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Author Topic: The Official Chris Christie Appreciation Thread  (Read 15940 times)
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« Reply #225 on: October 28, 2013, 12:52:10 PM »

Yeah, that whole compromise/RINO/flipping positions/moderate thing worked really well for McCain and Romney when it came to getting the base to show up and vote.

I dont think they should repeat that mistake in 2016.  Give em Rand/Cruz and let's make this a REAL contest for once!  Nobody wants to see Hilary win 40 states over Christie!

why do you think that a country who put Obama in the White House twice is going to be receptive to a far right wing ideologue ?
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« Reply #226 on: October 28, 2013, 12:57:29 PM »

why do you think that a country who put Obama in the White House twice is going to be receptive to a far right wing ideologue ?

it's all in the numbers.  Rand will attract the base, the dutiful rinos that hate hilary, and the YOUTH vote.

A lot of those ron paul hipsters will line up to get their "love" revolution posters out, etc.  That CAN win.  I'm not sure Cruz can, he's a little hard on the eyes and extreme on some things, but I think he'd have a better chance that CHristie, who just looks terrible and has most of the same positions as hilary. 

Rand will win.  Cruz can win.  CHristie probably won't win.
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« Reply #227 on: October 28, 2013, 01:11:00 PM »

it's all in the numbers.  Rand will attract the base, the dutiful rinos that hate hilary, and the YOUTH vote.

A lot of those ron paul hipsters will line up to get their "love" revolution posters out, etc.  That CAN win.  I'm not sure Cruz can, he's a little hard on the eyes and extreme on some things, but I think he'd have a better chance that CHristie, who just looks terrible and has most of the same positions as hilary. 

Rand will win.  Cruz can win.  CHristie probably won't win.

Why would Rand attract "the base" when his father couldn't make a dent in it and Cruz is basically a cult leader with no ability to attract anyone except a handful of nuts

No one who is radical (left or right) is going to become POTUS
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« Reply #228 on: November 04, 2013, 06:52:23 PM »

All I want to know is how much weight has Fat Man lost?   Cheesy

Christie win could send strong message to GOP about 2016 presidential bid
By Barnini Chakraborty
Published November 04, 201

WASHINGTON –  Even in a deep blue state, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie is expected to coast into a second term Tuesday in his reelection race against Democratic state Sen. Barbara Buono.

If he wins big – as is expected – it will send a strong message to members of his own party about his popularity with voters and could set him up for a 2016 presidential run.

That’s a 180 degree turn from what Mitt Romney's political advisers thought of him as a potential 2012 running mate, according to a new book.

The book “Double Down: Game Change 2012,” by journalists Mark Halperin and John Heilemann, chronicles the political flirtation with and eventual dismissal of Christie by Romney and his political team.

According to the book, Romney’s advisers codenamed Christie “Pufferfish,” and their patience with him wore thin over chronic tardiness to joint political fundraisers and alleged diva demands of star treatment, including lavish travel arrangements.

Ultimately, Christie was dropped as a candidate and Sen. Paul Ryan was chosen as Romney’s running mate.

Still, Christie was able to strike a chord with Republicans and moderates and his continued popularity was among the few bright spots for the GOP during the 2012 election cycle.

For Christie, winning in a landslide Tuesday would be sweet revenge and a reminder to the GOP that its base should think about him to lead the party.

While campaigning Sunday night at a rally held by the New Jersey Outdoor Alliance, Christie told the crowd, “We need to show the Republican Party in America that we can win again. And guess where they’re going to be watching on Tuesday night to see if we can win: right here in New Jersey.”

On Monday, he was a little more scaled back, warning supporters not to take anything for granted.

"We are Republicans in New Jersey," the GOP governor said inside his packed Monmouth County headquarters. "You have to work and earn every vote you get in this state as a Republican. We're a minority party in this state."

Christie’s handling of Superstorm Sandy – which caused billions in damage – endeared him to many in his state.

Rutgers public policy professor Cliff Zukin says Christie’s Sandy efforts reinforced his standing among rank-and-file Republicans through “visibility in a crisis setting,” but will probably hurt him among conservative Republican Party leaders.

“Many … were very upset he ‘helped’ Obama given the proximity of Sandy to the national election,” Zukin told FoxNews.com.

Some social conservatives also seem on the fence about Christie.

