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Author Topic: The Hillary/DNC-Russia Conspiracy Theory  (Read 4589 times)
Yamcha
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« Reply #25 on: October 29, 2017, 07:05:19 AM »

 Wink


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« Reply #26 on: October 29, 2017, 07:08:28 AM »

Wink


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« Reply #27 on: October 29, 2017, 07:13:13 AM »

Obama was the worst pos ever to hold that office. 
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« Reply #28 on: October 29, 2017, 04:22:44 PM »

Obama was the worst pos ever to hold that office. 


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« Reply #29 on: October 29, 2017, 05:23:31 PM »



Where's the link to the article
How was this a "secret" if it's from FEC filings?
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« Reply #30 on: October 29, 2017, 06:13:15 PM »



ROFLMAO Grin Grin Grin
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« Reply #31 on: October 29, 2017, 06:53:30 PM »

Laughing my ass off watching Snowflake in Chief crying about the "unverified" allegations in the dossier

Trump spent the last 8 years making unverified claims about Obama and he makes verifiably false statements virtually every day

Crybabies gonna cry
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« Reply #32 on: October 29, 2017, 09:12:49 PM »

That's because democrats represent only the welfare bums , gays , blacks and liberal idiots on both coasts
Having a bit of a meltdown over Republican treason?


Try to cheer up, buddy.
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« Reply #33 on: October 30, 2017, 06:04:31 PM »

Hill Republicans want more answers from Wasserman Schultz, Podesta about Trump dossier money
Fox News
 
Podesta, Wasserman Schultz deny knowledge of dossier funding
Clinton campaign chairman and the former DNC chairwoman told Congress they were unaware of payments to Fusion GPS for anti-Trump dossier.

Congressional Republicans on Sunday called for Democrats John Podesta and Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz to provide further answers about their party paying for a dossier on President Trump’s alleged ties to Russia, after telling Senate investigators last month that they had no knowledge of such payments.

Wasserman Schultz is the former chairman of the Democratic National Committee, and Podesta was the chairman of Hillary Clinton’s 2016 presidential campaign. Both groups purportedly paid millions for research that led to the dossier, The Washington Post reported last week.

South Carolina Rep. Trey Gowdy, chairman of the House Oversight Committee, suggested on “Fox News Sunday” that the DNC paying a law firm for so-called opposition research connected to the dossier was tantamount to money laundering.

Chairman of the House Oversight Committee joins 'Fox News Sunday' to discuss new revelations surrounding Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign.Video
Rep. Gowdy on Russian dossier and accusations of collusion

“I'm not an election law expert, but the good news is you don't have to be, to understand the absurdity of believing that you can launder all of your campaign money by just hiring a law firm,” said Gowdy, a former federal prosecutor. “So I’m interested in that.”

He also seemed to question Podesta and Wasserman Schultz telling the Senate Intelligence Committee last month that they didn’t know who paid for the dossier.

“I am also interested in sharing some memory tricks with folks at the DNC because no one can remember who paid $10 million to a law firm to do oppo research,” Gowdy said. “I find that stunning. $10 million and no one can remember who authorized it, who approved it, who said, ‘This is a really good idea.’”

When questioned about the issue by Fox News last week on Capitol Hill, Wasserman Schultz said only: “I wasn’t aware of the arrangement at all.”

Also on Sunday, Maine GOP Sen. Susan Collins, a member of the Senate Intelligence Committee, said Podesta and Wasserman Schultz “absolutely need to be recalled” before the panel.

Judge Jeanine: After Russian Dossier Funding, Time to 'Lock Her Up'

“It's difficult to imagine that a campaign chairman, that the head of the DNC would not know of an expenditure of this magnitude and significance,” Collins said on CBS’ “Face the Nation.”

Podesta's attorney Marc Elias, who worked for the law firm that brokered the dossier funding, sat next to Podesta during his Senate appearance last mont, according to CNN. Collins also said Sunday that Elias should be questioned, too.

California Rep. Adam Schiff, the top Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee, on Sunday declined to answer on ABC’s “This Week” whether the DNC and Clinton campaign should have disclosed earlier their stake in the dossier. 

