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Author Topic: Paying for grad school  (Read 9258 times)
calfzilla
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« on: August 05, 2012, 03:46:26 AM »

So I'm wanting to go to grad school very soon. Any getbiggers know of Some good websites or resources to get grants or scholarships?  Trying to avoid taking too much more student loans.
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« Reply #1 on: August 09, 2012, 10:36:08 PM »

What degree do you want to earn and what do you plan to study?

"very soon" most likely means enrolling in fall of 2013 because the enrollment window for fall on 2012 in most programs is now closed.  That gives you plenty of time to secure the necessary funding if you are resourceful and should it prove necessary.  


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« Reply #2 on: August 19, 2012, 06:53:38 PM »

If youre working ask your company if they have any educational assistance programs. If not get a job and do your best to pay for your degree out of pocket. Preferably a job in the field that you want to go into to even if it isnt the position you want at the moment.

I would go to the financial aid department of the schools youre looking at attending and ask them for some help. They generally have a list of scholarships and grants that you can look over and see which ones you would be able to apply for.

I wouldnt really rely on scholarships and grants and would still plan on paying 80% plus of the total cost out of pocket and thats being liberal. Realistically I would plan on paying 90% plus of your total costs, so get used to budgeting.

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« Reply #3 on: August 20, 2012, 12:53:21 AM »

Thanks for all the advices, I would likely major in Social Science or Educational Leadership. I have been thinking about it a lot and I am leaning towards what Tommy said paying my own way cash. Probably just go part time. Unfortunately my employer only offers tuition assistance for undergrad.
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« Reply #4 on: August 20, 2012, 09:07:59 PM »

Thanks for all the advices, I would likely major in Social Science or Educational Leadership. I have been thinking about it a lot and I am leaning towards what Tommy said paying my own way cash. Probably just go part time. Unfortunately my employer only offers tuition assistance for undergrad.
I would try to find a full time job and go to school in the evening or whenever youre not working. Its a pain in the ass but in my opinion its worth it to get done with school sooner and with less debt. Maybe a work study program along with a part time job, I think I was offered a work study for my grad program and they offered like 1,500 for the semester. Not enough to pay for much of anything but good money towards tuition and you could study at work I assume.

Sucks about your business, what type of work did you want to do?
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« Reply #5 on: August 20, 2012, 09:20:10 PM »

Thanks for all the advices, I would likely major in Social Science or Educational Leadership. I have been thinking about it a lot and I am leaning towards what Tommy said paying my own way cash. Probably just go part time. Unfortunately my employer only offers tuition assistance for undergrad.

I wouldn't
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« Reply #6 on: August 20, 2012, 09:31:58 PM »

I would try to find a full time job and go to school in the evening or whenever youre not working. Its a pain in the ass but in my opinion its worth it to get done with school sooner and with less debt. Maybe a work study program along with a part time job, I think I was offered a work study for my grad program and they offered like 1,500 for the semester. Not enough to pay for much of anything but good money towards tuition and you could study at work I assume.

Sucks about your business, what type of work did you want to do?

Still considering all my options. Right now I work FT but want to find another job that is more rewarding and with better hours. Options are work FT and school PT or school FT and work/work study PT.  I would like to work in a college or university in a non teaching role such as career services, student housing, admissions or advising or something like that. Or work for a good nonprofit.  I like money like everyone else, but it is not one of my biggest values or goals.

@clowney I imagine your opinion is because those fields don't pay super well?  I understand that and like I said money isn't too important to me. Part of the desire of a MS degree would be for personal accomplishment and learning as well as I do think that in the long run it will pay off. Perhaps I'm wrong though.
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« Reply #7 on: August 20, 2012, 09:42:39 PM »

 In terms of accomplishment, getting a degree in educational leadership is objectively not very challenging.  If you want to challenge yourself, get a degree in a program that is more rigorous.  Not sure what you mean by "social science," but I guess an advanced degree in economics or law can give you a sense of accomplishment.  As far as paying off, I doubt a masters degree in educational leadership will get you anything substantially more than what work experience and a bachelor's degree will get you.
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« Reply #8 on: August 21, 2012, 05:07:53 PM »

Still considering all my options. Right now I work FT but want to find another job that is more rewarding and with better hours. Options are work FT and school PT or school FT and work/work study PT.  I would like to work in a college or university in a non teaching role such as career services, student housing, admissions or advising or something like that. Or work for a good nonprofit.  I like money like everyone else, but it is not one of my biggest values or goals.