On Friday, a southern New Jersey couple sued the governor over his signing of a bill banning so-called gay conversion therapy.

The couple claims that the bill Christie signed into law in August violates their constitutional rights. Specifically, they argue that the law violates their rights to free speech and freedom of religion because it prevents them from seeking treatment for their 15-year-old son.

http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2013/11/04/christie-win-could-send-strong-message-to-gop-about-2016-presidential-bid/
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« Reply #229 on: November 05, 2013, 12:19:13 PM »

Chris Christie: I’m a conservative, not a moderate

Mendham, New Jersey (CNN) - It's Election Day 2013, and polls indicate New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie is easily going to win re-election. Still, Christie is hitting the pavement, glad handing, and popping into the ballot booth to cast his vote.

CNN anchor and Chief Washington Correspondent Jake Tapper caught up with Christie outside a New Jersey polling place, and asked the GOP governor, who's seriously considering a bid for the 2016 Republican presidential nomination, if he thought of himself as a moderate.

"I’m a conservative," Christie said. "I’ve governed as a conservative in this state, and I think that’s led to some people disagreeing with me in our state, because it’s generally a left-of-center, blue state."

"The difference has been is I haven’t tried to hide it, or mask it as something different," said Christie, who recalled meeting a woman on the campaign trail and arguing with her about a particular issue.

"Finally I just turned to her and said, ‘Listen if this is your most important issue, and the issue you’ve decided on, vote for Barbara Buono. 'Cause I’m not changing, and it doesn’t sound like you are,’" Christie told Tapper, anchor of CNN's "The Lead with Jake Tapper."

The final three polls in New Jersey indicate Christie way ahead of state Sen. Barbara Buono, the little-known Democratic challenger.

"Most folks, they’re willing to let you disagree with them a little bit, as long as they think you’re being straight with them," added Christie. "That’s the difference. And so I’ve governed as a conservative, and most people who look at my record objectively, will come to that conclusion."

http://thelead.blogs.cnn.com/2013/11/05/chris-christie-conservative-moderate-new-jersey_race/
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« Reply #230 on: November 05, 2013, 12:25:27 PM »

I guess anyone who runs is a "top contender" at this point. 

Newt Gingrich: Christie 'one of the top contenders' in 2016
Posted by
CNN Political Unit

(CNN) - Former House Speaker and CNN host Newt Gingrich says he sees New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie as a major candidate for the 2016 Republican presidential nomination.

Gingrich was on CNN's "New Day" Tuesday morning talking about the prospects and implications of the day's elections that include governors races in New Jersey and Virginia.

In New Jersey, the "Crossfire" host expected what polls have said for months, a landslide victory for Christie against his Democratic challenger, little known state Sen. Barbara Buono.

"He'll probably set the record for at least the last 30 years," Gingrich said of Christie. "The question will be how many Republicans does he bring into the legislature, which will be a big way of measuring his impact institutionally," he told CNN's Chris Cuomo.

In 2016, Gingrich said he expects Christie to be one of the top four or five contenders for the Republican nomination, alongside Govs. Scott Walker of Wisconsin, John Kasich of Ohio and Rick Perry of Texas.

"I think governors will play a big role in '16," said Gingrich, who served 11 terms in the House of Representatives. Gingrich did not mention any of the legislators thought to be candidates for the 2016 nomination like Sens. Ted Cruz of Texas, Rand Paul of Kentucky, and Marco Rubio of Florida.

The Virginia race has been in part a matter of messaging, Gingrich said Tuesday, with businessman and former Democratic National Committee chair Terry McAuliffe leading in the polls largely because he managed to paint his opponent in a negative light early on. Republican Ken Cuccinelli, the state Attorney General, is a tea party favorite whose conservative views have become fodder for McAuliffe in the increasingly purple state.

"The guy who gets defined as an extremist is going to be on defense all the time," Gingrich said.

The messaging and idea of pervasive negativity served as a segue for Gingrich to talk about his new book, "Breakout." According to Gingrich, the book looks at some of the major technological advances and bold ideas in the United States amid what is in large part a complete inability for the political elite to move forward with ideas just as bold.

http://politicalticker.blogs.cnn.com/2013/11/05/newt-gingrich-christie-one-of-the-top-contenders-in-2016/
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« Reply #231 on: November 05, 2013, 06:19:48 PM »

Christie was just elected governor for the second time.  He is unbeatable.  He should run for president.   Smiley
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« Reply #232 on: November 07, 2013, 10:06:18 AM »

Rand Paul: Moderate Like Christie Has Little Chance in 2016
Thursday, 07 Nov 2013
By Bill Hoffmann

The sweeping re-election of New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie proves moderates are an integral part of the Republican Party, Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky says.