“I can't answer that,” he said. “I certainly would have liked to know who paid for it earlier, but nonetheless, that's just one factor to be considered.”

http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2017/10/29/hill-republicans-want-more-answers-from-wasserman-schultz-podesta-about-trump-dossier-money.html
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« Reply #34 on: February 02, 2018, 05:07:59 PM »

Outrageous.  Now this conspiracy actually has legs. 

http://static.foxnews.com/pdf/370598711-House-Intelligence-Committee-Report-On-FISA-Abuses.pdf
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« Reply #35 on: February 04, 2018, 02:09:02 PM »

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« Reply #36 on: February 26, 2018, 04:31:02 PM »

The Russians Colluded Massively — with Democrats
By DEROY MURDOCK
February 24, 2018

https://www.nationalreview.com/2018/02/the-russians-colluded-massively-with-democrats/
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« Reply #37 on: March 07, 2018, 10:01:22 AM »

Australian diplomat whose tip prompted FBI’s Russia-probe has tie to Clintons
BY JOHN SOLOMON AND ALISON SPANN - 03/05/18

http://thehill.com/376858-australian-diplomat-whose-tip-prompted-fbis-russia-probe-has-tie-to-clintons
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« Reply #38 on: December 17, 2018, 03:52:06 PM »

Anti-Trump dossier author was hired to help Hillary challenge 2016 election results
By Rowan Scarborough - The Washington Times - Wednesday, December 12, 2018
https://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2018/dec/12/christopher-steele-hillary-clinton-was-preparing-t/
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« Reply #39 on: April 10, 2019, 01:53:43 PM »

Barr: 'Spying did occur' on Trump campaign
by Naomi Lim
April 10, 2019

Attorney General William Barr said Wednesday he believes "spying did occur" on President Trump's 2016 campaign.

During testimony before a Senate panel, Barr said it was his obligation to ensure the government did not abuse its surveillance powers and he had set up a team to investigate whether this happened with the Trump campaign.

"I think spying did occur. But the question is whether it was predicated — adequately predicated," Barr testified. "I'm not suggesting it wasn't adequately predicated, but I need to explore that. I think it's my obligation. Congress is usually very concerned about intelligence agencies and law enforcement agencies staying in their proper lane."

Barr was grilled by Sen. Jeanne Shaheen, D-N.H., the ranking member of the Senate Appropriations subcommittee that oversees the Justice Department, on reports he was assembling a team to review why the FBI opened a counterintelligence inquiry into Russian interference in the 2016 elections.

"I think spying on a political campaign is a big deal. It's a big deal," Barr said, an apparent reference to GOP allegations that the FBI misled the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court to monitor former Trump 2016 campaign foreign policy adviser Carter Page.

Later in the hearing, Sen. Brian Schatz, D-Hawaii, asked Barr if he wanted to rephrase the "spying" comment, but Barr declined to back away from his assertion. "Unauthorized surveillance ... is that more appropriate in your eyes?" Barr said.

Barr also alluded to a promise he made during his confirmation hearing to examine "the genesis and the conduct of intelligence activities directed at the Trump campaign." But he said the panel was yet to be formally created, that it wasn't a probe into the FBI, and that he didn't consider there to be an endemic problem with the agency.

"And a lot has already been investigated and is being investigated by the Office of Inspector General at the department," he said. "But one of the things I want to do is pull together all the information from the various investigations that have gone on, including on the Hill and in the department, and see if there are any remaining questions to be addressed."

Barr's testimony comes as House Intelligence Committee ranking member Devin Nunes, R-Calif., is poised to send to the DOJ criminal referrals targeting eight people tied to the origins of the Trump-Russia investigation.

The FBI's original Russia investigation, which began in July 2016, was later wrapped into special counsel Robert Mueller's inquiry looking into Russian meddling in the 2016 election and possible collusion between Trump's campaign and the Kremlin.

Republicans, including Nunes and Rep. Mark Meadows, R-N.C., have long been engaged in their own investigations into alleged misconduct and bias within the upper echelons of the Department of Justice and FBI, including the anti-Trump text messages of former FBI officials Peter Strzok and Lisa Page, which they are concerned will reveal a scheme to undermine Trump.

Nunes has not disclosed any names of people ensnared in his referrals, but he did break down three categories in which they fall on Sunday, including conspiracy to lie to Congress and the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court. Nunes also suggested his effort could drastically expand to encompass dozens of people.

In his first hearing of the week on Tuesday, Barr said he has not yet seen these referrals, but when he does, he added, "Obviously, if there is a predicate for investigation, it will be conducted.”

Barr's examination of the initial Russia investigation could intersect with an investigation by U.S. Attorney John Huber, who was appointed by former Attorney General Jeff Sessions in March 2018 to look into GOP claims of FBI misconduct. On the Senate side, Judiciary Chairman Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., says there will be continued investigations into the origins of Mueller’s inquiry and potential bias in the Justice Department and FBI, including a look at FISA warrants.

Mueller concluded his monthslong Russia investigation last month, after which Barr submitted a four-page letter that stressed the special counsel did not find evidence of collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia.

Barr also said Mueller left the obstruction question unresolved. A line taken from Mueller's final report says, "while this report does not conclude that the President committed a crime, it also does not exonerate him." Barr said he and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein found there was a lack of “sufficient” evidence to determine whether Trump obstructed justice.

Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., asked Barr on Wednesday if he had any conversation with Mueller about why he did not reach a conclusion one way or the other on whether Trump obstructed justice. "Yes, I did. And he also has a fuller explanation of that in the report that I'll be making available hopefully next week," Barr replied.

Barr also clarified when pressed by Shaheen whether he would redact parts of Mueller's report on his findings from the federal Russia inquiry to protect Trump's privacy and reputational interests.

"No, I'm talking about people in private life, not public office holders," Barr said.

https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/news/barr-spying-did-occur-on-trump-campaign
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« Reply #40 on: May 02, 2019, 08:15:52 PM »

Ukrainian embassy confirms DNC contractor solicited Trump dirt in 2016
BY JOHN SOLOMON, OPINION CONTRIBUTOR — 05/02/19
 
The boomerang from the Democratic Party’s failed attempt to connect Donald Trump to Russia’s 2016 election meddling is picking up speed, and its flight path crosses right through Moscow’s pesky neighbor, Ukraine. That is where there is growing evidence a foreign power was asked, and in some cases tried, to help Hillary Clinton.

In its most detailed account yet, Ukraine’s embassy in Washington says a Democratic National Committee insider during the 2016 election solicited dirt on Donald Trump’s campaign chairman and even tried to enlist the country's president to help.

In written answers to questions, Ambassador Valeriy Chaly's office says DNC contractor Alexandra Chalupa sought information from the Ukrainian government on Paul Manafort’s dealings inside the country, in hopes of forcing the issue before Congress.

Chalupa later tried to arrange for Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko to comment on Manafort’s Russian ties on a U.S. visit during the 2016 campaign, the ambassador said.

Chaly says that, at the time of the contacts in 2016, the embassy knew Chalupa primarily as a Ukrainian-American activist, and learned only later of her ties to the DNC. He says the embassy considered her requests an inappropriate solicitation of interference in the U.S. election.

“The Embassy got to know Ms. Chalupa because of her engagement with Ukrainian and other diasporas in Washington D.C., and not in her DNC capacity. We’ve learned about her DNC involvement later,” Chaly said in a statement issued by his embassy. “We were surprised to see Alexandra’s interest in Mr. Paul Manafort’s case. It was her own cause. The Embassy representatives unambiguously refused to get involved in any way, as we were convinced that this is a strictly U.S. domestic matter.

“All ideas floated by Alexandra were related to approaching a Member of Congress with a purpose to initiate hearings on Paul Manafort or letting an investigative journalist ask President Poroshenko a question about Mr. Manafort during his public talk in Washington, D.C.,” the ambassador explained.

Reached by phone last week, Chalupa said she was too busy to talk. She did not respond to email and phone messages seeking subsequent comment.

Chaly’s written answers mark the most direct acknowledgement by Ukraine’s government that an American tied to the Democratic Party sought the country’s help in the 2016 election, and they confirm the main points of a January 2017 story by Politico on Chalupa’s efforts.

In that story, the embassy was broadly quoted as denying interference in the election and suggested Chalupa’s main reason for contacting the ambassador’s office was to organize an event celebrating women leaders.

The fresh statement comes several months after a Ukrainian court ruled that the country’s National Anti-Corruption Bureau (NABU), closely aligned with the U.S. embassy in Kiev, and a parliamentarian named Serhiy Leshchenko wrongly interfered in the 2016 American election by releasing documents related to Manafort.

The acknowledgement by Kiev’s embassy, plus newly released testimony, suggests the Ukrainian efforts to influence the U.S. election had some intersections in Washington as well.

Nellie Ohr, wife of senior U.S. Justice Department official Bruce Ohr, acknowledged in congressional testimony that, while working for the Clinton-hired research firm Fusion GPS, she researched Trump and Manafort’s ties to Russia and learned Leshchenko, the Ukrainian lawmaker, was providing dirt to Fusion.

Fusion also paid British intelligence operative Christopher Steele, whose anti-Trump dossier the FBI used as primary evidence to support its request to spy on Trump campaign adviser Carter Page.   

In addition, I wrote last month that the Obama White House invited Ukrainian law enforcement officials to a meeting in January 2016 as Trump rose in the polls on his improbable path to the presidency. The meeting led to U.S. requests to the Ukrainians to help investigate Manafort, setting in motion a series of events that led to the Ukrainians leaking the documents about Manafort in May 2016.

The DNC’s embassy contacts add a new dimension, though. Chalupa discussed in the 2017 Politico article about her efforts to dig up dirt on Trump and Manafort, including at the Ukrainian embassy.

FEC records show Chalupa’s firm, Chalupa & Associates, was paid $71,918 by the DNC during the 2016 election cycle.

Exactly how the Ukrainian embassy responded to Chalupa’s inquiries remains in dispute.

Chaly’s statement says the embassy rebuffed her requests for information: “No documents related to Trump campaign or any individuals involved in the campaign have been passed to Ms. Chalupa or the DNC neither from the Embassy nor via the Embassy. No documents exchange was even discussed.”

