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Author Topic: squats alone for quads  (Read 1277 times)
trapz101
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« on: February 15, 2013, 08:54:01 PM »

does it work?will it build size?plan to do squats only,6-8 heavy high rep sets and done
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Yev33
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« Reply #1 on: February 15, 2013, 09:46:11 PM »

It depends on your body proportions and the way you do them, where you will see the most growth ( glutes, hams, quads ).
They will definetely build size if you have enough volume and eat enough. You should check out the Smolov Squat cycle if you're serious about it, plenty of volume there for your legs to grow and boost your squat numbers.
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« Reply #2 on: February 16, 2013, 04:05:51 AM »

does it work?will it build size?plan to do squats only,6-8 heavy high rep sets and done

1 option may be to do 9 sets with 3 different foot positions... say, start with 3 sets x 12 reps with a close stance (feet 6 inches apart), then 3 sets x 10 reps with a shoulder width stance and then 3 sets x 8 reps with a wide stance (toes pointed at 45 degrees)
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« Reply #3 on: February 16, 2013, 04:12:15 AM »

It depends on your body proportions and the way you do them, where you will see the most growth ( glutes, hams, quads ).
They will definetely build size if you have enough volume and eat enough. You should check out the Smolov Squat cycle if you're serious about it, plenty of volume there for your legs to grow and boost your squat numbers.

nice post ... i like high reps for legs(squats) they work great and work everything...
http://stronglifts.com/how-to-add-100-pounds-to-your-squat-smolov/
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« Reply #4 on: February 16, 2013, 10:01:09 AM »

Squats can give exceptional legs (quad development is only part of the story), and a single focus on this one movement has produced great results. Machines be cool and all that, but serious squatting still remains the king of leg work. Just make sure your form is correct and understand your limits with this exercise, going slow and learning to do it the right way...at first.

It requires hard work, along with mental effort, with each set. Squats can setup  the metabolism to function at a better rate of efficiency. In other words, to boost the muscle and strength gains of the body. Higher reps  (getting to the point of heavy, forced breathing..usually 15 -20 rep range..old timers have gone as high as 40 reps, all on record) seem to encourage these factors much more.

Foot spacing is very important (as WOOO explained) and the hip/joint structure may judge which is more natural for the individual. If into serious Pl'ing, it's more like... go wide or go home..for most guys. The Smolov method is a  advanced training system, designed for experience and powerful men. If the average BB'er wishes to try it, than good for them. You will make advancements, but the rest of a BB'ing workout will have to be adjusted to using fewer other body part exercises. And training days.

For more quad attention, the raising of the heels (a few inches) shifts the work load onto the quads. Also relief to the lower back and better balance to most guys. Might suggest including both the flatfooted and raised version in a squatting protocol. The front squat can be a important addition to any squatting workout, also hitting the quads well. Good Luck.

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trapz101
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« Reply #5 on: February 17, 2013, 05:58:48 PM »

Squats can give exceptional legs (quad development is only part of the story), and a single focus on this one movement has produced great results. Machines be cool and all that, but serious squatting still remains the king of leg work. Just make sure your form is correct and understand your limits with this exercise, going slow and learning to do it the right way...at first.

It requires hard work, along with mental effort, with each set. Squats can setup  the metabolism to function at a better rate of efficiency. In other words, to boost the muscle and strength gains of the body. Higher reps  (getting to the point of heavy, forced breathing..usually 15 -20 rep range..old timers have gone as high as 40 reps, all on record) seem to encourage these factors much more.

Foot spacing is very important (as WOOO explained) and the hip/joint structure may judge which is more natural for the individual. If into serious Pl'ing, it's more like... go wide or go home..for most guys. The Smolov method is a  advanced training system, designed for experience and powerful men. If the average BB'er wishes to try it, than good for them. You will make advancements, but the rest of a BB'ing workout will have to be adjusted to using fewer other body part exercises. And training days.

For more quad attention, the raising of the heels (a few inches) shifts the work load onto the quads. Also relief to the lower back and better balance to most guys. Might suggest including both the flatfooted and raised version in a squatting protocol. The front squat can be a important addition to any squatting workout, also hitting the quads well. Good Luck.



so can use both version in one session?or do flat footed today,and raised version the next time?
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« Reply #6 on: February 17, 2013, 07:24:58 PM »

There are two basic ways to squat.

The power lifting method. You put the bar as low on your back as you can. This puts leverage in your favor. Wide foot placement and squatting shallow. What passes for legal squats today appear to be half squats to me.

Olympic lifters use a medium foot placement. The bar is high on the traps. They squat to maximum depth staying relatively up right. Bodybuilders would benefit more from this type of squat.
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« Reply #7 on: February 17, 2013, 11:11:20 PM »

TrapZ101:  Lots of guy's include both versions of the regular squat, in a leg program. Others will do regular squats and the front squat, which also throws more of the work load onto the quads, in the same workout. Placing the heels on a 2" board, BB plates, etc, when doing front squats places better focus and balance when going into a deep squat position, also. Why Olympic lifters have raised heels built into their training shoes/boots. Pick which ever way you want, but probably a good idea to change up every 4 to 8 weeks weeks, or so, with a different approach to the squat.

