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coltrane
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« on: January 18, 2011, 07:21:48 AM »

Again, i've hurt my lower back.  I felt that "twinge" and was on my back for a day yesterday with my legs up.  Can barely stand straight up.  Anyway, it's happened before prior, which is probably why it's happening now again.

My question:  once I feel comfortable again, i.e. inflammation is gone, what are the exercises I should be doing to strengthen my lower back to hopefully avoid this happening again?  I can do my own research on the net, but just wondering what YOU recommend. 

When this happens, i'm outta the gym for a week or two...  and the pain is never really gone.  I suspect a herniated disk.  I don't have insurance right now, so dr. is outta the question.

Thanks JPM.  You help a lot of ppl on here and it is appreciated.
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Butterbean
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« Reply #1 on: January 18, 2011, 07:34:27 AM »

I'm not JPM, but I believe having strong abs can help avoid some lower back issues.

Hope you feel better soon.
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Princess L
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« Reply #2 on: January 18, 2011, 07:46:39 AM »

^what she said
and

bird dogs (opposite arm/leg) - alternate - repeat 10x






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coltrane
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« Reply #3 on: January 18, 2011, 07:55:05 AM »

Keep 'em coming guys and girls!

I've been doing (prior to this last injury) the chaiir you sit on with the pad that goes across your back and you lean backwards.  Seems to help some.

I will DEF start back up with abs too.  Did them all last year and stopped.
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Princess L
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« Reply #4 on: January 18, 2011, 07:59:01 AM »

Supermans











I've been doing (prior to this last injury) the chaiir you sit on with the pad that goes across your back and you lean backwards.  Seems to help some.



That might feel good, but I don't think it's doing much in terms of strengthening.
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vic86
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« Reply #5 on: January 18, 2011, 11:47:27 AM »

You might want to add mobility drills after the inflamation has gone,to improve the flexibility of hips,glutes and hamstring.One thing that everyone experiences is lower back tightness for which lack of flexibility of hips and glutes is the main reason.Variations in Supermans are also good .
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coltrane
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« Reply #6 on: January 18, 2011, 12:55:58 PM »

You might want to add mobility drills after the inflamation has gone,to improve the flexibility of hips,glutes and hamstring.One thing that everyone experiences is lower back tightness for which lack of flexibility of hips and glutes is the main reason.Variations in Supermans are also good .

Yes, i intend to start some stretching of the hams and lower back as soon as possible.  Tight hams creates pull on the lower back i've been told.
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jpm101
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« Reply #7 on: January 18, 2011, 07:21:51 PM »

Coltrane: Does sound like you may have a Herniated disc, as you suggested. Misaligned, pinched or pressured raw nerve damage is something that may not go away. One side of the hip/leg may be much weaker and one leg may be shorter than the other as a result.  Every thing may seem OK  and back to normal, after a while, but even turning, reaching, raising or lowering into a sitting position, etc can bring on the pain again.

Normal medical treatment will give you light 'roids, muscle relaxants, etc and tell you to take it easy with rest, hot/cold packs (pro's & con's with this). Rest is the bottom line.

A few friends of mine have used acupressure with very good results. Chiropractor adjustments may help also. Ideas is to try return the spine to near it's original state. Which does not always cure the underlining problem; nerve stress, but can go far to relieve it. When the back returns to somewhat of a normal state, I might suggest a deep sports or Rolfing massage. You ain't seen or felt nothing yet until you experience a few of those. I understand you limited funds, but some acupuncture, massage & chiropractor schools will allow advance students to work on people as a learning experence.  Guy's I knew in college did this all the time.

Princess L brings up some good exercise ideas and they do strengthen the muscles involved very well. I have a background in Yoga, so am very bias in this regard for spinal flexibility, stretch and strength. If people think Yoga movements are for less than macho men, try holding some of those positions for even 20 seconds. let alone 3 to 5 minutes as some advance little old ladies students do.

 The hips/butt/hams/calves/ankles form a rear lower muscle chain so working for a flex and stretch is the main focus. You want to stretch the ligaments just as well as the muscles themselves.

Stand and clasp the hands/fingers together behind the back. Place the toes on a 2X4, thick book, etc. Keeping the total back/spine straight and bend over to the front. Your not going to go very far down but the whole point is to work on the stretch, not a full ROM. Try doing these every day (not meant for a muscle size building exercise) for 20-30 stretches. Hold the bottom position for 3 to 5 seconds each rep. Do them 3 times a day.

In a few weeks the back should be strong enough to start doing light Romanian DL's, with the toes on that 2X4.,etc.  Add weight as you get stronger. Can also do GoodMornings, either standing or sitting. At this point, do the heavier exercises with the feet/toes flat on the floor. Use the hands behind the back, toes on a 2X4 as a warmup movement before Romanians, GM'ing , SLDL's, regular DL's or most forms of squatting. This can insure, with a tricky back, that a range of flexibility is paid attention too.

May also want to use a warming agent or lotion on the lower back before any lifting starts.  A light wrap or belt (place a small towel between the lower back and belt it's self) around the waist area can also bring warmth (and keep it there) during workouts. Good Luck.

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coltrane
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« Reply #8 on: January 19, 2011, 07:17:42 AM »

JPM and everyone else:  Thank you very much for your advice.  It's amazing to me that I (without knowing anyone on here) can come on and post a question and you (without knowing me) take the time to help.

Again, thanks.

