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Author Topic: A simple way to set up a routine  (Read 1143 times)
Yev33
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« on: March 01, 2013, 02:53:31 PM »

This is what I have used to help people set up training routines that are just starting out.

9 compound movements per week:
1.Back Rowing
2.Vertical Pulling
3.Back Rowing or vertical pulling
4.Chest press
5.Shoulder press
6.Tricep press
7.Squat variation
8.Single leg squat variation
9.Deadlift variation

Take a 3x5 notecard and cut into 9 pieces, on each piece write one of these exercise variations. Now arrange them into 3 training days. You get 5 total exercises per training session, 3 compound and 2 isolation.

For example:

Monday
Pull Ups
Db shoulder press
Stiff leg deadlift
Lying tricep extention
Hanging leg raises

Wednesday

Bench Press
Barbell Rows
Walking Lunges
Standing Calf Raises
Barbell Curls

Friday

Squats
Chin Ups
Dips
Rear delt raises
Incline Crunches

This allows many ways to arrange the compound movements and allows you to focus on what you need more or less work on.
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jpm101
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« Reply #1 on: March 01, 2013, 07:11:54 PM »

Interesting. If that is successful for some folks, than good. And glad your spreading the word about training.

I have a different view to a training program for people new to working out. Find that if the program is short and to the point, the folks make the adjustment better towards forming a habit of working out.  This is usually all new to them and can even be somewhat overwhelming and confusing, even with a simple start...so easy does it, at first. Use the same approach if the newbee is a teenager or well into their 50's or 60's. A general truth is that a lot, new to physical training, will drop out after 2 or 3 weeks, without the proper encouragement. Now this is for Americans, can't say for the rest of the world. So it's more like easing them into a more likeable effort, something that seems not like a chore. Have to form a pattern to working out.

Depends on the goals of each new trainee, but a general outline would be something like this, and the general rule of thumb is to start with the larger muscle groups and have the smaller muscle groups worked at the end of a program. This is a basic, getting introduced to a weight resistance plan.

1) Squats...find that confidence is something a lot will have to develop, with having a weight on their shoulders..even a very light one.
2) Lat machine pulldown...or BB row..depends on the individual or his/her gym.
3) Bench Press...Everyone new to training thinks this is "The" exercise. But there is also a level of confidence that needs to be gained by some. Some don't find comfort having a weight held, at arms length, over their body...as much as they thought they would. At times, DB's may prove to be better for them.
4) DB lateral raise...an extension exercise, rather than a compound movement.
5) BB Curl...everyone one relates to building the biceps.
6) Crunches
Optional...Calf raise

Dips & Chins:Though exceptional exercises, most new trainee's don't have the strength built up yet to do these two exercise justice. If any one of them does, for a good  8 reps, than replace the lat pulldown and bench with them.

Based on a 3 day a week workout, with one set the first week. Two sets the next 2 weeks. Three sets after that...max on any exercise. 8-12 reps, in the progressive weight advancement style. Never use any type split program or have a new trainee used machines, in a break in period. After 2 1/2 to 3 month, let the new trainee explore other, more advanced, avenues of training.

If training an athlete who must gain 10 to 15lbs of muscle in a rather quick period on time, for his selective sport, the basic simple approach also applies. Three to four heavy compound movements usually does it. Good Luck.
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Yev33
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« Reply #2 on: March 01, 2013, 08:32:18 PM »

I came up with this a while back for a guy who has been training for about a year using a split routine. He was really frustrated with his progress. I am not a big fan of giving someone a routine with specific exercises. I prefer to give them a template to set up their training so they can fill it with the exercises that they are comfortable with and know how to do. So this is more for someone who is not an absolute beginner, but rather someone who is just starting to get into control of his own training and coming up with things that will work him, rather than follow a specific routine with the exact movements.
 
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jpm101
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« Reply #3 on: March 01, 2013, 08:57:54 PM »

Yev33

OK, got ya. Than it's seems a very inventive approach, mostly for guy's who may crave a bit of variety in training. Met a few men like that in the past. Whatever works for you....works for you.  Training need not always be by the book.
                                                  Good Luck.
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Yev33
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« Reply #4 on: March 01, 2013, 09:15:29 PM »

I have found that a lot of people want to throw everything into their training that they heard works. There are a ton of great movements out there but that doesn't mean you should do them all in the same training cycle. I have found that this actually gets people to take a more careful approach to their training and reinforces the fact that you can't just keep adding exercises, at some point when you add something you have to also take something away.

