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Author Topic: groin pubic area injury question  (Read 1526 times)
XmanX
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« on: May 11, 2006, 08:43:05 PM »

should i still workout with a groin injury? i don't think it is a hernia, i looked extensively on the internet, went to the doctor, and no hernia found. I think it is Osteitis pubis. what kind of workouts should i do? or should i completely rest and just do light walking, ie, the walking that just gets me from place to place? i love to workout and hate the feeling of not working out. thanks.
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YoMamaBeenLurking
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« Reply #1 on: May 12, 2006, 02:18:53 PM »

If it is what you think it is, then you may want to rest for a bit...

http://www.med.umich.edu/1libr/sma/sma_osteitis_sma.htm
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ZEEK
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« Reply #2 on: May 13, 2006, 10:13:15 PM »

you can still do upper body.

if you sit around waiting for the pain to go away youll never get back in the gym

you have to focuss on other parts of the body and work out so the problem area will work its self out.
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Superman
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« Reply #3 on: July 10, 2006, 01:33:15 AM »

Should I still workout with a groin injury? No absolutely not, if it's bothering you still. I suggest you take off a week and feel it out from there. Do not push it; it's worth the wait trust me.
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Doc Savage
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« Reply #4 on: July 12, 2006, 11:02:21 AM »

Pain in the groin is common in athletes, especially football and hockey.  We see tons of pro athletes with this - can be career ending.  Treat it very carefully - once injured you are prone to re-injury.  At the pubic symphysis there is a coalescence of the rectus abdominis, pectineus, adductor longus magnus and brevis and gracilis.  these have a common attachment and once one goes the others follow.  This is often percieved as a hernia (aka "sportsman's hernia") even though is is almost always not a hernia.  Some athletes alternatively get stress changes at their pubic symphysis or osteoarthritis, commonly referred to as 'osteitis pubis'.
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