I'lll keep you posted.  Today the initial jolting pain is gone.  Now i'm left with a dull sore back.  I know if i move just wrong though, it's ZAP again.

I am going to do a little ice/heat tonight to increase the blood flow.  Then later on in the week some light stretching.
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vic86
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bring back the 80`s


« Reply #9 on: January 19, 2011, 07:45:40 AM »

Coltrane: Does sound like you may have a Herniated disc, as you suggested. Misaligned, pinched or pressured raw nerve damage is something that may not go away. One side of the hip/leg may be much weaker and one leg may be shorter than the other as a result.  Every thing may seem OK  and back to normal, after a while, but even turning, reaching, raising or lowering into a sitting position, etc can bring on the pain again.

Normal medical treatment will give you light 'roids, muscle relaxants, etc and tell you to take it easy with rest, hot/cold packs (pro's & con's with this). Rest is the bottom line.

A few friends of mine have used acupressure with very good results. Chiropractor adjustments may help also. Ideas is to try return the spine to near it's original state. Which does not always cure the underlining problem; nerve stress, but can go far to relieve it. When the back returns to somewhat of a normal state, I might suggest a deep sports or Rolfing massage. You ain't seen or felt nothing yet until you experience a few of those. I understand you limited funds, but some acupuncture, massage & chiropractor schools will allow advance students to work on people as a learning experence.  Guy's I knew in college did this all the time.

Princess L brings up some good exercise ideas and they do strengthen the muscles involved very well. I have a background in Yoga, so am very bias in this regard for spinal flexibility, stretch and strength. If people think Yoga movements are for less than macho men, try holding some of those positions for even 20 seconds. let alone 3 to 5 minutes as some advance little old ladies students do.

 The hips/butt/hams/calves/ankles form a rear lower muscle chain so working for a flex and stretch is the main focus. You want to stretch the ligaments just as well as the muscles themselves.

Stand and clasp the hands/fingers together behind the back. Place the toes on a 2X4, thick book, etc. Keeping the total back/spine straight and bend over to the front. Your not going to go very far down but the whole point is to work on the stretch, not a full ROM. Try doing these every day (not meant for a muscle size building exercise) for 20-30 stretches. Hold the bottom position for 3 to 5 seconds each rep. Do them 3 times a day.

In a few weeks the back should be strong enough to start doing light Romanian DL's, with the toes on that 2X4.,etc.  Add weight as you get stronger. Can also do GoodMornings, either standing or sitting. At this point, do the heavier exercises with the feet/toes flat on the floor. Use the hands behind the back, toes on a 2X4 as a warmup movement before Romanians, GM'ing , SLDL's, regular DL's or most forms of squatting. This can insure, with a tricky back, that a range of flexibility is paid attention too.

May also want to use a warming agent or lotion on the lower back before any lifting starts.  A light wrap or belt (place a small towel between the lower back and belt it's self) around the waist area can also bring warmth (and keep it there) during workouts. Good Luck.


Thanks for the brief information!.JPM Smiley
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jpm101
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« Reply #10 on: January 19, 2011, 10:05:14 AM »

Sorry Vic86. I know you lips were getting tired reading all that so slowly. Good Luck.
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Montague
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« Reply #11 on: February 11, 2011, 06:18:34 PM »

Again, i've hurt my lower back.  I felt that "twinge" and was on my back for a day yesterday with my legs up.  Can barely stand straight up.  Anyway, it's happened before prior, which is probably why it's happening now again.


Just curious:
Do you feel the majority of low back pain in the dead-center of your back, or is it more to one side?
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coltrane
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« Reply #12 on: February 11, 2011, 06:30:46 PM »


Just curious:
Do you feel the majority of low back pain in the dead-center of your back, or is it more to one side?
The first time it went out was the side of my spine.  THis time it was more in the center.  There hasn't been any sciatic involved.
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Montague
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« Reply #13 on: February 11, 2011, 07:47:23 PM »

The first time it went out was the side of my spine.  THis time it was more in the center.  There hasn't been any sciatic involved.


Okay.
I was wondering if maybe it was a sacro-iliac problem.
A displaced SI will often cause pain emphasis on one side down around where the waistline of your pants sit (assuming you wear your pants like normal people).

Sometimes, overly tight hamstrings fascilitate SI problems, which can be somewhat negated by stretching the hammies.

I'm not saying this is what you have, but if it is, the stretching is something you could try.
Also, Chiropractors and most PT's are able to "reset" SI's - chiros use a lumbar adjustment; PT's use mobilization techniques.
PTA's (assistants) are more common/numerous, and several gyms I've belonged to have had one or two who would happily pop me in about once per week free of charge.
Of course, it helped I'd gotten to know these people over the course of several years.

It never hurts to ask around to see WHO is around.
You can often find help in the least likely of places.
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coltrane
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« Reply #14 on: February 11, 2011, 08:12:24 PM »

Interesting because it does hurt in my hips sometimes.
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Montague
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« Reply #15 on: February 11, 2011, 08:22:15 PM »

Interesting because it does hurt in my hips sometimes.


While sitting in a chair, straighten your right leg and - keeping it straight - raise your foot about 8-10 inches off the ground.
Then repeat the steps with your left leg.

If SI-related, this movement will oftentimes cause a noticeable, localized sensation (discomfort/pain) on the affected side.
If both sides result in soreness, it's possible both SI joints are out.
The above movement really pinpoints the source of the pain, though.


edit: sometimes raising BOTH legs will cause pain on the affected (ONE) side.
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