And this allows them to program however they see fit for their current goals as long as they stay within the guidelines. You can set this up as a 3 days a week full body, 2 upper one lower, one full body one upper one lower. You can use the two isolation exercises per workout to bring up a weaker body part or to help bring up a lift you are struggling with.
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Yev33
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« Reply #5 on: March 01, 2013, 09:26:20 PM »

Just to add, I have ran a training cycle using this template myself about a year ago. In roughly 3 months was able to take my weighted pull ups from +65 x 4 to +90 x 4 ( which was 20lbs more than my all time best), squats from 335x2 to 370x2 and 385 for a single ( 25lbs more than my all time best ), incline bench from 235x3 to 250x4 ( this was actually only a 5lb improvement over my all time best, I started out really weak since I haven't used the incline barbell press in a while).
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« Reply #6 on: March 02, 2013, 01:03:20 AM »

I have heard that it is best to use high reps and lower rest (kind of like circuit lift training) when you're first starting out.  This way you build the foundation of muscle and muscle endurance that will allow you to progress faster.  Do the hi rep stuff for 4 weeks and then switch to power and shorter reps for the next four weeks...then repeat.

I did this high rep upper body routine and it wrecked me but after a couple of weeks I got used to it and I felt so much stronger.

http://www.bodyathleticsblog.com/2013/01/03/269/
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Donny
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« Reply #7 on: March 02, 2013, 04:22:29 AM »

using short basic routines are not new and yes they work but as an advanced trainer you need to train with more variety. you will never build a quality physique with just a few basic exercises and this is where split routines came into play. no champion like frank Zane or Bill Pearl every won anything on such a routine. Yevīs workout ideas make sense and are i think bringing new light to an old subject..(how to train as a beginner) i will just finish on a quote from V Gironda..."You cannot build a good physique with just a few Basic movements. It is impossible. Itīs no wonder our Gyms are full of physical monstrosities"  from "the wild physique" p35.
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Yev33
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« Reply #8 on: March 02, 2013, 08:33:30 AM »

Yes, it obviously depends on the training level of the person. This isn't how I have been training for the last 4 years, but I did give this a run again last year just out of curiosity.
Funny thing is, even though I did absolutely no direct arm training I lost absolutely no size in them.
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Yev33
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« Reply #9 on: March 02, 2013, 08:37:20 AM »

I have heard that it is best to use high reps and lower rest (kind of like circuit lift training) when you're first starting out.  This way you build the foundation of muscle and muscle endurance that will allow you to progress faster.  Do the hi rep stuff for 4 weeks and then switch to power and shorter reps for the next four weeks...then repeat.

I did this high rep upper body routine and it wrecked me but after a couple of weeks I got used to it and I felt so much stronger.

http://www.bodyathleticsblog.com/2013/01/03/269/

This really depends on the person and what kind of shape they are in. If it's someone who is overweight and has a lot og BF to lose than I could see this being a good approach.
If it's a 6'0" 18 year old who weighs 145lbs then not so much.
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jpm101
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« Reply #10 on: March 02, 2013, 09:43:09 AM »

Been my experience  that the mental approach is just as important as the physical one, when someone is new to working out. Don't want their enthusiasm to get carried way, by doing things the body is not set up for...yet.Tend to get discouraged , with some quitting all together.

That's why a slower breaking in period is always needed. Want to curb that enthusiasm, at first. The foundation is built  with a conventional and simple workout plan. Setting the mind, as well as the body, to adapt to this new physical life style. After the few months of the break in period, more demands a can be made on the mental and physical aspects of training. Of course results always seem to be the prime motivation for everyone, and so many option are open in BB'ing.  Just have to discover the better method for yourself..

If finding, after the break in period is over, that your goal is getting in a higher degree of fitness, and more towards lean muscle mass, I would suggest the PHA system (Bob Gadja). Which can also produce outstanding stamina (endurance + strength).  If only doing regular weight training (increased muscle mass, strength, etc) , than would also suggest interval training (as Tabata, etc) for any cardio training. Good Luck.
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« Reply #11 on: March 02, 2013, 11:27:53 AM »

using short basic routines are not new and yes they work but as an advanced trainer you need to train with more variety. you will never build a quality physique with just a few basic exercises and this is where split routines came into play. no champion like frank Zane or Bill Pearl every won anything on such a routine. Yevīs workout ideas make sense and are i think bringing new light to an old subject..(how to train as a beginner) i will just finish on a quote from V Gironda..."You cannot build a good physique with just a few Basic movements. It is impossible. Itīs no wonder our Gyms are full of physical monstrosities"  from "the wild physique" p35.
AMEN!
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