"There's room in the Republican Party for moderates, like Chris Christie. They seem to be the only ones that are winning in the Northeast," Paul told "The Steve Malzberg Show" on Newsmax TV.

"The other thing that might happen in the Northeast, if we had a little more libertarian-leaning Republicans, they would have a chance in the Northeast," Paul said Wednesday.

"But there's room for moderates, like Chris Christie, and he's got a place in the party."

But conservatives are still the driving force of the GOP, Paul says.

"Conservatives are a much bigger force than the moderates, but it doesn't mean that we want to exclude moderates from our party," he said.

Still, with a nod to Christie, Paul said moderate Republicans will have a tougher time getting the Republican nomination for president.

"The road to the nomination for a moderate is actually pretty difficult because a lot of the Republican primaries are very conservative," he said.

"And so, someone who's most well-known for grabbing up federal money as much as they can get, probably that kind of attitude may or may not go off so well in a Republican primary."

Paul says the Republican Party let down Ken Cuccinelli, the GOP candidate for governor of Virginia, who narrowly lost to Democrat Terry McAuliffe.

"Some of the establishment let us down in that race. If you look back to the race when [Bob] McDonnell won four years ago, the establishment put a lot more money in for McDonnell than they did for Cuccinelli," he said.

"Cuccinelli could have won if everybody had stuck with him . . . He got very darn close, people were coming his way. He just didn't have any money in the end.

"This came from pressure from some establishment Republicans who don't like conservatives, and that's a disappointment because he really could have won . . . He was right there on the edge."

Paul said the Republican lack of muscle and outspending by Democrats doomed Cuccinelli.

"[The Democrats were] outspending two or three to one, and they were able to attack and attack and attack and define who he was. And so, he didn't have much of a chance without the money."

Paul says Americans are now aware of the multitude of problems the Affordable Care Act is causing.

"[It] may well be that everyone with an individual policy is ultimately canceled. A huge percentage are being canceled because anybody whose insurance policy has changed since 2009 is canceled, but eventually everybody's policy will change," he said.

"So really, it eventually means that nobody has an individual policy, nobody gets to choose their doctor, everybody in the individual market will be under an Obamacare plan and those are their only choices."

Paul, who is one of the nation's most vocal opponents of the Affordable Care Act, said virtually everybody in the country is going to be limited to four dependent insurance plans.

"[President Barack Obama] should have said, instead of you get to keep your doctor, it should have been you get to keep your doctor if I like your doctor or you get to keep your plan if I like your plan," Paul said.

"He didn't really put it that way, but that's the truth of the matter. You only get to keep your insurance plan or your doctor if he approves of them.

"The important thing to know is that we're not just talking about healthcare here. We're talking about the freedom of choice."

http://www.newsmax.com/Newsfront/rand-paul-chris-christie-gop-moderates/2013/11/06/id/535253#ixzz2jyqOwKGq
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« Reply #233 on: November 07, 2013, 10:30:46 PM »

Chris Christie: I’m a conservative, not a moderate

LOL!  Christie should just own that RINO role already.   I'm so sick of repubs doing this.  Act like a moderate for years, then suddenly "I'm a conservative!" when it's time for primaries.

I am offering to personally shit i the mouth of any getbigger that says, with a straight face, "Actually man, I think Christie is a conservative, and always has been...."


The left is SCARED of Rand.  They'd much rather have Obese, rude, sweaty, obnoxious RINO Christie up against Hilary. 

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« Reply #234 on: November 08, 2013, 10:12:25 AM »

Is Chris Christie the GOP's Bill Clinton?
Friday, 08 Nov 2013
By Rich Lowry

Chris Christie couldn't have been any more obvious about his 2016 intentions if he had begun his victory speech Tuesday with the words "My fellow Americans" and ended it with a balloon drop.

He offered New Jersey as an example for national healing. "Tonight," he said, "a dispirited America, angry with their dysfunctional government in Washington, looks to New Jersey to say, Is what I think's happening really happening? Are people really coming together?"

Trenton, a nation turns its lonely eyes to you.