@clowney I imagine your opinion is because those fields don't pay super well?  I understand that and like I said money isn't too important to me. Part of the desire of a MS degree would be for personal accomplishment and learning as well as I do think that in the long run it will pay off. Perhaps I'm wrong though.
I hear man Im of the same mind, I would state however that just b/c youre doing something you like and that makes a difference doesnt mean you cant make decent money.

any reason you cannot do full time work and full time school?

I agree somewhat with Clowney, a masters without experience is basically like having a bachelors with a few years experience. If its at all possible for you to attend school full time and work full time then I would encourage you to do that. It is not the easiest thing to do especially if youre married, have children or are in a relationship but in all honesty in todays tough job market you need to take every step you can to give yourself an advantage.

Remember that while youre going to working part time and going to school there is someone else out there going to school full time and working full time thats going to be applying for the same job you are in the future.

Hope it all works out for you bro
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« Reply #9 on: August 24, 2012, 12:26:17 PM »

get your current employer to pay for it.
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« Reply #10 on: September 04, 2012, 01:47:29 PM »

A Generation Hobbled by the Soaring Cost of College
By ANDREW MARTIN and ANDREW W. LEHREN

ADA, Ohio — Kelsey Griffith graduates on Sunday from Ohio Northern University. To start paying off her $120,000 in student debt, she is already working two restaurant jobs and will soon give up her apartment here to live with her parents. Her mother, who co-signed on the loans, is taking out a life insurance policy on her daughter.

“If anything ever happened, God forbid, that is my debt also,” said Ms. Griffith’s mother, Marlene Griffith.

Ms. Griffith, 23, wouldn’t seem a perfect financial fit for a college that costs nearly $50,000 a year. Her father, a paramedic, and mother, a preschool teacher, have modest incomes, and she has four sisters. But when she visited Ohio Northern, she was won over by faculty and admissions staff members who urge students to pursue their dreams rather than obsess on the sticker price.

“As an 18-year-old, it sounded like a good fit to me, and the school really sold it,” said Ms. Griffith, a marketing major. “I knew a private school would cost a lot of money. But when I graduate, I’m going to owe like $900 a month. No one told me that.”

With more than $1 trillion in student loans outstanding in this country, crippling debt is no longer confined to dropouts from for-profit colleges or graduate students who owe on many years of education, some of the overextended debtors in years past. As prices soar, a college degree statistically remains a good lifetime investment, but it often comes with an unprecedented financial burden.

About two-thirds of bachelor’s degree recipients borrow money to attend college, either from the government or private lenders, according to a Department of Education survey of 2007-8 graduates; the total number of borrowers is most likely higher since the survey does not track borrowing from family members.

By contrast, 45 percent of 1992-93 graduates borrowed money; that survey included family borrowing as well as government and private loans.

For all borrowers, the average debt in 2011 was $23,300, with 10 percent owing more than $54,000 and 3 percent more than $100,000, the Federal Reserve Bank of New York reports. Average debt for bachelor degree graduates who took out loans ranges from under $10,000 at elite schools like Princeton and Williams College, which have plenty of wealthy students and enormous endowments, to nearly $50,000 at some private colleges with less affluent students and less financial aid.

Here at Ohio Northern, recent graduates with bachelor’s degrees are among the most indebted of any college in the country, and statewide, graduates of Ohio’s more than 200 colleges and universities carry some of the highest average debt in the country, according to data reported by the colleges and compiled by an educational advocacy group. The current balance of federal student loans nationwide is $902 billion, with an additional $140 billion or so in private student loans.

“If one is not thinking about where this is headed over the next two or three years, you are just completely missing the warning signs,” said Rajeev V. Date, deputy director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, the federal watchdog created after the financial crisis.

Mr. Date likened excessive student borrowing to risky mortgages. And as with the housing bubble before the economic collapse, the extraordinary growth in student loans has caught many by surprise. But its roots are in fact deep, and the cast of contributing characters — including college marketing officers, state lawmakers wielding a budget ax and wide-eyed students and families — has been enabled by a basic economic dynamic: an insatiable demand for a college education, at almost any price, and plenty of easy-to-secure loans, primarily from the federal government.