There are three basic ways to handle squatting. BB high on neck/traps, back kept straight....strict style, pure BB'ing. BB resting on the shoulders/mid to upper traps area, which most average BB'ers use...back usually not in line with the bar/upper body. Greater chance of injury suggested...common bad form in the majority of lifters.  BB resting (some times wedged) on the lower trap/back. This type placing resembles something close to a GoodMorning, with a upper body leaning forward quite a bit. Having a huge belly may actually help with this style squat. Foot placement will depend on he structure of the hips & joints. Going by the book, for any squatting, is not always suited for every person. Short to tall trainee's may all need a different foot placement. Experimentation may be required by each of us. Good Luck.

A advanced form of squatting is the box/bench squat, a exceptional exercise. This can be a learning exercise, where a technical approach is very important. Once learned, the regular squat can increase quickly. The  box/bench squat also builds muscle mass quite well.
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« Reply #8 on: February 18, 2013, 01:08:48 AM »

do not raise the heels in squats. it puts high torque stress on the knees and is used because of poor ankle flexibility and also in the calfes,hamstrings and hip area. look at the picture below perfect joint alignment WITHOUT a heel raise. also in the attached article read point 7.
http://ditillo2.blogspot.de/2009/10/squat-brooks-kubik.html
 


* SquatTorque.jpg (31.7 KB, 300x400 - viewed 391 times.)
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« Reply #9 on: February 18, 2013, 02:41:09 AM »

do not raise the heels in squats. it puts high torque stress on the knees and is used because of poor ankle flexibility and also in the calfes,hamstrings and hip area. look at the picture below perfect joint alignment WITHOUT a heel raise. also in the attached article read point 7.
http://ditillo2.blogspot.de/2009/10/squat-brooks-kubik.html
 

I'd suggest that this is the safest and most productive squat option.
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« Reply #10 on: February 18, 2013, 02:46:03 AM »

does it work?will it build size?plan to do squats only,6-8 heavy high rep sets and done

you've just warmed up or are you not counting your warmup sets?
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« Reply #11 on: February 18, 2013, 05:36:57 AM »

if you are able to increase your training loads, then yes it will work

in my own personal experience, 2 or at the most 3 failure sets per exercise does the trick and works best for me
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Yev33
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« Reply #12 on: February 18, 2013, 08:26:48 AM »

do not raise the heels in squats. it puts high torque stress on the knees and is used because of poor ankle flexibility and also in the calfes,hamstrings and hip area. look at the picture below perfect joint alignment WITHOUT a heel raise. also in the attached article read point 7.
http://ditillo2.blogspot.de/2009/10/squat-brooks-kubik.html
 

Agree 100%. I had issues with front squats until I fixed my flexibility.
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jpm101
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« Reply #13 on: February 18, 2013, 11:29:53 AM »

If BB'ers are overly concerned with the flex of an ankle, than do a few light sets of light calf raises (holding the stretch) before any form of squats (flat footed or raised heels). Also ham stretches, which are linked to the ankle flexing. Too the extreme (not really) drop down to a full squat position (bwt only) and hold that position for a good minute. Relax as your just sitting there. Get a very good stretch, from the ankles to the hip/lower back.

If overly concerned with the torque ratio upon the knees (ever after doing calf & ham stretches) from a raised heel squat, than don't do that form of squat. The only real reason not to used raised heels, is that your a PL'er only. Olympic lifters used raised heels all the time and I don't see many of them in rehab. But do see quite a few PL'ers.  Make of your own mind, but may want to do a little Google, to check some things out for yourself. Never, ever, take my word, or anyone else, as the final answer.  Good Luck.
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« Reply #14 on: February 18, 2013, 11:36:15 AM »

squat is the main thing in the iron game . for powerlifters for bodybuilders for weightlifters . . what other exercice could compete with this . power clean . maybe . or clean and press ..
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« Reply #15 on: February 18, 2013, 12:21:50 PM »

Very true Kimo.

A personal favorite of mine is the squat clean. Add the press or jerk press to this and you have a true full body exercise. Not only power and muscle development, but also outstanding stamina (endurance & strength), if done with BB'ing or higher reps (15-20).
                                                       
Good Luck.
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Yev33
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« Reply #16 on: February 18, 2013, 12:24:00 PM »

If BB'ers are overly concerned with the flex of an ankle, than do a few light sets of light calf raises (holding the stretch) before any form of squats (flat footed or raised heels). Also ham stretches, which are linked to the ankle flexing. Too the extreme (not really) drop down to a full squat position (bwt only) and hold that position for a good minute. Relax as your just sitting there. Get a very good stretch, from the ankles to the hip/lower back.