None of this was subtle, but Christie had certainly earned it. Almost every decision he's made — sometimes shamelessly so — has been geared to making the rubble bounce in his re-election and then using his crushing victory as a credential in an incipient national campaign. He succeeded brilliantly on his own terms.

In a state President Barack Obama won by 17 points in 2012, Christie won 60 percent overall. He won Latinos outright and took 21 percent of the black vote. He won women and men. He won high-school graduates and people with advanced degrees. He won people making more than $200,000 and people making less than $50,000.

These numbers are eye-popping. If they were automatically transferable to the national stage, Hillary Clinton would have to give it up and content herself with giving $200,000 speeches for Goldman Sachs forevermore. But they aren't.

As Henry Olsen of the Ethics and Public Policy Center points out, essentially uncontested races against badly overmatched opponents aren't a predictor of anything. William Weld won 70 percent of the vote and every county in Massachusetts in his 1994 re-election as governor, then lost by 7 points to John Kerry in a 1996 Senate race in which the map of Massachusetts snapped back to its natural state.

Granted, getting into a position where you can run essentially uncontested against a badly overmatched opponent in a major race is an achievement in itself.

Christie's implicit pitch to the national GOP will probably be that he's to Republicans in the 2010s what Bill Clinton was to the Democrats in the 1990s. In other words, he offers a different kind of politics that can potentially unlock the presidency after a period of national futility for his party.

Like Clinton when he was governor of Arkansas in the 1980s, Christie is operating on hostile partisan and cultural territory, and managing to thrive by co-opting or neutralizing natural enemies.

Like the "explainer in chief," Christie has a knack for public persuasion. The New Jersey governor's relentless town halls during the fight for his public-sector reforms were model examples of making an argument fearlessly and effectively.

Like Clinton, who so famously felt people's pain, Christie connects. He has a reputation for confrontation, rightly, but Christie's emotional range is much broader. His response to Hurricane Sandy was, in part, a great act of empathy.

What Clinton had that Christie evidently lacks is a well-thought-out approach to his party's predicament. As a "New Democrat," Clinton had a different governing philosophy, expressed in a raft of new policy proposals. Chris Christie has an affect and a style of governance.

If Christie's message to the GOP is merely that it should look to what he did in the Garden State and be as wonderfully unifying as he is, it deserves to flop.

It could come off as boastful and hectoring, and about as original as the average political discussion on NPR. Coupled with his various departures from conservative orthodoxy, it could be toxic.

For Christie truly to capitalize on his opportunity, he will need a conservative reform agenda, geared to the bread-and-butter concerns of ordinary voters.

In his victory speech, Christie spoke of being "one of you." As Henry Olsen writes, Christie's potential is in matching that Everyman appeal with substance. He could set out to make himself a Republican by and for the middle class in a departure for the contemporary party.

Congratulations on the big win, governor. Now show us what's next.

http://www.newsmax.com/RichLowry/clinton-christie-gop-president/2013/11/08/id/535619#ixzz2k4iZQRBh
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« Reply #235 on: November 08, 2013, 10:15:44 AM »

The left is SCARED of Rand.  They'd much rather have Obese, rude, sweaty, obnoxious RINO Christie up against Hilary. 

You are spot on. This is the only comment that you have posted on this board in the past year that you have shown some kind of lucid thinking. Congrats.

Hopefully this time you will vote Rand and not stay home. Undecided
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« Reply #236 on: November 08, 2013, 12:18:01 PM »

Of course the left is scared of Rand... They were scared of his dad too, and how did that work out for them?

There is no way... and I'm saying this for truth here... No WAY a Rand Paul wins the nomination for Republican President in 2016... Because the powers that be DO NOT WANT IT.
this. George carlins comment about political change seem to fit here.

The pauls represent real change. They will never have a shot.
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« Reply #237 on: November 12, 2013, 10:07:23 AM »

Fat Man sounds like he is testing the waters. 

Packaging a President: Christie's Rollout Models Clinton, Bush, and Obama

New Jersey's governor vows bipartisanship, big fixes, courage, and authenticity. Sound familiar?

Ron Fournier By Ron Fournier
November 11, 2013

In an era of wrenching economic and social change, voters bet their hopes on a little-tested leader who a) echoed their disillusionment, b) pledged to end polarization, c) defied his party's extremists, d) embraced the task of tackling big problems, and e) seemed authentic.