The roots of the borrowing binge date to the 1980s, when tuition for four-year colleges began to rise faster than family incomes. In the 1990s, for-profit colleges boomed by spending heavily on marketing and recruiting. Despite some ethical lapses and fraud, enrollment more than doubled in the last decade and Wall Street swooned over the stocks. Roughly 11 percent of college students now attend for-profit colleges, and they receive about a quarter of federal student loans and grants.

In the last decade, even as enrollment at state colleges and universities has grown, some states have cut spending for higher education and many others have not allocated enough money to keep pace with the growing student body. That trend has accelerated as state budgets have shrunk because of the recent financial crisis and the unpopularity of tax increases.

Nationally, state and local spending per college student, adjusted for inflation, reached a 25-year low this year, jeopardizing the long-held conviction that state-subsidized higher education is an affordable steppingstone for the lower and middle classes. All the while, the cost of tuition and fees has continued to increase faster than the rate of inflation, faster even than medical spending. If the trends continue through 2016, the average cost of a public college will have more than doubled in just 15 years, according to the Department of Education.

Much like the mortgage brokers who promised pain-free borrowing to homeowners just a few years back, many colleges don’t offer warnings about student debt in the glossy brochures and pitch letters mailed to prospective students. Instead, reading from the same handbook as for-profit colleges, they urge students not to worry about the costs. That’s because most students don’t pay full price.

Even discounted, the price is beyond the means of many. Yet too often, students and their parents listen without question.

“I readily admit it,” said E. Gordon Gee, the president of Ohio State University, who has also served as president of Vanderbilt and Brown, among others. “I didn’t think a lot about costs. I do not think we have given significant thought to the impact of college costs on families.”

Of course, economists and many parents say that the only thing worse than graduating with lots of debt is not going to college at all, since study after study has shown that graduates earn more over a lifetime. And most college students in the United States manage to eventually pay back their student loans.

To that end, the Obama administration has given out more grants and loans than ever to more and more college students with the goal of making the United States first among developed nations in college completion. The balance of federal student loans has grown by more than 60 percent in the last five years. And in 2007, Congress made sure the interest rates on many of those loans were well below commercial rates; currently, a debate over keeping those lower rates from doubling in July is roiling lawmakers.

But even if student loans are what many economists consider “good debt,” an increasing number of borrowers are struggling to pay them off, and in the process becoming mired in a financial morass.

Education Department data shows that payments are being made on just 38 percent of the balance of federal student loans, down from 46 percent five years ago. The balances are unpaid because the borrowers are still in school, have postponed payments or have stopped paying altogether.

Nearly one in 10 borrowers who started repayment in 2009 defaulted within two years, the latest data available — about double the rate in 2005.

Economists do not predict a collapse of the student loan system, which would, in essence, mean wholesale default. And if there were one, it would be unlikely to ripple through the economy with the same devastating impact as the mortgage crash. Though now larger than credit card and other consumer debt, the student loan balance remains smaller than the mortgage market, and most student loans are issued by the federal government, meaning banks wouldn’t be affected as much.

Still, economists say, growing student debt hangs over the economic recovery like a dark cloud for a generation of college graduates and indebted dropouts. A study of recent college graduates conducted by researchers at Rutgers University and released last week found that 40 percent of the participants had delayed making a major purchase, like a home or car, because of college debt, while slightly more than a quarter had put off continuing their education or had moved in with relatives to save money. Roughly half of the surveyed graduates had a full-time job.

“I’ll be paying this forever,” said Chelsea Grove, 24, who dropped out of Bowling Green State University and owes $70,000 in student loans. She is working three jobs to pay her $510 monthly obligation and has no intention of going back . . . http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/13/business/student-loans-weighing-down-a-generation-with-heavy-debt.html?ref=business
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« Reply #11 on: September 04, 2012, 07:28:05 PM »

The title of that article should be "stupid people do stupid things, then act surprised"

sorry in what world does spending 120k on an undergrad make sense?

LOL "nobody told me" you fuking moron, you think they were just giving it away for free?

HOW DID THESE "SCHOLARS" MAKE IT INTO COLLEGE TO BEGIN WITH?

