not true, grade a stuff was always high in THC, maybe the Mexican brick weed, this is a common fallacy.

He pointed to Colorado, which has operated with de-facto legalization for five years, as a case study. By 2011, Denver had more medical marijuana shops than Starbucks or McDonalds.

The state has more kids using marijuana, he said, resulting in more kids in treatment and higher rate of car crashes. There have even been two deaths tied to marijuana use, including one involving domestic violence.

“Legalization in practice is a lot scarier than legalization in theory,” Sabet said. “It means a pot shop in your backyard, mass advertising and commercialization and greater health harms.”

In the book, Sabet takes on the myth that marijuana isn’t addictive. He said one in six kids who try marijuana will become addicted—the same as alcohol. That’s because young people are vulnerable than adults.

“There are more kids in treatment for marijuana today than all other drugs, including alcohol, combined,” Sabet said.

You just can't make up shit.
 
He worries that as other states and the District of Columbia consider legalization, more people will be hurt by the drug.

http://blog.heritage.org/2014/05/30/alarmed-marijuana-legalization-according-former-obama-drug-adviser/

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=060pHP7v3i0" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=060pHP7v3i0</a>
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« Reply #370 on: June 16, 2014, 11:35:20 AM »

After 5 Months of Sales, Colorado Sees the Downside of a Legal High

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/01/us/after-5-months-of-sales-colorado-sees-the-downside-of-a-legal-high.html?_r=4
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« Reply #371 on: June 16, 2014, 11:39:20 AM »

Quote
....there is scant hard data.
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« Reply #372 on: June 16, 2014, 11:47:48 AM »

The full paragraph:

Despite such anecdotes, there is scant hard data. Because of the lag in reporting many health statistics, it may take years to know legal marijuana’s effect — if any — on teenage drug use, school expulsions or the number of fatal car crashes.

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« Reply #373 on: June 16, 2014, 11:52:44 AM »

The full paragraph:

Despite such anecdotes, there is scant hard data. Because of the lag in reporting many health statistics, it may take years to know legal marijuana’s effect — if any — on teenage drug use, school expulsions or the number of fatal car crashes.



....until then its all conjecture.


Doesn't change the point of my post.


And....

Heaven forbid, people die as a result of accidents from people who are high.

Wait, doesn't that already happen with Alcohol?  Cheesy
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« Reply #374 on: June 16, 2014, 11:56:07 AM »

....until then its all conjecture.


Doesn't change the point of my post.


And....

Heaven forbid, people die as a result of accidents from people who are high.

Wait, doesn't that already happen with Alcohol?  Cheesy

It was out of context.  Nobody really knows what the long term implications will be, but early reports are not good.

The fact drunk drivers kill and injure tons of people isn't very good precedent.
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