And so it happened in 1992, 2000, and 2008 that Bill Clinton, George W. Bush, and Barack Obama became president. Judging by his rhetoric after a landslide reelection Tuesday, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie hopes to package himself as the "Perfect Candidate for Troubled Times," version 4.0.

Voters crave—and the nation needs—a transformational president to lead America into the post-industrial era, just as Theodore Roosevelt reset U.S. political and social institutions for the post-agricultural era. But after three less-than-promised presidencies, voters may not be inclined to buy the hype.

And yet, it begins. Interviewed on four Sunday news shows, Christie pushed all the familiar buttons.

"There are obvious problems that need to be fixed, and the people in Washington, both parties, are not fixing these problems, nor is the president." Christe's pox-on-both-houses broadsides are sure to anger partisans while resonating with moderate voters who are sick of the status quo. Moderates also elect presidents. As sitting governors, Bush and Clinton spoke as outsiders against "politics as usual" in Washington. In 2008, then-Sen. Barack Obama vowed to "change the culture of Washington," and voters had the audacity to hope he could.

"On governing, it's about doing things, accomplishing things, reaching across the aisle and crafting accomplishments." Clinton and Bush came to Washington with records of bipartisanship accomplishment. Through fault of their own and of their enemies, both presidents left the office more polarized than they found it. Part of the problem is something Christie would never admit: It's easier to be bipartisan on the state level, where structural issues that gridlock Washington—redistricting, special-interest money, a lack of familiarity among leaders etc.—don't exist or are less of a problem. Clinton, a Democrat, worked with a largely Democratic state Legislature in Arkansas. As governor of Texas, Bush had little constitutional authority; the Republican Bush would have accomplished little without the help of the powerful lieutenant governor, a Democrat. Obama had barely made a mark in the Illinois Legislature or the U.S. Senate when he famously denounced polarization in his 2004 Democratic National Convention address for nominee John Kerry. "We worship an awesome God in the Blue States, and we don't like federal agents poking around in our libraries in the Red States," Obama said. "We coach Little League in the Blue States, and, yes, we've got some gay friends in the Red States." As president, Obama is more of a captive of polarization in Washington than an enemy of it.

"We need to not pander on these issues. We need to have adults in the room who make decisions based upon controlling violence in our society." Christie defending his support of limited gun control, anathema to Second Amendment purists who dominate the GOP nomination process, reminds me of a campaign trip in 1999 when I asked the Texas governor about efforts by Republicans in Washington to delay payments to the working poor to save money in the 2000 budget. "I don't think they ought to balance their budget on the backs of the poor," Bush replied. The remark angered GOP lawmakers and worried conservative activists, but it helped brand the Texan as a "compassionate conservative." As a candidate in 1992, Clinton criticized a black rapper, and as president, enacted welfare reform, both signals to white middle-class voters that he would not be anchored to liberal ideology. Obama has offered to cut entitlements like Social Security and Medicare, a nod to the middle that enrages liberals.

"What our election was about was a record that showed that we can get the job done: 143,000 new private-sector jobs, reformed pension and benefits, slowed the growth of property taxes, cut business taxes $2.3 billion. You know, reform teacher tenure." Christie wants voters to know he tackled important and complicated issues in New Jersey, because he surely has outsized aspirations for the nation. Clinton ambitiously tried to overhaul the nation's health care system, but failed. Obama succeeded. Bush promised in 2000 to change the way students and schools are measured, and did so as president, with the help of Democratic Sen. Edward Kennedy. Bush later set his sights on war in Iraq and Social Security reform, both flawed policies.

"I tell folks in New Jersey the hard truths they need to hear." Christie blasted Obama for deceiving the public about health insurance reform as a way to underscore his reputation for candor. This is the age of authenticity: There is so little of it in popular culture today that product brands stand to gain by just being real. Domino's Pizza, for example, remade its pizza recipe after acknowledging in commercials that the old one tasted horrible. In business, that's called a "credibility investment." Clinton invested in his credibility from the moment he became a candidate in 1992, promising Americans that he would work tirelessly to put them back to work. When he got caught lying about an extramarital affair in 1998, his political authenticity saved him from ruin over his personal credibility. Two years later, Bush packaged himself as the antidote to the disgust people felt about Clinton's personal behavior, promising at every campaign stop "to restore honor and dignity to the White House." 