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« Reply #12 on: September 04, 2012, 07:33:10 PM »

"Smart" people do a lot of stupid shit. Kids with bachelors degrees that cost a shit-ton go to law school and pile on more debt and then graduate and dont get good jobs and are left with 250k (sometimes more) in debt.  These are kids that were smart enough to get into good law schools.  The best part is that the law schools believe the hype themselves.  Read some ridiculous article about Rutgers thinking it was a "best value" school because some office drone had made a mistake entering numbers.  Unbelievable shit.   
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« Reply #13 on: September 04, 2012, 08:53:03 PM »

"Smart" people do a lot of stupid shit. Kids with bachelors degrees that cost a shit-ton go to law school and pile on more debt and then graduate and dont get good jobs and are left with 250k (sometimes more) in debt.  These are kids that were smart enough to get into good law schools.  The best part is that the law schools believe the hype themselves.  Read some ridiculous article about Rutgers thinking it was a "best value" school because some office drone had made a mistake entering numbers.  Unbelievable shit.   
book smart is not a good measure of intelligence....

common sense would tell you that if they industry your going into isnt good for employment, then dont spend 100k in education just to get your foot in the door.

I agree that schools play themselves up but that doesnt excuse these morons from taking out mountains of debt without doing proper research.
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« Reply #14 on: October 19, 2012, 11:51:06 AM »

Still considering all my options. Right now I work FT but want to find another job that is more rewarding and with better hours. Options are work FT and school PT or school FT and work/work study PT.  I would like to work in a college or university in a non teaching role such as career services, student housing, admissions or advising or something like that. Or work for a good nonprofit.  I like money like everyone else, but it is not one of my biggest values or goals.

@clowney I imagine your opinion is because those fields don't pay super well?  I understand that and like I said money isn't too important to me. Part of the desire of a MS degree would be for personal accomplishment and learning as well as I do think that in the long run it will pay off. Perhaps I'm wrong though.

The utility of an MS degree is dubious in most fields.  As a general rule, I would advise you to get a doctorate or don’t bother—especially if your goal is to work at a university.  Almost any decent job in higher education requires “an earned doctorate and 10 or more years of progressively responsible experience…”  Without a PhD you will find many doors within the university closed to you.  Based on what you have written previously, I think you should try to get a job at a large and comprehensive state university right now.  It almost doesn’t matter what the job is. &guy state schools tend to be more flexible about this sort of thing than smaller schools or private schools.  The University of Massachusetts, Univ. of Maryland, or one of the Cal State Schools are examples of what I am talking about.  Once you are an employee beyond the probationary period, you can take advantage of tuition remission and work on your degree at the school as your work schedule permits.  Of course, as you suggest, you could quit work and go to school full time.  I don't know how old you are, but obviously, getting a doctorate can take a long time... and going part time will take even longer!

Whether you want to work in Student Affairs, Academic Affairs, or Business Affairs, a degree in a traditional academic discipline (biology, chemistry, economics, English, history, math, physics, etc.) will give you much more credibility than a degree is something like “Educational Leadership.”  As the higher education job market becomes even more saturated degrees like those are increasingly considered second tier.

Finally, remember that an Ed.D. is not the same as a Ph.D.  In many circles, the Ed.D. is simply not respected and will place you at a competitive disadvantage. We can argue about why this should or should not be the case, but it is a fact you should be very aware of.
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« Reply #15 on: October 21, 2012, 07:10:08 PM »

you can get into a phd program without having a masters ?  Huh   im going to be done with my bachelors in a few months and have been checking out grad school's, mostly business and law schools..    if it would be possible to get into a phd program somewhere i would much rather do that...    but probably not in law or business, more like philosophy..  if i got a phd id love to be philosophy professor.. thats what ive wanted to do for a long time.. but chose to get my bachelors in business because its a much more marketable degree.. thinking of getting the MBA or going to law school to get into a career i could like doing and be good at but still get good pay..    anyways..   somebody want to help me out with some info ?? bay?
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« Reply #16 on: October 23, 2012, 12:38:38 PM »

you can get into a phd program without having a masters ?  Huh   im going to be done with my bachelors in a few months and have been checking out grad school's, mostly business and law schools..    if it would be possible to get into a phd program somewhere i would much rather do that...    but probably not in law or business, more like philosophy..  if i got a phd id love to be philosophy professor.. thats what ive wanted to do for a long time.. but chose to get my bachelors in business because its a much more marketable degree.. thinking of getting the MBA or going to law school to get into a career i could like doing and be good at but still get good pay..    anyways..   somebody want to help me out with some info ?? bay?