If overly concerned with the torque ratio upon the knees (ever after doing calf & ham stretches) from a raised heel squat, than don't do that form of squat. The only real reason not to used raised heels, is that your a PL'er only. Olympic lifters used raised heels all the time and I don't see many of them in rehab. But do see quite a few PL'ers.  Make of your own mind, but may want to do a little Google, to check some things out for yourself. Never, ever, take my word, or anyone else, as the final answer.  Good Luck.

The reason you see more powerlifters with knee issues than oly lifters is because there are waaaaaayyyy more ELITE powerlifters over 30 than there are oly lifters. Not to mention the fact that there are considerably more powerlifters than oly lifters in the U.S. period.

Also, they don't necessarily wear them for squatting per se but simply because they wear them in competition for the c&j and the snatch. Those two movements definetely have much better stabilty when you are catching the bar explosively in a squat position with the heel raised.
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« Reply #17 on: February 18, 2013, 12:48:03 PM »

Yev33: Actually , never said they wore raised heels for regular squatting. Though most alternate between flat and raised heels in training. Power squats are usually done flatfooted. Technique training is usually done in raised heels.

Yes, overwhelming much more PL'ers, of whatever class, today that Olympic lifters. Olympic lifters need to be a bit more athletic than the Pl'er. Pl'ers seem to go on, year after year. Olympic lifters, not so much, having  shorter fling at the spot..

 A speed and quickness is required more, rather than  slower lifts of the PL'er.  Though both sports give very powerful men. Another difference is the distance that a weight is traveled in a specific lift.  Attention to the greater distance a overhead lift must travel from the floor, compared to the DL or even the squat. Benches, now days, are rather short. Each sport has it's own special qualities of timing, speed and harnessed power. Timing and speed, of the Olympic lifter, is reduced as their age advance, maybe the reason of their shorter involvement in the sport. Good Luck.
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« Reply #18 on: February 19, 2013, 07:25:40 AM »

Olympic lifters are a little more athletic than Power lifters?? Really? How about a lot more.  I guess you have limited experience trying to clean and jerk a weight. Power lifting is bigger than Olympic lifting in the United States but world wide it isn't.

Power lifting should be called strength lifting and Olympic lifting should be called power lifting. Olympic lifting is the definition of power when it comes to lifting weights. In timed 40 meter sprints in the 1968 Olympics I believe,Olympic lifters were always near the top in tested athletes. Anyone that has been around Olympic lifters lifters knows their vertical leap is amazing. It's because Olympic lifters develop power from the sport and their innate ability. There are many huge power squatters that can't jump or sprint because they are not training for power just strength.  

The evolution of the lifting shoe in Olympic lifting came around due to the different techniques used through the years. Initially they used a power clean with a shallow knee bend. Sometimes they even spread their legs sideways. From there came the split technique where a clean or snatch was caught in a lunge type squat. Both techniques used a flat or a regular heeled shoe. When the squat technique came into effect the better lifters were getting lower and lower to catch the weight. When they found the heavier the weight got the lower they had to go to catch it they lost some cleans due to being bent over. With a raised heel it kept their back upright.

A power lifter can squat more with no heel because they bend over when they squat to put the lower back into the squat. A power lifting squat used to be called a hip lock squat back in the day. Low bar placement, spread foot placement and toes pointing far laterally.
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« Reply #19 on: February 19, 2013, 07:37:46 AM »

powerlifting squats are basically all ass, hammies, and spinal erectors

dr. squat ie. fred hatfield had notoriously weak quads, yet he was the 1st man to squat 1000 pounds
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« Reply #20 on: February 19, 2013, 08:18:16 AM »

true to a point . so the powerlifting squat is then a compound squat . .. for and old lifter like me a kind of not real squat . most lifters out squat their deadlifts by 100 pounds . and more . the weightlifter squat workd quads more . but then it depends of your leverages too.
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« Reply #21 on: February 19, 2013, 11:24:52 PM »

I've been doing a lot of Bulgarian squats lately to change things up.   My knees are not as good as they used to be so I'm only using 50lb dumbbells for reps, but I'm getting a great workout that I feel in the entire leg the following day. 
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anabolichalo
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« Reply #22 on: February 21, 2013, 02:50:53 PM »

i have done a lot of olympic squats for years

really good for quad development i say

but squats are not without risk

careful
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« Reply #23 on: February 22, 2013, 03:43:46 AM »

if theres one standalone exercise for quads, itd be leg curls.

but thats kinda boring isnt it.




i haven't done them in years because i train at home.... my hams still match my quads though... i think they get a lot of work in walking lunges, step ups (2') and squats
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« Reply #24 on: February 22, 2013, 01:13:31 PM »

goerge turner used to say that full intense squats increase sex drive by hormonal production . but you have to really squat hard i guess . also you need a solid midsection for big squats often . obliques abs . squats work midsection too .
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