I wrote last week that there are many hurdles between Christie and the GOP nomination. Staunch conservatives will try to stop him, his shadowy background may not stand the glare of a national campaign, and his blunt style may not wear well on voters. In many ways, the New Jersey governor is the closest thing we've got to Clinton, Bush and Obama—a packaged-for-the-times candidate, Version 4.0, glitches included.

http://www.nationaljournal.com/politics/packaging-a-president-christie-s-rollout-models-clinton-bush-and-obama-20131111
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« Reply #238 on: November 12, 2013, 10:26:22 AM »

I would vote for anyone to defeat that communist worthless carpet bagging pos hitlery.   She lied over the 4 bodies just to protect that terrorist loving slug Obama
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« Reply #239 on: November 12, 2013, 01:21:48 PM »

it was mean of Rand Paul to call Chris Christie "The King of Bacon" like he did last week
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« Reply #240 on: November 15, 2013, 02:07:19 PM »

You go Fat Man.  He will be the new Jared from Subway. 

Christie Half-Way To Weight Goal
Posted: Nov 14, 2013 4:25 AM HST
Updated: Nov 14, 2013 7:50 PM HST
By Ronica Cleary, @ChasingRonica

Since Governor Christie won the gubernatorial election last week, many have been speculating about him making a potential run for president in 2016. Many have questioned if he can win the presidential election at his current weight.

Christie has noted that since his secret lap band surgery, he is more than halfway to his goal weight. He said that he is eating differently and even sleeping better.

To learn more about how weight might impact a political candidate, image expert Sylvie di Giusto chimed in. She noted that Governor Christie's face is thinner and more powerful since he lost weight. “You will see a huge difference in his face actually and the face is always important for politicians you cannot hide anything in the face,” she said.

Sylvie also noted that Mary Pat, Governor Christie's wife, might need to improve her image as Governor Christie enters the national spotlight. “Right now she doesn’t show that professional appearance and attitude, he has to make sure that if he runs for president in a few years that he will start preparing the team right now," she said.

For more information about Sylvie di Giusto's work, visit her website: http://executive-image-consulting.com/

As far as another New Jersey politician goes Cory Booker seems to be sticking to social media these days, especially Twitter. His latest tweet about a crush on Star Trek’s Lt. Uhura and how the actress who played her is a true “role model” has many people buzzing that the mayor turned senator is a secret “trekkie”.

http://www.my9nj.com/story/23967736/christie-half-way-to-weight-goal
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« Reply #241 on: November 16, 2013, 12:06:42 PM »

Is Chris Christie the GOP's Bill Clinton?
Friday, 08 Nov 2013
By Rich Lowry

Women LOVED Bill Clinton.

There is ZERO chance Bill Clinton would have screamed at females, teachers, etc like Christie does.  And he does these things during normal business... Imagine the pressure of a presidential race.  We always see the TRUE colors of candidates during these races.  Rick Perry looked like the next president... give him a few debates and we discover he doesn't know his own platform.  Fred Thompson REALLY looked like a President... two debates in, we realized he really was dumb as a bag of hair.   On the other hand, Santorum was always a fringe candidate... then people realized "Wow, he really is way smarter and more conservative than Romney, isn't he?"  

You give Christie 18 months of intensive public spotlight... pressure of hecklers, questions... hot weather campaigning in FL in August... the pile-on from 4-6 conservatives in debates that mock him for, well, being a RINO.....  christie will drop the F-bomb or slam something on his podium or tell someone they're acting like a moron.  Watch.  And.  See.  You don't get to be 350+ pounds of fire by being calm, logical and consistent.  EXTREMES get you that fat - he's as furious at the dinner table as he is at the podium.  Dude WILL crack under pressure of a run.  

Please - Rand or Cruz.  Please!
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« Reply #242 on: November 16, 2013, 04:07:48 PM »

Of course the left is scared of Rand... They were scared of his dad too, and how did that work out for them?

There is no way... and I'm saying this for truth here... No WAY a Rand Paul wins the nomination for Republican President in 2016... Because the powers that be DO NOT WANT IT.