If I may suggest: you should be seeking career/educational advice from a counselor at your undergraduate school—not from a bodybuilding forum.  The kind of counseling you want is something you are already paying for via your tuition.  Why not take advantage of it? 
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« Reply #17 on: October 23, 2012, 04:18:48 PM »

you can get into a phd program without having a masters ?  Huh   im going to be done with my bachelors in a few months and have been checking out grad school's, mostly business and law schools..    if it would be possible to get into a phd program somewhere i would much rather do that...    but probably not in law or business, more like philosophy..  if i got a phd id love to be philosophy professor.. thats what ive wanted to do for a long time.. but chose to get my bachelors in business because its a much more marketable degree.. thinking of getting the MBA or going to law school to get into a career i could like doing and be good at but still get good pay..    anyways..   somebody want to help me out with some info ?? bay?
yes dizzle you can get into a Phd program without a masters as a matter of fact it would probably be much quicker to do so. You can still become a professor with a masters but in a lot of colleges you wont be eligible for tenure if they even have it.

If youre not a big reader then I would really think about law school twice. The amount of reading that is done there is astronomical from the lawyers I know and when you get out it will be much of the same.

Either way get working dizzle, you need relevant work experience to go along with your education otherwise youre just another educated person without any real work application/experience.

those ppl are known as liberals Wink
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« Reply #18 on: October 23, 2012, 06:18:10 PM »

Update:  So I decided on holding off on grad school for now, mainly because I don't want any additional and would rather save money than pay for tuition, especially for something like Ed leadership or Social Science, like Bay said those types of masters degrees aren't that much more helpful than a BS.

I'm sure one day I think I will go to grad school but would prefer to find a job that reimburses for grad school tuition or just pay out of pocket once I save up. Also thinking of a more solid major like Biology or Natural Resource Mngt or something similar.

I guess I really just miss going to school and being in that environment and living the student life style.
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« Reply #19 on: October 24, 2012, 08:23:24 PM »

Update:  So I decided on holding off on grad school for now, mainly because I don't want any additional and would rather save money than pay for tuition, especially for something like Ed leadership or Social Science, like Bay said those types of masters degrees aren't that much more helpful than a BS.

I'm sure one day I think I will go to grad school but would prefer to find a job that reimburses for grad school tuition or just pay out of pocket once I save up. Also thinking of a more solid major like Biology or Natural Resource Mngt or something similar.

I guess I really just miss going to school and being in that environment and living the student life style.

It is time to be honest with yourself about the prospect of going back to school.  From what you have posted here, I don’t think you have it in you.  If you did, you would not be so noncommittal about it.  Nationally, across all disciplines, 49% of the people who start a doctoral program never finish.  Even passionate students end up dropping out.  Someone with an “I can take it or leave it” attitude does not have a prayer of making it to the finish line.

If you are thinking about a master’s degree be very clear in your mind about what this degree will enable.  Do not pursue it because you think it will generically make your more competitive.  Get it because the one or two jobs you are aiming for specifically require the degree.

As for finding a job that will reimburse you for getting an advanced degree, be very careful about this.  Lots of companies talk about this as an employee benefit, but often there are so many strings attached to it and hoops to jump through that it becomes unusable.  For example, the school does not pay your tuition; you have to pay out of your own pocket up front.  Only after the semester or year is over are you reimbursed.  Often you have to get specific grade in the classes to get reimbursement; if you don’t get that grade you do not get reimbursed!  The company may offer the benefit but the classes or course of study you want may conflict with your work schedule so you are unable to take them.  I have seen this many times.  More often than not the benefit of tuition reimbursment is a “bait and switch.”  The employer uses it to lure you into working for them… but once you’re an employee you quickly learn that the benefit is so complicated and has so many strings attached to it that perhaps one employee in the last fifteen years was able to take advantage of it.  Bottom line: do not count on this benefit to advance your education.  Obviously if it were easily utilized lots of employees would take advantage of it… costing the employer a lot of money… and the employer would therefore have little incentive to offer the benefit.