But Andrii Telizhenko, a former political officer who worked under Chaly from December 2015 through June 2016, told me he was instructed by the ambassador and his top deputy to meet with Chalupa in March 2016 and to gather whatever dirt Ukraine had in its government files about Trump and Manafort.

Telizhenko said that, when he was told by the embassy to arrange the meeting, both Chaly and the ambassador’s top deputy identified Chalupa “as someone working for the DNC and trying to get Clinton elected.”

Over lunch at a Washington restaurant, Chalupa told Telizhenko in stark terms what she hoped the Ukrainians could provide the DNC and the Clinton campaign, according to his account.

“She said the DNC wanted to collect evidence that Trump, his organization and Manafort were Russian assets, working to hurt the U.S. and working with Putin against the U.S. interests. She indicated if we could find the evidence they would introduce it in Congress in September and try to build a case that Trump should be removed from the ballot, from the election,” he recalled.

After the meeting, Telizhenko said he became concerned about the legality of using his country’s assets to help an American political party win an U.S. election. But he proceeded with his assignment.

Telizhenko said that, as he began his research, he discovered that Fusion GPS was nosing around Ukraine, seeking similar information, and he believed they, too, worked for the Democrats.

As a former aide inside the general prosecutor’s office in Kiev, Telizhenko used contacts with intelligence, police and prosecutors across the country to secure information connecting Russian figures to assistance on some of the Trump organization’s real estate deals overseas, including a tower in Toronto.

Telizhenko said he did not want to provide the intelligence he collected directly to Chalupa, and instead handed the materials to Chaly: “I told him what we were doing was illegal, that it was unethical doing this as diplomats.” He said the ambassador told him he would handle the matter and had opened a second channel back in Ukraine to continue finding dirt on Trump.

Telizhenko said he also was instructed by his bosses to meet with an American journalist researching Manafort’s ties to Ukraine.

About a month later, he said his relationship with the ambassador soured and, by June 2016, he was ordered to return to Ukraine. There, he reported his concerns about the embassy’s contacts with the Democrats to the former prosecutor general’s office and officials in the Poroshenko administration: “Everybody already knew what was going on and told me it had been approved at the highest levels.”

Telizhenko said he never was able to confirm whether the information he collected for Chalupa was delivered to her, the DNC or the Clinton campaign.

Chalupa, meanwhile, continued to build a case that Manafort and Trump were tied to Russia.

In April 2016, she attended an international symposium where she reported back to the DNC that she had met with 68 Ukrainian investigative journalists to talk about Manafort. She also wrote that she invited American reporter Michael Isikoff to speak with her. Isikoff wrote some of the seminal stories tying Manafort to Ukraine and Trump to Russia; he later wrote a book making a case for Russian collusion.

“A lot more coming down the pipe,” Chalupa wrote a top DNC official on May 3, 2016, recounting her effort to educate Ukrainian journalists and Isikoff about Manafort.

Then she added: “More offline tomorrow since there is a big Trump component you and Lauren need to be aware of that will hit in next few weeks and something I’m working on you should be aware of.”

Less than a month later, the “black ledger” identifying payments to Manafort was announced in Ukraine, forcing Manafort to resign as Trump’s campaign chairman and eventually face criminal prosecution for improper foreign lobbying.

DNC officials have suggested in the past that Chalupa’s efforts were personal, not officially on behalf of the DNC. But Chalupa’s May 2016 email clearly informed a senior DNC official that she was “digging into Manafort” and she suspected someone was trying to hack into her email account.

Chaly over the years has tried to portray his role as Ukraine’s ambassador in Washington as one of neutrality during the 2016 election. But in August 2016 he raised eyebrows in some diplomatic circles when he wrote an OpEd in The Hill skewering Trump for some of his comments on Russia. “Trump’s comments send wrong message to world,” Chaly’s article blared in the headline.

In his statement to me, Chaly said he wrote the article because he had been solicited for his views by The Hill’s opinion team.

Chaly’s office also acknowledged that a month after the OpEd, President Poroshenko met with then-candidate Clinton during a stop in New York. The office said the ambassador requested a similar meeting with Trump but it didn’t get organized.

Though Chaly and Telizhenko disagree on what Ukraine did after it got Chalupa’s request, they confirm that a paid contractor of the DNC solicited their government’s help to find dirt on Trump that could sway the 2016 election.

For a Democratic Party that spent more than two years building the now-disproven theory that Trump colluded with Russia to hijack the 2016 election, the tale of the Ukrainian embassy in Washington feels just like a speeding political boomerang.

https://thehill.com/opinion/white-house/441892-ukrainian-embassy-confirms-dnc-contractor-solicited-trump-dirt-in-2016
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