I would love it if Rand was the nominee as would many if not most Dems

It's not the "powers that be" that don't want Rand

It's the vast majority of the voters who don't want him (or Cruz or any of a number of batshit crazy teabaggers)

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« Reply #243 on: November 16, 2013, 05:37:06 PM »

I would love it if Rand was the nominee as would many if not most Dems

It's not the "powers that be" that don't want Rand

It's the vast majority of the voters who don't want him (or Cruz or any of a number of batshit crazy teabaggers)


one must keep in mind you think pelosi is not bat shit crazy when reading comments like this
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« Reply #244 on: November 16, 2013, 06:16:28 PM »

one must keep in mind you think pelosi is not bat shit crazy when reading comments like this

Do you even have that much room in your mind?
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« Reply #245 on: November 16, 2013, 06:18:21 PM »

Do you even have that much room in your mind?

barely but yes Wink
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« Reply #246 on: November 16, 2013, 09:26:21 PM »

I would love it if Rand was the nominee as would many if not most Dems

It's not the "powers that be" that don't want Rand

It's the vast majority of the voters who don't want him (or Cruz or any of a number of batshit crazy teabaggers)



Very well said.  The Republicans are back to the Romney dilemma, given that the GOP is still fractured, with infighting between the more moderate factions and the teabaggers.   Christie is their new Romney.  If they want to win this time, they need Democrats and Independents.  That means Christie runs as the rational, "get it done" moderate and the tea party gets pushed aside.

On the other hand, if Christie tries to tilt right a la Romney, he's toast and Hillary is in.  Seems obvious to everyone but tea party rubes and nutcases.

None of the other Republican chumps like Cruz, Rubio, Santorum, or Paul stand a chance against Hillary.  Bush might, but that could be a third Romney-like path, since Bush comes across as more conservative than he really is.  Just look at his record in Florida.

Either Christie or Bush.  Not a chance for anyone else against Hillary.
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« Reply #247 on: November 16, 2013, 09:48:59 PM »

33 can you please kick this off?   And no fat jokes.   Cheesy

Chris Christie is a Fat Man
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« Reply #248 on: November 17, 2013, 10:47:16 AM »

On the other hand, if Christie tries to tilt right a la Romney, he's toast and Hillary is in.  Seems obvious to everyone but tea party rubes and nutcases.

I think there is a 100% chance that Christie will spend a year trying to convince the base that he's far right.  Just like mccain and romney before him... to win the nomination, he'll abandon his RINO record and agree to pledges, promises, denials, explanations, etc... As a result, the base will see him as inauthentic, just as they did with Romney and Mccain. 

He may win the nomination, and MSNBC/CNN will LOVE him all the way, propping him up and making him the expected nominee.  But anyone who argues "the ase will come out and support him!" has to ignore 2008 and 2012, along with the fact obama was VERY FAR LEFT, which should have motivated them like crazy in 2008, and had just done obamacare, which should have activated them in 2012... and both times, the base just stayed home AND didn't donate as much as the libs did either. 

Until repubs can realize the folly of their ways in 08 and 2012, things won't change.  Stop with the RINOS, their "mainstream appeal" means the base stays home.  Christie is Romney II, Mccain III.
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« Reply #249 on: November 17, 2013, 10:51:58 AM »

I think there is a 100% chance that Christie will spend a year trying to convince the base that he's far right.  Just like mccain and romney before him... to win the nomination, he'll abandon his RINO record and agree to pledges, promises, denials, explanations, etc... As a result, the base will see him as inauthentic, just as they did with Romney and Mccain. 

He may win the nomination, and MSNBC/CNN will LOVE him all the way, propping him up and making him the expected nominee.  But anyone who argues "the ase will come out and support him!" has to ignore 2008 and 2012, along with the fact obama was VERY FAR LEFT, which should have motivated them like crazy in 2008, and had just done obamacare, which should have activated them in 2012... and both times, the base just stayed home AND didn't donate as much as the libs did either. 

Until repubs can realize the folly of their ways in 08 and 2012, things won't change.  Stop with the RINOS, their "mainstream appeal" means the base stays home.  Christie is Romney II, Mccain III.

he would be stupid to do that

it's a proven LOSING strategy and everyone knows he's not FAR right

The country (and the Republican party) is not looking for a far right candidate

McCain lost because of his disastrous pick for VP and also because of a few other bad choices (the economy is strong comment, shutting down his campaign, etc..)

Romney lost because he was unlikable, dishonest and fake and, like McCain also because he picked a bad VP

Romney and McCain both picked FAR RIGHT VP's and the voters couldn't get away fast enough

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