The idea of saving up for grad school tuition is kind of silly.  Have you seen a tuition bill lately?  I just checked: MBA tuition at Stanford (to pick a school at random) is $57,300/year and that does not include living expenses, insurance, books, transportation, etc.  If you throw in all the typical expenses identified by the school the cost is $90,531 per year and the typical MBA degree cannot be completed in one year.  Are you really going to wait until you save up all that money before you go to grad school?  There is a reason why lots of students graduate with student loans: waiting to go until you can save up the money for tuition means you will never go.  Law school is even more expensive!

Enrolling in a graduate degree program simply because you “just miss going to school” is not very smart.  Think carefully about your next steps.
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« Reply #20 on: October 24, 2012, 10:39:24 PM »

Thanks Bay I certainly have it in me, but the bottom line is I really don't need it other than wanting it. If one day there is like you said one or two jobs I need it for than I will go for it, but until then I shall wait.

I've had people with Masters degrees work under me so I know it's true that they dont make you that much more competitive. Some of these people are quite morons but that's another story.
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« Reply #21 on: November 12, 2012, 09:33:56 AM »

Thanks Bay I certainly have it in me, but the bottom line is I really don't need it other than wanting it. If one day there is like you said one or two jobs I need it for than I will go for it, but until then I shall wait.

I've had people with Masters degrees work under me so I know it's true that they dont make you that much more competitive. Some of these people are quite morons but that's another story.


You still don’t get it do you?  When that future job—the one you need the advanced degree for--appears, they are not going to wait for you to go back to school.  You must have those jobs in mind now, and be working on your degree NOW… so that when those jobs come up you will be able to compete for them.

As I suggested previously, your tentative approach (“one day I think I will go… I decided on holding off… I don’t want additional student loans…”) suggests that graduate school is not right for you.  While you are dithering more competitive professionals are aggressively positioning themselves to take advantage of future opportunities.  For some people that means going to graduate school, for others it may mean coming to work early, staying late, volunteering for extra work assignments, learning another language, etc.  Do you plan to stay in your present position until you retire?  If not, how competitive do you think you are going to be for a future job with your current level of education, training, and skill set?   Embarrassed
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« Reply #22 on: November 12, 2012, 09:39:55 AM »

I paid most of the cost out of my own pocket.  Instead of taking two year, it took me around four.  Taking longer accomplish two things, it allowed me to pay the costs myself and it suspended repayment of my undergraduate student loans for a extra couple of years.  

What I would suggest doing is joining academic societies and fraternities, both of the general variety and those specifically related to your area of study. I made many contacts who were able to provide me with scholarship and grant opportunities.
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« Reply #23 on: November 12, 2012, 06:10:43 PM »


You still don’t get it do you?  When that future job—the one you need the advanced degree for--appears, they are not going to wait for you to go back to school.  You must have those jobs in mind now, and be working on your degree NOW… so that when those jobs come up you will be able to compete for them.

As I suggested previously, your tentative approach (“one day I think I will go… I decided on holding off… I don’t want additional student loans…”) suggests that graduate school is not right for you.  While you are dithering more competitive professionals are aggressively positioning themselves to take advantage of future opportunities.  For some people that means going to graduate school, for others it may mean coming to work early, staying late, volunteering for extra work assignments, learning another language, etc.  Do you plan to stay in your present position until you retire?  If not, how competitive do you think you are going to be for a future job with your current level of education, training, and skill set?   Embarrassed
I agree with bay on the competitiveness not necissarily on the "ready for grad school" part though.

if you have two ppl with the same qualifications one with a masters and the other without youre probably going with the masters candidate.

Graduate degrees dont take the place of experience but they do open the doors to many more opportunities over bachelor degrees.

Even if its just to get your foot in the door for an interview its still an opportunity that you wouldnt have without it.

Education is one of those industries where a higher degree can really open doors for you so if thats what youre looking to go into I would say you should definitely go and go sooner rather than later.
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tonymctones
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« Reply #24 on: November 12, 2012, 06:11:50 PM »

I paid most of the cost out of my own pocket.  Instead of taking two year, it took me around four.  Taking longer accomplish two things, it allowed me to pay the costs myself and it suspended repayment of my undergraduate student loans for a extra couple of years.   

What I would suggest doing is joining academic societies and fraternities, both of the general variety and those specifically related to your area of study. I made many contacts who were able to provide me with scholarship and grant opportunities.
good advice here, it will also help build up your contacts for future job openings if you ever need them.
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